Canadian Social Research Links

Links to Human Rights Sites

Related links:
United Nations Links

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada
Sites concernant les droits de la personne

Voir également:
Liens vers les Nations-Unies
Updated March 5, 2016
Page révisée le 5 mars 2016

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


"First they came for the communists, and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a communist.

Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a Jew.

Then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak out for me."

Source:
Pastor Martin Niemöller (1892–1984)


No offense, but...
http://goo.gl/9DQKE0

---

I'm not racist but...
http://imnotracistbut.tumblr.com/

---

I'm not prejudiced, but...
http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/I'm_not_prejudiced,_but...

---

I'm not homophobic, but...
http://goo.gl/PoHdxR



Use the links below to go directly to specific content further down on this page:

- Government section
- Sections 7 and 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights
- Human rights legislation in Ontario
- International Human Rights Day (December 10)
- Non-governmental section
- Canada at the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights- 1998 papers
- International section

Canada's Second Universal Periodic Review
April, 2013 (Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights)


See the following related Canadian Social Research Links pages:

- United Nations Links - for all things U.N. (including Human Development reports and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)

- Case Law / Court Decisions / Inquests - Court cases, inquests and appeals dealing with human rights, poverty and welfare issues. That's where you can find information about Kimberly Rogers - Louise Gosselin - Sandra Falkiner - James Finlay - Charter cases - more...

- Children's Rights - a separate page of links concerning the rights of children and youth - incl. the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (Special Session on the Rights of the Child) Canada’s National Plan of Action for Children, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, etc.

 
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Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, was the result of the experience of the Second World War. With the end of that war, and the creation of the United Nations, the international community vowed never again to allow atrocities like those of that conflict happen again. World leaders decided to complement the UN Charter with a road map to guarantee the rights of every individual everywhere.
Source:
History of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/history.shtml


Evolution of human rights in 20th Century Canada

"...key court cases and laws that have shaped human rights in our country since 1900."
The site is divided into 4 distinct periods: 1900-1924 /// 1925-1949 /// 1950-1974 /// 1975-2000.
You can navigate the site via one of these time portals or by subject.
Subjects include : Human Rights - Women's Rights - Minority Rights - Aboriginal Rights - Persons with Disabilities - Freedom of Expression - Freedom of Religion - Voting Rights - Criminal Law - International - Charter - Justice Department's History - Ministers
Source:
Canadian Human Rights Commission (CHRC)

More links to selected CHRC reports - this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading



Know Your Rights

This is a ten-part CBC Radio One series that aired from June 27 to August 29, 2011. Each episode lasts just over 27 minutes)
* About Know Your Rights
* Know Your Rights Blog
* Past Episodes:
--- Episode 10 : Where Do We Go From Here? (Aug. 29/11)
--- Episode 9 : Aboriginal rights (Aug. 22/11)
--- Episode 8 : Language rights (Aug, 15/11 )
--- Episode 7 : Freedom from discrimination based on race, origin or colour (Aug. 8/11)
--- Episode 6 : Freedom from discrimination based on mental or physical disability (Aug. 5/11)
--- Episode 5 : Freedom from discrimination based on sex, age (July 29/11
--- Episode 4 : Life, liberty and security of the person (July 18/11)
--- Episode 3 : Freedom of religion (July 11/11)
---
Episode 2 : Freedom of peaceful assembly and association (July 8/11)
---
Episode 1 : Freedom of expression (June 27/11)

The Fine Print
55+ links to related resources organized by episode
- also includes links to the full text of The Charter of Rights and Freedoms and a CBC Television special from 2002 entitled "The Constitution and Charter Re-evaluated".
Source:
CBC Radio

---

Know Your Rights Facebook page

NEW

Human Rights and Poverty Reduction Strategies:
A Guide to International Human Rights Law and its
Domestic Application in Poverty Reduction Strategies
(PDF - 217KB, 20 pages)
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/FINAL-Human-Rights-Guide-August-2015.pdf

Table of contents:

* Introduction
* Who should read this Guide?
* What you will learn from this Guide?

II. The Human Rights Approach
What are human rights and where do they come from?
How are human rights relevant to my work?
What rights are important for people living in poverty?
What is the human rights approach to poverty reduction?
Why is the human rights approach the right approach?

III. Putting the Human Rights Approach into Action
Identifying people living in poverty
Incorporating international human rights standards
Consulting people who live in poverty
Promoting substantive equality and non-discrimination
Setting goals and establishing timelines
Monitoring progress
Ensuring accountability

IV. Checklist

Source:
Canada Without Poverty

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

United Nations Report On Canada's Human Rights Record A 'Wake-Up Call'
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/07/23/canada-human-rights-record-2015_n_7857224.html
By Zi-Ann Lum
July 23, 2015
The United Nations Human Rights Committee has accused Canada of failing to take effective action on a range of issues, including missing and murdered Aboriginal women, political audits of charities, and the federal government's anti-terror legislation.The report, published Thursday, is the first substantive review of the country’s human rights record under Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government.

Canada's Human Rights Record Under UN Review For First Time Since 2006
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/07/06/canada-un-human-rights_n_7737376.html
July 6, 2015

Source:
Huffington Post Canada

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

From the
United Nations Human Rights Committee:
[ http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/CCPR/Pages/CCPRIndex.aspx ]

Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under article 40 of the Covenant:
Sixth periodic reports of States parties due in October 2010
http://goo.gl/QtcDQE

Concluding observations on the sixth periodic report of Canada
(Adopted by the Committee at its 114th session : 29 June-24 July 2015)
http://goo.gl/ppt2De
The Committee considered the sixth periodic report submitted by Canada at its 3176th and 3177th meetings held on 7 and 8 July 2015.
At its 3192nd meetings, held on 20 July 2015, it adopted the following concluding observations.

The Committee welcomes the submission of the sixth periodic report of Canada. It expresses appreciation for the opportunity to pursue its constructive dialogue with the State party's high level delegation on the measures that the State party has taken during the reporting period to implement the provisions of the Covenant. The Committee thanks the State party for its written replies to the list of issues which were supplemented by the oral responses provided by the delegation and for the supplementary information provided to it in writing.
(...)
While noting that the Government of British Columbia has published a report on the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry and adopted legislation related to missing persons, and the Government of the State party is implementing the Action Plan to Address Family Violence and Violent Crimes Against Aboriginal Women and Girls , the Committee is concerned about the lack of information on measures taken to investigate, prosecute, and punish those responsible.
(...)
[ With respect to Bill C-51] The Committee is also concerned about the lack of adequate and effective oversight mechanisms to review activities of security and intelligence agencies and the lack of resources and power of existing mechanisms to monitor such activities.]
(...)
Excessive use of force and police accountability at the G20 protests in 2010 in Toronto...
(...)
Prison conditions...
(...)
Freedoms of expression, peaceful assembly and association
(...)
Indigenous lands and titles...
(...)
The Indian Act...
(...)
Overrepresentation in criminal justice and access to justice for indigenous peoples
(...)
More...

Canada's Human Rights Record Under UN Review For First Time Since 2006
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/07/06/canada-un-human-rights_n_7737376.html
By Zi-Ann Lum
June 7, 2015
Canada's human rights record will be under the microscope at the United Nations this week in the first substantive review since Prime Minister Stephen Harper came to power in 2006. Several of the country’s most high-profile advocacy groups are in Geneva to participate in UN Human Rights Committee hearings (see the next link below) over a three-day period. Among them is Canada Without Poverty, an Ottawa-based charity that leans on using human rights and international law to advocate for impoverished and homeless Canadians.

Source:
Huffington Post
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

------------------------------------------------------------

UN Human Rights Committee hearings

CCPR - International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
114 Session (29 Jun 2015 - 24 Jul 2015)
http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/SessionDetails1.aspx?SessionID=899&Lang=en
Main page for links to all session documentation including the agenda (next link below), the programme of work, Procedural Guidelines for States parties on the examination of reports before the Human Rights Committee (July 2015), information notes for Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and more.
Scroll down the main page for documentation related to the "Consideration of State reports", including Canada.

Provisional agenda and annotations
http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/Treaties/CCPR/Shared%20Documents/1_Global/CCPR_C_114_1_23368_E.doc
- links to the agenda in English, French and Spanish

Consideration of State Reports
http://goo.gl/KtiO1n (scroll down the page for State reports)
The Committee will consider the following State reports during the session:
Canada (see below) - France - Spain - The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia - United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Crown Dependencies) - United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Overseas Territory) - Uzbekistan - Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)

State Report : CANADA
NOTE : Click a link below, then (on the next page) click the small box with the "Plus" sign in the left margin to expand the content.
State party's report :
Common Core Document : http://docstore.ohchr.org/SelfServices/FilesHandler.ashx?enc=FhOD6sgqgzAhFXD9F%2feKaFMm83LbFY75RhkIFGrig%2b6CiwzlWh8sTHygXRgCXNepVlsZrCNNoQT786Z%2bO1a8qF2jVfuQrPNNXyUO1Xe2kjZiFUMYfP5fTQk16y7z42

List of issues : http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G14/225/94/PDF/G1422594.pdf?OpenElement
Reply to List of Issues : http://goo.gl/iTQHp7
Info from Civil Society Organizations (for the List of Issues and for the Session)
--- Links to over three dozen submissions, incl. Canada Without Poverty, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the Canadian Federation of University Women and many more
Info from National Human Rights Institutions (the Canadian Human Rights Commission) : http://goo.gl/8Gk7Y8
List of delegation/participants : http://goo.gl/1ezuHo

Related links:

International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
http://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/ccpr.aspx

UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/DRIPS_en.pdf

Source:
United Nations

http://www.un.org/en/index.html

------------------------------

More media coverage re. the UN hearings:

A sobering look at Canada’s human rights record
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/a-sobering-look-at-canadas-human-rights-record/article25405839/
July 10, 2015
[ Globe and Mail : http://www.theglobeandmail.com/ ]

Canada Without Poverty Charity Challenges Harper Govt. Audits At UN In Geneva
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-without-poverty-charity-challenges-harper-govt-audits-at-un-in-geneva-1.3136289
[ CBC News http://www.cbc.ca/news/ ]
July 5, /2015

UN human rights panel hears aboriginal plight is among Canada's top issues:
Committee reviewing Canada's record on civil and political rights
http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/un-human-rights-panel-hears-aboriginal-plight-is-among-canada-s-top-issues-1.3140622
July 6, 2015
[ CBC News : http://www.cbc.ca/news/ ]

Canada gets human rights failing grade from Amnesty International
http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2012/12/19/canada_gets_human_rights_failing_grade_from_amnesty_international.html
[ Toronto Star : http://www.thestar.com/ ]
December 19, 2012

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women:
UN Urges Canada to call inquiry into missing, murdered Native women

https://redpowermedia.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/un-urges-canada-to-call-inquiry-into-missing-murdered-native-women/
March 6, 2015
GENEVA – A United Nations committee has joined the chorus of critics who say Canada should establish a national inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women. The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women said Canada has violated the rights of aboriginal women by failing to thoroughly investigate why they are targeted for violence.

---

Canada’s failure to effectively address murder and disappearance
of Aboriginal women ‘grave rights violation’ - UN experts

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15656&LangID=E
News Release
GENEVA (6 March 2015) – Canada has committed a “grave violation” of the rights of Aboriginal women by failing to promptly and thoroughly investigate the high levels of violence they suffer, including disappearances and murders*, a UN expert committee has found. In a report published today, the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) says that the Canadian police and justice system have failed to effectively protect Aboriginal women, hold offenders to account, and ensure that victims get redress.

Full report:

Report of the inquiry concerning Canada of the Committee of the Elimination
of Discrimination against Women under article 8 of the Optional Protocol to the
Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women
(PDF - 545KB, 57 pages):
http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/Treaties/CEDAW/Shared%20Documents/CAN/CEDAW_C_OP-8_CAN_1_7643_E.pdf
March 6, 2015

Source:
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

http://www.ohchr.org/

Canada has disagreed with CEDAW’s finding that there have been grave violations of rights. It has, however, accepted 34 of the Committee’s recommendations, although not the call for a national inquiry and plan of action.

Canada's complete response to the report:

Observations of the Government of Canada on the report of
the inquiry concerning Canada of the Committee on the
Elimination of Discrimination against Women under article 8
of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the
Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women
(PDF - 391KB, 25 pages)
http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/Treaties/CEDAW/Shared%20Documents/CAN/CEDAW_C_OP-8_CAN_2_7644_E.pdf
March 6, 2015

Funniest (but not ha-ha funny) line in the Canadian Government's response, according to Gilles:
"...Canada takes its international human rights obligations seriously."

BULLSHIT.

* Federal minister says child poverty not Ottawa’s problem
http://www.news1130.com/2013/12/15/federal-minister-says-child-poverty-not-ottawas-problem/

* John Baird announces plans to close Rights and Democracy group
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1155970
April 3, 2012

* Canada's commitment to adequate, affordable housing (PDF - 155KB, 27 pages):
http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrcouncil/docs/10session/A.HRC.10.7.Add.3.pdf

* Implementing Canada's Human Rights Obligations:
Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/SEN/Committee/371/huma/rep/rep02dec01-e.htm

* United Nations raps Canada on children's rights
http://www.timescolonist.com/life/raps+Canada+children+rights/7306925/story.html
September 27, 2012

* CANADA: Persistent violations of children's rights
http://www.crin.org/resources/infoDetail.asp?ID=29731&flag=report
Violations include:
* Use of, and conditions in, detention for children
* Violence against children, including domestic violence
* Sexual exploitation of children
* Inequality in the provision of social and welfare services for vulnerable children, including those from minority backgrounds
* Poverty disproportionately affecting children from minority backgrounds
* Barriers to access to education for children from minority backgrounds and discrimination against those children within the education system
* Gap between healthcare provision for children from indigenous backgrounds and other Canadians
* Discrimination against First Nations women and children in relation to personal status rules
Source:
Child Rights International Network
http://www.crin.org/

International Human Rights Organizations Take On Government of Canada in Homelessness Case
http://www.escr-net.org/node/365508

Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera...

International Human Rights Organizations Take On Government of Canada in Homelessness Case
http://www.escr-net.org/node/365508
May 23, 2014
ESCR-Net is appearing jointly with Amnesty International in an historic constitutional case in Canada, brought by individuals affected by widespread homelessness in that country. A rare three day hearing at the Court of Appeal for Ontario commences Monday May 26th in Toronto.

The international human rights organizations are already at loggerheads with the Government of Canada, after Canada tried to prevent the Court from looking at critical recommendations from UN treaty bodies and records of commitments Canada has made to them. In a preliminary judgment on the interventions, the Court ruled against the Government, permitting ESCR-Net to rely on concluding observations and summary records of UN treaty bodies.

---

Written submissions of Amnesty International and ESCR-Net (PDF - 1MB, 29 pages)
http://socialrightscura.ca/documents/R2HOCA/AI-ESCR-Net%20-%20OCA.pdf

---

Government of Canada’s submissions and other documents
http://socialrightscura.ca/eng/legal-strategies-charter-challenge-homlessness-motion-to-strike.html

---

Source:
ESCR-Net
(economic, social and cultural rights)
http://www.escr-net.org/
ESCR-Net is a global movement working together to advance social justice through human rights. ESCR-Net Members around the world advance economic, social and cultural rights by facilitating mutual learning and strategy sharing, developing new tools and resources, engaging in advocacy, and coordinating information-sharing and networking.

---

Related link:

Social Rights in Canada
A Community-University Research Alliance Project (CURA)
http://socialrightscura.ca/eng/index.html

CURA Publications
http://socialrightscura.ca/eng/publications.html
- incl. 150+ links to articles and studies about economic, social and cultural rights.

Upcoming world conference dominates 2014 session of UN Forum on Indigenous issues
http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=47868#.U4CjJ_ldWo0
22 May 2014 – Calls for the full, equal and effective participation by the world’s 370 million indigenous peoples in the upcoming, first-ever World Conference devoted to the realization of their rights gained momentum during a two-week annual forum at United Nations Headquarters.

Source:
UN News Centre
http://www.un.org/News/

December 10 : International Human Rights Day
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/

2013 Theme: 20 Years Working for Your Rights
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon : "As we commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, let us intensify our efforts to fulfill our collective responsibility to promote and protect the rights and dignity of all people everywhere."

The UN General Assembly proclaimed 10 December as Human Rights Day in 1950, to bring to the attention ‘of the peoples of the world’ the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations. In 2013, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights marks 20 years since its establishment.

The Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2013/about.shtml

Secretary-General's Message
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2013/sgmessage.shtml

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Pages/WelcomePage.aspx

Past Human Rights Days
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2013/past.shtml

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights : 20th Anniversary
http://at20.ohchr.org/
As we continue to strive towards a world that acknowledges the rights of all human beings, the Vienna Declaration and Plan of Action, adopted at the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna in 1993, still sets the agenda for much of our work.

Source:
United Nations
http://www.un.org/en/index.shtml

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

From
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada:

http://www.international.gc.ca/

Canada Reaffirms Commitment to Championing Human Rights
http://www.international.gc.ca/media/aff/news-communiques/2013/12/10a.aspx
December 10, 2013 - Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird today issued the following statement on the occasion of Human Rights Day:
“This year’s Human Rights Day comes at a time of global remembrance for Nelson Mandela, one of the last century’s greatest champions of human rights. His unrelenting commitment to the cause was an inspiration to all of us, and in 2001 he became the first living person to receive honorary Canadian citizenship."

----------

December 10, 2013
Public Service Announcement:

Government of Canada Announces New
Human Rights Initiative to Eliminate Poverty, Homelessness & Hunger

http://goo.gl/TrQYgk

Always check the small print.

United Nations Human Rights page
- incl. links to : UN Bodies - Thematic Issues - International Courts and Tribunals - Other Resources - Past Conferences

High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. We have a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

---

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

Human Rights Day:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Rights_Day

Canada rejects UN rights review of violence against aboriginal women
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/09/19/canada_rejects_un_rights_review_of_violence_against_aboriginal_women.html
Canada’s government rejected calls from a United Nations rights review body to develop a comprehensive national review to end violence against native women.
September 19, 2013
Cuba, Iran, Belarus and Russia used a UN body Thursday to criticize Canada’s human rights record, as the Canadian envoy rejected calls to develop a comprehensive national review to end violence against aboriginal women. Canada was responding Thursday to the UN Human Rights Council (HRC), which is conducting its Universal Period Review of Canada’s rights record, on a wide range of issues from poverty, immigration, prostitution and the criminal justice system. Countries have their rights records reviewed every four years by the Geneva-based UN forum, but the Harper government has been skeptical in part because it allows countries with dubious rights records to criticize Canada.

NOTE (by Gilles):
The Harper Government™' has consistently dismissed the recommendations of the UN's international human rights bodies such as the HRC, alleging that they "allow countries with dubious rights records to criticize Canada."
That's absolutely ridiculous.
UN rapporteurs have, in recent years, presented reports and recommendations to the Canadian government about violence against aboriginal women, food insecurity, housing, human rights and children's rights. In each case, the government or its media friends always trot out their tired, old
logical fallacy : how dare someone from a third world country with its own problems come to Canada to tell US how to run the country??
In reality, the UN rapporteurs are working for the UN, not for any particular country, AND it's sillly to even suggest that the people who critique Canada's record in any one area could be responsible for their native country's "dubious rights records".

Canada Gives Human Rights the Cold Shoulder: Disgraceful Response
to UN Human Rights Review Contains No New Commitments

http://www.amnesty.ca/news/news-releases/canada-gives-human-rights-the-cold-shoulder-disgraceful-response-to-un-human-righ
News Release
September 19, 2013
In presenting a deeply disappointing report today at the UN Human Rights Council, outlining Canada’s response to a review of the country’s human rights record carried out in April 2013, the Canadian government has squandered a valuable opportunity to move forward in addressing important national human rights concerns and to demonstrate human rights leadership on the world stage.
Canada was reviewed under the UN’s Universal Periodic Review process on April 26 and 30. Other countries, including many of Canada’s closest allies, highlighted a wide range of concerns and made recommendations to Canada regarding steps to improve human rights protection in the country.

Source:
Amnesty International Canada
http://www.amnesty.ca/

---

Déjà vu, all over again.
You can't say that the Harper Government™ isn't consistent --- consistently embarrassing, that is, with respect to its human rights record on the international stage.

The following is from just over four years ago:

Canada to UN: We'll decide what rights we will choose to observe...
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/blog/canada_to_un__we_ll_decide_what_rights_we_will_choose_to_observe___/
June 8, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Canada has signed a significant number of international human rights treaties that are legally binding in international law, but the federal government believes that it can pick and choose among its obligations - according to the official document tabled at the United Nations' Rights Council in Geneva today. The good news is that the federal government has accepted its responsibility to take a stronger role in ensuring all Canadians are adequately housed, but the federal government says that companion initiatives to address deep and persistent poverty and income inequality are mostly the responsibility of provinces and territories (and not the national government)...

Source:
Wellesley Institute
http://wellesleyinstitute.com/

Poverty as a Human Rights Violation* (PDF - 324K, 21 pages)
http://www.povnet.org/sites/povnet.org/files/SSRN-id2279838.pdf
(* Except in governmental anti-poverty strategies)

By Vincent Greason
June 18, 2013
This paper explores how six provincial anti-poverty strategies are remarkably similar in spite of the fact that they address differing socio-economic realities, have been developed by governments representing different political parties and (supposedly) differing political ideologies. He finds that none of the strategies address poverty as a human rights violation even though many human rights are directly related to poverty.

[ Author Vincent Greason works at the Table ronde des organismes volontaires d’éducation populaire de l’Outaouais (TROVEPO), a coalition of popular education groups. This is their (unilingual French) website : http://www.trovepo.org/ ]

Found in:
PovNet
http://www.povnet.org/
PovNet is an online resource for advocates, people on welfare, and community groups and individuals involved in anti-poverty work. It provides up-to-date information about resources in British Columbia and Canada.


Canada’s Second Report under
the Universal Periodic Review
April 2013

---

From
Canadian Heritage:

Canada's Second Universal Periodic Review
April 26, 2013
http://www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1357245757204/1357245878778
Canada's second review before the United Nations Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review (UPR) Working Group took place on April 26, 2013.

A total of 82 countries intervened during the three-and-a-half-hour dialogue. These states made recommendations to Canada on a wide range of topics.

Click the link above for more info on UPR background and process, and related links to Canada's First UPR (reports, recommendations) in 2009.


What's a Universal Periodic Review
?
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/UPR/
The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a unique process which involves a review of the human rights records of all UN Member States. The UPR is a State-driven process, under the auspices of the Human Rights Council, which provides the opportunity for each State to declare what actions they have taken to improve the human rights situations in their countries and to fulfil their human rights obligations. As one of the main features of the Council, the UPR is designed to ensure equal treatment for every country when their human rights situations are assessed.

Source:
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

http://www.ohchr.org/

The Report of the Working Group* on the Universal Periodic Review of Canada (PDF - 528K, 25 pages)
[ http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G13/152/42/PDF/G1315242.pdf ]
[28 June 2013)]
... includes a list of the 162 recommendations Canada received from other States.

The Response of Canada* to the Recommendations (MS Word file - 95K, 7 pages)
[ http://lib.ohchr.org/HRBodies/UPR/Documents/Session16/CA/A.HRC.24.11.Add.1.doc ]
...was submitted to the United Nations on September 16, 2013. Canada’s response was prepared in close collaboration with federal departments and provincial and territorial governments in accordance with UN guidelines (limit of 2,675 words). (...)
The final outcome of Canada’s review was adopted by the Human Rights Council on September 19, 2013. Canada will report on implementation of the accepted recommendations at its next review in 2017.

---
* NOTE : The Canadian Government response refers to the recommendations by number only.
You need to open (or print) the working group report containing the full text of each recommendation in order to understand the govt. response.
---

Canada’s Second Report under the UPR
[ http://www.international.gc.ca/genev/mission/Periodic_Review_Second_Report_2013.aspx ]
... was submitted in February 2013 to the Human Rights Council in preparation for Canada's appearance . A major focus of Canada’s report is on measures that relate to the recommendations and voluntary commitments Canada accepted during its first UPR in 2009.

Table of Contents:
*
Introduction
* Methodology and consultation process
* Achievements, best practices, challenges and constraints
--- Enhancing awareness of human rights and implementation mechanisms
--- Aboriginal peoples
--- Protecting women and children from violence
--- Poverty and homelessness
--- Freedom of expression and freedom of peaceful assembly
--- Access to justice
--- Promoting social inclusion and equality
--- Immigrants, refugees and temporary foreign workers
* Conclusion

Human Rights Program - from Foreign Affairs and
International Trade Canada

http://www.international.gc.ca/rights-droits/index.aspx

Foreign Affairs and
International Trade Canada

http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/

---

Related links:

From Canadian Heritage:
http://www.pch.gc.ca/

Human Rights
http://www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1266364666208

Human rights Links
http://www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1357240553642/1357240754317

---

From the
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
:
http://www.ohchr.org/

Documents : Universal Periodic Review Second Cycle - Canada
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/UPR/Pages/CASession16.aspx

Universal Periodic Review
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/UPR/

---

From UPR Info:

Canada Review 2013
http://www.upr-info.org/Review-2013-1653.html
- includes links to Canada's National report, OHCHR's Compilation of UN information, OHCHR's Summary of stakeholders’ information, NGO submissions and Advance written questions.
TIP : Click "NGO submissions" to access a collection of 48 submissions to the Review from (mostly Canadian) NGOs
including the following:
* the Canadian Human Rights Commission
* the Assembly of First Nations
* Amnesty International
* the Council of Canadians with Disabilities
* the Canadian Civil Liberties Association
* Citizens For Public Justice
* Canada Without Poverty and the Centre for Equality Rights
* FAFIA - the Feminist Alliance for International Action
* Housing Justice Project
* Human Rights Watch
* Wellesley Institute
* many more...

Source:
UPR Info
http://www.upr-info.org/
UPR Info is a non-profit and non-governmental organisation based in Geneva, Switzerland. We aim at both raising awareness and providing capacity-building tools to the different actors of the UPR process, such as United Nations Member States, NGOs, National Human Rights Institutions and civil society in general.
UPR Info is in Special Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) [ http://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/ ].

---

From iPolitics:

UN vetting Canada’s human rights record
http://www.ipolitics.ca/2013/04/24/un-vetting-canadas-human-rights-record/
By Michelle Zilio
Apr 24, 2013
As the United Nations prepares to review Canada’s human rights record Friday in Geneva, Canadian human rights advocates are calling for an overhaul of the government’s framework for implementing its international human rights obligations.

The UN Human Rights Council [ http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/Pages/HRCIndex.aspx ] will examine Canada as a part of its second Universal Periodic Review (UPR) and make recommendations as to how Canada can improve its record. Country reviews are carried out by the council every four-and-a-half years. This is the second time Canada’s record has been reviewed — the first time was in 2009.
(...)
The UPR will consider written input from three sources: a report from the country under review, a compilation of recent recommendations from UN human rights treaty bodies and special rapporteurs, and a summary provided by human rights institutions and non-governmental organizations.

Following the review, a report will be prepared that provides recommendations made by council. Canada will have until September to notify the UN of which recommendations it is prepared to accept.

Source:
iPolitics

http://www.ipolitics.ca/




The Canadian Constitution was patriated on April 17, 1982.
[ http://goo.gl/kGBrR ]

---

From
Huffington Post Canada:

Charter Of Rights Anniversary:
Stephen Harper Says Charter's Divided History Keeps Him From Celebrating
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/04/16/stephen-harper-charter-of-rights_n_1429678.html
April 16, 2012
SANTIAGO, Chile - The Conservative government has been notably silent on the 30th anniversary of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and Stephen Harper says there's a reason for that. (...) Harper offered a qualified response on the significance of the Charter in Canadian history.

"In terms of the anniversary, the Charter was an important step forward in the development of Canadian rights policy, a process that began in earnest with (Conservative prime minister) John Diefenbaker's Bill of Rights in 1960, so it's a little over 50 years old," Harper said. (...) Harper alluded to the fact that Quebec did not sign on to the Constitution Act of 1982, of which the Charter was a part. Two other attempts to bring Quebec into the constitutional fold — the Meech Lake and Charlottetown Accords — failed.

"In terms of this as an anniversary, I think it's an interesting and important step, but I would point out that the Charter remains inextricably linked to the patriation of the Constitution and the divisions around that matter, which as you know are still very real in some parts of the country," Harper said.

Source:
Huffington Post Canada

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

---

From the
Globe and Mail:

How the Charter helped define Canada
http://goo.gl/7c0yA
By Louise Arbour*
April 16, 2012
The most significant political event of post-Second World War Canada may be the enactment of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It has transformed a country obsessed with the federal-provincial division of powers and enabled it to address its diversity in a substantive, principled way. This was not inevitable. Credit is due in large part to the quality of the judicial branch of governance and, obviously, to the legal profession.
[ * Louise Arbour is the former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and a former justice of the Supreme Court of Canada and of the Court of Appeal for Ontario. She has since July 2009 served as President and CEO of the International Crisis Group - http://www.crisisgroup.org/ ]

More about Louise Arbour:
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail.asp?crinmailID=2669#hc
[From the Child Rights International Network]


30 in 30, the Charter showdown:
Vote for what changed Canada the most

[dead link]
By Kirk Makin
April 13, 2012
To mark 30 years of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, we want to know - what Charter cases have had the most effect on our country? We've selected 30 of the most important cases to reach the Supreme Court. Vote on whether you think each case improved or diminished Canada. Join the debate in the comments or on Twitter, and we may print some of your best points. Includes comments by Prof. Jamie Cameron, constitutional expert at York University’s Osgoode Hall Law School.


Conservatives won’t hold formal event to mark Constitution’s 30th birthday
http://goo.gl/Z3Pnq
By Andy Blatchford
April 12, 2012
The Harper government says it will mark the 30th anniversary of the patriation of the Constitution – by issuing a couple of news releases. Heritage Minister James Moore said Thursday he will commemorate the Constitution's birthday next week by releasing a statement. Mr. Moore said the Justice Department, which is in charge of the tribute, will do the same. (...) The Constitution was patriated on April 17, 1982 following a long campaign by then-Liberal prime minister Pierre Trudeau. It is the backbone of Canada's governing system and its framework for legal rights.

533 comments about this article:
http://goo.gl/nE3zR

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/


From the
Toronto Star:

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms at 30
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1162615
April 16, 2012
Thirty years ago, on April 17, 1982, Queen Elizabeth, sitting under a wet and gloomy sky in front of Canada’s Parliament Buildings, proclaimed in force the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms — a key element of the new Constitution Act. This event did not bring about a transformation of Canada’s political life — it has not significantly added sensitivity to human rights to our politics. But what it did do was bring a missing legal instrument to Canadian liberal democracy: constitutional entrenchment of such basic rights as freedom of association, speech and religion, due process and equality.

At 30, the Charter of Rights has reshaped our society, for the better
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/article/1161574
Editorial
April 14, 2012
Think of it as a shield against the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, adopted 30 years ago this week, protects us all. Time and again, Canadians have invoked it to challenge overbearing government power, to expand freedoms including that of free speech and of the press, to right wrongs and to remedy inequality. It is one of our great treasures Indeed, Canadians put it on a par with such icons as Confederation itself, and universal health care. And for good reason. We look to the Charter for guidance on the political, legal, social and ethical issues that define our lives.

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/


Media and Policy News: Tuesday, April 17, 2012
http://goo.gl/Zs6GN
Selected content

Thanks for the media links below to:

Jennefer Laidley
Policy & Research Analyst
Income Security Advocacy Centre
http://www.incomesecurity.org/
Email: laidleyj@lao.on.ca

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms: 30th Anniversary Today

Here are just a few of the many news stories about the Charter’s 30th anniversary – do a Google news search and you’ll see the enduring controversy around the Charter

The Charter is a trendsetter:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/04/16/f-charter-30-intl.html

Ibbitson says the Charter is Canada’s gift to the world:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/john-ibbitson/the-charter-proves-to-be-canadas-gift-to-world/article2403254/

Andrew Coyne: Canada’s Charter of Rights imposes vital limits on the discretion of government:
http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/04/16/andrew-coyne-canadas-charter-of-rights-imposes-vital-limits-on-the-discretion-of-government/

Chretien on the Charter:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/04/16/chretien-interview.html

Metro Morning’s interview with Clayton Ruby on the Charter:
http://www.cbc.ca/metromorning/episodes/2012/04/17/charter-turns-30/

And another interview with the founder of The Charter Project:
http://www.cbc.ca/metromorning/episodes/2012/03/12/anniversary-of-charter/

Here’s the link to The Charter Project:
http://charterproject.ca/

What Harper thinks about the Charter:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/04/16/stephen-harper-charter-of-rights_n_1429678.html

What Irwin Cotler thinks about what Harper thinks about the Charter:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/irwin-cotler/charter-anniversary_b_1429785.html

 


The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food will Visit Canada in May
From May 6 to 16 (2012), Olivier de Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, will be conducting a formal country mission to Canada. He and his team will be looking at issues including: economic accessibility and poverty; Aboriginal peoples and the right to food; organization of food chains; governance, policies and programs; and international development, trade and investment. A coordinating committee, including FSC, is assisting in convening a series of meetings with civil society across the country.

Briefing note:
(Question-and-answer format)
PDF (1.5MB, 4 pages)
http://foodsecurecanada.org/sites/foodsecurecanada.org/files/FSC_RTF_briefing_note.pdf

Contents of the briefing note:
What is the right to food?
Who is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food?
What will happen during the Special Rapporteur’s country mission to Canada?
How has Canadian civil society engaged with the mission so far?
How can you be involved?
What does this have to do with the People’s Food Policy and Food Secure Canada?
Making the link between Canada’s current failure to respect, protect and fulfill the right to food for all – and the need for the People’s Food Policy – is a powerful message to bring to our elected officials and the media across the country at this key time.

Sign up to participate in a pan-Canadian call about
how to promote the People's Food Policy to your MP:
http://foodsecurecanada.org/webform/resetting-table-stirring-pot

People's Food Policy Project home page
http://peoplesfoodpolicy.ca/
The People’s Food Policy Project is a pan-Canadian network of citizens and organizations that is creating Canada’s first food sovereignty policy.Thirty years ago, a group of activists created the People’s Food Commission (PFC). The Commission toured the country, holding hearings in 75 communities which explored how food systems affected ordinary Canadians: farmers, fisherpeople, housewives, poor people, trade unionists, academics, artists and others. The People’s Food Policy project starts where the People’s Food Commission left off.

Source:
Food Secure Canada

http://foodsecurecanada.org/
Food Secure Canada is a national voice for the food security movement in Canada. It is a nonprofit organization with individual and organization members across Canada. The organization is based in three interlocking commitments to:
*
Zero Hunger
*
Healthy and Safe Food
*
A Sustainable Food System.

Related links:

Website of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food
http://www.srfood.org/

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
http://www.fao.org/righttofood/
The Right to Food Unit supports the implementation of the human right to adequate food, using FAO’s Right to Food Guidelines
[ http://www.fao.org/righttofood/publi_en.htm ].

Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Pages/WelcomePage.aspx
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. The OHCHR has a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm



International Human Rights Day : December 10

December 10 : International Human Rights Day
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/

2013 Theme: 20 Years Working for Your Rights
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon : "As we commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, let us intensify our efforts to fulfill our collective responsibility to promote and protect the rights and dignity of all people everywhere."

The UN General Assembly proclaimed 10 December as Human Rights Day in 1950, to bring to the attention ‘of the peoples of the world’ the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations. In 2013, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights marks 20 years since its establishment.

The Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2013/about.shtml

Secretary-General's Message
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2013/sgmessage.shtml

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Pages/WelcomePage.aspx

Past Human Rights Days
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2013/past.shtml

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights : 20th Anniversary
http://at20.ohchr.org/
As we continue to strive towards a world that acknowledges the rights of all human beings, the Vienna Declaration and Plan of Action, adopted at the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna in 1993, still sets the agenda for much of our work.

Source:
United Nations
http://www.un.org/en/index.shtml

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

From
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada:

http://www.international.gc.ca/

Canada Reaffirms Commitment to Championing Human Rights
http://www.international.gc.ca/media/aff/news-communiques/2013/12/10a.aspx
December 10, 2013 - Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird today issued the following statement on the occasion of Human Rights Day:
“This year’s Human Rights Day comes at a time of global remembrance for Nelson Mandela, one of the last century’s greatest champions of human rights. His unrelenting commitment to the cause was an inspiration to all of us, and in 2001 he became the first living person to receive honorary Canadian citizenship.

----------

December 10, 2013
Public Service Announcement:

Government of Canada Announces New
Human Rights Initiative to Eliminate Poverty, Homelessness & Hunger

http://goo.gl/TrQYgk

Always check the small print.

 

From the United Nations website:

Human Rights Day
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted on 10 December 1948. The date has since served to mark Human Rights Day worldwide. The High Commissioner for Human Rights, as the main UN rights official, and her Office play a major role in coordinating efforts for the yearly observance of Human Rights Day.

Past Human Rights Days
- back to 2002

United Nations Human Rights page
- incl. links to : UN Bodies - Thematic Issues - International Courts and Tribunals - Other Resources - Past Conferences

High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. We have a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

---

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

Human Rights Day:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Rights_Day

From the
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights:

http://www.ohchr.org/

International Human Rights Day 2012
[ http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Day2012/Pages/HRD2012.aspx ]
The designated theme for Human Rights Day 2012 is ‘Inclusion and the right to participate in public life.’
- incl. links to:
* Events in Geneva and New York * Statements and messages * Social media * Visual designs * Videos * Stories

Statement by the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay on Human Rights Day
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=12865&LangID=E
10 December 2012
(*...) Today, I salute all those who have suffered so much seeking what is rightfully theirs, and all those people in other countries who in their own way – whether it is in Santiago or Cairo, Athens or Moscow, New York or New Delhi – are also saying we have a voice, we have our rights and we want to participate in the way our societies and economies are run. Because that is how it should be.

Human Rights Day
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/ABOUTUS/Pages/HumanRightsDay.aspx
Human Rights Day is observed by the international community every year on 10 December. It commemorates the day in 1948 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights [ http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Pages/UDHRIndex.aspx ].
- includes links to observances of Human Rights Day from 2004 to 2011.

---

From the
United Nations:
http://www.un.org/en/

International Human Rights Day 2012
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/
December 10, 2012
Human Rights Day presents an opportunity, every year, to celebrate human rights, highlight a specific issue, and advocate for the full enjoyment of all human rights by everyone everywhere. This year, the spotlight is on the rights of all people — women, youth, minorities, persons with disabilities, indigenous people, the poor and marginalized — to make their voices heard in public life and be included in political decision-making.

Past Human Rights Days (2002 to 2011, incl. theme for each year):
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2012/past.shtml

---

From Canada Without Poverty
(formerly the National Anti-Poverty Organization or NAPO):
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

December 10, 2012
A Message from Leilani Farha, Executive Director, Canada Without Poverty
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2012/12/human-rights-day-where-does-canada-stand/
It’s human rights day. And the silence is audible. Funny how, on the one day a year when we are meant to talk about universal human rights, like rights to housing, to food, an adequate standard of living, self-determination, freedom from torture – we hear nothing from our elected officials, no relevant headlines in mainstream media. A quick scan of the “home pages” of our leaders is telling: Prime Minister Harper makes not a single reference to the significance of December 10th. The Hon. John Baird, Minister of Foreign Affairs: Nothing. Etc., etc., etc.

International Human Rights Day 2011
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2011/12/december-10th-international-day-for-human-rights/
December 10, 2011
Saturday, December 10, marks International Human Rights Day for 2011. This occasion “commemorates the day in 1948 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Although the Declaration with its broad range of political, civil, social, cultural and economic rights is not a binding document, it inspired more than 60 human rights instruments which together constitute an international standard of human rights.

Canada Without Poverty (formerly the National Anti-Poverty Organization or NAPO) has worked on poverty as a human rights issue since our founding in 1971. We have appeared several times before UN bodies to give testimony on Canada’s performance with respect to economic and social rights. We aspire to step up our efforts in economic and social rights education and advocacy, the latter through our sister organization, the CWP Advocacy Network [ http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2011/12/cwp-advocacy-network/ ]. You can help strengthen our voice for eradicating poverty as a human rights obligation by donating now through Canada Helps [ http://www.canadahelps.org/Home.aspx ] or calling 613-789-0096 (1-800-810-1076). For more information, please contact us [ info@cwp-csp.cainfo@cwp-csp.ca ].

Source:
Canada Without Poverty:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada

---

From the
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights:
http://www.ohchr.org/

International Human Rights Day for 2011
[ http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Day2011/Pages/HRD2011.aspx ]
On Human Rights Day 2011 we pay tribute to all human rights defenders and ask you to get involved in the global human rights movement.
- incl. links to:
* Events in Geneva and New York * Statements and messages * Visual designs * Videos * Stories

---

From the
United Nations:
http://www.un.org/

International Human Rights Day 2011
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2011/
December 10, 2011
This year, millions of people decided the time had come to claim their rights. They took to the streets and demanded change. Many found their voices using the internet and instant messaging to inform, inspire and mobilize supporters to seek their basic human rights. Social media helped activists organize peaceful protest movements in cities across the globe - from Tunis to Madrid, from Cairo to New York - at times in the face of violent repression
- incl. links to:
* About Human Rights Day * Secretary-General's Message * High Commissioner's Message * UNESCO's Message * Op-Ed: The Tunis Imperative
Events * Join the Party! * Conversation on Human Rights * Videos * The Universal Declaration of Human Rights * Publicize the Day! * Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights * Past Human Rights Days

Speak Up, Stop Discrimination : Human Rights Day 2010
December 10, 2010
Human Rights Day 2010 on 10 December recognizes the work of human rights defenders worldwide who act to end discrimination. Acting alone or in groups within their communities, every day human rights defenders work to end discrimination by campaigning for equitable and effective laws, reporting and investigating human rights violations and supporting victims.
- incl. links to :
* What Is a Human Rights Defender? * Profiles of Human Rights Defenders * Defending the Defenders * Secretary-General's Message * High Commissioner for Human Rights Message * Other Statements * Videos * Publicize the Day! * Test Your Knowledge ... * Events * Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights * Past Human Rights Days

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights- related links
[ United Nations ]

---

From the Canadian Union of Public Employees:

International Human Rights Day – December 10
DEC 9, 2010 11:28 AM CUPE has a long history of defending human rights and fighting discrimination and remains diligent in monitoring and denouncing all forms of discrimination, especially in the face of rising social conservatism. We encourage CUPE members and our communities everywhere to seize the opportunity of Human Rights Day 2010 to join hands to embrace diversity and end discrimination.
Source:
Equality Branch
[ Canadian Union of Public Employees ]

---

Human Rights Day - from Wikipedia

Human Rights Day 2009 on 10 December will focus on non-discrimination. “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights”. These first few famous words of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights established 60 years ago the basic premise of international human rights law. Yet today, the fight against discrimination remains a daily struggle for millions around the globe.
- includes links to the following:UN Home
* Main Page
* About discrimination
* Get involved
* Visual designs
* General Assembly
President's Message
* Secretary-General's Message
* High Commissioner for Human Rights Message
* UNESCO Director-General's Message
* Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
* Student Conference on Human Rights
* Human Rights Resources
* Additional Resources
* Past Human Rights Days
* Webcast

Source:
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
[ United Nations ]

 


Happy 60th anniversary - Universal Declaration of Human Rights

December 10, 2008
By Michael Shapcott
Today (December 10) marks the 60th anniversary of the United Nation's Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Human rights form the cornerstone of national and global economic, political and social policy. Every person, instead of being reduced to pleading for special favours, is recognized to have universal rights - and governments are obliged to also recognize those rights.

The Universal Declaration was forged in the aftermath of the second world war and the great depression of the 1930s, when the world had grown tired of bloodshed and inequality. The opening sentences recognize the importance of human rights and the perils of ignoring them: "disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people."

Source:
Wellesley Institute

Related link from the United Nations:

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights the full text of which appears in the following pages. Following this historic act the Assembly called upon all Member countries to publicize the text of the Declaration and "to cause it to be disseminated, displayed, read and expounded principally in schools and other educational institutions, without distinction based on the political status of countries or territories.


Human rights abuses could kill the Commonwealth: report
October 20, 2011
By Chris Cobb and Mark Kennedy
OTTAWA — The Commonwealth could cease to exist unless it takes stronger, more public stands against egregious human rights violations in its member countries, according to a punishing 200-page report, obtained exclusively by Postmedia News. Some leaders of the 54-nation group have attempted to keep the report — titled Time for Urgent Reform — out of the public eye ahead of a major summit in Australia Oct 28-30 to be attended by Commonwealth leaders including Prime Minister Stephen Harper. (...) The report was scheduled for release well in advance of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Perth but an apparent dispute among member nations over its contents has delayed the official release until Oct. 28, the first day of the Australia summit.
Source:
National Post

Eminent Persons Group
The Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group (EPG) was established by Commonwealth Heads of Government at their summit in Trinidad and Tobago in November 2009. The group’s goals are to sharpen the impact, strengthen the networks, and raise the profile of the Commonwealth.

---

Commonwealth refuses to release report on reforms
[Expired link]
October 18, 2011
Commonwealth leaders are sitting on a groundbreaking report prepared by their own advisory group that has concluded the 54-nation organization will lose international relevancy and moral authority unless it institutes key reforms. The warning comes from the Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group, an 11-person panel - which includes Canadian Senator Hugh Segal - appointed by Commonwealth leaders at their last meeting in 2009.
Source:
The Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)

Know Your Rights - ten-part series (Audio only)
Know Your Rights is an on-the-ground and in-the-field exploration of our rights as Canadian citizens. Host Craig Norris navigates the complex world of what we legally can and cannot do in our country. What freedoms do we have? And how far can we push it before someone pushes back?
[About Know Your Rights]
- includes links to : Main - About the Show - Know Your Rights Blog - Past Episodes - The Fine Print - Contact Us

This ten-part series aired from June 27 to August 29, 2011.

Archive of all episodes to date
NOTE: These are all links to audio files (no video).
Click the link to any episode below for a summary of the program.
Then, to listen to a particular episode, go to the Past Episodes page and click on the "Listen" button.

All episodes are just over 27 minutes in length (the duration of the radio program).
Be sure to check the 50+ related resources (total for all episodes) in The Fine Print.

Episode 10
Where Do We Go From Here? (Finale)
August 29, 2011
To bid farewell, we look to the future. Next year, our Charter will be 30! Something to celebrate, for sure. But also a good time for reflection on what could be amended. And that's what our final episode is all about: Where do we go from here?

The Fine Print (Episode 10)
Click the link above to access any of the following
resources related to this program:
:: Enshrining The Charter (April 17, 1982)
:: Huntington Society of Canada
:: Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness
:: Canadian Civil Liberties Association
:: B.C. Civil Liberties Association

NOTE : the Fine Print link above is cumulative for all episodes;
it contains almost 60 links to related resources.

Episode 9
Aboriginal rights
August 22, 2011

Episode 8
Language rights
August 15, 2011

Episode 7
Freedom from discrimination based on race, origin or colour
August 8, 2011

Episode 6
Freedom from discrimination based on mental or physical disability
August 5, 2011

Episode 5
Freedom from discrimination based on sex, age
July 29, 2011

Episode 4
Life, liberty and security of the person
July 18, 2011

Episode 3
Freedom of religion
July 11, 2011

Episode 2
Freedom of peaceful assembly and association
July 8, 2011

Episode 1
Freedom of expression
June 27, 2011

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Know Your Rights Blog <===keep up with the latest releases from Know Your Rights

-----------------------------

The Fine Print
55+ links to related resources organized by episode
- also includes links to the full text of The Charter of Rights and Freedoms and a CBC Television special from 2002 entitled "The Constitution and Charter Re-evaluated".
Source:
CBC Radio

---

Know Your Rights Facebook page

New from openDemocracy:

Canada: punishing the undeserving poor
By Wendy Chan
August 1, 2011
The governance and perception of welfare in Canada has inextricably linked poverty, welfare and crime: to be poor is to be culpable. Only by resisting punitive trends and addressing the root causes of poverty can we reverse the tide of criminalization in welfare.

Governing poverty: risking rights
By Kate Donald and Smriti Upadhyay
August 1, 2011
The regime of controls, conditionalities and sanctions that characterise the governance of poverty - in stark contrast to laissez faire financial governance - threatens the rights and the dignity of those it ostensibly protects.

The punitive regulation of poverty in the neoliberal age
By Loic Wacquant
August 1, 2011
The increasing penalization of poverty is a response to social insecurity; a result of public policy that weds the "invisible hand" of the market to the "iron fist" of the penal state

Migration: controlling the unsettled poor
By Briget Anderson
August 1, 2011
Examining the way in which first rulers, and then the state, have coerced the poor in England into mobility and immobility, offers opportunities for developing a new politics of migration.

Source:
openDemocracy
openDemocracy publishes high quality news analysis, debates and blogs about the world and the way we govern ourselves.
(...) openDemocracy is committed to human rights and democracy. We aim to ensure that marginalised views and voices are heard. We believe facilitating argument and understanding across geographical boundaries is vital to preventing injustice. (...) openDemocracy.net is published by openDemocracy Limited, a UK registered company limited by guarantee and wholly owned by the openDemocracy Foundation for the Advancement of Global Education.
[ About openDemocracy ]

"If you've got nothing to hide, you've got nothing to fear."

Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide'
May 15, 2011
By Daniel J. Solove
When the government gathers or analyzes personal information, many people say they're not worried. "I've got nothing to hide," they declare. "Only if you're doing something wrong should you worry, and then you don't deserve to keep it private."
(...)
Commentators often attempt to refute the nothing-to-hide argument by pointing to things people want to hide. But the problem with the nothing-to-hide argument is the underlying assumption that privacy is about hiding bad things. By accepting this assumption, we concede far too much ground and invite an unproductive discussion about information that people would very likely want to hide. As the computer-security specialist Schneier aptly notes, the nothing-to-hide argument stems from a faulty "premise that privacy is about hiding a wrong."
(...)
The deeper problem with the nothing-to-hide argument is that it myopically views privacy as a form of secrecy. In contrast, understanding privacy as a plurality of related issues demonstrates that the disclosure of bad things is just one among many difficulties caused by government security measures.
(...)
Privacy is often threatened not by a single egregious act but by the slow accretion of a series of relatively minor acts.
(...)
Privacy is rarely lost in one fell swoop. It is usually eroded over time, little bits dissolving almost imperceptibly until we finally begin to notice how much is gone.

Source:
Chronicle of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education is the No. 1 source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty members and administrators. Based in Washington, D.C., The Chronicle has more than 70 writers, editors, and international correspondents. [ About the Chronicle ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

Canada's Universal Periodic Review:
Report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on
Foreign Affairs and International Development (International Human Rights)
- Presented in the House November 3, 2010
- Posted to the Parliamentary website January 18, 2011

NOTE : If you're not familiar with the UN human rights "Universal Periodic Review", I suggest that you start reading this section (above the red divider below ) from the bottom. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights site offers information on the UPR in general as well as content that is specific to Canada. Above that you'll find links to UPR content on the Heritage Canada (govt.) website. And finally, immediately below this paragraph, the latest report from the House of Commons Subcommittee whose long name appears under "Source" below.
----------------------------------------------------------------
WARNING - Spoiler !
Don't read the next four bullets
if you want to be surprised when you read the 44-page report below.

* Effective Consultation Between Government and Civil Society : NOT.
* Government Transparency : NOT.
* Good track record of monitoring and reporting on human rights in Canada : NOT.
* Good track record of implementing and enforcing Canada's international human rights obligations domestically : NOT.
----------------------------------------------------------------

New on the Parliamentary
website January 18, 2011:

Canada’s Universal Periodic Review and Beyond—Upholding
Canada’s International Reputation as a Global Leader in the Field of Human Rights
(PDF - 633K, 44 pages)
Report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on
Foreign Affairs and International Development

(Adopted by the Committee on October 21, 2010; Presented to the House on November 3, 2010; posted on the Parliamentary website January 18, 2011)
(...)
The report has three main sections. The first section deals with the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) process as well as with Canada’s other reporting obligations in the UN system. The second section focuses on the concerns raised by a number of parties regarding the way in which Canada monitors and reports on its domestic human rights situation. The third section focuses on concerns raised regarding the way in which Canada implements and enforces its international human rights obligations domestically.
Alex Neve (Secretary-General for Amnesty International Canada) said in his testimony : "When it comes to any country’s human rights record, the real value lies not in the treaties that have been ratified, the promises that have been made, or the review processes undertaken. The proof lies in compliance and implementation... This has long been a troubling shortcoming for Canada."
The Subcommittee is troubled by this and acknowledges that many Canadians are unaware of this situation. However, these concerns have not gone unnoticed by its peers in the international community. It is time for Canada to stop falling short on its human rights obligations and work fastidiously toward upholding its international reputation as a global leader in the field of human rights.
Source:
Subcommittee on International Human Rights (SDIR)
[ SDIR is part of the
House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development (FAAE) ]

___________

From
Canadian Heritage
:

* Canada's Universal Periodic Review
* Reports on UN Human Rights Treaties and Other Documents
* Human Rights Links

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights:

United Nations Universal Periodic Review (UPR)
The Universal Periodic Review is a unique process which involves a review of the human rights records of all 192 UN Member States once every four years. The UPR is a State-driven process, under the auspices of the Human Rights Council, which provides the opportunity for each State to declare what actions they have taken to improve the human rights situations in their countries and to fulfill their human rights obligations. As one of the main features of the Council, the UPR is designed to ensure equal treatment for every country when their human rights situations are assessed. [Created in March 2006] through the UN General Assembly, (...) the UPR is one of the key elements of the new Council which reminds States of their responsibility to fully respect and implement all human rights and fundamental freedoms. The ultimate aim of this new mechanism is to improve the human rights situation in all countries and address human rights violations wherever they occur. [More...]
Source:
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. We have a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

Also from OHCHR:

Universal Periodic Review (UPR) - Canada
- includes links to versions in six languages of:
* the National report
* the Compilation of UN information
* Summary of stakeholders' information
* Questions submitted in advance
* Outcome of the review :
--- Report of the Working group
--- Addendum 1
--- Decision on the outcome
--- Draft Report of the eleventh session of the Human Rights Council

[ UPR Canada is part of the OHCHR Canada Homepage - recommended reading! ]

Human Rights in Canada - a starting point for research on Human Rights in Canada
- incl. links to:
* Home * Getting Started * Databases * Books * Articles * Theses * Case Law * Legislation * Current Awareness * New Media * Human Rights Protection Mechanisms * Research Centres/Chairs - policy, reports Arrow * Advocacy/Legal Clinics * Domestic Implementation of Int. Human Rights Law * Country Reports * Poverty
Source:
University of Ottawa Library

Canada's Rights Movement : A History
The site is organized around four primary objectives:
1. Introduce visitors to the history of human rights activism in Canada.
2. Provide access to primary materials.
3. Create an interactive teaching resource for secondary and post-secondary instructors.
4. Facilitate links among individuals interested in the study of human rights in Canada and promote the work of historians.
Recommended reading!
- includes an impressive collection of links to : Human Rights Organizations - External Research Tools - Canadian History Sites - Academic Journals (Human Rights - History - Social Movements)

Women's Court of Canada
The Women’s Court of Canada is an innovative project bringing together academics, activists, and litigators in order literally to rewrite the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms equality jurisprudence. Taking inspiration from Oscar Wilde, who once said “the only duty we owe to history is to rewrite it”, the Women’s Court operates as a virtual court, and ‘reconsiders’ leading equality decisions. The Women’s Court renders alternative decisions as a means of articulating fresh conceptions of substantive equality.
- incl. links to :
* Home * About Us * Blog * WCC Judgments * Media and Events * Resources * Archives * Contact

Women's Court of Canada Judgments
The first six WCC judgments were published in the Canadian Journal of Women and the Law in early 2008. These decisions concern issues that affect the lives of Aboriginal women, women with disabilities, women living in poverty, women with children, and women workers.
The WCC judgments are for the following cases
:
* Symes v. Canada, [1993] : deduction — child care expenses — women — taxpayer — income
* Native Women’s Association of Canada v. Canada, [1994] : funding — freedom of expression — women — equal — constitutional
* Eaton v. Brant County Board of Education, [1997] : placement — disabled — special — child — pupil
* Law v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1999] : discrimination — differential treatment — claimant — survivor’s pension — dignity
* Gosselin v. Quebec (Attorney-General), [2002] : programs — welfare recipients — security of the person — dignity — legislation
* Newfoundland (Treasury Board) v. Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Public and Private Employees, [2004] : pay equity — government — crisis — hospital workers — women

Resources - links to over two dozen useful feminist resources

Canada’s Human Rights Institutions At Risk
By Shelagh Day, Senior Editor and Publisher, Canadian Human Rights Reporter
July 28, 2010
It is time to go into worry mode about Canada’s human rights institutions.
Here are some recent developments that cause concern:
• Saskatchewan’s Minister of Justice proposes to dismantle the Saskatchewan Human Rights Tribunal and send human rights complaints directly to the courts
• The B.C. Law Institute has been asked by the Ministry of Labour to conduct “research and analysis in relation to workplace dispute resolution mechanisms in British Columbia”. The disputes in question include human rights employment complaints.
*
Heather MacNaughton, the widely respected Chair of the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal, was not re-appointed. Human rights watchers speculate that British Columbia also plans to dismantle its Tribunal.
• The Supreme Court of Canada has granted leave to appeal in Canada (Attorney General) v. Mowat, a case about whether the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal has the authority to award legal costs to a successful complainant. This case arises because the Canadian Commission has stopped representing human rights complainants before the Tribunal and courts, and complainants are increasingly appearing unrepresented, with a high likelihood of losing, or they are hiring their own counsel.
* more...
The effect of shutting down Tribunals, sending human rights complainants to courts, and using legal costs as a substitute for public access, will be to weaken Canada’s system of human rights laws and discourage Canadians from using them.
Source:
Women's Court of Canada

From the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights:

Increase engagement of NGOs, civil society and Canadian
public in next UPR process, develop comprehensive plan
says Senate Human Rights Committee report

News Release
June 23, 2010
Canada needs a comprehensive plan to prepare for its next Universal Periodic Review (UPR) before the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC), including a clear, effective, inclusive and transparent process for engaging not only with NGOs and the rest of civil society, but also with the Canadian public regarding Canada’s human rights record, says a report by the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights entitled: Canada and the United Nations Human Rights Council: Charting a New Course. (...) The report outlines twenty-one recommendations for the Government of Canada to enhance its human rights leadership role internationally and to better meet its human rights obligations at home.

The complete report:

Canada and the United Nations
Human Rights Council: Charting a New Course
(PDF - 1.3MB, 139 pages)
June 2010
"(...)The committee became aware of concerns that Canada is no longer fulfilling a "bridge-builder" role between UN Member States with diverging views, as it once was able to do. It is also noted that Canada received strong criticism during the review from some of its traditional allies over its handling of issues affecting Aboriginal peoples and the homeless. Canadaes international reputation could weaken unless Canada quickly demonstrates that it can improve its human rights record on such issues and unless it can demonstrate an ability to achieve results in promoting its own position on human rights issues in international fora.
[Excerpt, p. 2]

Source:
Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights

< Begin snide remark. >

Gilles' recommendation #1 for the Government of Canada "... to enhance its human rights
leadership role internationally and to better meet its human rights obligations at home":
Dump Harper and his minions.

< /End snide remark. >

-----------------------------------------------

Earlier reports by the
same Senate Committee:

Children: The Silenced Citizens
Effective Implementation of Canada's
International Obligations with respect to the Rights of Children
(PDF - 1.3MB, 323 pages)
Final Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights

The Honourable Raynell Andreychuk, Chair
The Honourable Joan Fraser, Deputy Chair
April 2007

Promises to Keep : Implementing Canada's Human Rights Obligations
Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights
December 2001

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Contextual links:

From the
United Nations Office of the
High Commissioner for Human Rights
:

The Human Rights Council
The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the UN system made up of 47 States responsible for strengthening the promotion and protection of human rights around the globe. The Council was created by the UN General Assembly on 15 March 2006 with the main purpose of addressing situations of human rights violations and make recommendations on them.

Universal Periodic Review - Canada
- includes links to versions in six languages of:
* the National report
* the Compilation of UN information
* Summary of stakeholders' information
* Questions submitted in advance
* Outcome of the review :
--- Report of the Working group
--- Addendum 1
--- Decision on the outcome
--- Draft Report of the eleventh session of the Human Rights Council

------------------------------------------------

Human Rights Council
"...easy access to the best resources about the Human Rights Council - published by the UN, NGOs, or the media."

From
Canadian Heritage
:

Canada's Universal Periodic Review
Canada's review before the United Nations Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review (UPR) Working Group session took place on February 3, 2009. A total of 45 states intervened during the three-hour interactive dialogue. These states made recommendations to Canada on a wide range of topics.

The National Report of Canada under the Universal Periodic Review (PDF - 231K 24 pages), submitted in December 2008, contains information on the promotion and protection of human rights in Canada, including achievements, best practices, and challenges.

The Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review of Canada (PDF - 97K, 24 pages, March 2009) includes a list of the 68 recommendations Canada received from other States.

The Response of Canada to the Recommendations was prepared in close collaboration with provincial and territorial governments in accordance with UN guidelines, and submitted to the United Nations in advance of Canada's appearance on June 9, 2009

Source:
Human Rights Program (Canadian Heritage)

------------------------------------------------

From
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada:

Universal Periodic Review
- A Canadian perspective, contains some of the same material as the Canadian Heritage site (above) and some complementary information.

------------------------------------------------

Universal Periodic Review - UPR-info.org
The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a new and unique mechanism of the United Nations which started in April 2008 and consisting of the review of the human rights practices of all States in the world, once every four years.
You will find on this website all the documents available on the UPR, including: States and NGOs reports; OHCHR summaries and compilations; summaries of each review; reports of the Working Group; final outcomes with recommendations; webcasts of the UPR sessions; press statements by NGOs and analyses by UPR Info and other NGOs as well as detailed explanations on how to engage in the process

----------------

From the World Report [on human rights] 2010 by
Human Rights Watch:

Introduction to World Report 2010:
The Abusers’ Reaction: Intensifying Attacks on
Human Rights Defenders, Organizations, and Institutions

By Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch

World Report: Abusers Target Human Rights Messengers
Rights-Respecting Governments Should Speak Up to Protect Defenders
January 20, 2010
News Release
Washington, DC - Governments responsible for serious human rights violations have over the past year intensified attacks against human rights defenders and organizations that document abuse, Human Rights Watch said today in issuing its World Report 2010. The 612-page report, the organization's 20th annual review of human rights practices around the globe, summarizes major human rights trends in more than 90 nations and territories worldwide*, reflecting the extensive investigative work carried out in 2009 by Human Rights Watch staff.
-----
* more than 90 nations and territories worldwide, including the U.S. --- but not Canada.
Hey - wassup with THAT?
... "attacks against human rights defenders and organizations that document abuse" sounds like something that's been happening here in Canada, what with the increasing amount of media slagging in the past few years about human rights bodies and even respected individuals, like Louise Arbour, former Supreme Court Justice and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Complete report:
World Report 2010
(PDF - 3.7MB, 624 pages)

Country Chapters - links to individual reports for 90 countries , including the U.S. --- but not Canada.

The only Canada coverage in the Human Rights Watch site is the following:
Canada: Human Rights Watch
- incl. links to * News Releases * Reports * Commentaries * Letters

Source:
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. Human Rights Watch focuses international attention where human rights are violated, gives voice to the oppressed and holds oppressors accountable for their crimes.


Social Rights Advocacy Centre (SRAC)
"Promoting and claiming social and economic rights through an inclusive human rights practice"
Incorporated in 2002, the Social Rights Advocacy Centre is
a not for profit, non-governmental organization whose purpose is to relieve poverty and improve access to adequate food, clothing, housing, education, healthcare and other requirements of dignity, equality and security of low income persons and other disadvantaged groups through:
* research
* public education in social rights
* legal advocacy and representation.

- be sure to check the links to Canadian human rights caselaw, including the historic Charter Challenge to Homelessness and Violations of the Right to Adequate Housing in Canada.

Check out each of the following sections of the site for valuable resources:
* Judicial and Legal Education
* International Education and Advocacy
* Litigation Support
* Research
* Publications
- links to over two dozen reports by Bruce Porter and Martha Jackman on a number of topics related to social and economic rights in Canada.
* Public Education

SRAC provides administrative support and co-ordinates the work of the Charter Committee on Poverty Issues which has intervened in more than a dozen cases at the Supreme Court of Canada

The Rise and Fall of Economic and Social Rights : What Next? (PDF - 110K, 8 pages)
May 29, 2010
By Ed Broadbent, former federal leader of the New Democratic Party
Adapted from a speech Mr. Broadbent delivered in Montreal on May 29
to the Congress of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences (CCFHSS).

In his address to the CCFHSS on May 29th, the former leader of the NDP summarizes the journey of generations and issues a challenge to today's leaders: stop ignoring the threat of rising inequality, tackle poverty, and show Canadians your progress.

"It is time to reverse the growing trend to deep inequality in Canada. It is time for the federal government to
fulfill its legal responsibilities for enforcing the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. The Covenant
is quite clear on its obligations. We are required, to the maximum of our available resources, to progressively
realize its quite specific list of rights. This requires positive action by governments, among other
obligations, to build hospitals and schools, provide adequate pensions, ensure employment insurance for
all workers, guarantee equal pay for men and women, and create and enforce laws enabling workers to have
unions." [Excerpt, page 7]

Source:
Canadian Centre for
Policy Alternatives

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

Recent release from
Human Rights Watch:

California: From Foster Children to Homeless Adults
State Fails to Prepare Foster Youth for Adulthood
[Dead link]
News Release
May 12, 2010
(LosAngeles) - California is creating homeless adults by failing to ensure that youth in foster care are given the support to live independently as adults and by ending state support abruptly, Human Rights Watch said in a new report. Human Rights Watch said that the state should provide financial support, connections with adults, shelter, and other safety nets for young people as they make the transition towards independence.

The 70-page report, My So-Called Emancipation: From Foster Care to Homelessness for California Youth (PDF - 1.3MB), documents the struggles of foster care youth who become homeless after turning 18, or "aging out" of the state's care, without sufficient preparation or support for adulthood. California's foster care system serves 65,000 children and youth, far more than any other single state. Of the 4,000 who age out of the system each year, research suggests, 20 per cent or more become homeless.

Source:
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes.

Also from Human Rights Watch:

World Report: Abusers Target Human Rights Messengers
Rights-Respecting Governments Should Speak Up to Protect Defenders
January 20, 2010
News Release
Washington, DC - Governments responsible for serious human rights violations have over the past year intensified attacks against human rights defenders and organizations that document abuse, Human Rights Watch said today in issuing its World Report 2010. The 612-page report, the organization's 20th annual review of human rights practices around the globe, summarizes major human rights trends in more than 90 nations and territories worldwide*, reflecting the extensive investigative work carried out in 2009 by Human Rights Watch staff.
-----
* more than 90 nations and territories worldwide, including the U.S. --- but not Canada.
Hey - wassup with THAT?
... "attacks against human rights defenders and organizations that document abuse" sounds like something that's been happening here in Canada, what with the increasing amount of media slagging in the past few years about human rights bodies and even respected individuals, like Louise Arbour, former Supreme Court Justice and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The only Canada coverage in the Human Rights Watch site is the following:
Canada: Human Rights Watch
- incl. links to * News Releases * Reports * Commentaries * Letters

Complete report:
World Report 2010
(PDF - 3.7MB, 624 pages)

Introduction to World Report 2010:
The Abusers’ Reaction: Intensifying Attacks on
Human Rights Defenders, Organizations, and Institutions

By Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch

Country Chapters - links to individual reports for 90 countries , including the U.S. --- but not Canada.

Source:
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes

Related links:

* United Nations Association in Canada
***** Canada and Human Rights

List of Provincial Human Rights Commissions
Newfoundland and Labrador: http://www.justice.gov.nl.ca/hrc/
Prince Edward Island:
http://www.gov.pe.ca/humanrights/index.php3?number=72187&lang=E
Nova Scotia: http://www.gov.ns.ca/humanrights/
New Brunswick: http://www.gnb.ca/hrc-cdp/index-e.asp
Quebec:
Ontario:
http://www.ohrc.on.ca
Manitoba: http://www.gov.mb.ca/hrc
Saskatchewan: http://www.shrc.gov.sk.ca/
Alberta: http://www.albertahumanrights.ab.ca/
British Columbia: http://www.bchrt.bc.ca/

Google News Search results:
"Canada, human rights"
- 2,495 results

NEW



20th Anniversary of the Equality Clause*
- incl links to : Home | Welcome | About the Coalition | Discussion Papers | Quotes | Press Releases | Supreme Court of Canada Section 15 Cases | Media Coverage | Relevant Links | Contact Us | français
"April 17, 2005, marks the 20th anniversary of the entry into force of section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which guaranteed the right of Canadians to equality. The Charter itself came into force in 1982. The three-year delay of section 15 allowed federal, provincial and territorial governments time to bring their legislation into line with its provisions."
[Excerpt from the Welcome page]
*NOTE: this website is no longer online; clicking the link above takes you to an archived version (Feb. '8) of the 20th annniversary site at Archive.org

---

Caselaw related to the justiciability of social and economic rights in Canada
(Word file - 62K, 3 pages)
- list of Canadian cases that address social and economic rights --- includes links to specific cases
Source:
Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation



List of Provincial Human Rights Commissions (as at 24/01/10)

Newfoundland and Labrador: http://www.justice.gov.nl.ca/hrc/
Prince Edward Island:
http://www.gov.pe.ca/humanrights/index.php3?number=72187&lang=E
Nova Scotia: http://www.gov.ns.ca/humanrights/
New Brunswick: http://www.gnb.ca/hrc-cdp/index-e.asp
Quebec:
Ontario:
http://www.ohrc.on.ca
Manitoba: http://www.gov.mb.ca/hrc
Saskatchewan: http://www.shrc.gov.sk.ca/
Alberta: http://www.albertahumanrights.ab.ca/
British Columbia: http://www.bchrt.bc.ca/

 

Human Rights Links
from Canadian Heritage:

http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/pdp-hrp/liens-links/index-eng.cfm
- links to provincial/territorial, fedral/national and international human rights resources



E-Petitions and Letter-Writing Campaigns - Yes or No? --- The story of Amina Lawal

A Canadian Social Research Links page (2003)
- the compelling story of a Nigerian woman sentenced to death for adultery, and why we should be wary of signing online petitions...

Internet Petitions
Signing and circulating online petitions is an effective way of helping to remedy important issues.
Or is it?
"The 2000s have seen the birth of an Internet phenomenon: the e-petition. It offers instant comfort to those outraged by the latest ills of the world through its implicit assurance that affixing their names to a statement decrying a situation and demanding change will make a difference. That assurance is a severely flawed one for a multitude of reasons..."
Source:
Snopes.com


60th anniversary of the
Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

Barbarism Lite: The Political Attack on Social Rights
February 21, 2009
Opinion
By Ed Broadbent*

Recommended reading!

In this 12-page transcript of his Avie Bennett Historica Lecture at York University (Toronto, February 19), Ed Broadbent reflects on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights from both the international and Canadian perspectives. The transcript includes a comprehensive overview of the evolution of social rights in the post-war era on an international level, from the December 1948 birth of the Declaration to the explicit neoliberal domestic political agenda of the 1980s (think Reagan and Thatcher) and the domestic social "policies" of the Harper and Bush administrations.
[ * Ed Broadbent is the former federal NDP leader who tabled a resolution in the House of Commons in 1989 to eliminate child poverty by the year 2000. The resolution was passed unanimously in the House.
We're still working towards that goal. For more on this, see Campaign 2000, a coalition of social groups created in 1991 to promote and support the goal of eliminating child poverty. ]
Source:
The Toronto Star


From the Justice Laws Web Site (Dept. of Justice):

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

The Canadian Human Rights Act

Government Sites

Canadian Heritage
Canadian Heritage is responsible for national policies and programs that promote Canadian content, foster cultural participation, active citizenship and participation in Canada's civic life, and strengthen connections among Canadians.

- incl. links to:
* Arts and Cultural Industries * Heritage Objects and Spaces * Holidays, Celebrations and Commemorations * Anthems and Symbols * Monarchy in Canada * Exchanges, Jobs and Studies * Cultural Diversity and Rights * Official Languages * Sport * International Activities * The Department * Minister and Ministers of State * About Us * Newsroom * Publications * Public Consultations * Career Opportunities

Human Rights in Canada
- incl. links to :

* Partnering for Children's Rights
* Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
* Canada's Reports to UN Human Rights Conventions and Related Official Documents
* Selected Themes and Tributes
* Did you know?
* Continuing Committee of Officials on Human Rights

Human Rights Program
- incl. links to : * Did You Know? * Links * Themes and Tributes * Funding Program * Publications and Documents * Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms * Human Rights in Canada * International Human Rights
- Links to other Human Rights websites

Canada and International Human Rights : Main Menu
- incl. links to:
* Canada and the International Human Rights System: An Introduction * Multilateral human rights treaties to which Canada is a party * Canada's Reports on United Nations Conventions and Related Official Documents * Complaints to international organizations * Decisions of international bodies * Glossary of UN Terms * Universal Periodic Review

In addition to supporting the principles enunciated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,
Canada has ratified the six United Nations human rights treaties and submitted reports on the implementation of each of these treaties.

Core Document to accompany all of Canada's Reports.
Basic reference document on Canada's political system for use by United Nations Human Rights Committees reviewing Canada's reports.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights - Adopted and proclaimed by the UN general Assembly on December 10, 1948.

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) - Accession by Canada in May 1976.Text of the Covenant, the first optional protocol and the views of the UN Committee on the merit of communications against Canada, Canada's most recent reports and the UN Committee conclusions on these reports.

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESC). Ratified by Canada in May 1976.Text of the Covenant, Canada's most recent reports and the UN Committee conclusions on these reports.

The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD). Accession by Canada in October 1970. Text of the Convention, Canada's most recent reports and the UN Committee conclusions on these reports.

The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Ratified by Canada in December 1991. Text of the Convention, the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict (ratified by Canada in July 2000), and the Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography (ratified by Canada in September 2005), Canada's reports and the UN Committee conclusions on these reports.

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Ratified by Canada in December 1981. Text of the Convention, the optional protocol, Canada's most recent reports and the UN Committee's conclusions on these reports.

Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT). Ratified by Canada in June 1987. Text of the Convention, Canada's most recent reports and the UN Committee's conclusions on these reports.

Also from Canadian Heritage:

Aboriginal Peoples' Program
The Aboriginal Peoples' Program (APP) supports the full participation and cultural revitalization of Aboriginal People in Canadian society. It enables Aboriginal Peoples to address the social, cultural, economic and political issues affecting their lives.
[ Aboriginal Programs, Policy, and Research ]

---

Canada's Universal Periodic Review
Canada’s review before the United Nations Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR) Working Group session took place on February 3, 2009. A total of 45 states intervened during the three-hour interactive dialogue. These states made recommendations to Canada on a wide range of topics.

The Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review of Canada (PDF - 97K, 24 pages)
March 3, 2009
- includes a list of the 68 recommendations Canada received from other States.

Response of Canada to the Recommendations
June 5, 2009
Canada welcomes and has given careful consideration to the 68 recommendations made during its Universal Periodic Review. (...)

2009 Universal Periodic Review
Annotated Table of recommendations for Canada
(Word file - 94KB)
June 7
NOTE: this table is a 14-page section-by-section checklist for all 68 recommendations, and it includes the government's response for each rejected recommendation in the marginal comments for that section. You must be using a reasonably recent version of Microsoft Word (or the FREE Word Viewer) to view the marginal comments.

Canada's Universal Periodic Review
Canada's review under the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) took place on February 3, 2009. Under the UPR, Canada must submit a written report (see "National Report" link above), with information on the promotion and protection of human rights in Canada, including achievements, best practices, and challenges. In addition, the report must include initiatives and commitments to address any challenges and improve human rights situations on the ground. Federal, provincial and territorial government officials worked together to identify the principal themes/issues that were to be addressed in Canada’s report. The issues that were included in Canada's report are available in the report outline.
- includes background information on the UPR, info on the UPR Process and a few links to related content.

Related link:

UN panel calls for better treatment of Canada's Aboriginals, immigrants
February 6, 2009
GENEVA — A United Nations panel is calling on Canada to improve the treatment of its Aboriginal people and other disadvantaged groups such as new immigrants and minorities. The UN Human Rights Council mentions in particular the need to protect Aboriginal women who face discrimination in various areas including "employment, housing, education and health care." The council also points out the "inequalities" that exist between Aboriginals, recent immigrants and other Canadians. Canada's human rights record came under review in Geneva this week with a Canadian government delegation appearing before the 47-country council for several hours Tuesday. It took just 15 minutes Thursday for the council to adopt a report containing 68 points based on concerns voiced by dozens of UN member countries about the situation in Canada.
Source:
CTV

Canada at the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights - 1998 papers
(this link takes you further down on this page - click your browser's BACK button to return here)

Links to other Human Rights websites - excellent collection - 70+ links!


Sections 7 and 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights

Canadian Charter of Rights Decisions Digest
- incl. links to : Contents | Interpretation | Waiver | Criminal Code | Statutes | Cases
This is a must-read for anyone interested in the Canadian Charter of Rights, for the connoisseurs and the curious alike --- includes an overview of each section of the Charter with commentaries (by Graham Garton, Q.C., Department of Justice, Ottawa) plus a large section of Charter decisions (with links to the actual text wherever possible).

Here are the links to two of the most relevant sections for poverty law in Canada:

Section 7 - Life, liberty and security of person
"Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice."

Section 15 - Equality

Section 15(1) - Equality before and under law and equal protection and benefit of law
"15.(1) Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability."

Section 15(2) - Affirmative action programs
"15.(2) Subsection (1) does not preclude any law, program or activity that has as its object the amelioration of conditions of disadvantaged individuals or groups including those that are disadvantaged because of race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability."

Source:
CanLII - Canadian Legal Information Institute

---

20th Anniversary of the Equality Clause*
- incl links to : Home | Welcome | About the Coalition | Discussion Papers | Quotes | Press Releases | Supreme Court of Canada Section 15 Cases | Media Coverage | Relevant Links | Contact Us | français
"April 17, 2005, marks the 20th anniversary of the entry into force of section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which guaranteed the right of Canadians to equality. The Charter itself came into force in 1982. The three-year delay of section 15 allowed federal, provincial and territorial governments time to bring their legislation into line with its provisions." [Excerpt from the Welcome page]
*NOTE: this website is no longer online.
Clicking the link above takes you to a copy of the site from Archive.org as it appeared in June of 2008.

----------------------------------------------------------------

CHARTER EQUALITY RIGHTS: INTERPRETATION OF
SECTION 15 IN SUPREME COURT OF CANADA DECISIONS
Prepared by Mary C. Hurley
Law and Government Division
August 1995 - Revised January 2005
"This paper contains a summary review of a number of principles relevant to section 15 and section 1 analysis, as determined by the Supreme Court of Canada, followed by a chart setting out basic elements of the Court’s decisions in which the equality rights provision has been raised.(...) Subsection 15(1) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, in effect since April 1985, provides that every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability."
Source:
Parliamentary Information and Research Service Publications
[ Parliament of Canada ]

----------------------------------------------------------------

Caselaw related to the justiciability of social and economic rights in Canada (Word file - 62K, 3 pages)
- list of Canadian cases that address social and economic rights --- includes links to specific cases
Source:
Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation


Canadian Human Rights Commission
Parliament created the Canadian Human Rights Act in 1977 to provide equal opportunity to everyone in Canada and to help people confront discrimination in their daily lives. (...)
The Canadian Human Rights Commission was created to administer the Canadian Human Rights Act. It also ensures compliance with the Employment Equity Act. The Commission operates independently from government when administering these two acts of Parliament.

* Publications

* Human Rights Links

* Women's Rights in Canada since 1900

* Aboriginal Rights in Canada since 1900

* Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Canada since 1900

* Publications


Evolution of human rights in 20th Century Canada

"...key court cases and laws that have shaped human rights in our country since 1900."
The site is divided into 4 distinct periods: 1900-1924 /// 1925-1949 /// 1950-1974 /// 1975-2000.
You can navigate the site via one of these time portals or by subject.
Subjects include : Human Rights - Women's Rights - Minority Rights - Aboriginal Rights - Persons with Disabilities - Freedom of Expression - Freedom of Religion - Voting Rights - Criminal Law - International - Charter - Justice Department's History - Ministers
Source:
Canadian Human Rights Commission

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
- incl. links to : About the CHRT - Public Documents - FAQ - Decisions  - Cases - Search - Alternate Resources 

Related link from MapleLeafWeb:

Canada’s Human Rights Commission System:
Introduction to the Canadian Human Rights Commission and Tribunal

By Jay Makarenko
November 18, 2008
The Canadian human rights commission system is constituted by two key federal agencies: the Canadian Human Rights Commission and the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. These agencies administer, promote, and adjudicate Canada’s federal human rights and employment equity legislation. This article provides an introduction to the history, role, structure, and key issues concerning these agencies.

The Canadian Human Rights Act: Introduction to Canada’s Federal Human Rights Legislation
By Jay Makarenko
November 18, 2008
One of Canada’s central rights documents is the Canadian Human Rights Act, which protects Canadians’ against discriminated against in areas of federal jurisdiction. This article presents the purpose and history of the Act, and provides an overview of its key provisions, application and administration.

Source:

Mapleleafweb.com
R.I.P. Mapleleafweb.com (2000-2011)
Maple Leaf Web is a non-profit, non-partisan Canadian political education web-site that aims to provide educators, students and the attentive public with a credible source for political education and information. Located at the University of Lethbridge, in Lethbridge, Alberta (Canada), Maple Leaf Web publishes original articles and features on Canadian political events and institutions and provides important links to a wide range of external resources.

NOTE : As of Jan. 17, 2011, after 11 years of publishing Canadian political educational materials on the Internet, Mapleleafweb.com will no longer be actively maintained.




Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Canada's International Human Rights Policy
Canada has been a consistently strong voice for the protection of human rights and the advancement of democratic values, from our central role in the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1947 to 1948 to our work at the United Nations today. Canada is a party to all six major international human rights conventions, as well as many others, and encourages all countries which have not made these commitments to do so.

Humanitarian Affairs



From the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights (Parliament of Canada):

Canada and the United Nations Human Rights Council: A Time for Serious Re-Evaluation (PDF - 260K, 49 pages)
June 2008
"(...) The Human Rights Council remains a deeply troubled institution that, in the Committee’s view, spends more time throwing obstacles in the way of effective human rights promotion than in fulfilling its role as the primary human rights mechanism in the international system. The Committee is very concerned that the advances made in the last two years are not enough, and without strong initiatives taken by Member states to work towards building consensus and objective, balanced resolutions, the Human Rights Council is destined to flounder."
Source:
Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights
[ Parliament of Canada website ]

The United Nations Human Rights Council is a body that was established in Geneva in June 2006 to replace the Human Rights Commission.

Related (??) links:

US: Leaving UN Rights Council Fails Victims of Abuse
(Geneva, June 6, 2008) – A decision by the United States to disengage from the UN Human Rights Council amounts to an abandonment of human rights defenders and victims, Human Rights Watch said today. The United States announced today at its daily State Department briefing that it will only participate in debates at the council when absolutely necessary and it feels compelled to do so by “matters of deep national interest.”
Source:
Human Rights Watch

Toews attacks Arbour in House
Calls human rights campaigner "a disgrace" on floor of Commons
June 17, 2008
OTTAWA - One of Stephen Harper's senior cabinet members called Louise Arbour "a disgrace" on the floor of the House of Commons Tuesday. Vic Toews, a Manitoba Conservative MP and the President of the Treasury Board, yelled "she's a disgrace" during Question Period as a Liberal MP, Martha Hall Findlay, was calling on the government to acknowledge Arbour's work as United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Arbour is to retire from that position later this month. During her question, Hall Findlay alleged that the government had ordered diplomatic staff abroad not to talk about Arbour's work.

Shame on you, Vic Toews.

Louise Arbour: Welcome Home
April 10, 2008
By Chris Donovan
Last month, former Supreme Court Justice Louise Arbour announced that she will not seek a second term in her current role as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Her four year term comes to a close on June 30th of this year.
- includes detailed biographical notes and a partial list of Mme Arbour's accomplishments.
Source:
The Court
An initiative of Osgoode Hall Law School, The Court is a site where scholars, practitioners and other interested citizens can discuss the recent work of the Supreme Court of Canada.

* Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
* United Nations Human Rights Council



Children: The Silenced Citizens
Effective Implementation of Canada's International Obligations with respect to the Rights of Children
Final Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights
The Honourable Raynell Andreychuk, Chair
The Honourable Joan Fraser, Deputy Chair
April 2007
PDF version
(1.3MB, 323 pages)
(...)In November 2004, the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights was authorized by the Senate to examine and report upon Canada’s international obligations with regard to the rights and freedoms of children. From the outset, the Committee reviewed Canada’s international obligations with respect to children’s rights as a case study reflecting the broader implications of ensuring that domestic legislation and policies comply with Canada’s international human rights obligations, and in keeping with a broader mandate that began with this Committee’s first report in 2001, Promises to Keep: Implementing Canada’s Human Rights Obligations. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child has been implemented, whether Canadian children are benefiting from it, and whether the Convention has been used as a tool to address key problems of facing children in this country. The Committee also looked at the role of Parliament within this framework. (Excerpt from the Executive Summary)

Executive Summary
Summary of Recommendations
Source:
Senate Reports - 39th Parliament, 1st Session (April 3, 2006 -

---

Promises to Keep : Implementing Canada's Human Rights Obligations
Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights
December 2001
This 37-page report explores various aspects of the field of human rights in Canada, with a special focus on the acceptance and implementation by Canadian governments of international human rights obligations.
Issues for Further Study include : Canada and the Human Rights Treaty Bodies - Parliament and the Treaty-Making Process - Legislative Implementation of International Human Rights Instruments - Reviewing Proposed Legislation for Consistency with Human Rights - International Human Rights and Canadian Federalism - Human Rights Treaties Not Yet Signed or Ratified by Canada - Canadian Accession to the American Convention on Human Rights - The Right of Privacy
Immediate Recommendations include : Canada’s Representation at the United Nations Human Rights Commission - Canada’s Outstanding International Human Rights Reports - Balancing Human Rights and Security - Discrimination on the Basis of Social Condition - Canada’s Human Rights Commissions - International Human Rights Web-Site - Supporting the Work of the Canadian Association of Statutory Human Rights Agencies - Conference of Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Human Rights
Press Release - December 13, 2001
Related Committee Proceedings : "...issues relating to human rights and, inter alia, the machinery of government dealing with Canada's international and national human rights obligations"

Related reports from the
Standing Committee on Human Rights from earlier sessions:

Enhancing Canada's Role in the Organization of American States : Canadian Adherence to the American Convention on Human Rights
May 2003
Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights
"In November 2002, the Senate Standing Committee on Human Rights received a second mandate to study and report on Canada's possible adherence to the American Convention on Human Rights. The role of the Committee was to review Canadian participation in the Inter-American system for the protection of human rights and make recommendations on whether or not Canada should ratify the American Convention on Human Rights."

 

Human Rights and Freedoms
- incl. links to the following 18 studies (as at October 2009) by the Parliamentary Information and Research Service:
(click the link above to access al of the studies below)

* Access to Information and Privacy Rights: Changes Introduced by the Anti-Terrorism Act and the Public Safety Act, 2002 (Revised 1 December 2008)
* Biometrics and Government (11 September 2006)
* Canada's Federal Privacy Laws (25 September 2008)
* Canada's Legal Age of Consent to Sexual Activity (12 April 2001)
* Charter Equality Rights: Interpretation of Section 15 in Supreme Court of Canada Decisions (March 2007)
* Collective Bargaining Under the Canada Labour Code -- Remedies When Parties Fail to Resolve Labour Disputes (26 January 2009)
* Drug Testing in the Workplace (28 February 2008)
* Extraordinary Rendition: International Law and the Prohibition of Torture (17 July 2008)
* Federal, Provincial and Territorial Access to Information Legislation: An Overview (3 October 2008)
* Freedom of Religion and Religious Symbols in the Public Sphere (22 September 2008)
* Human Trafficking [In Brief] (21 November 2006)
* The Notwithstanding Clause of the Charter (16 October 2008)
* The Right to Privacy and Parliament [In Brief] (22 February 2006)
* Sexual Orientation and Legal Rights (8 July 2008)
* Sexual Orientation and Legal Rights: A Chronological Overview (26 September 2005)
* Telecommunications and Lawful Access: I. The Legislative Situation in Canada (21 February 2006)
* Telecommunications and Lawful Access: II. The Legislative Situation in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia (28 February 2006)
* Trafficking in Persons (18 July 2008)

Source:
Library of Parliament Research Publications
[ Parliament of Canada ]

Also from the Library of Parliament:

Bill C-21: An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act
29 May 2008
Bill C-21 repeals section 67 of the federal human rights statute, which has restricted access to the legislation’s redress mechanisms with respect to “any provision of the Indian Act or any provision made under or pursuant to that Act.”(2) In December 2007 and January 2008, the Aboriginal Affairs Committee considered Bill C-21 clause by clause in four meetings, adopting five significant opposition amendments having to do with interpretive and process matters, and leaving the repeal provision itself intact. On 28 May, by unanimous consent of the House of Commons, the bill was deemed concurred in at report stage, with government amendments modifying two of the Committee’s proposals, and deemed read a third time and passed.


Canada Report on Human Rights Practices - 2001
From the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices
March 4, 2002
Source : U.S. Department of State


Court Challenges Program of Canada
The Court Challenges Program of Canada is a national non-profit organization which was set up in 1994 to provide financial assistance for important court cases that advance language and equality rights guaranteed under Canada's Constitution.

The Charter's challenges
The document is widely lauded but recent federal funding cuts have made challenges even more difficult to mount
April 7, 2007
By Tracey Tyler
To some, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Pierre Trudeau's greatest political legacy, was a supremely undemocratic development, weakening governments and handing judges the power to decide some of the most pressing social issues. But for the vast majority of Canadians, the Charter has become a symbol of national identity, taking its place alongside the Maple Leaf, hockey and snow. In poll after poll, most embrace the Charter as a kind of national mission statement, asserting the country's commitment to tolerance, fairness and equality.
Source
The Toronto Star

-----------------------------------------------------------

Support the Court Challenges Program (CCP)!
September 28, 2006
Below you will find links to a letter to the Prime Minister and several background documents regarding the Court Challenges Program. A Steering Committee representative of both language rights and equality rights communities has prepared these materials and is asking that you do the following:

Inform the Council of Canadians with Disabilities (CCD) by noon of Monday, October 2, if you or your organization are willing to be listed as either a supporting organization or individual on this letter, or both.
(See http://web.archive.org/web/20140603144324/http://dawn.thot.net/ccp/ for contact info)

Sign on to the Letter to the Prime Minister in Support of the Court Challenges Program
http://web.archive.org/web/20140603144324/http://dawn.thot.net/ccp/ccp1.html

The Court Challenges Program: An Important Access to Justice Institution
http://web.archive.org/web/20140603144324/http://dawn.thot.net/ccp/ccp2.html

The Court Challenges Program: An Effective and Accountable Institution
http://web.archive.org/web/20140603144324/http://dawn.thot.net/ccp/ccp3.html

The History of the Court Challenges Program
http://web.archive.org/web/20140603144324/http://dawn.thot.net/ccp/ccp4.html

Source:
Council of Canadians with Disabilities
DisAbled Women's Network - DAWN Ontario

-----------------------------------------------------------

Justice comes at too high a price: Chief Justice McLachlin
March 09, 2007
TORONTO - Middle-class Canadians are increasingly frozen out by the cost and complexity of Canada's judicial processes, Beverley McLachlin, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, said yesterday. Many Canadians would have to consider remortgaging their home, gambling their retirement savings or forsaking their child's college fund to pursue justice, Chief Justice McLachlin told an audience of about 150 at the Royal York Hotel yesterday.
Source:
National Post

-----------------------


Ontario - Human Rights

Legal Guide to Ontario Human Rights Law
30 September 2009
Table of contents:
* Overview
SUBSTANTIVE LAW
- Protected Activities - Prohibited Grounds - Discrimination - Forms of Discrimination - General Exceptions
PROCEDURAL LAW - The Tribunal and its Powers - Private Applications - Commission Applications - Parties - Motions - Summary Proceedings - Pre-Hearing Procedures - Service - Evidence - Hearings - Remedies and Offences - Commission Role - Reconsiderations
MISCELLANEOUS - Judicial Review - Transition
[ Related link : Ontario Human Rights Commission ]
Source:
Isthatlegal.ca (Ontario)
Legal Guides to Ontario and Canadian Law
The purpose of the Isthatlegal.ca website is to provide, in one convenient and generally accessible on-line location, detailed and thorough legal guides to areas of Ontario and Canadian law of general importance to the economically
vulnerable in our society, and to their advocates. All users should ensure that they meet the Terms of Use of the site.
[ Terms of Use ]
- includes recent amendments to the Ontario Human Rights Code

-------------------------------

Ontario Human Rights Legislation Reform (2005-2006)

From the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General:

Government Tables Key Amendments to
Bill 107 with Standing Committee on Justice Policy

November 28, 2006

Related Links:

From the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance
(formerly the Ontarians with Disabilities Act Committee)

Ontario Human Rights Reform - A Call to Action
November 27, 2006 - First Day of Toronto Public Hearings on Bill 107 - November 15, 2006
November 27, 2006 - McGuinty Muzzle Motion is an Even Bigger Flip-Flop
November 26, 2006 - AODA Alliance's November 26 2006, Toronto Sun Guest Column on Bill 107
"(...) We agree the underfunded, backlogged human rights system needs to be fixed. We've offered alternatives. The Liberals just slough them off and shut down legislative hearings, where we'd present and debate them. Instead, they heed the call of Bill 107 supporters -- a small vocal group of self-designated "human rights lawyers."*
* November 23, 2006 - Toronto Star Editorial Blasts McGuinty for Shutting Down Promised Bill 107 Public Hearings
* November 22, 2006 - Keep Up Pressure on McGuinty Government for Shutting Down Bill 107 Public Hearings
* November 21, 2006 - McGuinty Government Blasted in Legislature for Plans to shut Down Promised Bill 107 Public Hearings
NOTE: the Call to Action page contains links to dozens of resources providing extensive background and contextual information.

 


Non-Governmental Organizations

CANADA WITHOUT POVERTY / CANADA SANS PAUVRETÉ
Founded in 1971, Canada Without Poverty (officially the National Anti-Poverty Organization) is an incorporated, not-for-profit, non-partisan, member-based organization dedicated to the eradication of poverty in Canada. We believe this ideal can be realized by 2020, if not sooner, especially in a country as wealthy as Canada

Canada to reject 14 of 68 international human rights
recommendations including the development of a national strategy to eliminate poverty
June 6, 2009
By Rob Rainer
On Friday June 5, 2009 the Government of Canada made public Canada’s response to the 68 human rights-related recommendations made to Canada by the UN Human Rights Council, per the 2009 Universal Periodic Review.
This response will be communicated by the government before the Council on Tuesday June 9.

To aid your understanding of the UPR recommendations to Canada and Canada's response, and for ready reference, please see the links below from Heritage Canada's Human Rights Program website.

Of the 68 recommendations, Canada is accepting 39, rejecting 14 and partially accepting 15. Canada is rejecting some recommendations that, were they to be accepted, would mean Canada would join and/or ratify several international human rights treaties. The rejected recommendations also include a number specific to economic and social rights, including:

#1 (Ratify the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights)
#10 (Recognize the justiciability of social, economic and cultural rights, in accordance with the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; ensure legal enforcement of economic, social and cultural rights in domestic courts; grant the same importance to and treat equally civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, in its legislation at all levels); and
#17 (Develop a national strategy to eliminate poverty)

On #17, that Canada is rejecting the call for a national strategy to eliminate poverty undermines the recent or current efforts of the House of Commons' HUMA Committee and various Senate committees and sub-committees to help determine the appropriate role of the federal government in combating poverty Canada-wide. It also flies in the face of calls from at least a couple of provinces (e.g., Newfoundland and Labrador, Ontario), pursuant to their provincial poverty action strategies, for complementary engagement of the federal government to help ensure progress on poverty.

If you have not already done so, please register your support for the new Dignity for All Campaign for a Poverty-free Canada. Through this campaign civil society will strengthen its press for enduring federal commitment for a pan-Canadian approach to combating poverty, in which the federal government exercises the leadership it ought to exercise. Such leadership includes convening a process by which a pan-Canadian strategy to eliminate poverty, that complements and supports provincial and territorial strategies, will be realized, with a strong foundation in Canada’s international and domestic human rights commitments.

Rob Rainer
Executive Director / Directeur executif
CANADA WITHOUT POVERTY / CANADA SANS PAUVRETÉ

Related link:

Canada to UN: We'll decide what rights we will choose to observe...
June 8, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Canada has signed a significant number of international human rights treaties that are legally binding in international law, but the federal government believes that it can pick and choose among its obligations - according to the official document tabled at the United Nations' Rights Council in Geneva today. The good news is that the federal government has accepted its responsibility to take a stronger role in ensuring all Canadians are adequately housed, but the federal government says that companion initiatives to address deep and persistent poverty and income inequality are mostly the responsibility of provinces and territories (and not the national government)...
Source:
[ Wellesley Institute ]

Canadian Civil Liberties Association
"...a non-profit, non-government law-reform organization dealing with issues of fundamental civil liberties and human rights that affect those who live all across Canada."
- incl. links to : Action ! | News & Events | CCLA Positions | CCLA History | CCLA People | CCLA In The Schools | Join Us | Feedback | Search | Other Interesting Sites

Canadian Charter of Rights Decisions Digest
- incl. links to : Contents | Interpretation | Waiver | Criminal Code | Statutes | Cases
This is a must-read for anyone interested in the Canadian Charter of Rights, for the connoisseurs and the curious alike --- includes an overview of each section of the Charter with commentaries (by Graham Garton, Q.C., Department of Justice, Ottawa) plus a large section of Charter decisions (with links to the actual text wherever possible).

Here are the links to two of the most relevant sections for poverty law in Canada:

Section 7 - Life, liberty and security of person
"Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice."

Section 15 - Equality

Section 15(1) - Equality before and under law and equal protection and benefit of law
"15.(1) Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability."

Section 15(2) - Affirmative action programs
"15.(2) Subsection (1) does not preclude any law, program or activity that has as its object the amelioration of conditions of disadvantaged individuals or groups including those that are disadvantaged because of race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability."

Source:
CanLII - Canadian Legal Information Institute

Human Rights & Poverty- Get Involved!
An initiative of the National Anti-Poverty Organization (NAPO)

Food and Human Rights: Hunger, Health and Social Well-Being
International Symposium
University of British Columbia
September 28-29, 2005
Co-chairs: Kimberly Azyan, President, Social Work Alumni Association and
Graham Riches, Director, The School of Social Work and Family Studies.
"The UBC School of Social Work and Family Studies, in partnership with the UBC Social Work Alumni Association, cordially invite you to a thought provoking and informative public forum on the growth of hunger and food insecurity internationally and in Canada, and what to do about it. Explore the tensions and complexities of the global food system and learn about the right to food as an effective tool for action at home and overseas. Celebrate the role of food and nutrition in building healthy and sustainable communities and participate in drafting recommendations for achieving food security to be directed to international institutions, governments (all levels) and civil society."
Program
HTML
PDF
(1.03MB, 2 pages)
NOTE: the PDF version includes a registration form and fee info ($75 for all sessions, lower fees for low income participants/students)

"We expect this to be a popular event so space will be limited. Please register by September 9, 2005.
Register on-line at the UBC Alumni website

Source:
School of Social Work and Family Studies
[University of British Columbia]
Celebrating 75 Years of Social Work Education at UBC!

Women's Civil and Political Rights in Canada 2005
The Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action submission to the United Nations Human Rights Committee
on the occasion of its review of Canada’s 5th report on compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
September 2005
Introduction - HTML
Full Report (PDF file - 179K, 55 pages)
Source:
Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action

Civil and Political Rights in British Columbia 2005
The Poverty and Human Rights Centre submission to the United Nations Human Rights Committee
on the occasion of its review of Canada’s 5th report on compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
October 2005
Introduction
Full Report (PDF file - 140K, 48 pages)
Source:
Poverty and Human Rights Centre

The Rights of Children & Youth
- incl. links to : Introduction - Rights at Stake - International and Regional Instruments of Protection and Promotion - National Protection and Service Agencies - Advocacy, Educational and Training Materials - Other Resources
Source:
Human Rights Education Associates (HREA)

Related HREA links:

Study Guides
"...present definitions, key rights at stake, human rights instruments, and protection and assistance agencies, [in addition to] links to the full text of international treaties relevant for the topic, and other useful resources on the HREA and University of Minnesota Human Rights Library web sites."
themes include : Children & youth - European human rights system - Ethnic and racial minorities - Food & water - Freedom of assembly and association - Freedom of expression - Freedom of movement - Freedom of religion or belief - Housing - Indigenous peoples - Inter-American human rights system - International humanitarian law -- Persons with disabilities - Refugees - Right to culture - Right to a family - Right to life - Right to means for adequate health - Right to vote - Rights of non-citizens -
Slavery and forced labour - Sexual orientation and human rights - Sustainable development - The aged - United Nations human rights system

Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children
"The mandate of the Coalition is to ensure a collective voice for Canadian organizations and youth concerned with the rights of children as described in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the World Summit for Children Declaration."
- incl. links to : More About the Coalition - Our members, and links to their sites - UN Special Session on Children - How Does Canada Measure Up?

Related Links: Go to the Canadian Social Research Links Children's Rights Links page

Poverty and Human Rights Centre (Canada, International, United Nations, etc.)
Centre Directors: Gwen Brodsky, Shelagh Day
(formerly the Poverty and Human Rights Project)
"The Poverty and Human Rights Centre is committed to eradicating poverty and promoting social and economic equality through human rights.
The Library is a searchable database of materials related to social and economic rights. It includes texts of relevant international human rights treaties, Canadian and other laws, court decisions, legal briefs, and articles.
To use the library, go to buttons at the top of the page (topics, documents, resources).
Factum Library What's new
The Factum Library section contains factums, pleadings and other litigation documents from selected Canadian human rights cases. The materials are organized by case name, articles, and date.
"
- incl. links to :
Recently added links - Contact Us - About the Centre - Centre Publications

Human Rights Denied (PDF file - 93K, 2 pages)
B.C. Government Discriminates
Against Poor Single Mothers – report
Press Release
April 28, 2005
"Vancouver - Four constitutional and human rights experts are issuing a report today that condemns the Government of British Columbia for its treatment of single mothers on social assistance. Shelagh Day, Margot Young, Melina Buckley and Gwen Brodsky conclude in Human Rights Denied that single mothers are discriminated against by the B.C. Government."

Complete report:

Human Rights Denied:
Single Mothers on Social Assistance in British Columbia
(PDF file - 524K, 59 pages)
April 2005
By Gwen Brodsky, Melina Buckley, Shelagh Day, and Margot Young

The Virtual Human Rights Research Library section of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre is an enormous collection of links to Canadian human rights websites organized under the following headings:
Human Rights Commissions in Canada - Human Rights Legislation - Human Rights Tribunals - Federal & Provincial Courts - Other Federal Human Rights Protection Mechanisms (incl. Court Challenges Program of Canada, Official Languages Commissioner, Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada, Privacy Commissioner) - Ombudsman Offices - Federal Law and Policy - Government Departments and Agencies - Parliament - Provincial Legislation and Policy - International Human Rights Instruments (Domestic Implementation)
Source :
Human Rights Research and Education Centre - HRREC (University of Ottawa) 

This is one of the most comprehensive Canadian collections of human rights resources that I've seen so far.

Also on the HRREC site:

Interdisciplinary Studies in Law: Globalization, Justice and Law
Large bibliography and almost 100 links to information about globalization and human rights

FAPO warns Government to keep its hands off Human Rights Act (PDF file - 150K, 1 page)
[ text version ]
December 13, 2004
"The Fredericton Anti-Poverty Organization is warning the Lord government to keeps its hands off an amendment to the NB Human Rights Act (see below for the link to a summary of these amendments) that will allow welfare recipients to live together after January 1st. Dan Weston of the Fredericton Anti-Poverty Organization says the Lord government will have a fight on its hands if it tries to weaken the Human Rights Act by exempting the controversial Economic Unit Policy. He calls the Economic Unit Policy 'the single biggest creator of homelessness in New Brunswick.'"

More on the Economic Unit Policy from FAPO (PDF file - 1.3MB, 2 pages)
October 2002

Source:
Fredericton Anti-Poverty Organization (FAPO)

Related info:

The maximum social assistance payable to a single unemployed man or woman in New Brunswick is $264 per month.
Source:
Social Assistance Rate Schedules

Household Income Policy
"An Economic Household is defined as two or more persons residing together who share the responsibilities of the household, and benefit economically from the sharing of food, shelter and/or facilities. When an Economic Household is determined to exist, FCS will consider it one household, and therefore determine eligibility for only one assistance cheque.
FCS determines economic households to exist even though there is no marital, familial, or conjugal relationship among the members of the household. This policy was developed in order to ensure we do not discriminate against people on the basis of gender, marital status, or sexual orientation. The determination of an economic household will often result in assistance being refused, cancelled, or decreased, depending on the particular circumstances."
Source:
Excerpt from the
New Brunswick Social Assistance Policy Manual
[ Department of Family and Community Services ]

Amendments to the Human Rights Act
July 7, 2004
"FREDERICTON (CNB) - The following statement was issued by Alanna Palmer, Chair of the New Brunswick Human Rights Commission.
The Human Rights Commission welcomes the addition of the two new grounds of prohibited discrimination to the New Brunswick Human Rights Act: social condition and political belief or activity. This amendment was passed by the legislature last week and is expected to come into effect on December 31, 2004.
Source:
N.B. Human Rights Commission

Equal Marriage For Same-sex Couples
This is the story of Kevin Bourassa and Joe Varnell and other gay couples seeking the legal recognition of their right to be a married couple.
It
documents the journey of same-sex couples in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec, as they fight governments in court for the right to marriage.
The site includes legal factums and documents, first-hand accounts, photos, etc.
What are Registered Domestic Partnerships? Why are same-sex couples speaking out against RDPs? Find out here.
Great site, extensive content, good presentation, and a worthy cause to support if you believe in equality and freedom of choice. Visit the site, order the book ("Just Married", May 2002) online, donate, write a letter of support.
"...
there are many gay and lesbian Canadians living today in long-term committed relationships, caring for each other, and raising families together. They are entitled to respect and dignity and should be afforded the same recognition in law as opposite-sex couples." (Canadian Human Rights Commission)

Human Rights Internet (HRI) - large Canadian site
"...a  world leader in the exchange of information within the worldwide human rights community. HRI has its headquarters in Ottawa, and communicates with more than 5,000 organizations and individuals around the world working for the advancement of human rights."

Manitoba Association for Rights and Liberties



List of issues to be taken up in connection with the consideration of the third periodic report of Canada : United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights - Implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (June 10, 1998) 
 

Canadian Government Responses: 
(November 1998) 
Federal Government Response
British Columbia Government Response
Alberta Government Response
Saskatchewan Government Response
Manitoba Government Response
Ontario Government Response
Québec Government Response
New Brunswick Government Response
Nova Scotia Government Response
Newfoundland Government Response
Northwest Territories Government Response
Yukon Government Response

No response available from PEI 

*Réponse du Gouvernement du Québec
(voir la note sur la page de réponse du Québec pour obtenir le texte complet en français)


NOTE: Check the government pages for a wealth of recent program information and statistics on welfare reform, poverty, disability, women, aboriginal people, homelessness and other topical issues. 

 

.
(excellent information on social program restructuring in Canada and its impacts on women)
Canadian Women and the Social Deficit (dead link, try Google):
A Presentation to the International Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights by the National Association of Women and the Law 
November 1998
 


Amnesty International Canada


Charter Committee on Poverty Issues (CCPI) - Canada
CCPI is a national coalition founded in 1989 to bring together low-income activists and poverty law advocates for the purpose of assisting poor people in Canada to secure and assert their rights under international human rights law, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (the "Charter"), human rights legislation and other laws in Canada.

Litigation - information concerning Canadian human rights cases involving the Charter Committee on Poverty Issues.

Submission by the Charter Committee on Poverty Issues (CCPI) to the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on the occasion of the Review of the Third Report of Canada at the Committee's 19th Session (November - December, 1998)
- Includes a detailed analysis (~25 printed pages) of "the right to social assistance" with references to the Constitution Act, the Charter of Rights and the change from CAP to the CHST.
NOTE: The CCPI submission includes information on welfare case law in a number of jurisdictions that you definitely won't find elsewhere - dealing with the right to social assistance, adequacy of social assistance benefits, provincial contravention of national "standards" under CAP, sections 7 and 15 of the Charter of Rights, etc.
The case law information was prepared by Vincent Calderhead, Solicitor for the Charter Committee on Poverty Issues, in November, 1998.


Canadian Housing Equality Resources
This website is produced by the Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA), an Ontario-based non profit human rights organization that has spent the past 20 years challenging the systemic barriers and discrimination that contribute to homelessness and housing insecurity.

- incl. links to : Advocate's Guide - Human Rights - Tools - Legislation - Case Law - Other Resources

Source:
Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA)


Access to Justice Network

United Nations Association in Canada (UNAC)

Canadian Human Rights Foundation

Canadian Human Rights Reporter
Canadian human rights case law from boards, tribunals, and courts published by the Canadian Human Rights Reporter (C.H.R.R.)



INTERNATIONAL (Links added in reverse chronological order)

Social Rights
This website aims to give prominence to and address the major theoretical and practical issues of economic, social and cultural rights – the so-called “second generation rights”. Although most governments and international organizations claim to support the idea of the universality and indivisibility of rights, the situation on the ground is quite different. There is silent agreement that economic, social and cultural rights should be given second-class status.
- incl. links to : * Home * About Us * Submit an Article * Contact Us * List of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Instruments and Bodies
* Topics ( Council of Europe - Democracy - European Union - Human Rights NGOs - Human Rights Theory - Legal Instruments - Philosophical Topics - Political Theory - Promoting Economic Social and Cultural Rights - Protection Mechanisms - United Nations - Workers' Rights)

-------------------------------

From the website of
the United Nations:

The Human Rights Council
The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the UN system made up of 47 States responsible for strengthening the promotion and protection of human rights around the globe. The Council was created by the UN General Assembly on 15 March 2006 with the main purpose of addressing situations of human rights violations and make recommendations on them.

---------------------------------

U.S. to Join U.N. Human Rights Council, Reversing Bush Policy
By Colum Lynch
March 31, 2009
UNITED NATIONS, March 31 -- The Obama administration decided Tuesday to seek a seat on the U.N. Human Rights Council, reversing a decision by the Bush administration to shun the United Nations' premier rights body to protest the influence of repressive states. (...) The Geneva-based Human Rights Council was established in March 2006 to replace the 60-year-old Human Rights Commission, which lost international credibility after countries with abysmal rights records, such as Sudan and Zimbabwe, were allowed to join and thwart criticism of their actions. The Bush administration refused to join the new rights body, saying it was not convinced that it represented much of an improvement over its predecessor. (...) The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the U.N. system made up of 47 elected members whose mission is to strengthen the promotion and protection of human rights globally.
Source:
Washington Post

Related links:

United Nations Human Rights Council
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

---------------------------------------------------------------

United Nations to Canada: You're failing in your housing obligations...
March 5, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Canada has a long and successful history of housing programs that have provided a good home to literally hundreds of thousands of households, but much of that history has been shredded by almost two decades of funding cuts, downloading and cancellation of programs at the federal level, and also at lower levels of government. That's the official verdict of Miloon Kothari, the United Natons' Special Rapporteur on the Right to Adequate Housing. The full report will be presented to the United Nations' Human Rights Council on Monday. The Wellesley Institute was pleased to help organize the civil society portion of Mr. Kothari's fact-finding mission to Canada, and also to provide research and policy assistance.
Comment found in:
[ Wellesley Institute ]

Complete report:

Report of the Special Rapporteur on adequate housing as a component of the right
to an adequate standard of living, and on the right to non-discrimination in this context
(PDF - 155K, 27 pages)
17 February 2009
By Miloon Kothari
At the invitation of the Government, the Special Rapporteur conducted a mission to Canada from 9 to 22 October 2007. The visit focused on four areas: homelessness; women and their right to adequate housing; Aboriginal populations; adequate housing and the possible impact of the 2010 Olympic Games on the right to adequate housing in Vancouver.

Report of the Special Rapporteur on adequate housing as a component of the right
to an adequate standard of living, and on the right to non-discrimination in this context
(PDF - 105K, 25 pages)
4 February 2009
By Raquel Rolnik
The recent housing and mortgage crisis and the subsequent financial crisis have been at the forefront of the media and international attention. Yet, little has been said about their global impact on the right to adequate housing. In October 2008, the Special Rapporteur shared her concerns with the General Assembly. Encouraged by a number of delegations, she decided to devote her first report to the Human Rights Council to this issue. The first section of the present report discusses the housing/mortgage and financial crisis. The second part relates these crises to the prevalent economic, financial and housing policies and approaches and their impact on the right to adequate housing. The report concludes with a number of preliminary recommendations to address the current situation including consideration of the issue by the Human Rights Council.

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the right to food (PDF - 104K, 22 pages)
The role of development cooperation and food aid in realizing
the right to adequate food: moving from charity to obligation
11 February 2009
By Olivier De Schutter
This report examines the contribution of development cooperation and food aid to the realization of the right to food. Development cooperation and food aid increasingly form a continuum ranging from interventions aimed at providing long-term support for food security to short-term answers to emergency situations. Both these policies have been under increased scrutiny in recent years, and both are in need of reform.

Report of the 2008 Social Forum (Geneva, 1-3 September 2008) (PDF - 110K, 29 pages)
16 January 2009
The present report contains a summary of discussions and recommendations of the 2008 Social Forum, held in Geneva from 1 to 3 September 2008, in accordance with Human Rights Council resolution 6/13. In that resolution, the Council decided to preserve the Social Forum as a vital space for dialogue between the representatives of Member States and civil society, including grass-roots organizations and intergovernmental organizations, on issues linked with
the national and international environment needed for the promotion of the enjoyment of all human rights by all.

Human Rights Council
The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the UN system made up of 47 States responsible for strengthening the promotion and protection of human rights around the globe. The Council was created by the UN General Assembly on 15 March 2006 with the main purpose of addressing situations of human rights violations and make recommendations on them.
[ this link is part of Human Rights Bodies ]
[ ...which is part of UN High Commissioner for Human Rights ]
[... which is part of the United Nations ]

---

Universal Periodic Review - Canada
3 February 2009
The Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review, established in accordance with Human Rights Council resolution 5/1 of 18 June 2007, held its fourth session from 2 to 13 February 2009. The review of Canada was held at the 3rd meeting on 3 February 2009.

Highlights of the Canada session 3 February 2009

National report (PDF - 91K, 41 pages)
January 5, 2009
[ Each country under review must submit a written report to the Council in advance of the review; this is Canada's report for the Feb. 3/09 review. ]
- prepared in collaboration by the federal, provincial and territorial governments of Canada

Compilation of UN information (PDF - 94K, 19 pages)
The present report is a compilation of the information contained in the reports of treaty bodies, special procedures, including observations and comments by the State concerned, and other relevant official United Nations documents.

Summary of stakeholders' information (PDF - 87K, 18 pages)
NOTE : scroll down to "Related links" below for the actual text of each of the 50 submissions

Outcome of the review of Canada:
Report of the Working group
(PDF - 96K, 24 pages)
February 5, 2009

Some general contextual information:

Universal Periodic Review
The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a unique process which involves a review of the human rights records of all 192 UN Member States once every four years. The UPR is a State-driven process, under the auspices of the Human Rights Council, which provides the opportunity for each State to declare what actions they have taken to improve the human rights situations in their countries and to fulfil their human rights obligations. As one of the main features of the Council, the UPR is designed to ensure equal treatment for every country when their human rights situations are assessed.
[ More Basic facts about the UPR ]

Source:
Human Rights Council
[ United Nations ]


Human Rights (U.K.)
"800 years of human rights in the United Kingdom explored using original documents from The National Archives"
The idea of "human rights" is a relatively new development in history, but as this website from Britain’s National Archives notes in its discussion of the long trajectory of struggles for equality and so forth, "We could do worse than characterizing this history as the struggle for human rights." This visually compelling online exhibit uses original documents from The National Archives to take a long view of these struggles and movements. Visitors can start their journey through the site by picking a time period, and then reading an introductory essay on the period. Each time period includes a timeline and links to digitized version of relevant documents, such as The Poor Act of 1601 and a poster for a Staffordshire coal miners’ union public meeting from 1831. The site is rounded out by a thorough glossary and a document index.
Source:
National Archives
(Government of the United Kingdom)
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2007.



Amnesty International Report 2007: the state of the world's human rights
Amnesty International
Posted 07-06-2007
In Amnesty International's 2007 report on the state of the world's human rights the Australian government is one of the countries singled out for criticism for adopting 'the politics of fear' in relation to asylum seekers. Additionally Australia's refugee policies, violence against women and the counter-terrorism measures were areas highlighted as concerns.

Source
APO Weekly Briefing
[ Australian Policy Online (APO) ]


Human Rights Education Associates (HREA)
HREA is an international non-governmental organisation that supports human rights learning; the training of activists and professionals; the development of educational materials and programming; and community-building through on-line technologies.

Study Guides
"The Study Guides offer introductions to various human rights topics. The guides present definitions, key rights at stake, human rights instruments, and protection and assistance agencies. They guides also offer links to the full text of international treaties relevant for the topic, and other useful resources on the HREA and University of Minnesota Human Rights Library web sites."
Topics include:
* Children & youth * Education * European human rights system * Ethnic and racial minorities * Food & water * Freedom of assembly and association * Freedom of expression * Freedom of movement * Freedom of religion or belief * Housing * Indigenous peoples * Inter-American human rights system * International humanitarian law * Persons with disabilities * Refugees * Right to culture * Right to a family * Right to life * Right to means for adequate health * Right to vote * Rights of non-citizens * Slavery and forced labour * Sexual orientation and human rights * Sustainable development * The aged * Torture, inhuman or degrading treatment * United Nations human rights system
[Click the Study Guides link above to access any of these guides.]

Library
The HRE Library contains over 2,000 full-text guides, curricula, textbooks and other documents that can be used for both formal and non-formal education about, for and in human rights.


Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Updated 14 September 2007:
UN General Assembly adopts the Declaration in September 2007
With an overwhelming majority of 143 votes in favour, only 4 negative votes cast (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United States) and 11 abstentions, the United Nations General Assembly (GA) adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on September 13, 2007. The Declaration has been negotiated through more than 20 years between nation-states and Indigenous Peoples.
Source:
International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs

Canadian vote left stain on country's reputation
September 26, 2007
Thursday Sept. 13 was a sad day for Canada and its partnership with First Nations peoples – a partnership that has had too many sad chapters. It was also a sad day for Canada's international reputation. The Government of Canada accomplished a stunning about-face in voting against the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples before the world that day.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Related Web/News/Blog links:

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples"
- Web search results page
- News search results page
- Blog Search Results page
Source:
Google.ca


Poverty and Human Rights (PDF file - 237K, 32 pages)
Peter Townsend
Published July 28, 2006
"Townsend presents the case for using human rights and the deprivation of human rights as a measure of poverty. He argues that the World Bank’s dollar-a-day standard, while a good temporary measure is now inconsistent, uneven and ultimately inadequate. To Townsend, the Bank’s strategies focusing on macro economic reform and that follow a neoliberal framework of privatizations and cuts in public spending have failed. He promotes an alternative strategy for poverty alleviation that includes employment creation, equitable taxation, universal social services and democratic control of Trans National corporations and agencies. Townsend hopes that by providing this alternative development strategy the most vulnerable portions of global populations would be protected, namely the elderly, sick (with terminal illness, i.e. AIDS), and children from vagaries of the market."
Source:
International Conference on The Many Dimensions of Poverty
Brasilia, 29-31 August 2005
International Poverty Centre
United Nations Development Programme



From Amnesty International:

Amnesty International Report 2006 ($)
- incl. links to: Regional Overview [including Canada, see the link below] • Asia-Pacific • Europe and Central Asia • Middle East and North Africa) - Key Issues (Arms Control, International Justice, Displaced People, Stop Violence Against Women [see the link below], Death Penalty) -
Secretary General's Message - The Search for Human Security - What does AI do?

Stop violence against women:
WOMEN’S RIGHT TO FREEDOM FROM VIOLENCE
Some 3,000 representatives from governments and women’s and human rights organizations came together in New York in March 2005 to mark the 10th anniversary of the Beijing UN World Conference on Women and to assess progress towards fulfilling the Beijing Declaration and Program for Action. While governments unanimously reaffirmed the commitments they had made a decade ago, they failed to make further pledges to promote and protect women’s human rights. This failure was in part the result of a retrogressive attack on women’s human rights that has become evident over the past few years. This attack, especially regarding women’s sexual rights and reproductive rights, was led by conservative US-backed Christian groups and supported by the Holy See and some member states of the Organization of the Islamic Conference. The attacks on women’s rights, the changed global security context and the lack of will by states to implement international human rights standards formed the backdrop against which AI continued throughout 2005 to join with women’s groups around the world to promote women’s human rights.

Regional Overview : Canada
"Indigenous women and girls continued to suffer a high level of discrimination and violence. There were concerns that counter-terrorism practices did not conform to human rights obligations. More..."

All Amnesty International Documents on Canada - links to 55 reports

Right of Choice:
It's In Our Hands: Stop Violence Against Women

Amnesty International Report 2006
July 10, 2006
From birth to death, in times of peace as well as war, women face discrimination and violence at the hands of the state, the community and the family. Female infanticide deprives countless women of life itself. Every year, millions of women are raped by partners, relatives, friends and strangers, by employers and colleagues, security officials and soldiers. Women, children and men suffer from violence inflicted in the home, but the overwhelming majority of victims are women and girls. During armed conflicts, violence against women is often used as a weapon of war, in order to dehumanize the women themselves, or to persecute the community to which they belong.
Source:
DAWN-Ontario (DisAbled Women's Network-Ontario)


Human Rights 101 (U.S. site)
"Using Human Rights 101, teens and teachers can find the materials they need to create a human rights project - or they can use the site to identify and pursue individual interests. The site provides teachers with an online version of the Thirteen Human Rights 101 educators' toolkit, while providing teens with ways to focus and absorb the variety of issues they can tackle.
- incl. an overview of human rights issues; a "profile" feature that enables users to identify which human rights issues are most important to them; a directory of human rights organizations highlighting teen volunteer opportunities; and links to human rights programs and Web sites."


E-Petitions and Letter-Writing Campaigns - Yes or No? --- The story of Amina Lawal
A Canadian Social Research Links page (2003)
- the compelling story of a Nigerian woman sentenced to death for adultery, and why we should be wary of signing online petitions...

Internet Petitions - Added August 30, 2009
Signing and circulating online petitions is an effective way of helping to remedy important issues.
Or is it?
"The 2000s have seen the birth of an Internet phenomenon: the e-petition. It offers instant comfort to those outraged by the latest ills of the world through its implicit assurance that affixing their names to a statement decrying a situation and demanding change will make a difference. That assurance is a severely flawed one for a multitude of reasons..."
Source:
Snopes.com


Double standards on human rights 'undermining UN'
March 14, 2005
The United Nations human rights commission, the UN's principal forum for promoting human rights, opens its annual six-week session today amid unprecedented criticism of its competence and credibility. For years human rights groups have complained of growing politicisation and double standards that have stifled debate and allowed countries responsible for egregious abuses to escape condemnation. (...) Kenneth Roth, head of New York-based Human Rights Watch, reckons that about half the commission's 53 members are there "not to promote human rights but to undermine them".
Source:

Financial Times - U.S.

-------------------------------------------

‘Freedom from want’ – from charity to entitlement (PDF file - 162K, 18 pages)
March 4, 2005
By Louise Arbour
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
Speech by Louise Arbour, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (LaFontaine-Baldwin lecture) on March 4, 2005 about human rights and poverty issues in Canada.
Source:
LaFontaine Baldwin Lecture 2005

Louise Arbour Takes Up Mandate of High Commissioner
Press Release
July 1, 2004
"Louise Arbour takes up her duties today as United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Mrs. Arbour was, until June 2004, a member of the Supreme Court of Canada."
Source:
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights


Derechos Human Rights
"...an international organization working for the respect and promotion of human rights all over the world."
- incl. links to : Site Map - Derechos' Café - HR Issues - The Disappeared - HR around the World - HR Actions! - Groups hosted by Derechos - HR Mailing Lists - HR Links - About Derechos - Contact Us
Derechos Human Rights Links : directory of links, incl. Campaigns & Actions - Directories - Education - General Human Rights Websites - Issues (reparations, torture, women's rights, etc.) - International Organizations - Law - NGOs (by issue, by region) - Politics & Government - Publications - Regional (regions, countries, etc.) - Reports & News - Resources & Tools
for human rights professionals & activists - Etcetera
- Canadian Human Rights Links


Universal Income Trust (New Zealand)
"Universal Income Trust is a non-profit, registered, educational charity. Its purpose is to inform people about the social, environmental, and economic benefits of universal income systems i.e. economic systems that fulfil the minimum basic requirements inherent in the International Bill of Human Rights."



Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
"The Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) is a global network based in the U.K. that disseminates information about the Convention on the Rights of the Child and child rights amongst non-governmental organisations (NGOs), United Nations agencies, inter-governmental organisation (IGOs), educational institutions, and other child rights experts."
-
LARGE site - containing references to hundreds of publications, recent news and upcoming events, as well as details of organisations working worldwide for children. The site also includes NGO reports reports submitted to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child

You'll find more links to CRIN website content - focusing on the work of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child - on the Canadian Social Research Links Children's Rights links page.


World Audit
"World Audit is in an international not-for-profit company, registered in England by the registered charity, World Concern. Our aim is to provide a truly global geopolitical perspective because we believe that corruption, human rights abuses, vote stuffing, miscarriages of justice, and press censorship in ANY country should be publicised to as wide an audience as possible.(...) World Audit brings together statistics and reports from highly respected agencies, each with their own developed specialities. Freedom House, Transparency International, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, The International Commission of Jurists are THE names where political rights, civil liberties, press freedom, perceptions of corruption, human rights, and the rule of law, are concerned. From their admirable work we present and update the World Democracy Audit. Our reports monitor and rank every one of the 149 nation states with populations in excess of 1 million - thus 99% of the world's population. In addition, for purposes of comparison, we include the Table produced by the World Forum of Electoral Democracies. Finally, we have 210 country pages which include World Audit statistics and links to democracy and human rights country reports, and now The Index of Economic Freedom as well, a different kind of liberty to the other reported here."
- [Canada's World Democracy Audit overall ranking --- 9th of 149 countries]
Related Links:
World Concern
- "Sharing Christ's love in word and deed"
Freedom House - "...a non-profit, nonpartisan organization, a clear voice for democracy and freedom around the world"
Transparency International - "...the global coalition against corruption"
Amnesty International - "...working to protect human rights worldwide"
Human Rights Watch - "...dedicated to protecting the human rights of people around the world"
International Commission of Jurists - "dedicated to the primacy, coherence and implementation of international law and principles that advance human rights"


Center for Economic and Social Rights (U.S.)
The Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) was established in 1993 to promote social justice through human rights. CESR works with social scientists and local partners in affected communities to document rights violations, advocate for changes in policies that impoverish and exploit people, and mobilize grassroots pressure for social change.

- incl. links to : Home | About CESR | About Rights | NEW | Events | Get Involved | Links | Media | Publications | International Program | United States Program | Contact Info | Search
Links - excellent collection, includes : Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Organizations and Networks - Other Human Rights and Social Justice Organizations and Networks -
Community-Based Organizations - Health and Environmental Justice - Rights in the Global Economy - Middle East - Media Resources - Other Resources


OneWorld.net
OneWorld is dedicated to harnessing the democratic potential of the internet to promote human rights and sustainable development

- incl. links to thousands of articles and hundreds of partners around the world. 

- see Headlines - Special Reports - Campaigns - Editions - Guides - Think Tanks - Partners - and much more...

World Development Report 2000/2001: Attacking Poverty
Full text of the report
Key Documents
WDR web site
Source: World Bank PovertyNet

PovertyNet Newsletter #23 September 2000
World Bank
[I subscribe to the PovertyNet Newsletter, and I heartily recommend it to anyone looking for international poverty-related information...]
Click on the link above to read it online or to sign up to receive the newsletter by e-mail.
Source : World Bank PovertyNet website
- See the World Bank section lower down on this page
 

ILO and Copenhagen +5
On the recommendation of the World Summit for Social Development, the General Assembly decided in 1995 (resolution 50/161) to hold a special session in 2000 for an overall review and appraisal of the implementation of the outcome of the Summit and to consider further actions and initiatives. The Special Session of the General Assembly of the General Assembly entitled "World Summit for Social Development and Beyond: Achieving Social Development for All in a Globalizing World" will be held in Geneva from 26 to 30 June 2000.
The ILO and the Geneva 2000 Forum - Programme of activities

International Save the Children Alliance
The International Save the Children Alliance currently comprises 26 organisations around the world. Working in over 100 countries, Save the Children is the largest independent movement for children


World Bank
(Focus on : Africa - East Asia and the Pacific - Central Europe & Central Asia - Latin America & the Caribbean - Middle East & North Africa - South Asia)
This is an enormous site with scads of information - check out the site map.

On-line resources on the World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings
- Links to information on the April 2000 meetings of the joint World Bank-IMF Development Committee and the IMF's International Financial and Monetary Committee.
- Development Committee web site - incl. About the Development Committee - Issues - Members and Observers - Communiques - Documentation - List of Chairmen - Secretariat News and Events
Source : April 2000 issue of the PovertyNet Newsletter
NOTE: Social researchers should check out this newsletter for a wealth of info on global poverty issues. You can examine 18 issues of the newsletter online, each with timely information and links to reports and other related sites. You can also subscribe to receive the newsletter by e-mail; I did after reading just one issue.
Another must-visit site is  the World Bank PovertyNet website.


Amnesty International Online

- Canada Report 2004
- United States Report 2004

Source:
Amnesty International


rightsnet (U.K.)
"The welfare rights website for advice workers offers free, immediate access to the most up to date social security information available. The site also includes breaking news, new legislation, guidance and policy developments, discussion forums, an updater, swopshop, q&a’s, rightsjobs, benefit rates and more."


The WWW Virtual Library:  International Affairs Resources
 - Nongovernmental Organizations
 - The United Nations
 - The European Union
 - Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs

GLOBAL POLICY FORUM
New York
Monitoring global policy making at the United Nations
Social and Economic Policy
Human Rights and Transnational Corporations


Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is dedicated to protecting the human rights of people around the world. We stand with victims and activists to prevent discrimination, to uphold political freedom, to protect people from inhumane conduct in wartime, and to bring offenders to justice. We investigate and expose human rights violations and hold abusers accountable. We challenge governments and those who hold power to end abusive practices and respect international human rights law. We enlist the public and the international community to support the cause of human rights for all. Human Rights Watch is an independent, nongovernmental organization, supported by contributions from private individuals and foundations worldwide.

The Latest News - Human rights news from around the world, frequently updated.

2009 World Report: Obama Should Emphasize Human Rights
Stop Abusive States From Playing System to Avert Criticism

News Release
January 14, 2009
(Washington, DC) - The incoming Obama administration will need to put human rights at the heart of foreign, domestic, and security policy if it is to undo the enormous damage of the Bush years, Human Rights Watch said today in issuing its World Report 2009.

Complete report:

Human Rights Watch World Report 2009 (PDF - 4.5MB, 576 pages)
January 2009
This report is Human Rights Watch's nineteenth annual review of human rights practices around the globe. It summarises key human rights issues in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide, drawing on events through November 2008. Each country entry identifies significant human rights issues, examines the freedom of local human rights defenders to conduct their work, and surveys the response of key international actors, such as the United Nations, European Union, Japan, the United States, and various regional and international organisations and institutions.
Source:
Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes.]

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2008 Report: Democracy Charade Undermines Rights
Human Rights Watch Highlights Abuses in Pakistan, Kenya, China, Somalia

News Release
Washington, DC
January 31, 2008
The established democracies are accepting flawed and unfair elections for political expediency, Human Rights Watch said today in releasing its World Report 2008. By allowing autocrats to pose as democrats, without demanding they uphold the civil and political rights that make democracy meaningful, the United States, the European Union and other influential democracies risk undermining human rights worldwide.

Complete report:

World Report 2008
Human Rights Watch surveys the human rights situation in more than 75 countries.
- includes the U.S. but not Canada
HTML version - includes links to individual country sections (across the top of the page) along with an introduction, five essays. audio commentary, news conference, photography, news release, the complete report in PDF format
PDF version (PDF - 5.4MB, 581 pages)

* World Report 2007
* World Report 2006
[For earlier reports, see the far right column on the HRW Publications page

Source:
Human Rights Watch

Also from Human Rights Watch:

US: Leaving UN Rights Council Fails Victims of Abuse
(Geneva, June 6, 2008) – A decision by the United States to disengage from the UN Human Rights Council amounts to an abandonment of human rights defenders and victims, Human Rights Watch said today. The United States announced today at its daily State Department briefing that it will only participate in debates at the council when absolutely necessary and it feels compelled to do so by “matters of deep national interest.”



Disability Rights Links
Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI)
Family Village
GLADNET Association
 

See also United Nations Links

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