Canadian Social Research Links

Selected Canadian Social
Research Organizations (I)

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Groupes de
recherche sociale au Canada
(I)

Updated October 12, 2016
Page révisée le 12 octobre 2016

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



On this page, you'll find information about
:
Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI) - Caledon Institute of Social Policy - National Council of Welfare - Centre for the Study of Living Standards - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Canadian Council on Social Development - Canadian Institute for Advanced Research - Canadian Policy Research Networks - Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy - Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) - and a few others

See also Selected Canadian Social Research Organizations II - there, you'll find info about and links to : C.D. Howe Institute - Canada West Foundation - Council for Canadian Unity (Centre for Research and Information on Canada) - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fraser Institute - Institute for Research on Public Policy - Institute on Governance - Intergovernmental Committee on Urban and Regional Research - International Development Research Centre - policity.ca - policy.ca - Policy Research Initiative - Social Research and Demonstration Corporation

Related pages on this site : Non-Governmental Organizations - Ontario NGOs and Municipalities - Canadian Children's NGO Links - Union Pages - Other Countries' NGOs

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NEW

Strengthening Canada’s Public Employment Service Post-Devolution
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1104ENG.pdf
Donna E. Wood, September 2016

Starting in 1996, responsibility for managing Canada’s public employment service began to be devolved from the Government of Canada to provinces, territories and Aboriginal organizations. The variety of different labour market transfer agreements has created a complex and fragmented system. This paper proposes ways that Canada’s now largely decentralized public employment service could be strengthened through better governance.

Proposals include:

• develop a pan-Canadian multilateral labour market framework agreement
• consolidate the four federal-provincial agreements into one agreement
• devolve responsibility for federal youth and disability programming
• reaffirm the federal stewardship and coordination roles
• restore the National Aboriginal Labour Market Management Board
• develop a National Labour Market Partners' Council
• include comparative research in the mandate of the Labour Market Information Council.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

April 14, 2016
The Canada Child Benefit Needs to be Fully Indexed to Inflation (small PDF file, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1093ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
April 2016
This commentary published in the Globe and Mail argues that the newly-introduced Canada Child Benefit will lose its real value over time unless it is indexed to the rate of inflation.
***
We are at a loss to explain why the federal Liberal government would make such significant progress in assisting lower income families with children and then quietly unravel much of the improvement they were so proud to announce.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

http://www.caledoninst.org/

Some Implications of the Liberal Government’s Tax Changes
Richard Zuker, February 2016

Abstract (HTML)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/Detail/?ID=1090

Complete report (PDF - 5 pages):
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1090ENG.pdf
Canada’s new Liberal government recently introduced two major changes to the personal income tax system for the 2016 tax year. One implication of the tax rate decrease is that the amount of the tax saving increases with taxable income in the targeted tax bracket. While the tax reduction was touted as a tax benefit for the ‘middle class,’ the maximum benefit of $679 also extends to every taxpayer with a taxable income greater than $90,563. One quick fix is to increase the marginal tax rate in the 26 percent tax bracket by 1 percentage point, to 27 percent. Another problem: Because tax reductions are based on the taxable income of individuals, they can have uneven impacts when considered from the perspective of family units. Finally, lower-income Canadians who are excluded from the tax reduction are slated to benefit from the planned increases in child benefits. But the proposed increases in child benefits are greater for middle-income than lower-income families.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Memo to the Mayors of Canada (PDF - 452KB, 8 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1067ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
May 2015
This paper was written at the request of the Tamarack Institute [ http://tamarackcommunity.ca/ ] as a follow-up to the National Poverty Summit [ http://events.tamarackcommunity.org/povertyreductionsummit ] held in Ottawa on May 6-8, 2015. The federal and provincial/territorial governments hold the major policy levers to tackle poverty in the areas of affordable housing, education and skills training, and income security. But cities have equally important roles play in this agenda. Memo to the Mayors of Canada outlines five key actions that local governments can take on the poverty front. Design for livability. Engage citizens. Foster social capital. Reduce costs. Lead by example. Each action is discussed more fully in the Memo.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mémo à l'attention des Maires du Canada (PDF - 8 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1067FRE.pdf
Sherri Torjman, May 2015
Ce document a été préparé à la demande de l’Institut Tamarack en guise de suivi au Sommet national sur la pauvreté qui s’est déroulé à Ottawa du 6 au 8 mai 2015. Les gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux sont les instances détentrices des principaux leviers politiques permettant de s’attaquer à la pauvreté dans les domaines du logement abordable, de l’éducation et de la formation et de la sécurité du revenu. Mais les villes ont également un rôle important à jouer à cet égard. La Note de service destinée aux maires du Canada décrit cinq mesures importantes que peuvent prendre les administrations municipales afin de réduire la pauvreté : concevoir pour une meilleure qualité de vie; stimuler l’engagement citoyen; soutenir le développement du capital social; réduire les coûts; et donner l’exemple. La Note de service traite en détail de chacune de ces mesures.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

May 07, 2015
Child benefit reform is back on track (PDF - 25KB, 3 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1065ENG.pdf
Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
May 2015
This commentary analyzes the Liberals’ proposed Canada Child Benefit. It is a historic advance in income security policy for families. The Canada Child Benefit is everything the present hodgepodge of child benefits is not: a single, simple and transparent social program compared to the current collection of child benefits. It is not subject to income tax and is indexed to inflation. The proposed Canada Child Benefit is a win-win initiative that will fight child poverty and boost the incomes of the middle class.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Policy monitors <=============Recommended reading!

Federal Policy Monitor, April 2015 (small PDF file)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2015-04.pdf
The Caledon Institute regularly scans for the release of federal government policies and programs that impact areas of interest, including income security, disabilities, health, housing, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth.

---

Provincial Policy Monitor, April 2015 (small PDF file)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2015-04.pdf
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy and program developments related to our core work and interests. A partial list includes: disability, education, health, housing, income security, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth.

---

The 2015 Federal Budget and Housing: Too good to be true (PDF - 82KB, 4 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1066ENG.pdf
Steve Pomeroy
May 2015
The 2015 federal Budget made commitments on affordable housing that were originally interpreted as a positive response to housing advocates’ call to sustain federal spending on maturing federal funding agreements. This interpretation was incorrect; spending on existing social housing will decline over the next several years. This article explains the misinterpretation and what is really happening.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Making Ends Meet : Toronto’s 2015 Living Wage (PDF - 2MB, 38 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Ontario%20Office/2015/04/CCPA-ON_Making_Ends_Meet.pdf
By Kaylie Tiessen
April 10, 2015
Two working parents with two children need to each earn a minimum of $18.52 an hour just to make ends meet in Toronto. In a new report, CCPA-Ontario Economist Kaylie Tiessen calculates the living wage in Toronto by drawing on a national living wage methodological framework.

Related news release:
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/news-releases/it-takes-1852-hour-make-ends-meet-toronto-study

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Eight charts that make you wonder if Conservatives understand how modern families work
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/8-charts-make-you-wonder-if-conservatives-understand-how-modern-families-work
January 27, 2015

Conservatives sure like to talk about how they 'get' families. But do they? And do Stephen Harper's family-friendly policies actually make a meaningful impact in the lives of most Canadian families?

"Family life isn't the same today as it was 30 years ago," says a new study [ http://goo.gl/TzPrZe ] from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives [ https://www.policyalternatives.ca/ ] that looks at the rise of women in the workforce -- and concludes the federal Conservatives' family tax cuts are probably more helpful to Canadian families circa 1955 than they are to Canadian families in 2015. Instead, what modern families need are "childcare, parental leave, and economic policies that level the playing field."

Click the link above to access charts that lay out why:

1. The number of working women and mothers has nearly doubled in the last 30 years
2. ...And despite so many working mothers, there is a shortalerge of child care spaces in Canada
3. OK, so what does Stephen Harper's brilliant solution look like?
4. But who benefits? [Spoiler : It's m
ostly wealthy families.]
5. And Will that cover most families' child care costs?
6 - 7 - 8 : Missing in action
(By Gilles : The page title of this piece clearly says EIGHT charts but the numbered list contains only five charts.
The "eight" must refer to charts that appear as text links. I dunno...)

Source:
PressProgress
http://www.pressprogress.ca/
PressProgress advances progressive solutions and challenges conservative ideas with hard-hitting news and analysis.
PressProgress is a project of the Broadbent Institute [ http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/ ].

Time for federal family policy to grow up: study
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/news-releases/time-federal-family-policy-grow-study
JANUARY 27, 2015
OTTAWA—The current federal government's approach to family policy is falling short of the needs of parents, says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).

The study, by Kate McInturff, Director of CCPA's Making Women Count project, and David Macdonald, CCPA Senior Economist, finds complicated tax benefits that go largely to the well-off families do nothing to address the needs of families today. Instead, it calls for access to affordable childcare, improved leave for fathers, and tax policies that level the playing field in order to improve the quality of family life in Canada.

Complete study:

Time to Grow Up : Family Policies
for the Way We Live Now
(PDF - 869KB, 40 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2015/01/Time_to_Grow_Up.pdf
By Kate McInturff and David Macdonald
Federal and provincial governments have an opportunity to make the struggle to balance work and family life easier. Neither work nor family life looks the same today as it did a generation ago. It is time for our policies to catch up with the way families live now, by providing solutions to the problems families are facing today. [Source : report, p.7]

Source:
Canadian centre for Policy Alternatives

https://www.policyalternatives.ca

Recent releases from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Cut the Tax Cut (PDF - 31KB, 4 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1060ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
January 2015
In its November 2014 Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections, the federal government unveiled a set of measures for families with children that will take effect in 2015. One of the major changes, the Family Tax Cut (also known as ‘income splitting’), caught most of the media attention. But that tax cut was only one component of a larger package. Several associated measures were brought in at the same time – partly to offset the criticism that the government knew would be coming its way on the flagship Family Tax Cut.
(...)
The version of income splitting announced in November 2014 was modified somewhat in direct response to earlier negative comments. The additional changes to other child benefits were intended to help sell the new Family Tax Cut more easily to Canadians. There is no question that the altered plan is more palatable than its earlier design.

But we still don’t like it.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Symposium on Children of the Recession (PDF - 29KB, 4 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1059ENG.pdf
This blog highlights the proceedings of a national symposium on Children of the Recession organized by UNICEF Canada in partnership with the University of Ottawa.
By Sherri Torjman
January 2015
I recently had the opportunity to moderate a national symposium on Children of the Recession, which is also the subject of a UNICEF report. The day was organized by UNICEF Canada in partnership with the University of Ottawa.
This discussion about the Great Recession took place within a broader significant context. It is now 25 years since the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child became international law, yet many of its commitments remain unrealized. 2014 also marked a quarter-century since the unanimous all-party Resolution in the House of Commons to move toward the eradication of child poverty in Canada.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Policy monitors <=============Recommended reading!

Federal Policy Monitor, December 2014 (small PDF file)
http://caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2014-12.pdf
The Caledon Institute regularly scans for the release of federal government policies and programs that impact areas of interest, including income security, disabilities, health, housing, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth.

---

Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor, December 2014 (small PDF file)
http://caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2014-12.pdf
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy and program developments related to our core work and interests. A partial list includes: disability, education, health, housing, income security, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Hennessy’s Index, January 2015 : Political Divides
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessys-index-january-2015
By Trish Hennessy
January 5, 2015
Fourteen factoids based on an Environics survey of public opinion [the link appears below] regarding how Canadians see themselves in terms of political affiliations.

Here are just a few excerpts:

62% :
Percentage of Canadians who place themselves along the middle of the political spectrum.

76% :
Percentage of Canadians on the political left who support the right to express political dissent – up eight percentage points since 2012. Only 35 per cent of the political right support the right to dissent.

48% :
Percentage of Canadians who agree “the Canadian government should implement strong policies to reduce income inequality”; only six per cent disagree. Support for active government policies is strongest in Atlantic Canada, Quebec, among low-income Canadians and those on the political left.

Click the link above to see all 14 factoids.

Earlier issues of Hennessy’s Index + other articles by Trish Hennessy
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/authors/trish-hennessy

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

Source for
all 14 factoids:

AmericasBarometer: Canada 2014 (PDF - 3.4MB, 90 pages)
http://environicsinstitute.org/uploads/institute-projects/environics-iog%20-%20americasbarometer%202014%20final%20report.pdf
How do Canadians feel about their country’s democratic system of government and institutions today? How have opinions shifted in the past two years, if at all, in light of the major events over the past two years, including the increasingly divisive nature of Canadian politics?
[Excerpt from the Exec Summary.]

Conducted by :
The Environics Institute

http://www.environicsinstitute.org/
and
The Institute on Governance
http://iog.ca/

New from the
Metcalf Foundation:

Metcalf Foundation Newsletter - November-2014
http://metcalffoundation.com/newsletter/metcalf-foundation-newsletter-november-2014/

John Stapleton in the news
In September, Metcalf Innovation Fellow John Stapleton was a panelist on The Agenda for a segment that examined Ontario’s poverty reduction strategy:
http://theagenda.tvo.org/episode/206971/eye-on-eradication
("Poverty Reduction Reboot")

He was also featured in a Canadian HR Reporter article on guaranteed minimum incomes (Sept. 5):
http://openpolicyontario.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Money-for-Nothing.pdf

Recently, he was quoted in an article in The Globe and Mail on rising food bank use:
http://goo.gl/f8uqSC

John was also quoted in an article in The Toronto Star on hazards facing low-income people when navigating financial services:
http://goo.gl/3LZWBk

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Metcalf paper tackles labour market deficiencies and income inequality
http://metcalffoundation.com/publications-resources/view/better-work-the-path-to-good-jobs-is-through-employers/
October 2014
Is the threat to good jobs inevitable? Definitely not, according to Metcalf Innovation Fellow Tom Zizys. His new paper, Better Work: The path to good jobs is through employers, examines our under-performing labour market. His recommendations focus on the demand side, and the role of employers, intermediaries, government, and citizens to motivate and sustain efforts to create betters jobs for more people.
* includes a 23-minute video presentation by Tom Zizys and highlights from his paper.

Better Work : The path to good jobs is through employers (PDF - 7MB, 90 pages)
http://metcalffoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/2014-10-02-Better-Work.pdf
By Tom Zizys
October 2014
In Part One of this paper, we review data and trends that illustrate the labour market challenges experienced by different subgroups in Ontario. Part Two chronicles the economic and political changes that transformed our labour market over the last several decades. Part Three demonstrates the case for workforce development for both businesses and society. The balance of the paper addresses pragmatic solutions for creating and sustaining a healthy labour market — what I call an enabling environment. Part Four outlines barriers that often inhibit employers from investing in their workforce and explores ways to overcome them. Part Five promotes strengthening the supportive structures and processes necessary to facilitate the uptake of workforce development. Part Six addresses norms and values needed to advance workforce development and ensure equitable labour market outcomes.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Also in the November 2014 Metcalf Foundation Newsletter:
http://metcalffoundation.com/newsletter/metcalf-foundation-newsletter-november-2014/
In addition to the article about John Stapleton and the report by Tom Zizys, here's what you'll find in the November 2014 Newsletter:
* Significant refinements to our Environment Program
* Cycle City
* Electrifying Movement
* Enabling Solutions
* Performing Arts Internships changes announced
* Building an Inclusive Local Economies learning community
* Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission launches
* A creative inquiry about Canada's future
* A report from Community Food Centres Canada
* SpaceFinder Toronto launches with 250 listings
* City Building Institute launches at Ryerson

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sign up for the Metcalf Foundation Newsletter
http://metcalffoundation.com/publications-resources/newsletter/

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Source:
Metcalf Foundation
http://metcalffoundation.com/
The Metcalf Foundation helps Canadians imagine and build a just, healthy, and creative society by supporting dynamic leaders who are strengthening their communities, nurturing innovative approaches to persistent problems, and encouraging dialogue and learning to inform action.

At What Cost?
The Impacts of Rushing to Balance the Budget
(PDF - 179K, 10 pages)
By David Macdonald Kayle Hatt
November 12, 2014
This study reviews the extent of federal government cuts and provides tangible examples of how these cuts have negatively impacted important public services. While undermining Canada's economic recovery, the rush to balance the budget has also impacted federally delivered services, with the biggest cuts made in areas where Canadians most heavily rely on the federal government.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Ottawa should think hard before squandering money on income splitting
Income splitting would be a big tax win for the minority 15 per cent of households — most with high incomes.

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2014/10/03/ottawa_should_think_hard_before_squandering_money_on_income_splitting.html
By Sherri Torjman and Ken Battle
October 3, 2014
More low- and modest-income Canadians would be better off if Finance Minister Joe Oliver used tax cuts to enhance the child tax benefit rather than bringing in income splitting, according to Sherri Torjman and Ken Battle of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy.
(...)
Income splitting is out of step — and not just with trends in family structure. Its projected $2.6-billion cost is a lot of buck for relatively small impact. An enhanced Canada child tax benefit would be a far better use of such money.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

How to fix Canada's dysfunctional labour market
http://www.thestar.com/business/economy/2014/10/02/how_to_fix_canadas_dysfunctional_labour_market.html
By Dana Flavelle
October 2, 2014
Canada has been too focused on “supply” side of labour market, resulting in the world’s best educated workforce and also the highest rate of post-secondary graduates earning poverty level incomes.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

From the Metcalf Foundation:

Better Work: The path to good jobs is through employers, by Metcalf Innovation Fellow and labour market policy expert Tom Zizys, examines our under-performing labour market and challenges the popular notion that the threat to good jobs is inevitable.

Better Work:
The path to good jobs is through employers
(PDF - 6.9MB, 90 pages)
http://metcalffoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/2014-10-02-Better-Work.pdf
By Tom Zizys
October 2014

Source:
Metcalf Foundation

http://metcalffoundation.com/
The Metcalf Foundation helps Canadians imagine and build a just, healthy, and creative society by supporting dynamic leaders who are strengthening their communities, nurturing innovative approaches to persistent problems, and encouraging dialogue and learning to inform action.

Should Welfare Recipients Try Harder to Find Work?
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2014/09/11/should-welfare-recipients-try-harder-to-find-work/
September 11th, 2014
By Nick Falvo
This morning the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation [ http://www.srdc.org/ ] released a new report about “motivational interviewing” for welfare recipients.
---
News Release : http://goo.gl/NysBsH
Full report (PDF - 1.9MB, 72 pages) :http://goo.gl/RtKiKI
Executive summary (small PDF file) : http://goo.gl/xMYgbQ

---

By Nick :
Earlier this year, I was invited to be a discussant on the study at the Annual Conference of the Canadian Economics Association [ http://economics.ca/ ].
Here are 10 things I think you should know about this report:

1. The “intervention” being studied was the Motivational Interviewing (MI) technique.
2. Research participants were on welfare upon enrollment in the study.
3. Research participants had been on welfare for at least one year at the study’s outset.
4. Most of the research participants reported health problems.
5. The “intervention” was provided by welfare officials (specifically, by Employment and Assistance Workers and case managers).
6. The results of this study suggest that Motivational Interviewing can be effective.
7. Fewer than half of the members of the study’s treatment group actually took in even one (hour-long) Motivational Interviewing session.
8. The research was funded by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC).
9. The study took place at a time when, throughout Canada, there were considerably more unemployed persons than job vacancies.
10. This study took place at the same time that the federal government is aggressively bringing in more temporary migrant workers.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

http://www.progressive-economics.ca

From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Hennessy’s Index: June 2014
Voter turnout: How low can we go?
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessy%E2%80%99s-index-june-2014
By Trish Hennessy
June 2014

NOTE : At the end of each statement in each issue of Hennessy's Index, there's a link to the source of that statement.
You won't find any of those links below, though - just click the link above to access the individual sources.

Excerpts:

52.1
Percentage of voters who cast a ballot in the 2014 Ontario election (unofficial count), up a bit from the province’s 2011 historic low voter turnout of 48%.

64
Percentage of voters who went to the polls in the Ontario provincial election in 1990 – the election that swept the only New Democratic government to serve in the province. Voter turnout has gone down ever since.

-----------------------------------
NOTE : Click the link at the top for observations about the decline in voter turnout for each province.
SPOILER : The highest turnout was in the 2011 provincial election in Prince Edward Island, when 76.4% of eligible voters went to their polling stations.
The lowest voter turnout, 52%, was for the
2013 provincial election in British Columbia .
-----------------------------------

33
Percent of first-time voters in Canada who are actually voting – half of what first-time voter turnout was a generation ago.

#1
Main reason why Canadians say they didn’t cast a vote in the 2011 federal election: not interested (27.7% gave this response while 22.9% said they were too busy).

3.8
Percentage of Canadians who said they didn’t vote in the 2011 federal election because they forgot.
D’oh!

-----------------------------------

Source:
Hennessy's Index
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/index
Hennessy’s Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world.
- includes links to all earlier indices

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

The Skills Gap Trope
Hennessy‘s Index: April 2014

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessys-index-april-2014
By Trish Hennessy

NOTE : At the end of each statement in this issue of Hennessy's Index, there's a link to the source of that statement.
You won't find any of those links below, though - just click the link above to access the individual sources.

Excerpts:

1
Canada has more workers with post-secondary training than any other industrialized country. More than half of Canadians aged 25-34 have a post-secondary diploma or certificate; 28.9 per cent held a university degree in 2006 – up from 14.9 per cent in 1981.

Half
Number of Canadian university students who complete at least one co-op placement, practicum, internship or field placement during the course of their degree.

23
Percentage of Canadians aged 15-29 who are estimated to have been underemployed in 2013. About a third of young Canadians work in part-time jobs, many of which are low paying and temporary.

12.1
Percentage of very recent immigrants to Canada, aged 25-54, who were among the unemployed in 2012. If there was a true labour shortage, newcomers would rapidly find work.

24.6
Percentage of Canadian youth armed with a university degree who were employed full-time, year-round in 2005 performing duties that did not require a degree.

0
The conclusion based on a review of the “best peer-reviewed research in Canada” is that there “is no evidence of a national labour shortage at present or in the foreseeable future”.

Source:
Hennessy's Index
(inc. links to earlier issues)
http://policyalternatives.ca/index
Hennessy’s Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world.

Hennessy's Index is an ongoing project of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Source:
Hennessy's Index
(inc. links to earlier issues)
http://policyalternatives.ca/index
Hennessy’s Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world.

Hennessy's Index is an ongoing project of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

From the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

NOTE : For Hennessy’s Index: March 2014 "Tax Cuts 101", go to the Taxes and Tax Freedom Day links page of this website:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/tax_freedom_day.htm#hennessy

New from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

---

Disability Policy Highlights (PDF - 96K, 21 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1041ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
April 2014
This paper is the text of a speech delivered to the Ontario Cluster of the Centre for Research on Work Disability Policy [ http://www.crwdp.ca/ ], which is housed at the Institute for Work and Health [ http://www.iwh.on.ca/ ] in Toronto.

Abstract:
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/Detail/?ID=1041
Excerpt:
This paper presents an overview of disability policy highlights from 2006 to the present. It traces major developments in legislative, program and data/research areas, including the creation of the Registered Disability Savings Plan, Opportunities Fund, Enabling Accessibility Fund and post-secondary education grants. It also discusses the various federal-provincial/territorial labour market agreements that help enhance the employability of Canadians with disabilities.

---

Federal Policy Monitor, March 2014
http://caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2014-03.pdf
The Caledon Institute (www.caledoninst.org) regularly scans for the release of federal government policies and programs that impact areas of interest, including income security, disabilities, health, housing, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth.

---

Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor, March 2014
http://caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2014-03.pdf

---

Municipal Policy Monitor, March 2014
http://caledoninst.org/Policy/Municipal/2014-03.pdf
Coordinated by the Caledon Institute, the Municipal Monitor tracks municipal government activities in selected urban centres around several key social policy areas related to food security, housing and homelessness, income security, recreation, transportation and people.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

I Am Armine Yalnizyan, AMA (Ask Me Anything)
http://redd.it/1z79fo

On February 28th, CCPA Senior Economist Armine Yalnizyan faced one of the more intimidating challenges of the web, and did a Reddit AMA ("Ask Me Anything") session. Redditors dove right in and asked Armine questions on topics ranging from income inequality to Ontario’s minimum wage to Kevin O’Leary. Armine is senior economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives since 2008.

---

By Gilles:
Armine is a hero of mine and anyone who supports progressive social policy in Canada.
Grab a coffee or soda, sit back and read her views on a plethora of social policy related topics.
TEASERS:
* Is the CCPA's Alternative Federal Budget the only blueprint we need for progressive social policy in Canada??
* What's the difference between poverty and inequality?
* Who does Armine describe as "a cross between Don Cherry and Yosemite Sam"?
* She's "not a big fan of the minimum income" - eh? ("Guaranteed incomes can result in guaranteed poverty - it depends on how it's designed.")
* What's "Gin o'clock"? [Never mind: I think I know. --- (:-) ]
* Who's a pretty kitty?
* More...

Source:
Reddit Canadian Politics
:
http://www.reddit.com/r/CanadaPolitics/

Reddit:
http://www.reddit.com/
Reddit is an entertainment, social networking service and news website where registered community members can submit content, such as text posts or direct links

Reddit FAQ:
http://www.reddit.com/wiki/faq

Hennessy’s Index for February 2014:
Income Splitting --- Perks for the Rich

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessys-index-february-2014
By Trish Hennessy

NOTE : At the end of each statement in this issue of Hennessy's Index, there's a link to the source of that statement.
You won't find any of those links below, though - just click the link above to access the individual sources.

Excerpt:

2007
The year Canada’s federal government extended to senior families the opportunity to partake in extra tax breaks through pension income splitting.

$820
Estimated average tax break enjoyed the Canada’s richest 10% of Canadian senior couples who take advantage of pension income splitting at tax time.

10 cents
Estimated average tax break the poorest 10% of senior couples in Canada get from pension income splitting.

7 out of 10
Number of seniors who enjoy no benefit whatsoever from pension income splitting.

Source:
Hennessy's Index
(inc. links to earlier issues)
http://policyalternatives.ca/index

Hennessy's Index is an ongoing project of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Hennessy’s Index for January 2014
Out with the Old: Words primed for retirement in 2014
http://policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessys-index-january-2014

Some words that should be banished
from the English language (and WHY they should be banished):

Austerity - Attrition - Hardworking middle class families* - Special interests - War on the car - Ford Nation - Union bosses - Deregulation - Working poor - Unpaid internships - Debt Crisis - Tax haven -Tax burden
---
* Add Gilles' personal "favourite" : "...your hard-earned tax dollars..."
---

Source:
Hennessy's Index
(inc. links to earlier issues)
http://policyalternatives.ca/index

Hennessy's Index is an ongoing project of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

CEO earnings are a stark contrast to the average Canadian income
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/ceo-earnings-are-stark-contrast-average-canadian-income
News Release
January 2, 2014
Five years after a global recession knocked the wind out of Canada’s labour market, throwing tens of thousands of workers onto the unemployment line and sidelining a generation of young workers, the compensation of Canada’s CEO elite continues to sail along.
By 1:11pm on January 2, the first official working day of the year, Canada’s highest paid CEOs have already pocketed $46,634 — what it takes most Canadians an entire year, working full-time, to earn.

CCPA's annual CEO pay review, by economist and CCPA Research Associate Hugh Mackenzie, takes a snapshot of the 240 publicly listed Canadian corporations on the TSX Index, ranks the highest paid 100 CEOs on that list, and determines their average total compensation.

Read the full pay review:

All in a Day's Work? CEO Pay in Canada (PDF - 684K, 14 pages)
http://policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2014/01/All_in_a_Days_Work_CEO_%20Pay.pdf
January 2014

---
Version française:
Une journée de travail bien remplie (PDF - 308Ko., 16 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2014/01/All_in_a_Days_Work_CEO_Pay_FRENCH.pdf
janvier 2014
---

You can also follow along and keep track of who's making what.
Visit our CEO Pay Clock:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/ceo

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

The Mowat Centre's Top Eight Reports That Will Change Canada As We Know It:
Here are the eight reports that will fundamentally change our country. Forever.
(Each link takes you to an abstract and a link to the PDF file)

* Why Are Shrinks Taking a Closer Look At Public Servants?
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=98

* You Won't Believe What the Mowat Centre Is Saying About Oil And Gas Pipelines
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=96

* One Cool Trick To Fix Economic Development Programs
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=97

* Five Things You Need To Know About Your Next Non-Profit Boss
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=94

* Everything You Know About Equalization Payments is Wrong. Here's why.
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=79

* Nine Things That Will Change Everything You Know by 2030
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=95

* Twelve Ways We’re Wasting Canada’s Most Valuable Economic Resource
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=91

* One Big Idea That Might Save the Senate, And Why You Should Care
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=81

Source:
Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation

http://www.mowatcentre.ca/
The Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation is an independent, non-partisan public policy think tank. We were established in 2009 with seed money from the Ontario government. We undertake applied public policy research and engage in public dialogue on federal issues important to the prosperity and quality of life of Ontario and Canada.

New releases from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
:
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Here’s a thought : The Canada Skills Grant
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1030ENG.pdf
By Michael Mendelson
December 2013
The provinces and territories have unanimously rejected the Canada Job Grant. What should Ottawa do? It can try to unilaterally deliver some version of the Canada Job Grant without provincial cooperation but this will create chaos in the skills training sector. Or it can make another choice. It can take a pragmatic approach, look at alternatives and test what works best to ensure that Canada’s workers are at least as highly skilled as any in the world. This paper sets out one alternative approach which might gain the support of all stakeholders, which we call the Canada Skills Grant. The new Skills Grant would operate under the current Employment Insurance Act that allows for "innovative projects that identify ways of helping persons prepare for, return to or keep employment and be productive participants in the labour market.

---

Disability in December (PDF - 28K, 3 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1028ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
December 2013

December 3 is the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. There have been many noteworthy achievements in the country in such areas as transportation, communications, technology and equipment. But significant actions are still required, particularly around income security and disability supports.
The Caledon Institute has proposed a new Basic Income for persons with severe disabilities that would replace welfare with an adequate federally delivered benefit. The resulting provincial and territorial savings would be reinvested in a wide range of disability supports. These are the goods and services that enable independent living.
In the absence of major income security reform, Ottawa could still create a fund that would allocate monies to the provinces and territories to encourage investment in a comprehensive system of supports. These goods and services provide essential assistance not just to persons with disabilities but also to the entire population. They are especially crucial in light of Canada's aging population.

---

Laurie Needs Affordable Housing
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1029ENG.pdf
Sherri Torjman and Ken Battle
December 2013

The Caledon Institute will be releasing shortly the Welfare Incomes report. Its calculations make clear that welfare incomes fall below all major comparator measures.
It is becoming increasingly difficult for welfare recipients to make ends meet. Shelter allowances, in particular, have not kept pace with market rents.
Laurie is a Calgary resident who is on the Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped program in Alberta. Her poignant story, which she sent to us, speaks powerfully to the need for affordable housing in Canada. Several policy options are proposed to enhance the ability of renters to pay for housing and to increase the availability of affordable housing.

---

Federal Policy Monitor, November 2013 (PDF - 48K, 5 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2013-11.pdf

---

Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor, November 2013 (PDF - 84K, 6 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2013-11.pdf

NOTE : Both the federal and provincial/territorial monitors are searchable by jurisdiction and category;
see Caledon’s “Policy Monitor” webpage:
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/

--------------------------------------------------------------

Strengthening the Canada Pension Plan: Take it to the public (PDF - 64K, 11 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1026ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
November 2013
(...)
On November 1, 2013, provincial/territorial finance ministers met and agreed on four conditions for reforming the Canada Pension Plan.

Increased benefits:
• must be fully funded
• have a limited economic impact on businesses, which have to pay higher contributions
• improve benefits for the middle class
• protect low-income earners.
The finance ministers hope to advance matters when they meet with the federal finance minister in December.
But prospects for immediate action look dim...

[ NOTE : The appendix to this paper gives a brief description of Canada’s three-tier retirement income system. ]

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

---

Time for Talk, Not Action [Re. Canada Job Grant program] (PDF - 28K, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1023ENG.pdf
By Michael Mendelson and Chris Atchison
November 2013
In its March 2013 Budget, Ottawa announced the new Canada Job Grant program, promising that the “detailed design” would be negotiated with the provinces “over the next year.” On November 8, 2013, Jason Kenney, the new Minister of Employment and Social Development, finally found the time to meet with his provincial counterparts. This op ed, originally published in the Vancouver Sun on November 7, 2013, reviews the problems inherent in the Canada Job Grant and the implications of funding the new program through cutting employability and training for vulnerable populations. It argues that the federal government should now work with the provinces to redesign the program.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

http://www.caledoninst.org/
Established in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a private, nonprofit organization with charitable status. It is supported primarily by the Maytree Foundation, located in Toronto. Caledon is an independent and critical voice that does not depend on government funding and is not affiliated with any political party.

- Go to the 2013 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2013.htm

More content from the Caledon website
- this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading.

NEW

NOTE : The links below will take you further down on this page to a description of and link to each organization's website and, in most cases, selected site content.


Caledon Institute of Social Policy .  National Council of Welfare
. Centre for the Study of Living Standards .
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)   Canadian Council on Social Development
  Canadian Institute for Advanced Research .
Canadian Policy Research Networks (CPRN) . Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy
  Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)

Canada 2020   Canadian Centre for Policy Ingenuity
 

Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI)

 
...and more... [scroll down this page]


Research Resources for the Social Sciences - Craig McKie (Carleton University, Ottawa)
Vast selection of (mainly Canadian) social research links covering a wide range of topics in the social sciences.
On this page, you'll find links to : General Resource Searchers  - Content to Browse - Reference Materials - Aggressive Pattern Searchers - Virtual Library at Coombs - Data Archives - Sociology and Anthropology - News and Journalism - Psychology - Law and Law Enforcement - Demography - Political Science - Economics - Geography - Women's Studies - Security Services - Miscellaneous - Site Information

Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI)
" ... a national charitable organization dedicated to enabling poor, unemployed and under-employed people to become self-sufficient"

Asset-Building (Powerpoint presentation - 498K, 18 pages)
How SEDI plans to offer low-income Canadians new ways of finding economic independence by helping them save and build assets.

Learn$ave
"SEDI has partnered with the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC), a leading expert in the field of social research and evaluation, to design and implement learn$ave. This multi-year (planned to 2009) demonstration of Individual Development Accounts for learning is funded by Human Resources Development Canada. The largest demonstration of its kind in the world, learn$ave will reach 4,875 low-income Canadians who volunteer to take part in one of 10 designated locations (cities/counties)across Canada."

Home$ave
"(...) Existing government home buyer and tax credit programs are out of reach for low-income earners, and in major cities like Toronto where home prices are so high, there isn’t nearly enough affordable housing to meet the demand. SEDI is piloting a project called that will give low-income Canadians a place to turn. By putting money aside in an Individual Development Account (IDA), participants can build their personal savings and earn a credit for a matching amount. The savings don’t have to be big, as long as they are consistent. Bit by bit, enough money is collected to put a downpayment on a home. SEDI is currently working in partnership with community groups, financial partners and government agencies to get this project started."
More info on Home$ave - April 2002 (small PDF file)

-------------------------

Wealth, Low-Wage Work and Welfare:
The Unintended Costs of Provincial Needs-tests
(PDF - 604K, 8 pages)
April 2008
"(...)Assets do matter as an important, but so far largely undervalued, factor in well-being. Assets are more than stored-up income, they are stored-up hope, agency and aspiration. To the degree that welfare policy is ultimately concerned with well-being - and we believe it is - far greater attention should be paid to assets." (Excerpt, p.7)
- includes detailed info on what constitutes assets in the Canadian welfare system as well as asset exemption levels in all Canadian jurisdictions and a number of options for provincial/territorial governments wishing to promote greater asset development within their welfare program.
Source:
Asset-building Program

SEDI Program Areas
To fulfill SEDI's mission statement and to pursue its organizational objectives, SEDI has been working in four broad issue areas: self- employment, youth, asset-building and financial capability. Click the link above and then, on the next page, select one of the programs areas in the left-hand margin for more detailed information and further links.

SEDI Publications List

Source:
Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI) :
SEDI is a national charitable organization dedicated to enabling poor and unemployed Canadians become self-sufficient. We take a variety of leading-edge social and economic approaches to this goal in areas such as policy development, program management, capacity building, public education, and research.

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm
More links to website content from SEDI
(this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading)

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
The Caledon Institute is a social policy think tank.
Established in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a private, nonprofit organization with charitable status. It is supported primarily by the Maytree Foundation, located in Toronto. Caledon is an independent and critical voice that does not depend on government funding and is not affiliated with any political party

Prudently Progressive : Caledon's First Decade as a Social Policy Think Tank (PDF file - 137K, 5 pages)
January 2003
By Michael J. Prince (University of Victoria)
Source:
University of Victoria

-------------------------------------------

Caledon's Publications list
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/Search/By%20Date/
ATTENTION WELFARE HISTORIANS: This link will give you access to hundreds of Caledon reports, commentaries, literature reviews, papers, etc., going all the way back to 1993. This collection includes invaluable historical information on a wide range of topics, including the transition from the Canada Assistance Plan to the Canada Health and Social Transfer, Ontario's workfare experiment under Mike Harris, disability issues, education, taxation, poverty reduction, social policy and the federal government, and much more.

Recommended resource!

------------------------------

Selected site content:

------------------------------

Welfare Incomes
Crowdfunding Campaign Update:
October 20, 2013
The purpose of this campaign was to help raise funds for Welfare Incomes that had been published regularly since 1989 by the National Council of Welfare.

Target for this campaign : $20,000
Amount raised so far : $20,608 (103% of target)
Number of days left in this campaign : 0
Number of supporters : 258
[ Note : To see the list of contributors, click the link below and then, on the next page, click "Activity" near the top of the page. ]

---------------------------------------

ANNOUNCEMENT:

Caledon Institute of Social Policy / Data Rescue
Welfare Incomes
October 17, 2013
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who contributed to our Data Rescue campaign to save the Welfare Incomes report. We are very pleased to announce that we exceeded our target of $20,000 with a total of $25,500 in donations to the crowdfunding campaign as well as cheques sent directly to the office.
We greatly appreciate not only your financial contributions but also your words of encouragement in support of our work. Welfare Incomes is alive and well and will be made available within the next few weeks. Thank you for helping us keep alive this vital source of national information.

---------------------------------------

Saving Welfare Incomes : Caledon Institute of Social Policy
- info about the Welfare Incomes campaign (video and text).
https://www.giveffect.org/campaigns/159-data-rescue

Source:
Caledon Blog
http://www.caledoninst.org/Blog/

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/
Established in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a private, nonprofit organization with charitable status. It is supported primarily by the Maytree Foundation, located in Toronto. Caledon is an independent and critical voice that does not depend on government funding and is not affiliated with any political party.

-------------------

More content from the Caledon website:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm#caledon
(This link takes you further down on the page you're now reading.)

Welfare Incomes
Crowdfunding Campaign Update:
October 17, 2013
The purpose of this campaign was to help raise funds for Welfare Incomes that had been published regularly since 1989 by the National Council of Welfare.

Target for this campaign : $20,000
Amount raised so far : $20,508 (102% of target)
Number of days left in this campaign : 0
Number of supporters : 257
[ Note : To see the list of contributors, click the link below and then, on the next page, click "Activity" near the top of the page. ]

---------------------------------------

ANNOUNCEMENT:

Caledon Institute of Social Policy / Data Rescue
October 17, 2013
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who contributed to our Data Rescue campaign to save the Welfare Incomes report. We are very pleased to announce that we exceeded our target of $20,000 with a total of $25,500 in donations to the crowdfunding campaign as well as cheques sent directly to the office.
We greatly appreciate not only your financial contributions but also your words of encouragement in support of our work. Welfare Incomes is alive and well and will be made available within the next few weeks. Thank you for helping us keep alive this vital source of national information.

---------------------------------------

Saving Welfare Incomes : Caledon Institute of Social Policy
- info about the Welfare Incomes campaign (video and text).
https://www.giveffect.org/campaigns/159-data-rescue

Source:
Caledon Blog
http://www.caledoninst.org/Blog/

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/
Established in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a private, nonprofit organization with charitable status. It is supported primarily by the Maytree Foundation, located in Toronto. Caledon is an independent and critical voice that does not depend on government funding and is not affiliated with any political party.

Giveffect
https://www.giveffect.org/
A crowdfunding platform built for charities

---------------------------------------

New way to keep the war on poverty alive
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2013/09/04/new_way_to_keep_the_war_on_poverty_alive_goar.html
By Carol Goar
September 4, 2013
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy turns to crowdfunding to raise money and reach younger generations.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---------------------------------------

Saving data to save the country
HTML version (Toronto Star) :
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2013/10/10/saving_data_to_save_the_country.html
PDF version (28K, 2 pages) : http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1018ENG.pdf
No Canadian can afford to remain idle as Ottawa strips away our most important collective resource - public information about who we are.
By Sherri Torjman
October 10, 2013
(...)
We had heard about the crowdfunding route, which involves making public a given cause and asking many, many people for modest sums of money. There is no amount too small. The wealth in this case derives from the power of networks to get the word out and to have multiple hands - and pockets - sharing the burden of the problem. The challenge was that no campaign had ever before been undertaken in support of a piece of social research.
Perhaps equally important to the money is the message about the underlying problem. The death of the National Council of Welfare was the thin edge of a far bigger wedge: the loss in recent years of many vital sources of national information.

---------------------------------------

October 24, 2013 : Luncheon (Regina)
Keynote address by Sherri Torjman

Welfare Re-form:
The Future of Social Policy in Canada
(small PDF file, 1 page)
http://www.schoolofpublicpolicy.sk.ca/events/pdf/Welfare%20Reform_Luncheon%20Poster.pdf
By Sherri Torjman, Vice-President of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy
(...)
Welfare is a rule-bound, stigmatizing scheme that guarantees low income. Our studies of income dynamics have led us to conclude that improving welfare can actually confine some recipients to a life of poverty through its insidious trap: the “welfare wall.” We have proposed instead a set of tax-delivered, income-tested programs – child benefits, earnings supplements and disability income - that provide far more effective and more secure forms of income security.

Ms. Torjman’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion entitled “Saskatchewan Practitioners’ Perspectives on the Current and Future Challenges of Canadian Social Assistance”

Source:
University of Regina
School of Public Policy
http://www.schoolofpublicpolicy.sk.ca/

--------------------------------------------

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Welfare Incomes
Crowdfunding Campaign
The purpose of this campaign is to help raise funds for Welfare Incomes that had been published regularly since 1989 by the National Council of Welfare.

Related (earlier) links:

---------------------------------------------

The War on Poverty or the Weapon of Choice?
Musings on Our Crowdfunding Campaign

http://www.caledoninst.org/Blog/Post/?ID=12
September 26, 2013
By Sherri Torjman

---------------------

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
Launches Data Rescue Campaign

(via email from Ken Battle of Caledon)
September 12, 2013
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy is pleased to announce the launch of our Data Rescue crowdfunding campaign. The purpose of this campaign is to help raise funds for the report Welfare Incomes that had been published regularly since 1989 by the National Council of Welfare.

In 2012, the federal government announced – with no warning – that it was dismantling the National Council of Welfare and cutting all its work, including Welfare Incomes.
[ For more info about the Council, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm ]

After much deliberation, we decided at Caledon that we need to keep alive this vital source of information. We had developed the original methodology and knew how very difficult it would be to reconstruct credible numbers. We need to sustain Welfare Incomes, which provides credible evidence to make the case for decent incomes and for welfare reform.

Please watch our video:

Data Rescue - Caledon Rescues Welfare Incomes (duration 2:32)
http://youtu.be/8Ql46baO0dg

...and help us by contributing $20 (or more if possible) to our Giveffect campaign:
https://www.giveffect.org/campaigns/159-data-rescue

And please forward this notice to friends and networks, send a Tweet and/or post this link to your Facebook.

Together we can preserve this powerful weapon in the war on poverty. Thank you!

Ken Battle
President
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

http://www.caledoninst.org/
Established in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a private, nonprofit organization with charitable status. It is supported primarily by the Maytree Foundation, located in Toronto. Caledon is an independent and critical voice that does not depend on government funding and is not affiliated with any political party.

--------------------

Related link:

Welfare Incomes, 2009 (PDF - 6MB, 117 pages)
http://www.sixthestate.net/docs/welfare/welfareincomes2009.pdf
This was the last complete report on welfare incomes released by the Council.

--------------------------------

COMMENT (by Gilles):

I wholeheartedly encourage you to make a donation to support Caledon in its endeavour to rescue this project of the now-defunct National Council of Welfare.

It's important to keep the Welfare Incomes project alive, in my view, because it's the only report to my knowledge that compares welfare incomes not just across Canadian jurisdictions, but also with measures of adequacy such as After-tax Low Income Cutoffs, the Market Basket Measure and after-tax incomes.

Welfare Incomes is a collection of 17 reports going back to the mid-to-late 1980s and reporting on annual welfare incomes in each province and territory for four different case types. Each of those 17 reports was rigorously verified (in draft form) by *all* provincial and territorial governments for factual accuracy before the report was published.

There are two reasons why I support Caledon's crowdfunding campaign:

1. Welfare Incomes is a valuable resource for both government officials responsible for the administration of Canada's social programs (sharing best practices, comparing relative welfare "generosity " across provinces, etc.) and for social justice and other advocacy groups in their ongoing mission to keep federal and provincial governments' feet to the fire. It's called accountability, and it matters to me. If governments won't support the continuation of this project, Caledon is to be congratulated for and supported in their commitment to rescuing it for social researchers of every stripe.

2. "As the watering hole gets smaller, the animals start eyeing one another." (Anon.)
Let's face it --- the Harper Government™ has vacated the field social program information and most related funding, and the provinces appear to have gone back to doing their own individual internal analyses of what's going on elsewhere in Canada in matters relating to welfare. Revenue sources for non-governmental groups doing social research have long dried up for the most part, and many such groups have turned to social networks seeking funding for their project(s). A recent arrival in the field of crowdfunding, Giveffect, is a promising new approach to raising funds for projects: "Giveffect is a #NextGenDonor crowdfunding platform designed exclusively for charitable campaigns & causes."
I'm anxious to see how successful the Caledon campaign will be.
Giveffect isn't the silver bullet solution for all situations, but it's definitely another helpful resource.

Check their website:

Giveffect
https://www.giveffect.org/

Related link:

Giveffect : A new way to keep the war on poverty alive
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2013/09/04/new_way_to_keep_the_war_on_poverty_alive_goar.html
By Carol Goar
September 4, 2013
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy turns to crowdfunding to raise money and reach younger generations.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

--------------------------------------

I've made a donation to keep Welfare Incomes alive.
Won't you?

-----------------------------

Related links:

Welfare in Canada : The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1987_tangled_safety_net.pdf
1987
This was the Council's first report that included interprovincial welfare rate comparisons.
All information was vetted by provincial/territorial officials before finalizing the report.
The model and the methodology have remained constant for every subsequent edition of the report (with the exception of the Person with a Disability category, which was added in as of the 1989 edition).

---

Earlier editions of Welfare Incomes
http://sixthestate.net/?p=6350
(Jump down about two-thirds down the page to see the Welfare Incomes collection)

---

Publications Canada search results page for "Welfare incomes"
http://goo.gl/dnp4O
This is a pretty complete collection of links to the Welfare Incomes series of reports

---

More about the National Council of Welfare:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

Note from the Caledon Institute About
Poverty Reduction in Ontario
(PDF - 28K, 3 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1017ENG.pdf
September 26, 2013
By Michael Mendelson
While the provinces and territories can and should make an important contribution to reducing poverty, the federal government must also be engaged and do its part. It has at its disposal the most potent instruments to fight poverty and inequality.
(...)
The Caledon Institute has pointed to two zero cost options that the federal government could implement immediately, which would have at least some small impact on reducing poverty. It could eliminate pension incomesplitting, which is almost entirely of benefit only to the wealthiest seniors, and use the resulting one billion dollar savings to boost the Guaranteed Income Supplement for low-income seniors. Ottawa could also eliminate the flawed and inequitable Universal Child Care Benefit and nonrefundable Child Tax Credit and redirect the savings to the well-designed and equitable Canada Child Tax Benefit.
(...)
The recent Social Assistance Review is an important contribution to the effort to reform welfare. We do not here intend to undertake a detailed analysis. However, like many others in Ontario, we are reluctant to endorse the integration of Ontario Disability Supports into the Ontario Works program.

The Training Wheels Are Off: A Closer Look at the Canada Job Grant (PDF - 116K, 16 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1013ENG.pdf
Michael Mendelson and Noah Zon
June 2013
In its March 2013 Budget, the federal government proposed a new skills training program called the Canada Job Grant. The program would provide up to $15,000 per trainee for employer-sponsored training, of which the federal government would pay one third – if each of the sponsoring employer and the province or territory contribute matching funds. This report assesses the Canada Job Grant proposal and finds it to be deeply flawed. The proposal imposes an additional cost of up to $600 million plus administrative expenses on the provinces and territories while intervening with a unilateral federal initiative in a field recognized as within provincial jurisdiction. But aside from cost and jurisdictional issues, the Canada Job Grant is likely to deliver inferior results at higher costs, while remaining out of reach to many of the unemployed and underemployed Canadians it is intended to serve.

----------------------------------

Related links:

Advertised jobs program does not yet exist
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/national/Advertised+jobs+program+does+exist/8538869/story.html
By Andrew Coyne
June 17, 2013

Turn on your television this playoff season, and chances are you will run across an ad from the Government of Canada touting its new Canada Job Grant, unveiled in the spring budget. The ads promise $15,000 in funding for unemployed workers who need training, followed by the usual cheery invitation to “find out more.”
There’s just one catch — well, two, actually. Workers who look up the advertised website will find out rather less than more about the program — for the simple reason that the program, as such, does not yet exist. Ottawa proposes to foot only one-third of the cost of the grants; the remainder is contingent on the participation of the provinces and employers, which has yet to be negotiated.

Source:
Ottawa Citizen
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

---

* Federal Policy Monitor May 2013 (PDF - 32K, 3 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2013-05.pdf
- includes news items (and related links) on the following topics:
Aboriginals - Families - Governance - Health - Housing - Income Security - Seniors

* Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor May 2013 (PDF - 80K, 6 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2013-05.pdf

Source:
Federal Policy Monitor*
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/
[*NOTE : For links to the provincial/territorial monitor, scroll down the page.]
The Caledon Institute regularly scans for the release of federal government policies that impact areas of interest, including income security, disabilities, health, housing, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth. Both the federal and provincial/territorial Monitors are now searchable by date, jurisdiction and category.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Case for a Canada Social Report (PDF - 64K, 14 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1011ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
May 2013
The demise of the National Council of Welfare, announced in the 2012 Budget, would have punched a huge hole in Canada’s social policy database. The Council’s annual Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profile reports had for decades provided invaluable information on welfare and low income.

Rather than simply lamenting this potential loss, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is acting to rescue this important data by taking over its preparation and distribution. The welfare and poverty information will form part of a new Canada Social Report that will provide data and information on social programs and related tax benefits in Canada. The Report will not only collect key program and socioeconomic statistics, but also undertake analyses that help explain the shape and implications of identified trends. It will track and document major developments in social policy in a wide range of domains.

The first product of the Canada Social Report is already available, in the form of Caledon’s online Policy Monitor [ http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/ ] which tracks developments in federal and provincial/territorial social programs. The range will expand to include social policy developments at the municipal level. During the rest of this year, the Canada Social Report will update the welfare incomes and poverty trends, and will prepare a study on minimum wages. The project will grow over time, housed at Caledon but encouraging inputs from other organizations with an interest in social policy.

---

Related link
from the Toronto Star:

Defunct social agency comes back to life
Thanks to two resourceful social activists, the National Welfare Council, killed by the Conservatives last year, has come back to life.
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2013/05/29/defunct_social_agency_comes_back_to_life_goar.html
By Carol Goar
May 29, 2013
The government thought the National Welfare Council would stay dead when Finance Minister Jim Flaherty killed it a year ago.
The 43-year-old agency, weakened by successive government cutbacks, was on its last legs. Only a few churches, social agencies and food banks still cared about it. Flaherty didn’t even bother to announce its demise. A couple of Canadians took it upon themselves to revive the council. Now it’s back — not as a languishing bureaucracy, but as a modern online repository of socioeconomic information. The two rescuers were Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman , president and vice-president of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy.
(...)
They’re calling their national data hub the Canada Social Report. Initially it will include 72 federal and provincial social indicators, from pension coverage to child tax benefits, employment insurance payments to inequality trends. Next year, it will be expanded, bringing in information from 13 urban centres, including Toronto.

Source:
The Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---------------------------------------------

Comment (by Gilles):

I have the highest respect and admiration for Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman, both of whom I've known since the mid-to-late 1980s, and I want to take this opportunity to thank both of them, on behalf of social researchers of all stripes, for committing to creating and maintaining a Canada Social Report.

However, I do find that the headline of Carol Goar's article is misleading. The National Council of Welfare (NCW) was never a "social agency" like the Canadian Policy Research Network or the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, nor has it "come back to life."

The NCW was a semi-autonomous advisory body to the federal Minister responsible for social development, and the NCW's raison d'être was enshrined directly in the statute pertaining to that Minister's Department, thus giving it a much higher profile and credibility. The same Minister was responsible for payment of the Council's operating expenses; its membership comprised up to 15 individuals from all regions of the country, nominated by the Government of the day, and its mandate was to advise the Minister "regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate." The Council's reports were always made public, even though they were often (read "almost always") critical of federal government policy regarding supports for disadvantaged Canadians.

To say that Ken and Sherri can recreate the Council is to dream in technicolour. They can, however, help to breathe new life into the social research community by making those 72 federal and provincial social indicators available to the public.

Kudos to both Ken and Sherri for your commitment to evidence-based policymaking!

Private money, public programs? There will always be strings (PDF - 28K, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1010ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
May 2013
In response to the perpetual shortage of funding for a wide range of social needs, Ottawa just announced its commitment to the use of social impact bonds. The emerging sphere of social finance throughout the world opens many new fiscal doors. Social finance is a term that refers to a range of instruments, including social impact bonds, which blend public and private money to tackle tough social problems.

The potential problem with social impact bonds is not the fact that they bring private capital into the social equation. The primary concern with this instrument is the obsession with quantifiable performance outcomes. These expectations can lead to perverse outcomes, such as selecting the participants most likely to succeed in a program rather than the ones who need most help. The question of whose benefits are being measured must also be considered. Finally, patient capital is required in order to achieve real social change.

---

Federal Policy Monitor, April 2013 (PDF - 44K, 4 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2013-04.pdf
The Caledon Institute regularly scans for the release of federal government policies that impact areas of interest, including income security, disabilities, health, housing, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth.
In this issue:
* Aboriginals * Disability * Employment * Education * Governance * Health * Housing * Income Security *

Source:
Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor, April 2013 (PDF - 92K, 10 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2013-04.pdf
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy developments related to our core work and interests. A partial list includes: disability, education, health, housing, income security, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth. This tracking is intended to inform our analysis of policy trends.

NOTE : Both the federal and provincial/territorial monitors are searchable by date, jurisdiction and category.
If you prefer to browse through the past issues, go to the source link below, then click on a year and then a month to read the monitor for that month.
The federal monitor archive contains links to monthly issues from January to April 2013 only, while the provincial/terrirorial monitor goes right back to 2008.
Recommended reading!

Source:
Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor

http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy developments related to our core work
and interests. A partial list includes: disability, education, health, housing, income security, poverty reduction, recreation, seniors and youth. This tracking is intended to inform our analysis of policy trends.
[ NOTE : The provincial/territorial policy monitor is now searchable by date, jurisdiction and category – just click the source link above. ]

Ensuring the Welfare of ‘Welfare Incomes’ (PDF - 60K, 10 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1009ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
April 2013
This paper is the text of a speech on the “Role of Evidence in Policy-Making” delivered at the 2013 Queen’s Policy Forum held in Kingston on April 26, 2013. The paper discusses the importance of the Welfare Incomes reports and why the Caledon Institute decided to step in to save this work when Ottawa announced the dismantling of the National Council of Welfare.
[ See
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm ]
Welfare Incomes and the early Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net have served as foundational platforms for many Caledon proposals to reform the income security architecture in Canada . Welfare Incomes is based on a methodology that was painstakingly developed over time and would not be easily replaced. The rescue of this work is especially important in light of the recent loss of many vital sources of data in this country.

A Flimflam Budget (PDF - 28K, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1008ENG.pdf
By Michael Mendelson
April 2013
The recent federal Budget argued that there is a serious 'skills gap' in Canada . The Budget proposed a new Canada Job Grant to help fill that gap. But the Canada Job Grant is a poorly thought-out program and is likely to create no than more than a handful of training programs at best. Since the $300 million funding for the Canada Job Grant is to be taken out of existing provincial training programs, the result may actually be a substantial decrease in training programs in Canada .

Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor, March 2013 (PDF - 124K, 13 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2013-03.pdf
Content includes budget information from a social policy perspective for all jurisdictions where budgets have been tabled, along with other interesting bits of social policy info
for each province.

---

Federal Policy Monitor, March 2013 (PDF - 52K, 5 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Federal/2013-03.pdf
Contents of the March 2013 federal monitor:
* Aboriginals * Federal Budget + Caledon Institute Budget response: "The Skilled Budget" * Disability * Employment * Education * Governance * Interim Parliamentary Budget Officer named * Health * Homelessness * Housing * Income Security * Highlights of The Fiscal Monitor (Finance Canada) for January 2013 * Recreation * Seniors.

Guiding principles for social policy budgets (PDF - 36K, 4 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1004ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
February 2013
This commentary discusses three core principles that should guide the development of social policy measures in government Budgets:
1. Social program expenditures play a vital economic role because they act as both shock absorbers and fiscal stimulus. Rather than a drain on the economy, social programs have been crucial in ensuring that Canada’s economy has remained reasonably stable throughout the recent turbulence.
2. Maintaining and improving social programs can be equally important for the economic recovery. There is room for spending on new measures or improvements to existing programs by reassigning expenditure away from measures and programs that primarily benefit high-income Canadians or that are not warranted by current evidence.
3. Even in tough economic times, it is possible to introduce fundamental reforms through new measures or substantial modifications to existing programs. So long as the aim of fundamental reform is well articulated and a clear pathway toward its attainment is laid out, it is possible to reach the end goal through a series of incremental steps.

As the fiscal chill thaws: social policy ideas for the medium term (PDF - 32K, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1003ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
January 2013
Right now, Canada’s economic outlook remains uncertain. But as the economy begins to recover, as it eventually will, our fiscal situation will gradually improve.
This commentary argues that we need to begin now to develop well thought-out ideas for social policy reform. It sets out 12 areas for future social investments by the federal government, including increases to the Canada Child Tax Benefit and enhancements to the adequacy and coverage of the Working Income Tax Benefit.
The paper recognizes that it is not possible to introduce major changes in all 12 areas at the same time. It argues, instead, for an incremental approach in which gradual steps are taken toward the achievement of fundamental reforms.

Social Return on Investment: Strengths and Challenges (PDF - 68K, 12 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1000ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
December 2012
This paper presents the text of remarks delivered at the 2012 Social Finance Forum held at the MaRS Discovery District on November 8-9, 2012. Social Return on Investment is an evaluation methodology that seeks to move the assessment process from a focus on cost alone to one that includes value. It gives the social field the tools and language to get important issues heard at multisectoral tables where these concerns are often misunderstood, undervalued or dismissed as unimportant. Despite its vital contribution, there are serious philosophical, conceptual and methodological challenges embedded in this approach. These include the focus on quantification, the possibility of ‘creaming’ program participants most likely to succeed, the problem of attribution and the need to take into account key developments in the broader economic and social context.

Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor, November 2012 (PDF - 104K, 13 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2012-11.pdf

Caledon regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy developments related to our core work and interests. These include: Disability, Education, Health, Housing, Income Security, Poverty Reduction, Recreation, Seniors and Youth. This tracking is intended to inform our analysis of policy trends.

At Caledon's 20th anniversary celebration in Toronto in early October 2012, guests heard speeches by the three principals of the Caledon Institute : Caledon President Ken Battle, Vice-President Sherri Torjman and Senior Scholar Michael Mendelson.

Links to all three speeches appear below.

Architecture of Federal Income Security in Canada (PDF - 120K, 11 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/996ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle
October 2012
This text focuses on key federal income security programs in the areas of:
* Child Benefits:
--- Child Tax Benefit --- National Child Benefit and National Child Benefit Supplement --- Universal Child Care Benefit
* Adult Benefits:
--- Working Income Tax Benefit
* Un/Employment Insurance
* Seniors Benefits:
--- Old Age Security --- Guaranteed Income Supplement --- Canada and Quebec Pension Plans
* Guaranteed Annual Income?

.

Disability and the Aging Society:
Social Policy Challenges for Canada
(PDF - 132K, 14 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/997ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
Sherri presents an overview of Caledon’s past and current work on disability and aging in Canada and discusses Caledon's proposal for reforming disability income programs in Canada.

.

Is Canada (still) a fiscal union? (PDF - 120K, 11 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/998ENG.pdf
By Michael Mendelson
October 2012
If the economic commentators are to be believed there is at least one lesson from the never-ending Euro crisis: monetary union without fiscal union is unsustainable. Canada is a monetary union, but are we still a practicing fiscal union? Or has our fiscal union become so weakened that we are now more like the Euro-zone: ten more or less sovereign provinces tied together in a monetary union without effective programs to compensate adequately for fiscal imbalance between the provinces?

Assessing the Benefits of Community Human Services (PDF - 288K, 79 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/999ENG.pdf
By Anne Makhoul and Sherri Torjman
November 2012
This report presents a summary of the literature in the following eight areas of human service:
* early childhood education and care
* child welfare
* supports for families
family literacy
* disability supports
* home care
* crime prevention
* supports for at-risk youth.
The literature review was supplemented by conversations with 35 selected key informants from across Canada considered expert in their respective fields.
It places special emphasis on early childhood development and care, and crime prevention - the two domains with the most wide-ranging and robust evidence base.

The report also highlights the challenges involved in this work related to the widely variable evidence base among the eight areas of human service and to shifts in their delivery. Key developments in evaluation methods, including the growing interest in Social Return on Investment and developmental evaluation, are considered as well.

---

See also:

Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor - October 2012 (PDF - 92K, 8 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2012-10.pdf
The Monitor tracks Disability, Education, Health, Housing, Income Security, Poverty Reduction, Recreation, Seniors and Youth

June 2012
THE BAD NEWS:

Information is under attack in Ottawa.

* In 2010, the Harper Government™ announced that it was axing the long-form Census.
* Key social statistics are gone:.
--- The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey or PALS (the major source of national information on persons with disabilities and the supports they require to live independently) is being replaced, but the disability community hasn't yet been told what the new resource will be.
--- Social Security Statistics: Canada and Provinces, fantastic resource for historical statistical analysis of Canadian social programs over 25 years, has simply disappeared.
--- Ottawa has jettisoned the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) which gathered priceless information on changes experienced by individuals over time, such as movement in and out of poverty.
--- The National Council of Welfare (advisory body to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development) was abolished.

The last cut noted above places in jeopardy the future of two of the Council’s most important series – Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profile.

THE GOOD NEWS:
Caledon to the rescue!

The Caledon Institute of Social Policy will take over the task of gathering and analyzing the welfare and low income data in the two series. This vital information will form the first elements of a new Caledon product, the Canada Social Report.

Caledon is uniquely qualified to take over the Council’s welfare and poverty data. Twenty-five years ago, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman (then Director of the National Council of Welfare and consultant, respectively, now President and Vice-President of Caledon) created the welfare incomes methodology as part of the pioneering report, Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net. Sherri Torjman went on to write five more Welfare Incomes reports. Ken Battle created the first Poverty Profile in 1982 and wrote several editions thereafter before he left the Council to found Caledon in 1992.

More information will be provided as plans advance for incorporating the welfare and poverty data in the new Canada Social Report.
The statement whose link appears below provides some analysis and explanation of the Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profile series, tracing their origins and evolution over the years. It then makes the case as to why Caledon is uniquely qualified to save them.

The Caledon Statement:

Saving Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profile (PDF - 44K, 6 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/989ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
June 2012

On behalf of the social research community, I'd like to say:
KUDOS to Ken and Sherri of Caledon for committing to saving and updating these two important reports!!

Counsel for the Council (PDF - 32K, 3 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/973ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
January 2012
The Council of the Federation was created in 2003 to help promote cooperation and closer ties among provinces and territories. While the Council tackles a range of issues, it has focused considerable attention in recent years on health care. Subsequent to its meeting in July 2011, the Council issued a statement on Health Sustainability. Nearly a decade ago, Premiers published an accord that preceded the 10-year Canada Health Transfer agreement with the federal government. Like the current Council of the Federation communiqué, the 2003 First Ministers’ Accord on Health Care Renewal identified primary care reform and catastrophic drug coverage as major concerns. But another area that figured prominently at the time – home care – has not appeared (at least explicitly) on the Council of the Federation’s statements.
There can be no fundamental reform of health care in the absence of improved supports for long-term care, home care and informal caregivers. Community care should figure prominently when the Premiers resume their conversations at their upcoming meeting in Victoria on January 16 and 17, 2012.

Disability Papers
Sherri Torjman, January 2012
These three articles are contributions to a book published by the Council of Canadians with Disabilities. It sets out 30 years of achievements since 1981, the International Year of Disabled Persons, which have contributed to increased inclusion and participation by people with disabilities. The celebration was held on November 2, 2011, with special honours for the political champions responsible for the major milestones.

The first article discusses the work of the House of Commons Committee on the Disabled and the Handicapped, which produced the Obstacles report. The second entry summarizes the conclusions of In Unison, a vision paper published in 1998 by the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services. The third article summarizes the work of the Technical Advisory Committee on Tax Measures for Persons with Disabilities that reported to the Minister of Finance and the Minister of National Revenue.

Obstacles : 1981 House of Commons Committee on the Disabled (PDF - 32K, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/970ENG.pdf
November 201

In Unison: A Canadian Approach to Disability Issues (PDF - 32K, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/971ENG.pdf

Technical Advisory Committee
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/972ENG.pdf
November 2011

Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor - December 2011 (PDF - 108K, 7 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Policy/Provincial/2011-12.pdf
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy (www.caledoninst.org) regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy developments related to our core work and interests. These include: Disabilities, Education, Health, Housing, Income Security, Poverty Reduction, Recreation, Seniors and Youth. This tracking is intended to inform our analysis of policy trends.

Former Liberal mandarin Tom Kent dies
http://www2.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/story.html?id=5d2fc242-43b5-4670-9a12-555790df6569
November 16, 2011
Tom Kent, former Liberal Party mandarin and one of the key figures in 1960s Canadian public policy, has died. He was 89.
(...) Kent [became] the intellectual driving force behind the federal Liberal party's shift toward a more active role in social policy in the 1960s, helping to create the features of Canada's modern welfare state. He helped organize the party's famous Kingston Conference in 1960 that attracted 200 leading thinkers. His speech at the policy conference contained many of the radical ideas that later became party policies, such as medicare and federal funding for welfare.
Source:
Canada.com

COMMENT: Supporters of progressive social policy recognize and applaud the contributions of Tom Kent to the kinder, more compassionate Canada that we knew from the mid-1960s until the roof caved in in the mid-1990s with the demise of the Canada Assistance Plan --- but that's a whole other eulogy. Interesting how the relationship between Tom Kent and the Prime Minister of the day, Lester Pearson, led to some major social policy advances, just like the relationship between Tom Flanagan and Stephen Harper. <sarcasm>

Rest in peace, Tom Kent.
You will be fondly remembered.

--------------

Selected writings of Tom Kent for the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Health Care in a Renewed Federalism (67K, 19 pages)
April 2011

Federalism Renewed (PDF - 135K, 45 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/oldsite/WWW/Publications/PDF/623ENG.pdf
March 2007

A Short Path to Revitalized Federalism (PDF file - 118K, 5 pages)
January 2004

The UK in 2011 is not Canada in 1996 (PDF - 419K, 9 pages)
May 10, 2011
By Michael Mendelson
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
The lesson from Canada is not about how to cut the deficit: it is about when to cut the deficit. Nor was it cuts that created economic growth: rather it was economic growth that created the room for cuts. The effects of fiscal contraction in Canada were more than offset by the strongly growing economy with its foundation in exports to the US. Employment in Canada rose continuously during the period of fiscal contraction, due to the strength of the export-dominated market sector, enhanced by monetary policy...

Related link:
(found in the bibliography of the
above article by Michael Mendelson)

The impact of recessions in the United States on Canada
March 2009
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
Recessions in Canada and the US are often, but not always, closely synchronised. Moreover, there is a large disparity in the magnitude of the downturns since the severity of a recession in Canada is usually determined by the course of domestic demand, not exports. Of course, domestic spending is influenced by global trends, especially the impact of commodity prices on business investment. The record drop of our terms of trade late in 2008 suggests that the global recession will play a determinant role in domestic spending.
Source:
Canadian Economic Observer (March 2009) (Feature article)
[ Canadian Economic Observer - main product page ]
[ Statistics Canada ]

People’s Review Panel: Getting the Ontario Social Assistance Review issues straight
… from people with lived experiences of poverty
(PDF - 49K, 5 pages)
By Anne Makhoul and Richard Matern
January 2011
A People’s Review Panel composed of 18 members from across Ontario will provide input into Ontario ’s Social Assistance Review. People with lived experience of poverty are working with Voices from the Street and Daily Bread Food Bank to record, analyze and summarize the policy barriers which currently impede them.

Social Inclusion Consultation Workbook (PDF - 34K, 22 pages)
Sherri Torjman and Anne Makhoul
January 2011
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy has been asked by the Community Services Department of the City of Hamilton to prepare a Social Inclusion Vision in respect of their role as co-host of the 2015 Pan-Am Games. A draft Consultation Workbook was prepared to help kick start the community conversations about social inclusion.

Provincial/Territorial Policy Updates, December 2010 (PDF - 58K, 4 pages)
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
December 2010
Caledon regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy developments related to its core work and interests. This tracking is intended to inform Caledon's analysis of policy trends.
- includes a range of topics such as education, income security, poverty reduction, seniors, youth, etc.

Poverty and Disability: My Lived Experience (small PDF file - 3 pages)
By Calvin Wood
December 2010
On behalf of People First, an organization of people with intellectual disabilities, Calvin Wood was invited to speak at the “Disabling Poverty/Enabling Citizenship: End Exclusion 2010” conference in Ottawa in early November 2010. Calvin’s presentation to the Ottawa conference speaks to the everyday reality of the Canadians trapped and marginalized by the current income (in)security system.

Poverty Reduction in Québec: The First Five Years (small PDF file - 9 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
December 2010
This report is part of a series of papers on provincial poverty reduction strategies prepared for the Vibrant Communities project*. The report focuses upon the first five years of the poverty reduction initiative – though it should be noted that Québec recently renewed for another five years its commitment to reduce poverty and social exclusion. Some community groups have questioned the government's genuine commitment to tackling the problem of low income. Québec nonetheless has been a leader in many important respects, including the introduction of a legislative base as a foundation for poverty reduction, a series of linked actions in diverse fields, a long-term time frame within which to carry out this work, and an associated research and monitoring capacity.
[ * Vibrant Communities project : On the Caledon website home page, click "Special Projects" in the top menu, then
"Vibrant Communities" for a description of this initiative PLUS links to dozens of Vibrant Communities reports ]

Make Tax Time Pay: Program and Systems Change Successes (small PDF file - 8 pages)
By Anne Makhoul and Mark Cabaj
December 2010
Most poverty-related issues present opportunities for programmatic and systemic responses. Edmonton’s “Make Tax Time Pay” initiative confirmed that both can be done simultaneously. Communities can do some things to improve a situation, while government can work on the structural challenges.

How did the just society become just don't care?
One in an occasional series in which Canadian thinkers challenge the faltering federal Liberal party to do some fresh thinking in advance of a policy conference slated for March.
By Sherri Torjman, Ken Battle and Michael Mendelson
[ Caledon Institute of Social Policy ]
January 6, 2010
"(...) Poverty is the symptom of an unsettling malaise – a poverty of passion. Canada can be so much greater than just a society. The Liberals should use their upcoming conference as a significant moment to reclaim their vision and their voice. It's time for the Liberals to rekindle the flame for a nation that cares about its citizens."
Source:
Toronto Star

Related articles
in The Toronto Star:

* 'Tough on crime' stance needs scrutiny
January 3/10
Increasing jail time may have political appeal but it accomplishes little. To limit crime, Liberals need to consider what works, not what sounds good

* Canada must sit at international table
December 30/09

We have moved to the sidelines under the Harper government. To restore our crumbling image abroad, Michael Ignatieff must shape a convincing Liberal response to global upheavals

* How to sell a (gasp!) tax hike
December 30/09

Restoring the GST to 7% will go a long way toward fighting Ottawa's ballooning deficit. That's just good economics. Ignatieff's challenge is to make it good politics, too, and persuade consumers (read: voters) to buy into it.

* Redefining Canada's Liberal party
December 27/09
Priorities of equality and community should guide its future progressive agenda

December 02, 2009
Developing a Deprivation Index: The Research Process (PDF - 548K, 27 pages)
Richard Matern, Michael Mendelson and Michael Oliphant
December 2009
This paper tells the story of the development of the Ontario Deprivation Index by the Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy. A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

A three-stage community-based research process was used to develop the measure, engaging those with lived experience of poverty. Statistics Canada has now refined this list and incorporated it as a supplement to their Labour Force Survey, under the sponsorship of the Government of Ontario. The result of the process was the creation of the Ontario Deprivation Index, which constitutes one part of the multi-indicator “Child and Youth Opportunity Wheel” in the Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy. This is the first poverty measure to be developed through a unique partnership of a community organization, a policy think tank, government and Statistics Canada. It is also the first time a deprivation index has been developed in North America . The deprivation index is an innovative way of measuring poverty, different than all the other measures now used in Canada .

December 02, 2009
Testing the Validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index (PDF - 122K, 13 pages)
Richard Matern, Michael Mendelson and Michael Oliphant
December 2009
Using an empirical methodology based on a series of surveys and focus groups, Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy have developed a deprivation index for Ontario . A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

This paper is a preliminary test of the validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index using the results of a Statistics Canada survey of 10,000 Ontario households. We look at the performance of the index against 6 variables: income, education, employment status, immigration, family type and housing tenure. A similar method for testing the validity of the new Irish deprivation index was also used, although in this paper we are presenting only the most basic tests. Based on this early analysis, the Ontario Deprivation Index fully meets the tests of validity in relation to these variables.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
and
Daily Bread Food Bank
[NOTE: You'll also find links to both reports on the Daily Bread website.]

Related links:

New measure for the pain of poverty
December 3, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten and Tanya Talaga
One in eight Ontario children live in families that can't afford fresh fruits and vegetables every day, or can't afford to replace a broken appliance or share the occasional meal with friends or family.
These are a few of the 10 indicators listed in a new provincial poverty measure called the Ontario Deprivation Index, introduced Wednesday by Children's Minister Laurel Broten as part of the government's first annual report on the province's poverty reduction plan. The 10 "deprivation indicators" are not intended to be a comprehensive list. Instead, they are a sample of items and activities common to most Ontarians but out of reach for poor households, the report says.
Source:
Parent Central
[ Toronto Star ]

Where are you on the Deprivation Index?
By Laurie Monsebraaten
December 2, 2009
One in eight Ontario children is living in poverty, according to a new provincial measure released Wednesday that looks at whether families can afford items on a list of basic necessities. Families not able to afford two or more items from a list of 10 indicators on the Ontario Deprivation Index are considered as "having a poverty level standard of living," the McGuinty government says in its first annual report on Ontario's poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

National Post editorial board: A new way to overstate poverty
December 4, 2009
(...) The McGuinty government has chosen to use a measure of relative poverty known as a “deprivation index,” popular in England, Scotland, New Zealand and elsewhere. Any Ontarian unable to eat fresh fruit and vegetables daily, or meat, fish or “a vegetarian equivalent” every second day is considered poor. (...) We have long argued that Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut Off (LICO) — a commonly cited measurement of poverty in Canada — was a useless, relativist index. But we think Ontario’s deprivation index is even worse. No doubt, however, the bureaucrats like it just fine — for it justifies the case for more government intervention in the economy.
Source:
National Post

A Poverty Reduction Strategy for Nova Scotia (PDF - 47K, 9 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
November 2009
In December 2007, the Government of Nova Scotia passed Bill 94, An Act to Establish a Poverty Reduction Working Group in Nova Scotia. The mandate of the Working Group was to prepare a report recommending strategies and priorities to reduce poverty. Based on the recommendations of the Working Group, the Government of Nova Scotia released on April 3, 2009 its Poverty Reduction Strategy entitled Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity. The Strategy puts forward a framework for tackling the needs of persons living in and at risk of falling into poverty, while promoting prosperity for the province. Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity is a multi-year plan with four main goals: enable and reward work, invest in households in need, focus on children, and coordinate and collaborate. The paper describes the various measures that have been undertaken or are being planned in order to achieve each of these goals.

The Three Ghosts of Poverty (PDF - 36K, 3 pages)
Sherri Torjman
October 2009
Three ghosts stalk far too many households involved in providing personal care and support to relatives with severe disabilities, or sick and aging parents. First, many persons with disabilities and seniors live on low incomes and caregivers spend much of their own money for basic food, heat and shelter. Second, caregivers’ own employment status and income can be jeopardized by the pressures of caregiving responsibilities. Third, caregivers often pay the additional costs of disability-related goods and services not covered by medicare or private insurance. The commentary considers various policy solutions: reforming the disability income system, expanding the Compassionate Care Leave under Employment Insurance, providing a modest caregiver allowance, turning caregiver tax measures into refundable tax credits and investing in the supply of disability supports.

Why We Need a First Nations Education Act (PDF - 120K, 36 pages)
By Michael Mendelson
October 2009
This paper discusses the need for a First Nations Education Act. The first step in achieving ‘Indian Control of Indian Education’ was for the federal government to cede control over First Nations education, and this has largely been done. But the second and more crucial step is for First Nations to step into the vacuum and create the necessary organizational and financial infrastructure for a high-quality First Nations education system, and this has not been done. Despite many First Nations attempts to establish needed educational infrastructure, only bits and pieces of an education system have so far been set up on various reserves across Canada . For the most part, the major elements of an education system for First Nations are missing. The paper describes those missing pieces and sets out a plan for how they may be put into place across Canada . It is a proposal for a new Act of Parliament which would allow First Nations that wished to do so to establish properly funded First Nations school boards with clear legal empowerment and the necessary regional educational agencies to support them.

Talking Turkey on Taxes (PDF - 32K, 2 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
October 2009
This commentary gives thanks to the three million Canadians who provide informal care to infirm or aging parents, or to relatives with severe disabilities. While most caregivers would not want to give up their caregiving role, many admit that it can create onerous financial strains, which threaten to push them into poverty. These pressures arise from paying for basics for family members unable to work; reducing work hours or leaving employment altogether; and covering additional age- or disability-related expenses. In recognition of these three ghosts of poverty, Ottawa provides modest income tax relief through the caregiver credit and infirm dependant credit. The paper discusses the limitations of these measures and proposes preferred options for caregiver support.

Student Aid Meets Social Assistance (PDF - 278K, 77 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
September 2009
This study explores the interaction between student aid and social assistance - the two main systems in Canada that provide financial support to post-secondary students. Both systems are complex in themselves because they are governed by a wide range of rules and regulations. Their complexity is exacerbated by the constitutional nature of Canada . This paper focuses on the interface issues because of an overriding concern: Students from low-income households are under-represented in the post-secondary educational system - particularly at the university level. They face multiple barriers, including information and motivational factors, to participation. Another major problem, not surprisingly, is their limited income and assets relative to the cost of post-secondary education.

All Aboard Manitoba’s Poverty Train (PDF - 47K, 10 pages)
By Sherri Torjman, Ken Battle and Michael Mendelson
September 2009
This report summarizes the core elements of the newly-introduced poverty reduction strategy in Manitoba . Announced on May 21, 2009, All Aboard represents an annual investment of $744 million, including $212 million in new funding. To tackle the numerous factors that create and sustain poverty, the province is investing in four clusters of intervention: safe affordable housing; education, jobs and income support; strong and healthy families; and coordinated programs and services. The strategy has several elements of success: It is a whole-of-government approach rather than the effort of a single department. It invests in recognized pathways out of poverty and engages partners outside government in the diverse interventions. The strategy provides direct (albeit modest) payments to households with children to boost their incomes immediately. All Aboard includes a process to coordinate its many components and monitor its impact.

New Ingredients for the Health Care Mix (PDF - 35K, 3 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
September 2009
As the aging population puts more pressure on scarce resources, the debates as to who gets selected for essential health care services will become increasingly contentious. The typical response is to look for ways to reform health care in order to ration services more efficiently. Another answer is to shore up the supply of nurses. This paper argues for additional supports for the estimated three million informal caregivers in Canada . Options include greater provision of home supports and workplace policies that allow flexibility for elder care. Another possibility involves the development of secondary suites, an affordable housing option that enables the provision of care at home. The paper argues that urban design makes an important policy contribution to our social challenges.

Supporting Working Canadian Families:
The Role of Employment Insurance Special Benefits
(PDF - 105K, 33 pages)
By Michael J. Prince
September 2009
This paper explores the Employment Insurance (EI) policy objective of encouraging long-term labour market attachment by providing temporary income support during absences from work due to life events such as illness, childbirth and caring for a terminally ill family member. The study was undertaken as part of an ongoing assessment of the policies and programs of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, which is examining how EI may need to adjust to better align with current shifts in the labour market and society. The report examines five EI special benefits: the Family Supplement, Sickness, Parental, Maternity and Compassionate Care. The paper also includes a chronology of major developments in family-related benefits in EI policy from 1941 to 2006. Because EI special benefits operate at the intersection of labour market policy, income security policy and family policy, these benefits enable a better balance between work and family life, and have important implications for each of these policy domains.

Canada's Shrinking Safety Net:
Employment Insurance in the Great Recession
(PDF - 41K, 5 pages)
Michael Mendelson, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
April 2009
Belt-tightening changes made to Employment Insurance in the 1990s have decimated the program’s coverage over the years and substantially reduced the value of payments. Today only three in ten unemployed Canadians receive regular EI benefits in contrast to eight in ten in the last recession, in 1990. There is a gender gap in coverage, and it has widened. Both eligibility for benefits and the maximum duration of benefits vary widely from community to community and province to province, leading to unfair treatment of the unemployed. Caledon proposes several immediate changes to strengthen EI, including: a uniform set of rules governing entrance requirements and length of benefits, increasing the earnings-replacement rate from the current 55 to 70 percent of insurable earnings, and setting premium rates higher in good economic times and lower in bad times.

Reducing Poverty in Ontario: A Place-Based Approach
Ontario Poverty Conference
(PDF - 3MB, 8 pages)
June 10-12, 2009
The release of Ontario’s first comprehensive anti-poverty strategy makes now the ideal time for community leaders from across Ontario to come together and be inspired by the stories and experiences from Vibrant Communities and other successful poverty reduction initiatives throughout Canada that are producing real results. The purpose of Reducing Poverty in Ontario: A Place-Based Approach – a three-day learning event in Kitchener, Ontario from June 10 to 12 – is to offer community leaders a rich learning experience that will explore the distinction between reducing and alleviating poverty, and introduce concepts and tools that demonstrate how to build and sustain the multi-sector teams needed to engage citizens in comprehensive poverty reduction efforts.
Speakers include:
· Deb Matthews, Minister of Children & Youth Services and Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues
· Sherri Torjman, Vice-President of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy
· Robin Cardozo, CEO of The Ontario Trillium Foundation
· Tim Brodhead, CEO of The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation
· Frances Lankin, CEO of United Way Toronto
· Liz Weaver, Director of the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction
· Mark Chamberlain, Chair of the Hamilton Roundtable and CEO of Trivaris; and,
· Paul Born, CEO of the Tamarack Institute for Community Engagemen

The Forgotten Fundamentals (PDF - 47K, 5 pages)
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
December 2008
Strong social programs can play a vital part in an economic stimulus package. Ottawa has at its disposal several effective social programs that can play an important part in an economic stimulus package to combat the recession. Boosting three geared-to-income programs – the Canada Child Tax Benefit, refundable GST credit and Working Income Tax Benefit – would put additional money into the hands of lower-income households who are most likely to spend it immediately. Employment Insurance, which now serves only four in ten unemployed Canadians, must be restored and strengthened. Ottawa should also bolster its transfers to the hardest hit provinces and territories so that they do not bear the full burden of social assistance and other recession-linked cost increases.

Poverty Policy (PDF - 119K, 36 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
October 2008
This paper discusses ten major policy areas that comprise the core of a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy:
* affordable housing * early childhood development * high school completion and improved literacy proficiency * demand-driven customized training * improved minimum wages and enhanced supplementation of low earnings and of income * a restored and improved unemployment insurance system * adequate income and appropriate supports for persons with disabilities * assistance with the creation of assets for low- and modest-income households, support for the social economy * strong social infrastructure * place-based initiatives that fashion integrated approaches to intervention and that create effective responses to tackling poverty through creative combinations of resources and approaches.

Federal Election – Politicians refuse to admit that deficits are inevitable (PDF - 35K, 3 pages)
By Michael Mendelson
October 2008
This article, which first appeared in the Toronto Star, argues that Canada will be caught in a prolonged recession in the US. If so, most governments in Canada will end up with deficits in the next few years, and it is better to plan for this eventuality than to just hope it does not happen. The real challenge is to maintain fiscal discipline even when deficits are permitted. If governments plan sensibly, they can establish ‘fiscal rules’ setting out what deficit financing can be used to pay for and how large deficits can be.

Make Work Pay (PDF - 34K, 2 pages)
Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
September 2008
This Labour Day commentary explores various actions that governments and employers can take to improve the earnings of the working poor. One in four Canadian workers makes just $10 an hour or less and close to half (44 percent) of low-income households have at least one working adult. Key policy reforms include increasing and indexing minimum wages, investing in education and training, ensuring an adequate supply of decent affordable housing and enhancing the Canada Child Tax Benefit. This commentary focuses upon essential changes to the amount and design of the Working Income Tax Benefit - the federal policy measure whose intended purpose is to help make work pay.

Social Profits (PDF - 49K, 7 pages)
Sherri Torjman
September 2008
This essay discusses the various dimensions of the social economy - a unique and burgeoning sector of the economy in which business enterprises and economic activity seek not only to generate revenue but also to advance social goals. There are hundreds of thousands of hybrid businesses, also known as social enterprises, which are taking their place on the world stage - and increasingly in stock market portfolios. They try both to generate profit and create social value. They are sometimes referred to as ‘blended value’ organizations because that is precisely what they do. This paper explores their many different forms and puts forward policy proposals to bolster social enterprises within the Canadian economy.

Canadians Need a Medium-Term Sickness/Disability Income Benefit (PDF file - 112K, 36 pages)
By Michael J. Prince
January 2008
This paper focuses upon a serious weakness in Canada’s income security system. There is a major gap in social insurance coverage for millions of Canadians whose work and earnings are interrupted on a temporary or recurring basis because of illness or disability. This paper examines the current relationship between Employment Insurance (EI) sickness benefits and Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability benefits, and explores possibilities for stronger linkages between these programs. Various options for a medium-term sickness/disability income benefit are considered along with their respective strengths and weaknesses.

A Tale of Two Pension Plans: The Differing Fortunes of the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (PDF file - 192K, 46 pages)
By Ed Tamagno
January 2008
The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) are headed towards an historical crossroads. The most recent actuarial valuation of the CPP shows that the federal scheme is sound in its financing and should remain financially sound for the foreseeable future, without the need for any increase in its contribution rate over the next 75 years. Not entirely so, however, for the QPP. Although the Quebec plan is in no imminent financial difficulty, its most recent actuarial valuation indicates that changes to the QPP’s financing or benefits must be made well before 2050 or the scheme will be unable to meet its commitments fully after that year. This paper examines the reasons for the divergence in the financial projections of the Canada and the Quebec Pension Plans and proposes ways in which the parallelism of the two schemes, which has been a mainstay of federal and provincial policy for over four decades, can be maintained.

Caledon Response to Liberal
Poverty Strategy
(PDF file - 264K, 9 pages)
by Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman,
Michael Mendelson and Ed Tamagno
November 2007
"(...)The renewed focus on poverty is long overdue. Strong and explicit federal leadership, along with cooperation with the provinces and territories in several key areas, are essential to attain significant reductions in poverty. But real progress will not be possible unless sound policy measures are employed to achieve this crucial goal.

Repairing Canada's Social Safety Net (PDF file - 276K, 14 pages)
Sherri Torjman, May 2007
The Department of Human Resources and Social Development Canada invited departmental representatives and four outside panelists to a roundtable to consider options for repairing Canada’s social safety net. This paper summarizes the highlights from Caledon’s contribution, which made the case for the need to reform Employment Insurance and welfare in concert and in association with labour market changes... (Read the complete abstract)

Other Caledon reports - links to all 500+ reports from May 1993 to date
Search Caledon publications

Tax Fairness According to Canada's New Government (PDF file - 70K, 13 pages)
Ed Tamagno and Ken Battle
November 2006
Federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty’s surprise announcement on October 31, 2006, shutting down income trusts was front page news across Canada. Little media attention, however, was given to other changes to the income tax system announced at the same time. These include two of particular importance to seniors: a proposal to allow couples to split pension income and an increase in the age credit. This commentary analyzes these proposed changes to the tax system and who will benefit if they are implemented. It shows that the splitting of pension income will provide windfall benefits to some of the wealthiest seniors, only modest benefits to middle-income seniors, and nothing at all to the poorest of Canada’s elderly. The commentary goes on to present an alternative approach - involving changes to the age credit and pension income credit - that is fairer and that would cost no more, and probably even a bit less, than the government’s proposals.

Towards a New Architecture for Canada's Adult Benefits (PDF file - 143K, 37 pages)
Ken Battle, Michael Mendelson and Sherri Torjman
June 2006
Since its creation in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy has worked to modernize Canada’s social security system. We have made the case for major changes not just to individual social programs but to the basic structures and functions – the ‘architecture’, to use the current vogue term – of social policy. This paper advances our work on the modernization agenda in a large area of Canadian social policy that has for the most part defied successful reform – income security programs and supportive services for working-age adults, which Caledon has dubbed ‘adult benefits.’ The first part of the paper explains why current programs – especially welfare and Employment Insurance, the two core adult benefits – fail to meet the needs of working-age Canadians. Fundamental and comprehensive reform is required, through integrated changes to both federal and provincial/territorial programs and a realignment of governments’ roles and responsibilities. The second part offers our thinking on how to build a new architecture for adult benefits.

Finding Common Ground on Child Care (PDF file - 15K, 3 pages)
Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
February 2006
The proposed $1,200 Choice in Child Care Allowance is a stealth program that will in fact deliver smaller benefits than advertised. Caledon proposes that the federal government instead deliver the $1,200 through the tried and true Canada Child Tax Benefit.

Related Links:

Choice in Child Care Allowance - from the website of the Conservative Party of Canada
- incl. information on the Child Care Allowance, along with links to 20 news videos and articles about the Allowance.
Sample video:
December 12
News Conference, Rona Ambrose
NOTE: This is streaming video that you may not be able to access on a computer that's on a network either at the office or in a university. If you're interested in the area of child care and early learning, I highly recommend that you read the articles on the Conservative website...

Google Web Search Results : "Choice in Child Care Allowance"
Google News search Results : "Choice in Child Care Allowance"
Source:
Google.ca

The Choice in Child Care Allowance: What you See Is Not What You Get (PDF file - 63K, 7 pages)
Ken Battle, January 2006
The Conservatives’ plan for a “Choice in Child Care Allowance” is seriously flawed. Because the new program will trigger reductions in federal and provincial/territorial income-tested benefits and increases in income taxes, most families will end up with less – for modest-income families in the $30,000-$40,000 range, much less - than the gross $1,200 annual payment for every child under 6. The Child Care Allowance also will favour one-earner couples over single parents and two-earner families. The proposed scheme is really a child benefit, not a child care program. Caledon contends that it would be better to invest in further increases to the existing Canada Child Tax Benefit, a modern and effective social program that suffers from none of the failings of the proposed Choice in Child Care Allowance.

There's Madness to this Method (PDF file - 18K, 4 pages)
Sherri Torjman, January 2006
The November 2003 Report of the Auditor General, released in February 2004, set in motion a chain of events that led to an obsession with accountability. The November 2005 report of the Auditor General, by contrast, barely created any interest – despite several important recommendations that could help the federal government and voluntary organizations do their jobs more effectively. The latest audit looked at federal policies and practices around the creation, coordination and oversight of ‘horizontal initiatives.’ The Auditor General instructed central agencies to provide more explicit guidance for horizontal practice related to common application procedures, funding instruments, data collection, reporting practices and evaluation frameworks.

Evaluation Framework for Federal Investment in the Social Economy: A Discussion Paper (PDF file - 97K, 33 pages)
Eric Leviten-Reid and Sherri Torjman, January 2006
This paper was prepared on behalf of Social Development Canada to support the department and its partners in developing an evaluation framework for potential federal investment in the social economy. It also informed the efforts of government partners in their formulation of a horizontal Results Based Accountability Framework for the social economy initiatives announced in the 2004 federal Budget. The report discusses the nature of the social economy, identifies issues and challenges involved in evaluating its activities and proposes a learning-oriented approach to its evaluation. The paper also presents a logic model for conceptualizing the work of the social economy, including the broad societal objectives it seeks to achieve, major types of investment and support to sustain this activity, and results for households, organizations, communities and the social economy sector as a whole.

Vibrant Communities Calgary: Awareness, Engagement and Policy Change (PDF file - 36K, 9 pages)
Anne Makhoul and Eric Leviten-Reid, January 2006
By educating Calgarians about the complex realities of poverty and influencing the development of responsive public policies, Vibrant Communities Calgary is trying to create a profound shift in thinking. It seeks to move from a climate that sees poverty as a personal problem to one in which systemic change makes it possible for individuals and households to improve their circumstances. This is the second in a series of stories which describe the poverty reduction work of the six Vibrant Communities Trail Builders.

Strategies for Achieving Equity and Prosperity in Saskatchewan (PDF file - 50K, 15 pages)
Rick August, January 2006
This paper focuses on the coexistence of strong labour demand in Saskatchewan, and a chronically underemployed segment of the population that is not achieving full economic citizenship. It argues that these circumstances afford an opportunity to strengthen the province’s labour force and economy, while at the same time increasing the economic inclusion of its disadvantaged citizens. The paper proposes a strategy to reduce economic disadvantage through employment and productivity growth. On a practical level, it argues for a partnership between government and employers that would help potential workers to prepare for entry-level employment, and from this base of employment, to improve their employment security and income through productivity growth. The analysis relies on enabling approaches to public policy that are designed to influence market forces towards more equitable outcomes, and harness human motivations and energies to improve personal and societal outcomes. The paper argues that a fair distribution of wealth is achievable within the context of a competitive market economy, and that an employment inclusion and productivity growth strategy could lead to sustainable gains in both Saskatchewan’s aggregate wealth and its distributional equity.

A Working Income Tax Benefit That Works (PDF file - 15K, 3 pages)
Ken Battle and Michael Mendelson, November 2005
Like the National Child Benefit, the Working Income Tax Benefit should be debated and developed as a national – not just federal, nor just provincial/territorial – social policy reform.

Anyone Got a Plan? (PDF file - 19K, 4 pages)
Michael Mendelson, November 2005
Caledon Senior Scholar Michael Mendelson challenges governments to start thinking and talking about – and planning for – an inevitable looming crisis: the next recession.

The Disability Savings Plan: Contribution Estimates and Policy Issues (PDF file - 133K, 47 pages)
Keith Horner, November 2005

The Disability Savings Plan: Policy Milieu and Model Development (PDF file - 86K, 35 pages)
Richard Shillington, November 2005

Intergenerational Dimensions of Canada's Fiscal System (PDF file - 81K, 27 pages)
Joe Ruggerri, Yang Zou and Shannon Garrett, November 2005

real leaders volume 15 - Senator Landon Pearson (PDF file - 29K, 4 pages)
Anne Makhoul, November 2005
Senator Landon Pearson – the Senator for Children and the Children’s Senator – retires from her seat in the Senate in November 2005. This issue of ‘real leaders’ is dedicated to a woman whose life has been devoted to the task of advocating for children and youth.

Measuring child benefits: Measuring child poverty (PDF file - 270K, 73 pages)
February 2005
By Michael Mendelson
"This report addresses two critical questions in social policy: what is child poverty and how much is an adequate child benefit? To answer these questions, the report provides an analytic basis to distinguish between poverty among families with children and that element of their poverty that is properly understood as ‘child poverty.’ It argues that child benefits should cover the incremental cost of raising a child in a family living just above poverty levels. But to estimate an adequate child benefit, we must then define ‘poverty.’ Building upon a critical review of Canadian and international research, the report describes two alternative methodologies that could be adopted to develop a well-grounded Canadian poverty line. The report provides a number of preliminary quantitative estimates of the value of an adequate child benefit according to these methodologies. This report will challenge your understanding of ‘child poverty,’ how it should be measured and the role of child benefits in addressing it."

Presentation to the Finance Committee Pre-Budget Consultation
November 2004
Sherri Torjman, Ken Battle and Michael Mendelson
"This paper (...) discusses several key principles to help guide the spending of the federal surplus: transparency, balance and purpose. The paper proposes that the surplus not be directed towards debt reduction but rather towards a combination of program and tax reduction measures. With respect to program expenditure, the authors have identified three top priorities from a wide range of proposals they have put forward over the years: child benefits, early childhood care and learning, and community supports for persons with disabilities and the aging population. Possible tax reductions related to employment and education would be directed towards low- and modest-income households."

Presentation (PDF file - 56K, 13 pages)

Related links:
- go to the Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm

Transitions Revisited: Implementing the Vision
By John Stapleton
September 2004
"Transitions, the landmark 1988 report of the Social Assistance Review in Ontario, created a new vision for social assistance and related programs that called for a radically redesigned set of child benefits, a new income program for persons with disabilities and a new direction to bring welfare recipients into the mainstream of community life. Although some early investments were made to implement the vision, these reforms were largely dismantled in the mid- to late-1990s. John Stapleton, a former public servant and senior policy advisor to members of the Social Assistance Review Committee from 1986-1988, argues that there has never been a better time to bring some of the key proposals of Transitions up to date and to seriously consider implementing them."
[Abstract]

Complete report (PDF file - 135K, 38 pages)

Aboriginal People in Canada's Labour Market: Work and Unemployment, Today and Tomorrow
Abstract in English and French + link to the complete report in both official languages (46 pages in English)
[ version française : Les Autochtones sur le marché du travail canadien : travail et chômage, aujourd'hui et demain ]
Michael Mendelson
April 2004
"Has the labour market situation of Aboriginal people in Canada been improving over the last several years? This paper uses data from the 1996 and 2001 censuses to present comprehensive, factual answers to this question."
Related Links: go to the Canadian Social Research Links First Nations page

Learning and Evaluation for Poverty Reduction
Abstract in English and French + link to the complete report in both official languages
L'Apprentissage et l'évaluation dans le cadre d'initiatives de réduction de pauvreté
Sherri Torjman and Eric Leviten-Reid
March 2004
"This is the sixth in a series of papers written in support of the Vibrant Communities project, a four-year national effort to explore promising local solutions to reduce poverty. The paper discusses various aspects of community learning. It describes how the Pan-Canadian Learning Partnership, which comprises the foundation of Vibrant Communities, engages in a process of continual learning to inform and improve local efforts. The paper also explores the challenges involved in evaluating comprehensive community initiatives. It discusses the ‘logic model’ of evaluation. This approach is based on the assumption that there is a sequence of events which must take place, and that build upon each other in a logical fashion, in order to effect any complex change. The intermediary steps along the way can then be identified and assessed."

Reflections on Vibrant Communities
Eric Leviten-Reid
March 2004
(version française : Reflexion sur le projet collectivité dynamiques)
"
This is the seventh in series of papers written in support of the Vibrant Communities project. This paper reflects on the first 18 months of the Vibrant Communities experience and the Face-to-Face Forum in Guelph, Ontario, September 22-24, 2003. This Forum provided an opportunity for participants in Vibrant Communities to reflect on their experience in order to sharpen their focus and refine strategies for the next phases of the work. The aim of this paper is to capture some of the key lessons and observations from the early days of Vibrant Communities."
Complete report (PDF file - 73K, 20 pages)
Document complet en français (fichier PDF - 83Ko., 24 pages)

Three Choices for the Future of Medicare
Gregory P. Marchildon
April 2004
This paper argues that Canadians are at a crossroads in terms of the future of medicare. Critical directional decisions will be made at the First Ministers Meeting in a few months. Ottawa must decide its role before it negotiates with the provinces the future of a policy that is an integral part of the country’s identity.
Complete report - (PDF file - 88K, 20 pages)
Related Links: go to the Canadian Social Research Links Medicare Debate Links page

The Repair of Taxation
December 2003
Tom Kent
"...argues that federal taxation has become so unfair and so slack, so undermined by avoidance and evasion, that its repair is now the urgent social reform on which others depend. (...)The paper offers a combination of reforms to increase government revenues in ways both better for the economy and more progressive for society."
Complete report (PDF file - 88K, 26 pages)

New Ingredients for the Fiscal Pie
Sherri Torjman, December 2003
"...argues the need for exploring possible methods of expanding the ‘fiscal pie.’ It explores one possible model put forward by PLAN (Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network), a group of parents of children with severe disabilities. The group proposes a combination of private savings and public spending to help develop caring communities. (...) The proposal represents one idea in a range of possible savings and investment mechanisms to expand the fiscal pie – a direction which we should be debating seriously as a nation."
Complete report (PDF file - 19K, 3 pages)

Community-based Poverty Reduction: The Québec Experience
by William Ninacs
September 2003
Full report
(PDF file - 47K, 17 pages)
Highly recommended!
This is an excellent primer for people who want general information on how Quebec's social protection system works. It contains a brief overview of the evolution of Quebec's social, political cultural and economic fabric, with a special focus on community economic development
- Table of contents : Population and territorial organization - The ‘Quiet Revolution’ (1960 -66) - Culture - Economic development - Health and welfare - Community organizations and related social movements - Evolution of Québec government policies toward poverty reduction - Local and community economic development - Key theoretical constructs - Social development - Social economy

Child Benefits Levels in 2003 and Beyond: Australia, Canada, the UK and the US
Michael Mendelson
April 2003
Abstract
"Australia, Canada, the UK and the US all have programs providing cash benefits to families with children. This study is a detailed comparison of current child benefit rates in the four countries, for a representative lone parent family with one child and a two-parent family with two children. It also compares Canada’s child benefits in 2007, when all announced increases are implemented, to those in Australia, the UK and the US. The paper calculates the changes that would be needed to replicate UK child benefits in Canada, and analyzes the implications of these changes."
Full Document (PDF file - 75K, 13 pages)

Canada needs social policy that works, says new Caledon report
Press Release/Abstract
September 25, 2002
"We look to next week’s Speech From the Throne to advance the ideas put forward in our social policy-that-works agenda."

Proposals include:
- increasing the the maximum annual Canada Child Tax Benefit
- boosting federal transfers to the provinces and territories for early childhood development
- improving paid parental leave
- replacing welfare with a Basic Income Support system (Basic Wage + Training Allowance + Basic Support for those who can't work)
- indexing minimum wages and examining minimum wages
- launching a national Employment Skills and Learning Strategy
- developing a policy framework to support community economic development
- offering supplementary health benefits to all low- and modest-income Canadians
- improving targeted tax relief
- creating a Disability Supports Fund; improving tax benefits for Canadians with disabilities; developing a new National Disability Benefit.
- helping to build a strong social foundation for cities
Complete report online:
Social Policy That Works: An Agenda (PDF file - 68K, 22 pages)
by Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
September 2002

A New Era in British Columbia: A Profile of Budget Cuts Across Social Programs (PDF file - 36K, 10 pages)
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
July 2002
"This paper is a summary of the wide range of reductions and cuts the BC Liberals have introduced to social programs over the past year. It documents changes in the areas of health care, education, income security, justice, and services for children, women and persons with disabilities."

Fiscal Imbalances and the Financing of National Programs (PDF file - 23K, 5 pages)
Joe Ruggeri, July 2002
"
This paper explores the state of government finances in Canada. It focusses upon the growing fiscal imbalance, commonly known as vertical fiscal imbalance (VFI), between the federal and provincial/territorial levels of government."

Canada 2015: Globalization and the Future of Canada’s Health and Health Care (PDF file - 114K, 35 pages)
Michael Mendelson and Pamela Divinsky
July 2002
This report describes four scenarios for future global economic and political structures – called Global Club, Shared Governance, Cyberwave and Regional Dominators – and looks at the future of health and health care in Canada within each of these scenarios. The report is part of the ‘Future of Global and Regional Integration’ project, sponsored by the Institute of Intergovernmental Relations at Queen’s University, where the scenarios originally were developed. The report is meant to speculate not so much on what will be, as what could be, in an effort to stimulate consideration of our health system’s relationship to global futures.

The Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefit
February 2002
"This report presents a policy history of the Canada Pension Plan disability benefit. It discusses the strengths and unique features of this national program, trends in caseload and cost, key issues related to the disability benefit, appeals procedures and options for reform."
Complete Text (PDF file - 150K, 62 pages)

Medicure
February 2002
"This op ed points out how the loss of the Canada Assistance Plan in 1996 shook the foundation of community supports that help keep people out of hospital and decimated the systems of community care that enable patients to return or remain at home. The lack of community supports has created serious pressures for Canada’s health care system."

Complete Text (PDF file - 15K, 2 pages)

From Trade-Off to Trade-Up
February 2002
"This paper, presented at the Arthur Kroeger College of Public Affairs, argues that economic competitiveness and social cohesion are not a trade-off, but rather are intrinsically linked. It discusses three key means of advancing an integrated economic and social agenda: through practices, decision-making and trade standards that integrate competitiveness and cohesion."

Complete Text (PDF file - 50K, 17 pages)

Equalization: Will The Attacks Ever End?
February 2002
"In this commentary, the author contends that a recent misinterpretation regarding the equalization formula not only would undermine the constitutional foundations of the equalization program but also would threaten the existence of social programs, including health care, education and social assistance."

Complete Text (PDF file - 17K, 3 pages)

Enterprising Non-profits
February 2002
"This story describes the development of a program in British Columbia which supports non-profit organizations in their bid to diversify revenue sources by launching business enterprises. Started as a pilot project in 1997, the Enterprising Non-profits Program (ENP) was initiated by a partnership between VanCity Community Foundation, Vancouver Foundation, United Way of the Lower Mainland and VanCity Credit Union."
Complete Text (PDF file - 30K, 8 pages)

Reaching Past the Barricades: Conflict Resolution at International Summit Events
February 2002
"World summit events have recently been marked by violence, injury and property destruction. A process for engaging police, media, politicians, activists and the general public has been developed by a team at Saint Paul University in Ottawa in the hope that an inclusive approach to crowd management can direct the planning and implementation of such events."
Complete Text (PDF file - 72K, 8 pages)

Source : Hot Off The Press (Caledon institute of Social Policy)
TIP : Click this link to see another dozen Caledon reports dating back to October 2001

Relentless Incrementalism: Deconstructing and Reconstructing Canadian Income Security Policy (PDF file - 170K, 59 pages)
by Ken Battle
June 2001
This article was originally published in Keith Banting, Andrew Sharpe and France St-Hilaire (eds.) The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress. The Longest Decade: Canada in the 1990s (Montreal and Ottawa: Institute for Research on Public Policy and Centre for the Study of Living Standards, 2001)

Maytree Foundation
Principal funder of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy, the Maytree Foundation is a Canadian charitable foundation established in 1982. Maytree believes that there are three fundamental sets of issues which threaten political and social stability: wealth disparities between and within nations; mass migration of people because of war, oppression and environmental disasters; and the degradation of the environment

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
"The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates. By combining solid research with extensive outreach, we work to enrich democratic dialogue and ensure Canadians know there are workable solutions to the issues we face. "

Site map - links to everything on one page

About the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
- includes a brief description of the CCPA and links (in the left margin of the page)
to separate pages for the National CCPA Office and each of its provincial offices.
- each CCPA Office page has links to : Contact Us * Publications * Research Associates * Board of Directors; immediately below, you'll find links to the 'home page' for each provincial office and its publications page

British Columbia Office
- Publications

Saskatchewan Office
- Publications

Manitoba Office
- Publications

Ontario Office
- Publications

Nova Scotia Office
- Publications

Alternative Federal Budget
"Our alternative budgets show that governments budgets can be created in a way that is both fiscally and socially responsible. The CCPA has been coordinating the Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) since 1994, and our provincial offices produce alternative provincial budgets.
NOTE: click on the provincial links above for their respective Alternative Budgets

For more Government budget info (incl. federal pre-budget consultations and provincial-territorial budgets):
Go to the Canadian Social Research Links Canadian Government Budgets page

GrowingGap.ca
The growinggap.ca is an initiative of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Inequality Project, a national project to increase public awareness about the alarming spread of income and wealth inequality in Canada.

Research and Publications
Whether you're looking for a research study with detailed findings, short commentary on current affairs, articles from The Monitor (our national magazine), books by some of Canada's leading thinkers, or Our Schools/Our Selves (a quaterly journal about education), you'll find it here. The CCPA publishes on a wide range of social, economic and environmental issues, including:
* Aboriginal issues * Health, Health care system, Pharmacare * Agriculture * Housing and homelessness * Alternative budgets * Human rights * Biotechnology * Inequality and poverty * Children and youth * International relations, Peace & conflict

----------------------------------------------

Selected reports from the CCPA:
(in reverse chronological order)

---

Hennessy’s Index for February 2014:
Income Splitting --- Perks for the Rich

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessys-index-february-2014
By Trish Hennessy
NOTE : At the end of each statement in this issue of Hennessy's Index, there's a link to the source of that statement.
You won't find any of those links below, though - just click the link above to access the individual sources.

Excerpt:

2007
The year Canada’s federal government extended to senior families the opportunity to partake in extra tax breaks through pension income splitting.

$820
Estimated average tax break enjoyed the Canada’s richest 10% of Canadian senior couples who take advantage of pension income splitting at tax time.

10 cents
Estimated average tax break the poorest 10% of senior couples in Canada get from pension income splitting.

7 out of 10
Number of seniors who enjoy no benefit whatsoever from pension income splitting.

$3 billion
Estimated loss in federal revenues if the federal government extends income splitting to include families with children under 18.

Source:
Hennessy's Index
(inc. links to earlier issues)
http://policyalternatives.ca/index

Hennessy's Index is an ongoing project of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Hennessy's Index: Pseudo Census
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessys-index-pseudo-census
October 1, 2013

Excerpts:
NOTE : At the end of each statement in this issue of Hennessy's Index, there's a link to the source of that statement.
You won't find any of those links below, though - just click the link above to access the individual sources.

2010:
The year the federal government scrapped Canada’s mandatory long-form census, replacing it with a voluntary survey. It sparked a Save The Census campaign that drew the support of no fewer than 488 organizations and individuals.

July 21, 2010:
The date on which Munir Sheikh released a media advisory explaining his decision to step down as Statistics Canada’s chief statistician, saying the new voluntary National Household Survey (NHS) would be no substitute for the mandatory census.

1,813:
The number of census subdivisions whose voluntary NHS response rates were so low that Statistics Canada had no choice but to remove them from the data outcomes.

0:
The amount of voluntary NHS data that the city of Toronto says it will use to compare with previous census data. The city cites NHS reliability concerns when it comes to historical comparisons. [Source]

$22 million:
The additional cost of replacing the long-form census with the voluntary NHS

Source:
Hennessy's Index

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/index
... is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world. The home page includes links to all past editions.

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

The Young and the Jobless : Youth Unemployment in Ontario (PDF)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Ontario%20Office/2013/09/Young_and_jobless_final3.pdf
By Sean Geobey
September 2013
This report examines lingering post-recession youth joblessness in Ontario. It focuses on labour market trends that impact Ontarians aged 15–24.
A detailed analysis of the Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey reveals Ontario’s youth continue to su?er from unemployment levels that are twice as
high as the overall provincial unemployment level. In terms of unemployment, Ontario is competing with the Maritime provinces for being the toughest place in Canada for youth to land a job.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) | Ontario

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/ontario
CCPA's Ontario Office specializes in provincial and municipal issues. We deliver original, independent, peer-reviewed, non-partisan research that equips progressives with the arguments they need to press for social change.

CCPA National Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

----------------------------------------------------

CCPA's national blog, Behind the Numbers, delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect Canadians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more.

Go behind the numbers with these latest posts:

* Jeopardy, Jackpot, or Wheel of (Mis)Fortune?, by Erika Shaker
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/09/13/jeopardy-jackpot-or-wheel-of-misfortune/

* Student job market is tighter than a pair of skinny jeans, by Kayle Hatt
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/09/12/student-job-market-is-tighter-than-a-pair-of-skinny-jeans/

* National Household Survey provides blurred look at housing, by Armine Yalnizyan
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/09/12/national-household-survey-provides-blurred-look-at-housing/

* Memo to Obama: Canada’s carbon problem IS the tar sands, by Marc Lee
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/09/10/memo-to-obama-canadas-carbon-problem-is-the-tar-sands/

* Maintaining ignorance: the political economy of Ontario’s media, by Daniel Wilson
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/09/09/maintaining-ignorance-the-political-economy-of-ontarios-media/

* Lowering Our Standards, by Trish Hennessy
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/09/03/lowering-our-standards/

* Leaving Children out in the Cold, by Kate McInturff
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/08/23/leaving-children-out-in-the-cold/

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Hennessy's Index is back!
After a summer hiatus, our monthly Hennessy's Index has returned just in time for Labour Day weekend!
The focus of the September edition is (appropriately) on unions.

Read the latest index here:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/hennessys-index-unions

Hennessy's Index [ http://www.policyalternatives.ca/index ] is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world. The home page includes links to all past editions.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Update
http://e2.ma/message/hjg0d/dk2e7
May 3, 2013
* Without change in public policy, Canada's gender gap will persist
* This month's Hennessy's Index looks at the cost of austerity;
* Roundup of the latest blog posts from Behind the Numbers;
* Kevin Page's speech from the CCPA event last week;
* Op-ed by by CCPA Executive Director Bruce Campbell on the importance of the Parliamentary Budget Office;
* Armine Yalnizyan will be debating William Watson on the power of wealth in Canada on May 9 in Ottawa.

Progressive Tax Options for BC : Reform Ideas
for Raising New Revenues and Enhancing Fairness
(PDF - 2.6MB, 48 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/BC%20Office/2013/01/CCPA-BC-Tax-Options.pdf
January 29, 2013
By Iglika Ivanova and Seth Klein
[ Summary (PDF - 1.6MB) : http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/BC%20Office/2013/01/CCPA-BC-Tax-Options-SUMMARY.pdf ]
This report presents many possible scenarios for reforming our (BC) tax system to increase revenues and make the system more fair.

Related news release:

Change in direction on tax policy needed to escape budget crunch,
ensure high-income British Columbians and corporations pay fair share: study
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/news-releases/change-direction-tax-policy-needed-escape-budget-crunch-ensure-high-income-br
January 29, 2013

Two Infographics illustrating some of the progressive measures that the BC Government could implement (or restore) if the top 1% of BC taxpayers paid a fair share of taxes:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/bc-tax-options
[Click the link, then scroll halfway down the page to see the two infographics.]

Income inequality on the rise, especially in large cities
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/income-inequality-rise-especially-large-cities
January 28, 2013
Income inequality in Canada is on the rise—especially in the country's largest cities. CCPA analysis of new data finds the richest 1% of Canadians make almost $180,000 more today than they did in 1982 (adjusted for inflation), while the bottom 90% of Canadians saw income gains of only $1,700.
NOTE : Includes two graphics entitled "They're richer than you think" --- one graphic compares numbers across provinces, and the other compares numbers for eight cities across Canada.

[ Pour une analyse québécoise (en français), visitez le blogue d'IRIS:
Le 1% au Québec (1): plus de revenus, moins d’impôts
http://www.iris-recherche.qc.ca/blogue/le-1-au-quebec-1-plus-de-revenus-moins-dimpots ]

Beyond Austerity - A video by Trish Hennessy (duration 2:34)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/multimedia/beyond-austerity-trish-hennessy
January 2013
CCPA-Ontario Director Trish Hennessy summarizes the "Ontario 2013: Toward a Post-Austerity Vision" core message in this two-minute video blog

Source:
BC Office - CCPA

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Reducing child poverty in Ontario by 25% by 2013 : How are we doing? - December 3

December 4 marks the fourth anniversary
of Ontario's promise to reduce child poverty by 25% by 2013.
(video, duration 2:47)
http://ontarionewswatch.com/onw-news.html?id=448
December 3, 2012
In this video, Trish Hennessy (Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives' Ontario Office) argues that a boost in the minimum wage would really help get us there.

NOTE : The annual report monitoring Ontario's progress concerning this initiative by the 25 in 5 Poverty Reduction Network [ http://25in5.ca/ ] is due tomorrow (Dec. 4), and it will be posted on their website at that time.

Also from Trish Hennessy:

In Search of Child Care
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/search-child-care
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
By Trish Hennessy
December 1, 2012
This month's Hennessy's Index look at the shortage of affordable regulated child care in this country.
* includes a link to the source of each point raised in Hennessy's Index

A few excerpts:

* 3 million : Number of Canadian moms of children aged 12 or younger who work in the paid labour force.
* 78.2 : Percentage of children under the age of six in Canada who don't have the option of regulated child care because there aren't enough spaces to go around.
* 3 : Number of hours between Stephen Harper’s first swearing in as Prime Minister of Canada in 2006 and his cancellation of the Liberals’ nascent national child care program.
* $1.50 to $3 : Estimated return on investment for every dollar spent on early childhood education, according to the TD Bank. It’s an even greater return for children from disadvantaged families.

Earlier issues of Hennessy's Index:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/index

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Hennessy's Index: Idea Factory
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/idea-factory
November 2012
Hennessy's Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world. The November edition of the index features some incredible examples of community innovation.
Examples including...
* A Bike Superhighway, like the one they built in Copenhagen.
* Urban Umbrellas like the ones they’re planting on vacant land in San Francisco.
* A Robin Hood Tax like the one in France.
* Mandatory Voting, like they do in Australia and Brazil.
* More (click the link above...)
[ Earlier Hennesy's Indexes (links to 20+ postings):
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/index ]

Seth Klein on BC's Living Wage (video, duration 26:35)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TM4nMdTipsc
October 11, 2012
Seth Klein, Director of the BC office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, speaks about his experiences with a living wage policy. Recorded at Ryerson University. Produced by the CCPA Ontario office with support from the Metcalf Foundation.

Generation Now: 2012 David Lewis Lecture (video, duration 1:16:48)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqLwri0JPL8&feature=relmfu
Published on Nov 1, 2012
On October 4th, the CCPA proudly hosted the 2012 David Lewis Lecture, a series that examines the future of democracy in Canada. This year's lecture featured "Generation Now," four emerging voices on the Canadian political landscape: Vancouver's Emma Pullman (SumOfUs) and Jamie Biggar (Leadnow), and activists Brigette DePape and Ben Powless.

---

CCPA YouTube Channel (82 CCPA videos!)
http://www.youtube.com/user/policyalternatives?feature=watch

Behind the Numbers
CCPA's national blog, Behind the Numbers, delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect Canadians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more.

Go behind the numbers with these latest posts:

* Welcome to the Wageless Recovery, by Armine Yalnizyan (November 2)
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2012/11/02/welcome-to-the-wageless-recovery/

* Will Frankenstorm put climate change back on the political radar?, by Marc Lee (October 30)
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2012/10/30/will-frankenstorm-put-climate-change-back-on-the-political-radar/

* Privatizing CMHC?, by Louis Gaudreau, IRIS (October 29)
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2012/10/29/privatizing-cmhc/

* Right-to-Work: The (Ayn?) Rand Formula, by Erika Shaker
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2012/10/16/right-to-work-the-ayn-rand-formula/

* Charitable Organizations: A Pillar of Democracy, by Trish Hennessy (October 15)
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2012/10/15/charitable-organizations-a-pillar-of-democracy/

A Living Wage As a Human Right (PDF - 432K, 18 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Ontario%20Office/2012/10/Living%20Wage%20as%20a%20Human%20Right.pdf
B
y Mary Cornish
October 5, 2012
In Canada, many workers do not earn a living wage because of discrimination. Women workers and those who are racialized, immigrant, Aboriginal, living with disabilities or similarly disadvantaged are all segregated into low wage job ghettoes—their work systemically devalued. Governments and employers need to deliver more equitable compensation incomes for vulnerable workers. This paper explores how we can close discriminatory pay gaps, so that this basic human right — the right to work and to earn pay free of discrimination — is realized for Canada’s low-paid workers.

Youth Employment and Un(der) Employment in Canada:
More Than a Temporary Problem?
(PDF - 431K, 6 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2012/10/Youth%20Unemployment.pdf
By Karen Foster
October 4, 2012
This report looks at trends in youth employment, and finds that one of the most troubling narratives to emerge from the economic downturn of 2007–08 revolved around the effect of recessed global and local economies on young workers. According to the report, young workers are more likely to be unemployed or precariously employed in non-permanent jobs—and regardless of whether they have post-secondary qualifications, these young workers will likely endure the negative effects of un- and underemployment for years to come.

Crime, Punishment and Politics
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/crime-punishment-and-politics

By Trish Hennessy
August 1, 2012

26 : Percentage drop in Canada’s crime severity index (a measure of the seriousness of crime) between 2001 and 2011. Canada’s crime rate is the lowest point it’s been since 1972. (Source : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120724/dq120724b-eng.htm )

1991 : Year Canada’s crime rate peaked. Crime has since been dropping throughout Canada for most offences, including attempted murders, major assaults, sexual assaults, robberies, break-ins and motor vehicle thefts. (Source : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120724/dq120724b-eng.htm )

93 : Percentage of Canadians who felt satisfied with their personal safety from crime in 2009 – similar to 2004 (94%).
(Source : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2011001/article/11577-eng.htm )

30 : Percentage of Canadian federal legislative bills in 2010 that were related to crime. (Source : http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2010/11/Tough%20on%20Crime.pdf )

86.7 : Percentage increase in the Correctional Service of Canada’s budget expenditures since the Conservatives took office in 2005-06.
(Source : http://www.tpcp-canada.blogspot.ca/2011/06/what-austerity-and-small-government.html )

10,600 : Number of new prison spaces Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments are in the process of creating – with an infrastructure cost of $3.6 billion (and rising). (Source : http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/monitor/canada-crime-crossroads )

More:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/crime-punishment-and-politics

Source:
The Hennessy Index- "A number is never just a number"

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/index

The Hennessy Index is a special feature of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice

Related link:

Framed in Canada - Trish Hennessy's personal blog
http://framedincanada.com/

Canada’s Mean Test: Myths behind neo-con madness
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/06/29/canadas-mean-test-myths-behind-neo-con-madness/
June 29, 2012
By Erika Shaker
(...)
If you’ve expressed concern with some (all?) of the following: global warming, Indigenous rights, tuition fee increases, cuts to health care, OAS, EI, the arts, the CBC, and a number of anti-poverty initiatives… you’ve probably heard this argument:
“No one handed me anything. I worked hard and did well at (public) school. Only missed classes when I was sick and had to go to a (publicly funded) doctor. When I got my first job (right out of university), I was there (on public transportation) every day. And somehow I managed (having little or no student debt) to buy a car and a house and pay my bills. You don’t hear me complaining (except about paying the taxes that provide those social programs that I never, ever access); not like those whiny kids in the streets who wouldn’t know hard work if it served them one of those triple shot mocha-latte-chinos they’re so fond of. Heh heh.”

That whole myth of the self-made man is appealing in a plaid shirt/roaring fire/"it’s Miller time!"kind of way (if you’re, you know, into that sort of thing), but given what we know about the importance of social and physical infrastructure to our collective well-being, it’s also a teensy bit naïve...

Source:
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/
CCPA's national blog, Behind the Numbers, delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect Canadians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more.

Austerity’s Discontents
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/austeritys-discontents
June 1, 2012
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
By Trish Hennessy
Hennessy's Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world.

75 million:
Number of youth, aged 15-24, who will be unemployed globally this year. That’s 6% more than in 2007. The global youth unemployment rate is 12.7%.
Source : http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/22/global-youth-unemployment_n_1537103.html

46.4%:
The 2011 youth unemployment rate in Spain, up from 18.2% in 2007.
Source : http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-22/ilo-says-global-youth-unemployment-may-stay-elevated-for-years.html

13.9%:
Canada’s youth unemployment rate in April; nearly twice as high as the 7.3% rate for the overall labour market.
Source : http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1182249--youth-jobless-rates-remain-high-globally-report-says

6.4:
Number of unemployed Canadian workers for every reported job vacancy.
Source : http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/16/memo-to-ministers-the-issue-is-unemployment-not-job-vacancies/

100,000:
Number of total jobs the Parliamentary Budget Office estimates will be lost in Canada by 2014-15 as a result of federal and provincial government cutbacks.
Source : http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/04/25/pbo-strikes-again/

More...
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/austeritys-discontents

Earlier months (16 more links going back to early 2011):
http://policyalternatives.ca/index

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

See also:

Framed in Canada - Trish Hennessy's personal blog
http://framedincanada.com/

Behind the Numbers [blog] - May 2012
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/
CCPA's national blog, Behind the Numbers, delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect Canadians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more.

Selected recent blog posts:

* The Economics of EI “Reform.”, by Andrew Jackson
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/24/the-economics-of-ei-reform/

* De-growth or growth? Maybe we don’t need to figure that out, by Seth Klein
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/16/de-growth-or-growth-maybe-we-dont-need-to-figure-that-out/

* Tightening the Screws on the Unemployed, by Andrew Jackson
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/15/tightening-the-screws-on-the-unemployed/

* Don’t Kid Yourself: We all pay for the defunding of higher education, by Erika Shaker
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/09/dont-kid-yourself-we-all-pay-for-the-defunding-of-higher-education/

* While You Were Sleeping: Fed Policies Make It Easier to Hire a Cheaper You, by Armine Yalnizyan
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/03/while-you-were-sleeping-fed-policies-make-it-easier-to-hire-a-cheaper-you/

* The Federal Budget and Women, by Angella MacEwan
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/02/the-federal-budget-and-women/

Taxing Times
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/taxing-times
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
By Trish Hennessy
May 1, 2012
Hennessy's Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world.

31% : That’s how much of Canada’s economy is made up of income, sales, corporate, property and other taxes we pay to all levels of government.
[ Source : http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Canadian+taxes+high+think/6519558/story.html ]

$38 billion : That’s how much less Canadians now pay in individual income tax compared to 2000.
[ Source : http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Canadian+taxes+high+think/6519558/story.html ]

$19 billion : That’s how much less Canadians pay now in sales taxes compared to 2000. Since the Harper government cut the GST by two points in 2007, the average annual revenue loss to the treasury is about $12 billion.
[ Source 1 : http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Canadian+taxes+high+think/6519558/story.html ]
[ Source 2 : http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/Detail/?ID=921&IsBack=0 ]

$18 billion : That’s how much less corporations pay now in Canadian taxes compared to 2000.
[ Source : http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Canadian+taxes+high+think/6519558/story.html ]

$11,747 : Total income tax a person with an annual income of $50,000 will pay in Quebec for 2011, the highest regional amount in Canada.
[ Source : http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/taxseason/story/2012/04/12/f-taxseason-by-the-numbers.html ]

$8,349 : Total income tax that same person would pay in Nunavut, the lowest regional amount in Canada.
[ Source : http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/taxseason/story/2012/04/12/f-taxseason-by-the-numbers.html ]

NOTE : Click the Taxing Times link (above) for seven more factoids...

Hennessy's Index - earlier months:
http://policyalternatives.ca/index

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Canada’s secret bank bailout revealed
http://goo.gl/eOQaH
April 30, 2012
News Release
OTTAWA—A study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) estimates the previously secret extent of extraordinary support required by Canada’s banks during the financial crisis. According to the study, by CCPA Senior Economist David Macdonald, support for Canadian banks reached $114 billion at its peak—that’s $3,400 for every man, woman, and child in Canada.

The study:

The Big Banks’ Big Secret:
Estimating government support for
Canadian banks during the financial crisis
(PDF - 2.2MB, 46 pages)
http://goo.gl/wEL3x
By David Macdonald
Throughout the 2008-2010 financial crisis, Canadian banks were touted by the federal government and the banks themselves as being much more stable than other countries’ big banks. Canadians we assured that our banks needed no bailout. However, in reality, Canada’s banks received billions in cash and loan support during the 2008-2010 financial crisis—and the Canadian government has remained resolutely secretive about the details. This report examines the nature and extent of government support to Canada’s big banks, estimated on the basis of partial information provided by Canada’s public institutions, and an analysis of the banks’ own financial reports.

Old Age Security: Can We Afford It? (PDF - 169K, 4 pages)
http://goo.gl/Q49iF
February 2012
By Monica Townson
Old Age Security is the basic building block of Canada’s retirement income system. It is a flat rate monthly benefit that goes to everyone at age 65, provided they meet certain residency requirements. Canadians build on that foundation, saving for their retirement with benefits from the Canada or Quebec Pension Plan, a workplace pension if they’re lucky enough to have one, and private savings.

But now Prime Minster Harper says OAS is unsustainable. According to the Prime Minister, the program will not be able to accommodate the retirement of the baby boom generation over the next 20 years, so something must be done. Although details were sketchy at first, Harper now admits he is planning to raise the age of eligibility for OAS from 65 to 67.

Pension experts don’t agree with him.

Source:
Alternative Federal Budget Updates
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/projects/alternative-federal-budget

Author Monica Townson is an independent economic consultant working in the field of social policy. She has written six books and many reports and studies on pensions and retirement, income security programs and the economic situation of women.

More about Monica Townson
http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/2008/townson/

More reports and studies by Monica Townson
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/authors/monica-townson

Also from the Alternative Federal Budget project:

* Alternative Federal Budget Roundtable: Can Canada Escape a Lost Decade?
http://goo.gl/89aCz
February 8, 2012
As part of the consultations undertaken in preparation of our forthcoming Alternative Federal Budget, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives hosted an economic roundtable.

What economic recovery?
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/what-economic-recovery
January 26, 2012
We've all heard political leaders boast that the Canadian economy has fully recovered from the recession and that the recession was not as severe in Canada as in other countries. It turns out that both of those claims are false because they don't take population growth into consideration.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice.

National Update
January 27, 2012

Recent releases from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

* A recent CCPA study explores the distressing impact of federal cutbacks:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/cuts-behind-curtain

* Our new study on Canada's economic recovery finds that—despite claims to the contrary—things aren't so rosy:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/canada%E2%80%99s-incomplete-mediocre-recovery

* Our latest infographic depicts disturbing trends in income inequality:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/infographic-99-vs-1

* A round-up of the latest (and numerous!) blog posts:
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/
--- More Than 1.4 Million Unemployed, by Erin Weir
--- When Will the Baby Boomers Retire?, by Andrew Jackson
--- It’s up to the Senate to stop the Crime Bill, by Paula Mallea
--- The “Other” Side of the Story, by Karen Foster
--- The Harper House Rules: An Intervention, by Erika Shaker
--- Deregulation: A Bad Idea Crosses the Atlantic, by Erin Weir
--- Are There Labour And Skills Shortages In Canada? by Andrew Jackson
--- The Cuts Behind the Curtain, by David Macdonald
--- The Race To The Trough: What Did Corporate Tax Cuts Deliver?, by Andrew Jackson

On her blog dedicated to progressive issue framing, Framed in Canada [ http://framedincanada.com/ ], CCPA's Trish Hennessy recently posted a great piece on economic austerity entitled The Mysterious Case of Austerity Amnesia:
http://framedincanada.com/2012/01/24/the-mysterious-case-of-austerity-amnesia/

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice.
Scroll down to the second red bar below for more CCPA site content.

December 31, 2011

Recent blog posts from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

CCPA's national blog, Behind the Numbers [ http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/ ], delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect Canadians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more. Throughout December, our bloggers were busy!

Go behind the numbers with these latest posts:

* Social Insurance Benefits Increase for 2012, by Andrew Jackson
December 31st, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/31/social-insurance-benefits-increase-for-2012/

* Flaherty’s Christmas List — all Mixed Up, by Toby Sanger
December 23rd, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/23/flahertys-christmas-list-all-mixed-up/

* Is Money Enough? The Meaning of 6% and Flaherty’s Health “Plan”, by Armine Yalnizyan
December 21st, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/21/is-money-enough-the-meaning-of-6-and-flahertys-health-plan/

* Government intervention needed to address youth unemployment, by Graham Cox
December 20th, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/20/government-intervention-needed-to-address-youth-unemployment/

* Sitting on the Sidelines: Young People Miss Out on the Recovery, by Andrew Jackson
December 15th, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/15/sitting-on-the-sidelines-young-people-miss-out-on-the-recovery/

A Progressive Alternative to the Harper Agenda
November 18, 2011
By Andrew Jackson
The Harper government is set to cut spending on public services and social programs in the name of deficit reduction, but implemented mainly to increase reliance on the market, to create new sources of profit for the private sector, and to finance future tax cuts. This ideological agenda will take place against the background of a sluggish economy, a very weak job market, rising inequality, and increased insecurity for the great majority of working families.
The Harper government agenda must be confronted by an equally coherent alternative which resonates with currently centrist voters.
(...)
Here are five key social democratic propositions which can frame specific policies which attract broad support.
1.
More – not less – public investment is needed to increase private sector productivity and future economic growth.
2.
Expanding public programs is a more equitable, and also a much more cost effective, way to provide the services we all need.
3.
Expanding public programs is key to shoring up an equal opportunity, middle class society.
4.
We need a strong and productive private sector as well.
5.
Unions shape an equal society.
This is a debate that social democrats need not be afraid of, a debate that we can win.

Source:
Behind the Numbers.ca --- A blog from the CCPA
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

In the Red
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
By Trish Hennessy
September 30, 2011
[ PDF version of this index - 81K]

Excerpts* from In the Red (October 2011)
(*Click either of the two links above for the complete list of numbers for the October Hennessy Index.)

===> 1.57 Trillion --- Canadians’ household debt in the second quarter of 2011, reaching an all-time high this year.
===> 150.8% --- Canadians’ household debt ratio to personal disposable income in the second quarter of 2011, higher than our U.S. neighbours.
===> 7.6% --- Percentage of Canadian disposable income that goes toward interest payments.
===> 27% --- Percentage of non-retired Canadians who don’t commit to any type of savings, not even for retirement.
===> 1/3 --- Proportion of retired Canadian households carrying an average debt load of $60,000 into retirement.

Earlier editions of Hennessy's Index
* It's a living (September 2011)
* Gone Fishin' (August 2011)
* Canada vs the OECD (July 2011)
* Minimum Wage vs Living Wage (June 2011)
* Election Jawdroppers (May 2011)
* Democracy (April 2011)
* Security/Insecurity (March 2011)
* Inequality (February 2011)

Hennessy's Index: Gone Fishin'
July 29, 2011
Hennessy's Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world. This August, Hennessy's Index looks at vacation time - how do Canadian vacations stack up?

March 2011: Security/Insecurity
By Trish Hennessy
February 28, 2011
Trish Hennessy of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives presents a monthly listing of numbers about Canada and its place in the world.
[ PDF version - 464K, 1 page]

Excerpts* from Security/Insecurity (March 2011)
(*Click the link above for the complete list of numbers for the March Hennessy Index.)
===> 1.4 million = Number of Canadians officially unemployed in January 2011
===>
1.2 million = Population size of the nation’s capital, Ottawa
===>
14.4% = Canada’s youth unemployment rate in January 2011 (age 15-24); nearly twice the national average for all unemployed.
===> 867, 948 = Number of Canadians who used food banks in March 2010; record high.
===>
$5 billion = Estimated new additional annual costs of running provincial and federal jails by 2015/16 due to the latest Harper government crime law.
===> $220 billion = Total cost of Harper government tax cuts between 2006 and 2013/14. (Source)

February 2011 : Inequality
February 1, 2011
[ PDF version - 67K, 1 page ]
Excerpts:
===> $6.6 million = The average compensation of Canada’s best-paid 100 CEOs in 2009.
===> $42,988 = The average wage for Canadians working full-time, year-round.
===> 155 times = How much the best-paid 100 CEOs earn more than average wage.
===> 0 = The number of women among the best-paid 100 CEOs in Canada in 2009.
===> 20th = Canada ranks 20th, behind the U.S., in a global ranking of women’s equality

Source:
The Hennessy Index- "A number is never just a number"
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives' Trish Hennessy has long been a fan of Harper Magazine's one-page list of eye-popping statistics, Harper's Index. Instead of wishing for a Canadian version to magically appear, she's created her own -- a monthly listing of numbers about Canada and its place in the world. Hennessy's Index -- a number is never just a number -- comes out on the first of each month.

---

Five reasons to say no to more corporate tax cuts
By Armine Yalnizyan

January 28, 2011
The Harper government ’s commitment to further reduce the general corporate income tax rate while the nation struggles with budgetary deficits has been championed by – surprise! – the corporate sector. But the majority of Canadians, including business owners, and those who work for them, say no to these cuts now.
Here are five economic reasons not to keep reducing the federal corporate tax rate this year or next.
*
Least effective job creation measure
*
Little Impact on investments
*
Pay more tax to cut taxes
*
False economies
*
The question of working capital
[ 422 comments ]

Source:
Globe and Mail
Author Armine Yalnizyan is a senior economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Income inequality bad for everyone: Richard Wilkinson (video, duration 7:52)
December 17, 2010
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) was pleased to co-sponsor a three-city lecture tour featuring Richard Wilkinson, co-author of the best selling book The Spirit Level, which examines income inequality among developed nations. During his stop in Toronto, he sat down with the CCPA's Trish Hennessy to talk about the book.

The Spirit Level:
Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger
By Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson
January 2010
- more information about the book ($28) and where to buy it, as well as links to 17 reviews, commentaries and blog posts.
Source:
Bloomsbury Press

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Spirit Level from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The costs of inequality:
* Community life and social relations
* Mental health and drug use
* Physical health and life expectancy
* Obesity: wider income gaps, wider waists
* Educational performance
* Teenage births: recycling deprivation
* Violence: gaining respect
* Imprisonment and punishment
* Social mobility: unequal opportunities

Growing Gap project

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Richest 1% income shares at historic high
News Release
December 1, 2010
TORONTO – Canada’s richest 1% are taking more of the gains from economic growth than ever before in recorded history, says a report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The Rise of Canada’s Richest 1% looks at income trends over the past 90 years and reveals the 246,000 privileged few who rank among the country’s richest 1% took almost a third (32%) of all growth in incomes between 1997 and 2007. That's a bigger piece of the action than any other generation of rich Canadians has taken,” says Armine Yalnizyan, CCPA senior economist and the report’s author.

Complete report:

The Rise of Canada's Richest 1% (PDF - 739K, 22 pages)
By ArmineYalizyan
(...) Combine record-breaking growth in incomes with historically low top tax rates, and the richest 1% is taking a bigger piece of the economic pie today than at any time in the past century. The report also touches on the concentration of wealth, but 2005 was the last time Statistics Canada examined the distribution of wealth in Canada, a study it has no plans to repeat. A recent private sector study shows that by the end of 2009, 3.8% of Canadian households controlled $1.78 trillion dollars of financial wealth, or 67% of the total. [Excerpt from p. 4]
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

Related link:

The rich really are getting richer
By Joe Friesen
December 1, 2010
The super rich are, in one respect, not that different from ordinary Canadians: they work for their money. It’s just that they’re rewarded at a rate most people only dream of. The top 0.01 per cent of Canadian income earners, the 2,400 people who earn at least $1.85-million, aren’t just basking in investment income and business profits. Nearly 75 per cent of their income comes from wages, just like the average Canadian, according to a new study from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
[ The rewards of the rich - infographic ]
[ 146 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

Ed Broadbent’s Canada: More equal, more optimistic
"We need to bring back an agenda of social equality..."
Ed Broadbent, one of Canada’s most respected progressive sages, sat down with the CCPA’s Trish Hennessy to talk about the Canada he grew up in and how it’s changed over his lifetime. During this candid video conversation -- in Mr. Broadbent’s own Ottawa backyard -- he reflects on the profound shift away from equality.

The Power of Taxes:
The Case for Investing in Canadians
By Stephen Dale and Trish Hennessy
October 26, 2010
When you think about taxes, do you think about the $10,000 having a baby could cost if you lived in the U.S. and didn't have health insurance? Do you think about an education system that allows even the children of poor families to become doctors, teachers, or engineers?
Government inspectors, who make sure highway overpasses are repaired before they fall down, that meat packing plants don't poison their customers, that a city's water is safe to drink?
Read more about what our taxes buy us in this new primer.

The Power of Taxes:
The Case for Investing in Canadians
PDF - 3.7MB, 6 pages)

Canada’s Poverty Hole
New income data suggests troubling poverty trends are unfolding in Canada

By Armine Yalnizyan
June 21, 2010
Every recession ushers in a rising tide of poverty. As jobless and underemployed people struggle to make ends meet, the nouveau poor swell the ranks of the déjà poor. The most recent statistical update on incomes in Canada was released last week, telling us that in 2008, as the nation headed into a brutal recession, there were just over 3 million Canadians living in poverty using the standard measure, Statistic Canada’s after-tax low-income cut-off (LICO). Statistics on income data come in two years after the fact and much has happened since 2008. But if past recessions are any guide, between 750,000 and 1.8 million more Canadians will be counted as poor before recovery is complete. More than one in seven Canadians may have tumbled into poverty before this is over. Many of them will be working.
( ...)

It is not possible to predict how rapidly poverty will increase, but without question it will rise. Despite the relatively short span of the current recession, brutal job losses, tattered safety nets and the tentative nature of the job recovery suggest a rise in poverty may be unfolding that is closer to the pattern of the 1990s than the 1980s. That would mean the body count of Canadians finding themselves in straightened circumstances might be pushing five million – more than one in seven Canadians trying to get by. That’s no way to run a recovery.

Related link:

June 17, 2010
Income of Canadians, 2008
Source:
Statistics Canada

Another recent CCPA release:

The Rise and Fall of Economic and Social Rights : What Next? (PDF - 110K, 8 pages)
May 29, 2010
By Ed Broadbent, former federal leader of the New Democratic Party
Adapted from a speech Mr. Broadbent delivered in Montreal on May 29
to the Congress of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences (CCFHSS).

In his address to the CCFHSS on May 29th, the former leader of the NDP summarizes the journey of generations and issues a challenge to today's leaders: stop ignoring the threat of rising inequality, tackle poverty, and show Canadians your progress.

"It is time to reverse the growing trend to deep inequality in Canada. It is time for the federal government to
fulfill its legal responsibilities for enforcing the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. The Covenant
is quite clear on its obligations. We are required, to the maximum of our available resources, to progressively
realize its quite specific list of rights. This requires positive action by governments, among other
obligations, to build hospitals and schools, provide adequate pensions, ensure employment insurance for
all workers, guarantee equal pay for men and women, and create and enforce laws enabling workers to have
unions." [Excerpt, page 7]

Harper’s "tough-on-crime" bills costly, counterproductive
By Paula Mallea
March 16, 2010
The Harper government is reintroducing its proposed “tough-on-crime” laws that were killed when Harper prorogued Parliament in January. These crime bills, if passed, will result in the lengthy incarceration of hundreds of additional offenders under harsh conditions. Many Canadians approve. Fine, they say—whatever it takes to get the crime wave under control. But there is no crime wave.

Austerity is the wrong move
Harperite budget can only prolong the recession

By Mel Watkins
March 11, 2010
The Harper government's economic policy, as enunciated in the Throne Speech and the Budget, is properly described by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty as "stay the course" or business-as-usual (that is, what business wants business gets). That is, we are offered more of the same old neo-liberalism and globalization with wealth for the few and austerity for the many — with only a brief panic-stricken Keynesian moment — that got us into the messes we're in.

Owning the podium, selling the stadium
By Bruce Campbell
March 10, 2010
The Harper government portrays itself as standing up for Canada, but it is preparing a major selloff of Canadian interests that will compromise our cultural sovereignty, national identity and national security. In the Speech from the Throne, the Harper government signaled its intent to throw open the doors of foreign ownership in three strategic, previously protected, sectors: telecommunications, satellites and uranium.

Deficit hysteria no excuse to end economic stimulus
By Hugh Mackenzie
March 2, 2010
As Canada's recession winds down, there is growing talk of housing and debt bubbles but there is an even bigger bubble that's set to burst. It's the Harper government bubble – that carefully crafted, out-of-touch universe our Prime Minister has been living in since recession threw hundreds of thousands of Canadians out of work.

Watch Senior Economist Armine Yalnizyan of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
discuss'Job creation in a recession'
(The Agenda, TV Ontario)
January 28, 2010
On January 25th, 2010, the CCPA's Armine Yalnizyan appeared on Television Ontario's 'The Agenda' to discuss 'Job creation in a recession', part one of the show's look at the state of employment today. Armine warns that the 'triple threat' of household debt, growing inequality, and poor job/social security is still a big challenge for Canadians.

Panelists:

Karl Moore, associate professor with the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University
Carmi Levy, independent technology analyst and journalist based in London, Ontario
Don Drummond, senior VP and chief economist with TD Bank Financial Group
Armine Yalnizyan, senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Steve Maich, editor of Canadian Business magazine

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Related links:
The Agenda with Steve Paikin
[ TV Ontario ]

Soft landing for Canada’s CEOs
News Release
January 4, 2010
TORONTO—Canadians may have been hit hard by a worldwide economic recession, but it appears Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs are enjoying a soft landing. A report on executive compensation by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), a progressive think tank, reveals Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs pocketed an average $7.3 million in 2008, the year recession broadsided the nation.

A Soft Landing:
Recession and Canada’s 100 Highest Paid CEOs
(PDF - 432K, 17 pages)
By Hugh Mackenzie
January 4, 2010
"...the total average compensation for Canada's 100 highest paid CEOs was $7,352,895 in 2008—a stark contrast from the total average Canadian income of $42,305. They pocketed what takes Canadians earning an average income an entire year to make by 1:01 pm January 4—the first working day of the year."

Beyond the crisis:
Ten propositions for a resurgence of the progressive movement

by Ed Broadbent
December 3, 2009
[The Hon. Ed Broadbent was the lunchtime speaker at a CCPA
Alternative Federal Budget Roundtable held in Ottawa in November 2009.]
HTML version
Video version:
English
Français
Our task is to restore the dream for social justice. We know it’s desirable and possible to create a Canada with more involvement by our citizens, a Canada where we see our neighbours, not as competitors but as friends, a Canada that is healthier and happier in every respect. Our task is to demonstrate in every conceivable way, that with more equality this Canada is possible.
Source:
CPAC Video on Demand
(Canadian Parliamentary Affairs Channel)

Old Age Security system needs strengthening: report
Press Release
November 25, 2009
OTTAWA—Canada’s Old Age Security system needs improvement in order to help ensure the economic security and dignity of Canadians in retirement, says a new report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The report, by pension expert and CCPA Research Associate Monica Townson, reviews OAS and its associated programs of the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) and the Allowance and discusses measures that could be taken to strengthen this part of Canada’s pension system.

Complete report:

A Stronger Foundation: Pension Reform and Old Age Security (PDF - 146K, 7 pages)
By Monica Townson
November 2009

Economy still not recovering: Study
Press Release
October 29, 2009
OTTAWA - Canada's economy is still mired in recession and a long way from recovery, despite months of "green shoot" speculation, says a report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).

Complete study:

Canada’s Long Road to Economic Recovery (PDF - 350K, 18 pages)
October 2009

Can we have an adult conversation about taxes?
October 26, 2009
By Hugh Mackenzie
Research Associate,
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
At the risk of insulting a generation of 4-year-olds, it's time we had an adult conversation in Canada about taxes and public services. Most 4-year-olds have figured out that when you go to the store to get something you want, you have to be prepared to pay for it. Yet Canada's political leaders and business interest lobbyists would rather spit nickels than admit this basic fact. It's a problem with all political leaders and parties – not just those I disagree with.
Source:
Toronto Star

Pension system needs urgent attention: report
Press Release
October 8, 2009
OTTAWA— Canada’s pension system needs urgent attention, says a new report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The report, by CCPA Research Associate and pension expert Monica Townson, outlines some of the problems with Canada’s pension system and examines some of the options that have been proposed to deal with them.

Complete report:

What Can We Do About Pensions? (PDF - 147K, 9 pages)
By Monica Townson
October 2009

Now You See It, Now You Don’t
How federal and provincial benefits get wiped out with wage increases
(PDF - 123K, 3 pages)
By Michael Goldberg and Steve Kerstetter*
October 6, 2009
(...) Increases in wages are eroded or erased by a combination of increases in taxes and other payroll deductions, along with reductions in benefits from government programs that were set up mainly to help low-income people in the first place.

* Michael Goldberg is the former research director for the Social Planning and Research Council of B.C., and
Steve Kerstetter is the former director of the National Council of Welfare.

Recession sidelines polices to address women’s poverty: study
Press Release
September 1, 2009
OTTAWA—Canada still has shockingly high rates of women’s poverty but the recession seems to have sidelined anti-poverty policies, says a new study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Women’s Poverty and the Recession reveals even after taking into account government transfers and tax credits, almost one-quarter(24%) of Canadian women raising children on their own and 14% of single older women are poor, compared to 9 % of children. “Child poverty seems to win political points but Canadian governments are ignoring the very real and private struggle of women on their own who are living in poverty at shockingly high levels,” says CCPA Research Associate Monica Townson.

Complete report:

Women’s Poverty and the Recession (PDF - 662K, 54 pages)
September 2009
By Monica Townson
"(...) In Canada, the groups most vulnerable to poverty are Canadians from racialized communities, recent immigrants (many of whom are also from racialized communities), Aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities. Most of these groups have much higher rates of poverty than the general population. But in all the vulnerable groups, poverty rates for women are higher than those for men.

Now, more than ever, Canadians count on Premiers' leadership to reduce poverty
Editorial
By Laurel Rothman & Trish Hennessy
August 5, 2009
Canada has been plunged into a worldwide recession that is harsher than any economic downturn since the Great Depression. Now, more than ever, citizens are counting on their governments for vision, compassion, and leadership. This week’s upcoming Premiers’ talks create a vital opening to start now on an economic recovery plan that reduces poverty, prevents more Canadians from falling into poverty, and puts all of Canada’s provincial economies back on steady footing.
The recession hit Canada last October, and since then, about 370,000 Canadians have been thrown out of work. But the federal Employment Insurance (EI) program isn’t there for half (52%) of the nation’s unemployed. As Premiers, the fallout from this recession is landing squarely on their shoulders. Without an adequate EI program, Canada’s unemployed will be turning to social assistance, food banks, homeless shelters, and other provincially funded programs. Provincial poverty rates are bound to soar – with dizzying speed in some regions.
Authors:
Laurel Rothman works at Family Service Toronto and is National Coordinator, Campaign 2000.
Trish Hennessy is director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Inequality Project

Canada's Growing Gap Explained
A video about how the income gap between the rich and the rest keeps growing
by Trish Hennessy & Armine Yalnizyan
July 31, 2009 | National Office

Canada’s “He-cession”
Men bearing the brunt of rising unemployment
by Trish Hennessy & Armine Yalnizyan
July 24, 2009 | National Office
Prime working age men are bearing the brunt of Canada's recession, says a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). According to the report, 71% of those who have lost their jobs in the recession so far are men. Canada's unemployment gender gap is wider now than at any time since Statistics Canada began collecting monthly gender unemployment statistics in 1976.
[ Report: Canada’s “He-cession”: Men bearing the brunt of rising unemployment - PDF file, 152K, 3 pages]

Understanding the Link Between Welfare Policy and the Use of Food Banks (PDF - 401K, 34 pages)
April 2009
By Michael Goldberg and David A. Green
This report examines who uses food banks in Canada and how food bank use relates to changes in government welfare policy. Data collected by Food Banks Canada show that food bank use increased dramatically from just over 700,000 Canadians using food banks during March 1998 to over 840,000 in March 2004. This increase occurred in spite of increases in employment rates and average wages and decreases in the number of welfare recipients over this period. Since then, the numbers using food banks have declined to levels near those in the late 1990s but this indicates that the prolonged economic boom simply by-passed a substantial number of the least well-off in our society. Now that the boom appears to be over, the number of persons using the food banks will almost certainly swell. The report makes several recommendations to help ensure that all residents have a right to adequate and appropriate food.

Related link:

Welfare cuts drive up food bank use, study confirms
April 30, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Canada's booming economy helped reduce food bank use before the recession, but it didn't erase the surge that followed provincial welfare cuts of the 1990s, says a study to be released today. And unless federal and provincial governments repair the country's tattered social safety net, more Canadians will be forced to rely on food banks as the economic crisis deepens, the study warns.The study, by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, is the first national analysis of how welfare policy affects food bank use.
Source:
Toronto Star

Recession packs biggest wallop since 1930s: Study
April 28, 2009
Press Release
OTTAWA – This recession is hitting Canada harder and faster than any previous downturn and Canadians are more exposed to economic ruin than they’ve been since the 1930s, says a report released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Exposed: Revealing Truths About Canada’s Recession examines the previous 13 economic downturns and discovers two troubling signs: no other recession since the Great Depression has come on this strong and Canadians face greater vulnerability than at any time since the 1940s because of low savings, high household debt and a weakened social safety net.

Complete report:

EXPOSED: Revealing Truths About Canada’s Recession (PDF - 1.3MB, 43 pages)
By Armine Yalnizyan
This report looks at the signs of the current recession and compares it to Canada’s 13 other recessions, going all the way back to 1926. It discovers that, including the Great Depression, Canada’s economy has only had six experiences of economic decline lasting two quarters or more. It reveals how this recession has several things in common with the two biggest downturns in post-war history, but there are also important, and troubling, differences.

Deceptive economic glimmers
By Thomas Walkom
April 29, 2009
"(...) In the Great Depression, it took more than 12 years for the unemployment rate to return to 1929 levels. By a similar measure, the recession of the '80s lasted seven years. [Armine] Yalnizyan's remedy for this slump is to have government do more, more and more again – for the simple reason that there is nowhere else to turn. She makes a convincing case that Canada, in spite of entering this downturn from a relatively strong position, is more exposed than it has been at any time since the 1930s.
Source:
Toronto Star

Public services a bargain for Canadians: Study
Press Release
April 15, 2009
TORONTO – The majority of Canadian households enjoy a higher quality of life because the public services their taxes fund come at a solid bargain, according to a new study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Canada’s Quiet Bargain: The Benefits of Public Spending responds to incessant calls for tax cuts and concludes public services make a significant contribution to the majority of Canadians’ standard of living – worth at least 50% of their income.

Complete report:

Canada's Quiet Bargain:
The Benefits of Public Spending
(PDF - 1.3MB, 40 pages)
April 2009
By Hugh Mackenzie and Richard Shillington
[ Version française : L'aubaine discrète du Canada ]
"(...) This path-breaking study raises serious questions about continuing Canada’s tax cut agenda and provides robust evidence that the taxes Canadians pay contribute substantially to their standard of living by providing them with some of the best public services in the world. "

Fact Sheet:
Public services...a quiet bargain
(PDF - 198K, 2 pages)
(...)
The tax cuts implemented by federal and provincial governments over the past 15 years have reduced the living standards of the majority of Canadians.
The majority of Canadians would be better off if their governments had invested in improving and expanding local public services instead of cutting taxes.
75% of Canadians would be better off if their provincial governments invested in public services instead of broad-based income tax cuts.

Leadership for Tough Times:
Alternative Federal Budget Fiscal Stimulus Plan
(PDF - 330K, 28 pages)
January 2009
OTTAWA—Today the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released the Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) fiscal stimulus plan, a one-year package that would create 407,000 jobs, boost the economy by 3%, and help protect Canadians from the worst of a recession.

Banner year for Canada's CEOs:
Record High Pay Increase
(PDF - 390K, 17 pages)
January 2009
By Hugh Mackenzie

Ready for Leadership:
Canadians’ perceptions of poverty
(PDF - 516K, 25 pages)
October 2008
By Trish Hennessy & Armine Yalnizyan
The majority of Canadians believe Canada should try to distinguish itself in the world as a country where no one lives in poverty, according to an Environics Research poll conducted for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The national poll reveals 90% of Canadians say they would be proud if their Premier took the lead in reducing poverty in their province; 88% want Canada to be a leader in poverty reduction; and 77% say a recession is all the more reason to act now.

Why Inequality* Matters: Presentation to the Canadian Labour Congress Convention (PDF - 106K, 6 pages)
May 27, 2008
By Armine Yalnizyan
"(...) Unions are [also] looking at poverty through new lenses — not just the importance of improving inadequate incomes, but the necessity of affordability for basics like housing, child care, education, to make sure we are all set on the right path in life.
-----
*
NOTE: To avoid duplication of links as much as possible, all links pertaining to inequality of incomes or of wealth can be found in the Inequality Links page of this site: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

Spooked by the prospect of recession?
Toronto-based social policy analyst John Stapleton teaches us a valuable history lesson with his new piece The ‘Last Recession Spook’: A Very Curable Disease, released by the CCPA as part of its Ontario Alternative Budget technical paper series. This paper looks at the history of public investments during economic downturns and finds the ghost of the last recession (in the 1990s) still haunts Canadians, limiting our thinking of what’s possible to modest terms. Exhorting Canadians to start real change and improvement, he writes, “The last recession was unlike all others and rather than reducing government programs during recessions, we used to increase them.”

The ‘Last Recession Spook’: A Very Curable Disease (PDF File, 157K, 5 pages)
Source:
CCPA Ontario Alternative Budget series

Related link:

Open Policy Ontario
(John Stapleton's personal website, incl. links to more commentaries and presentations)

Want to learn more about the growing gap between the rich and the rest of us?
Check out our Growing Gap website, the ultimate resource on income inequality.

Why Charity Isn’t Enough:
The Case for Raising Taxes on Canada’s Rich
(PDF file - 216K, 12 pages)
December 2007
By Andrew Jackson
This Alternative Federal Budget Technical Paper makes a clear and simple case for raising taxes among the richest of Canadians, to fund the kinds of things Canadians say they want and need to continue to be productive citizens: public health care, affordable housing, reasonable university tuition, better public infrastructure, public transit, and affordable child care.
Source:
CCPA Alternative Federal Budget Project

Canada’s rich not contributing fair share in taxes: study
Press Release
November 8, 2007
TORONTO – More than a decade’s worth of tax cuts have disproportionately lined the pockets of Canada’s most affluent families, says a new tax study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. The study finds the top 1 percent of families in 2005 paid a lower total tax rate than the bottom 10 percent of families.

Complete report:

Eroding Tax Fairness:
Tax Incidence in Canada, 1990 to 2005
(PDF File - 967K, 44 pages)
November 2007

The Shock Doctrine
Naomi Klein speaks about her new book at CCPA event
September 5, 2007
- includes a brief excerpt from her speech
(Vancouver) Footage of Naomi Klein speaking about her new book, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, is now available online at www.youtube.com/policyalternatives or www.policyalternatives.ca/naomi_klein_videos. The set of six videos is from a CCPA fundraiser in Vancouver in February 2007.

The Expressive Liberty of Beggars:
Why it matters to them, and to us
(PDF file - 282K, 28 pages)
September 2007
Restrictions on peaceful panhandling—such as City of Winnipeg Bylaw No. 128/2005—constitute an illegitimate use of state power, says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. The study, by Arthur Schafer, director of the Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics at the University of Manitoba, says there is no moral or legal justification for turning peaceful beggars into criminals.

Rising Profit Shares, Falling Wage Shares - (PDF File, 301K, 16 pages)
June 2007
OTTAWA – Canadians are working harder and smarter, contributing to a growing economy, but their paycheques have been stagnant for the past 30 years, says a new study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Related link:

www.GrowingGap.ca
GrowingGap.ca is a project of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
"(...)What does the growing gap look like? In 2004, the richest 10% of families raising children earned 82 times more than the poorest 10% -- almost triple the ratio of 1976, when they earned 31 times more. In after-tax terms the gap is at a 30-year high"

The Art of the Impossible: Fiscal Federalism and Fiscal Balance in Canada - (PDF file - 1350K, 57 pages)
By Hugh Mackenzie
July 2006
* Executive Summary - PDF File, 164 Kb
* Résumé - Fichier PDF, 170Ko.

Canada’s high-income earners are not overtaxed—report
Press Release
October 13, 2005
"Despite recent reports to the contrary, Canada’s high-income earners do not pay a disproportionately large share of personal income tax. A new analysis by Prof. Neil Brooks of Osgoode Hall Law School, released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, takes a closer look at the numbers in Statistics Canada’s “Tax Incidence in Canada.” The Stats Can report sparked a series of news stories this spring claiming the top 10% of income earners pay 52% of the total tax bill but Brooks finds these figures both misleading and incomplete in assessing the fairness of the tax system.

The Statistics Canada study showed that the share of federal income taxes paid by the top 10% increased from 46% in 1990 to 52.6% in 2002. Brooks points out, however, that this increase is not a result of the tax system becoming more progressive. Instead, the main reason for the increase was because the share of earned income going to the most affluent among us increased by 12.6% over that same period, while the share going to the bottom 50% of tax-filers declined."

Complete analysis:

The Share of Income Tax Paid by the Rich:
The Business Press Gives another Lesson on How to Deceive with Statistics
(PDF file - 115K, 7 pages)

CCPA report to House of Commons Finance Committee predicts large surpluses ahead
News Release
August 22, 2005
"OTTAWA—The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, one of the independent forecasters commissioned by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance, announced today that is once again forecasting surpluses much higher than the official government figures. In her report to the Committee CCPA Senior Economist Ellen Russell is predicting a surplus of $6.8 billion in 2004/05 and $9.5 billion in 2005/06, while the government is projecting surpluses of $3 billion and $4 billion, respectively. The CCPA’s calculations include the additional spending that was negotiated by the NDP and included in Bill C-48."

Complete report:

Federal Fiscal Forecasting Round 3:
Report to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance
(PDF file - 208K, 25 pages)

Don’t believe the hype: What’s really behind the Fraser Institute’s “Tax Freedom Day”
News Release
June 16, 2005
"OTTAWA—Each summer the Fraser Institute announces the arrival of 'tax freedom day': the day when Canadians allegedly stop 'working for the government' and start 'working for themselves.' A study by Neil Brooks, released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, takes a closer look at Tax Freedom Day and finds that to arrive at this politically loaded and heavily-reported date the Fraser Institute’s calculations understate the income of Canadians, overstate their taxes and misuse the concept of averages."

Tax Freedom Day: A Flawed, Incoherent, and Pernicious Concept (PDF file - 216 K, 27 pages)
2005
By Neil Brooks
"(...)In the guise of helping Canadians to understand their tax system, the Institute presents information that is deeply flawed and misleading — information that in fact seriously limits the public’s ability to understand and participate
meaningfully in the shaping of tax policy." (Excerpt, p.6)

Related Links from the Fraser Institute:

Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 26th
News Release
June 24, 2005
"Vancouver, BC - This year, Canadians start working for themselves on June 26th. According to The Fraser Institute’s annual Tax Freedom Day calculations, Canadians worked until June 25th to pay the total tax bill imposed on them by all levels of government."
By Jason Clemens, Director of Fiscal Studies, and Niels Veldhuis, Senior Research Economist

Tax Calculator
"Use the Personal Tax Freedom Day calculator to determine the day you stopped working for government and started working for yourself."

--------------------------------------------------------------
NOTE: The Tax Freedom Day concept is not a concoction of the Fraser Institute --- follow the Google.ca web and news search results links below to see similar themes from The Tax Foundation in the U.S. and the Adam Smith Institute in the U.K.

"Tax Freedom Day" Google.ca Web Search
"Tax Freedom Day" Google.ca News Search
Source:
Google.ca



RIP, CPRN.


Leading Canadian Think Tank Closes Its Doors
News Release
October 26, 2009
Canada is losing one of its leading independent public policy think tanks due to a lack of long-term funding commitment from governments and other resources. "It is with sadness that I must announce that after 15 years of quality public policy research, Canadian Policy Research Networks [CPRN] is no longer financially viable and will cease operations," announced Dr. Sharon Manson Singer, President of CPRN.
Source:
Canadian Policy Research Networks [CPRN]

CPRN's final annual report:

Canadian Policy Research Networks (CPRN)
Annual Report [2008-2009] - Farewell
(PDF - 1.2MB, 65 pages)
Released 26 Jan 2010
CPRN's final Annual Report, entitled Farewell, summarizes 15 years of contribution to Canada's public policy agenda and highlights the last 18 months of our work. December 23, 2009, was the final day of operations for Canadian Policy Research Networks (CPRN).

All 700+ CPRN policy publications addressing major socioeconomic challenges facing Canadian society will remain accessible and free (for seven years at least), because the CPRN website is now hosted by Carleton University for archival purposes until 2017.

NOTE:
All of the CPRN links below this yellow text box are functional.

Recommended reading:

"As a tribute to the legacy of quality public policy work produced by CPRN over the last decade and a half, the founding President, Judith Maxwell, and the Current President, Sharon Manson Singer, have co-authored [an] essay highlighting the importance of independent policy research to Canadian democracy and public policy, and the lasting contribution made by CPRN to national public discourse." (A Message from our Presidents)
Source:
Canadian Policy Research Networks (CPRN)
CPRN has been recognized nationally – and internationally – as a champion of citizen engagement and non-partisan socio-economic public policy research and analysis and has produced a wealth of quality evidence-based publications on a wide variety of issues.

---

COMMENT:
Like so many Canadians working in the field of social research in some form or another, I was sorry to read the announcement last October concerning the demise of the CPRN. Thanks, CPRN, for your "15-year foray into policy research, dialogues and deliberations" on Canadian policy questions. Your work has made a difference, and your efforts to help make this a better country have been greatly appreciated by social researchers in Canada and elsewhere -- but not by the Conservative Party of Canada.
Gilles

Here's the CPRN website, frozen in time.

Canadian Policy Research Networks - CPRN
[ version française:
Réseaux canadiens de recherche en politiques publiques - RCRPP
]
Canadian Policy Research Networks is a non-profit, charitable policy think tank based in Ottawa with a voluntary board of directors. (...) CPRN's mission is to create knowledge and lead public dialogue and debate on social and economic issues important to the well-being of all Canadians. Our goal is to help make Canada a more just, prosperous and caring society.
- incl. links to : About CPRN * People * Newsroom * Publications * Contact Us

CPRN's research areas comprise:
* Children, Youth and Families
* Cities and Communities
* Citizen Engagement
* Democracy, Governance and Citizenship
* Diversity
* Education and Learning
* Health and Health Human Resources
* Job Quality
* Labour Market/ Vulnerable Workers
* Social Protection
Click on a research area link to see a description of CPRNs research in that area along with links to related sub-areas and publications.

Publications - links to 1500+ research reports, briefs, presentations and more, going right back to 1993
News Releases - links to 150+ releases back to 1996 --- includes links to related publications and themes
What's New - links to the latest 20 or so items posted to the CPRN site

 


National Council of Welfare, R.I.P.
1969-2012

---------------------------------

The National Council of Welfare (NCW) [ http://www.ncw.gc.ca/ ] closed its doors and its website at the end of September 2012.

---

The official demise of the National Council of Welfare:

BILL C-38, 2012
An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget
tabled in Parliament on March 29, 2012 and other measures

http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&DocId=5524772
First Reading April 26, 2012
Excerpt from the Summary (at the beginning of the file):

"Division 51 of Part 4 amends the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development Act to add powers, duties and functions that are substantially the same as those conferred by the Department of Social Development Act. It repeals the Department of Social Development Act and, in doing so, eliminates the National Council of Welfare."

Source:
Parliament of Canada

http://www.parl.gc.ca/Default.aspx?Language=E

Related link:

Federal budget 2012: Ottawa axes National Council on Welfare
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1154445
Laurie Monsebraaten
March 30 2012
Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/


NOTE : For links to over a dozen articles and op-eds in the media about the end of the line for the NCW, go to
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

 

 

The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and its website on September 28, 2012.

November 22 (2012) update:

The link to the NCW Archive below is dead. In late September, I sent an email to archiving staff at Library and Archives Canada hoping that they might fix the problem. I still haven't heard back from anyone, and L&AC took a big hit in terms of resources as a result of the latest Harper Budget. I'll leave the link below in case it suddenly comes to life. [I wish.]

--------------------

National Council of Welfare Archive
(dead link - please read the above paragraph.)
http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/205/301/ncw-cnb/2012-08-07/www.cnb.gc.ca/h.4m.2_40-eng.jsp.htm
This *should* include a complete snapshot (incl. all Council reports) of the Council's website as at September 28, 2012.

For more information about this Canada Budget 2012 decision, see:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

Source:
Government of Canada Web Archive
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/index-e.html
[ Library and Archives Canada:
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html ]


LE 28 SEPTEMBRE 2012 NOUVEAU

Archive électronique du Conseil national du bien-être social
Copie complète du site Web du Conseil (y compris toutes les publications), le 28 septembre 2012.
Le Conseil national du bien-être social a fermé ses portes et son site Web le 28 septembre 2012.

Pour plus de renseignements au sujet du Conseil et de son sort, veuillez vous référer au lien suivant:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm


Source:
Archives du Web du gouvernement du Canada
[ Bibliothèque et Archives Canada ]


Since the Government Organization Act of 1969, the National Council of Welfare has served as advisory group to the federal Minister responsible for the welfare of Canadians - in 2012, that's the Hon. Diane Finley, Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada - regarding "any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate."

Special features of the Council's new website, all accessible from the home page, include:
* an interactive map of welfare incomes for 2008 (bottom of the page)
* customized tables and charts (Datasets : Total Welfare Incomes - Adequacy of Welfare Incomes - Poverty Rates)
* media summaries on poverty and related topics

- includes links to the following information and resources:
* About Us * Council Members * Research and Publications * News Room * Public Statements * Provincial and Territorial Contacts * Frequently Asked Questions * Sites of Interest * Mailing List * Get RSS Feed * Site Map
* Communities (Cost of Poverty - Solving Poverty - Welfare Incomes - Poverty Profile * Datasets (Total Welfare Incomes - Adequacy of Welfare Incomes - Poverty Rates)

"Techie note":
If you've saved any links to content from the Council's now-superseded original website, you'll have to update those links starting from their new home page, because the new site has been completely overhauled, right down to the new domain name ( cnb-ncw.gc.ca - replacing ncwcnbes.net ) and the new site format (JavaServer Pages, replacing HTML). At this point in time, there's no auto-redirect for individual links from the old site (except for the splash page), nor is there a site-wide "global" fix --- each link in your old list (and mine - argh...) must be updated.

Endorsement by me*
As a Canadian welfare chronicler since 1975, I've always had the highest regard for the National Council of Welfare as a valuable source of advice for the federal Minister responsible for the welfare of Canadians. In addition, the Council offers a wealth of information for social researchers. If you do research on welfare incomes, the Welfare Incomes series of reports is the FIRST source that I recommend, because it's the only source whose work is verified for factual accuracy by provincial-territorial government welfare authorities before it's published. And it's the only source that offers a consistent approach across all Canadian jurisdictions and annual reports back to 1986. The Council also does some impressive work with respect to the cost (to Canada) of poverty, how to solve poverty, and poverty profiles.
Check out the new National Council of Welfare website, and use the terrific new interactive research tools that are now available!
* Gilles

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Selected Council reports:
(reverse chronological order)



From the
National Council of Welfare
(NCW):

Over the years, the Council has produced many reports on poverty and welfare, but there are three that stand out in my mind as milestone reports on the history of welfare in Canada, at least since the 1980s.

1. 1987
Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
November 1987
Tangled Safety Net examines the following issues in Canadian social assistance network of programs:
* Complex rules * Needs-testing * Rates of assistance * Enforcement * Appeals * Recommendations
This report is the first comprehensive national analysis of social assistance programs operated by the provincial, territorial and municipal governments. These programs function as the safety net for Canadians and are better known by their everyday name ‘welfare’.

Version française :
Le bien-être social au Canada : Un filet de sécurité troué (PDF - 3Mo., 138 pages)
Novembre 1987
[ NOTA : Si vous trouvez un lien vers ce fichier en français, veuillez communiquer avec moi pour le partager.
Merci! gilseg@rogers.com ]

____________

2. 1992
Welfare Reform
(PDF - 2.8MB, 61 pages)
Summer 1992
This report is an update of the 1987 Tangled Safety Net, but it presents information by jurisdiction rather than by issue - covers all provinces and territories.

Version française:
Réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 3,5Mo., 63 pages)

____________

3. 1997
Another Look at Welfare Reform
(PDF - 6.75MB, 134 pages)
Autumn 1997
- an in-depth analysis of changes in Canadian welfare programs in the 1990s. The report focuses on the provincial and territorial reforms that preceded the repeal of the Canada Assistance Plan and those that followed the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer in April 1996.
[Proactive disclosure : I did the research for, and wrote the provincial-territorial section of, this report while I was on a one-year secondment to the Council. Gilles ]

Version française:
Un autre regard sur la réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 8Mo., 148 pages)

Source:
National Council of Welfare
[ Conseil national du bien-être social ]
Established in 1969, the Council is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (originally the Minister of Health and Welfare Canada). The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

-------------------------------------------------

June 7 (2012) update:
The National Council of Welfare has been de-funded and will be closing its doors and its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty
September 28, 2011
The report shows the high dollar cost we are currently paying for the consequences of poverty. It examines why investments to end poverty make better economic sense, and it shows how ending poverty would save money and improve wellbeing for everyone. It concludes with recommendations for the way forward.

The report:


The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty
(PDF - 3.6MB, 116 pages)
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/cnb-ncw/HS54-2-2011-eng.pdf
[From the Publications Canada website]
Table of contents:

PART ONE – SENSE
1. Costs, benefits and the difference between spending and investing
2. The economy and poverty
3. Society and poverty
4. Social and economic relationships
PART TWO – DOLLARS
5. Comprehensive cost/benefit calculations
6. Specific cost/benefit examples
PART THREE – DOLLARS AND SENSE
7. Governance and public policy
8. Canadian policy in practice
PART FOUR – SENSIBLE INVESTMENT
9. Taking action: Council recommendations


Version française:

Le sens des sous pour résoudre la pauvreté
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/cnb-ncw/HS54-2-2011-fra.pdf
[du site Publications Canada]
* Format PDF
(4.8MB, 132 pages)
Table des matières:
PARTIE UN - SENS
1. Coûts, avantages et la différence entre une dépense et un investissement
2. L’économie et la pauvreté
3. La société et la pauvreté
4. Relations sociales et économiques
PARTIE DEUX - SOUS
5. Calculs exhaustifs des coûts/avantages
6. Exemples de coûts/avantages
PARTIE TROIS - LE SENS DES SOUS
7. Gouvernance et politiques gouvernementales
8. Les politiques canadiennes mises en pratique
PARTIE QUATRE - INVESTISSEMENT JUDICIEUX
9. passer à l’action : Recommandations du conseil

Selected media coverage:

Canada urged to spend smarter to cut poverty
September 28, 2011
By Laurie Monsebraaten
It would have taken $12.6 billion to give the 3.5 million Canadians living in poverty enough income to live above the poverty line in 2007. And yet Canadians spent at least double that amount treating the consequences of poverty that year, says the National Council of Welfare. Clearly, this spending pattern doesn’t make good economic or social sense, the council says in its report “The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty,” being released Wednesday.
Source:
Toronto Star

Welfare Incomes 2010
September 2010
The National Council of Welfare has just updated its cross-Canada welfare incomes report to reflect the estimated incomes (in constant and current dollars) for 2010 of four typical welfare households in each province and territory:
- a single employable person
- a single person with a disability
- a lone parent with a 2-year-old child
- a two-parent family with two children aged 10 and 15
Click the link above, then move your cursor over each province or territory to view welfare incomes by household type for 2010 .
Click on a province or territory to see a chart of welfare incomes over time for that jurisdiction. This feature requires Macromedia Flash; if you don't have Flash or if you've disabled it, click the link below the map of Canada to access the same information in HTML.

Adequacy of Welfare Incomes
This isn't the most user-friendly interface I've ever used, but once you get the hang of it, you can compare welfare benefit levels for all jurisdictions and all household categories for all years from 1986 (1989 for a person with a disability) to 2010 using any one of five measures of adequacy: After-tax average income - After-tax LICO - After-tax median income - Before-tax LICO - Market basket measure (MBM).

[ earlier editions of the Welfare Incomes report ]

Special features on the Council's home page:
* You can subscribe to the RSS feed (in the left margin) if you're into RSS.
* You can test your welfare income smarts by answering the NCW Quiz question of the week.
[
Do *you* know which province increased the adequacy of its welfare benefits for a single employable person the most from 2009 to 2010?
Answer the NCW Quiz and find out!]
* In the top right corner of the home page, you'll find links to media summaries on issues of interest to the Council.
These summaries include links to the full articles, they're posted to the site every two days, and the Council's website includes an extensive archive of media summaries (back to October 2010) to browse through. (Or subscribe to the RSS feed to receive the media summaries in your RSS reader.)


Welfare Incomes 2009

Welfare design outdated, counterproductive
More effective solutions exist says new National Council of Welfare report
News Release
December 13, 2010
OTTAWA, ONTARIO– A new report from the National Council of Welfare (NCW) shows that welfare can be harder to get today than 20 years ago. This means more people were forced into destitution to qualify for welfare in 2009, when the recession’s casualties were mounting. Canadians cannot receive welfare if their liquid assets, such as cash, money in bank accounts or even retirement savings, are over the limit set for their particular circumstances. The NCW report, Welfare Incomes 2009, illustrates many cases where these asset limits have eroded, whether by inflation or design. The limit can be as low as $50.

Source:
National Council of Welfare
The National Council of Welfare was established as an advisory group to the Minister of National Health and Welfare by the Government Organization Act of 1969. The Council now reports to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

The report:

Welfare Incomes 2009 (PDF - 6.2MB, 117 pages)
As the National Council of Welfare has done since 1986, in Welfare Incomes 2009 we look at the situation of four family types: a lone parent with a 2-year-old child, a couple with two children aged 10 and 15, a single person considered employable and a single person with a disability.

Chapter 1 lists the main elements of the complicated process of qualifying for welfare in Canada.
Chapters 2 to 5 focus on each family type, comparing their welfare incomes over time and gauging their adequacy using two low-income measures—Low income cut-offs and the Market Basket Measure—as well as average and median incomes.
Chapter 6 looks at liquid asset provisions as of January 1, 2009 and for the first time compares 1989 levels in constant dollars of 2009 to those of 2009.
Earnings exemption provisions are the subject of Chapter 7, where we also look at the potential impact of the federal Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB) on welfare households with earnings.


*
Welfare Incomes 2009 – Update as of March 2011
April 8, 2011
The Welfare Incomes 2009 report has been updated to reflect changes based on new information received concerning the Market Basket Measure (MBM) as well as some updated information from Alberta concerning its earnings exemptions provisions. As a result of these changes, some of the textual and graphic information about lone parents and comparisons between welfare incomes and the MBM were modified in the report .
Go to the March 2001 WI Update page to see the specific updates to Welfare Incomes 2009.
Source:
National Council of Welfare

Welfare Incomes 2009 - Postcards
What do you know about welfare incomes in Canada?
This handy set of seven postcards will give you quick overview.
It’s a great companion to the Welfare Incomes 2009 publication.
Release Date : 2011-03-14

 

---------

Media:

Welfare rules forcing people into destitution, report finds
By Laurie Monsebraaten
December 13, 2010
It is tougher to get welfare in Canada today than during the economic downturn of the early 1990s, the National Council of Welfare says in its latest report. That’s because Ontario and most other provinces force people to drain their bank accounts and spend all of their savings before they qualify for help, says the report, released in Ottawa Monday. As a result, it is almost impossible for those living on welfare to get back on their feet, says the council, created by Ottawa in 1969 to advise the minister of human resources on poverty in Canada.
(...)
“Canada’s welfare system is a box with a tight lid,” said TD Bank’s former chief economist Don Drummond, who is among numerous individuals and groups who have been urging provinces to ease up on asset limits. “Those in need must essentially first become destitute before they qualify for temporary assistance,” Drummond said in a statement. “But the record shows once you become destitute you tend to stay in that state.” The council recommends improving income support programs outside the welfare system, such as federal and provincial child benefits and the federal Working Income tax Benefit (WITB), which is available to those on welfare and tops up earnings to make work pay.

Selected 2009 welfare incomes* in Canada:
• Welfare income for an employable single person ranged from $3,773 in New Brunswick to $9,593 in Newfoundland.
• Welfare income for a single person with a disability ranged from $8,665 in New Brunswick to $12,905 in Ontario.
• Welfare income for a lone parent with one child ranged from $14,829 in Manitoba to $19,297 in Newfoundland.
• Welfare income for a couple with two children ranged from $19, 975 in New Brunswick to $24, 045 in Prince Edwrad Island.
[ * The territories are not included in the above highs and lows because of the high cost of living in the North. ]

Source:
Toronto Star

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Poverty Profile 2007
Release date September 30, 2009
Poverty Profile is a regular publication of the Council that is based on survey data from Statistics Canada. It includes detailed information about poverty rates and numbers, depth of poverty, duration of poverty, common sources of income for poor people, income inequality in Canada and poverty and the paid labour market.
- incl. links to earlier Poverty Profiles, from 1998 to 2004
.

Poverty Profile Bulletins
(Click the link above to access these bulletins.)

No. 1: Introduction to Poverty Trends in Canada, 1976-2007
No. 2: Poverty Trends by Family Type, 1976-2007
No. 3: Poverty Trends by Province, 1976-2007
No. 4: A Snapshot of Children Living in Poverty
No. 5: Depth of Poverty
No. 6: Duration of Poverty
No. 7: Poverty and Paid Work
No. 8: Sources of Income
No. 9: Poverty and Education
No. 10: Income Inequality
Methodology, Definitions and Data Sources

Source:
National Council of Welfare

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The Cost of Poverty and the Value of Investment
Can we afford to solve poverty?
Can we afford not to?
Canadians want an end to poverty, but even those most committed to the solutions can still wonder if we can afford to. We know there is a correlation between poverty and other areas of spending like health, education and justice, but just how much is poverty costing us? (...) The National Council of Welfare is seeing a growing number of reports and articles addressing the costs associated with poverty and we’ve set out to find what has been done and what it tells us.
- includes more info about the Council's new (February 2010) initiative and links to the complete report or individual sections in PDF format.
Click the link immediately below for the complete report in one file.


Comprehensive Bibliography
(PDF - 280K, 34 pages)
February 2010
- 300+ links divided into three main sections: Canadian studies, American studies and International studies
- six categories: General, Policies and Programs; Housing; Early Education programs; Education; and Health.
- incl. (at the end of the bibliography) a chronology of newspaper articles on the subject that will be updated regularly with new and relevant articles.
[Required reading for ALL social researchers!]
Well done, National Council of Welfare - this is an excellent resource!

Top Ten Picks (PDF - 67K, 3 pages)
January 2010
If you think that 300+ links all at once is daunting, the nice folks at the Council have bundled their top picks from the collection for you.
Start there.

-------------------------------------------------------------


Welfare Incomes 2008
With the recession starting in 2008, more and more Canadians are having to deal with one of the 13 different social assistance systems, discovering how complicated, cumbersome and stigmatizing most are.

Bulletins No. 1 through 4 give you a snapshot of the welfare incomes situation in 2008 for 4 types of families, and a fifth document provides detail on the methodology. Each bulletin focuses on one family type and provides, for the 2008 calendar year, the following information for a household in that situation:
* the total annual estimated income for the household (including government benefits and any exempted income) in each jurisdiction
* the total annual estimated income of a household receiving welfare compared with the Low-Income Cutoffs, the Market Basket Measure and average incomes in all provinces (but not the territories)
* asset exemption rules for all jurisdictions (how much an applicant can have in assets and remain eligible for welfare)
* the extent of the decline in welfare incomes in recent years
* earnings exemption provisions (what portion of work income is excluded when calculating entitlement)

* Bulletin No. 1: Single person considered employable (PDF - 1.8MB, 6 pages)
* Bulletin No. 2: Single person with a disability (PDF - 1.7MB, 6 pages)
* Bulletin No. 3: Lone parent with a child aged two (PDF - 1.7MB, 6 pages)
* Bulletin No. 4: Couple with two children aged 10 and 15 (PDF - 1.6MB, 4 pages)
* Methodology (PDF - 1.3MB, 5 pages)

Source:
Welfare Incomes 2008

Source:
National Council of Welfare
The National Council of Welfare advises the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development in respect of any matters relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

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Welfare Incomes, 2006 and 2007

A personal note about the Welfare Incomes series:
For about 25 of my 30 years as a welfare program information specialist with the federal government, I supported the work of the Council on the subject of welfare program information and welfare rates, and I think that their collection of historical, cross-Canada information on Canadian welfare programs is second to none.

Welfare Incomes, 2006 and 2007 (PDF - 16.6MB, 157 pages)
December 2008
Table of contents: * Message from the Chairperson * Patterns and Trends * What is Welfare? * Adequacy of Welfare Incomes * Welfare Incomes Over Time * Welfare Incomes and Child Benefits * Total Welfare Incomes and Poverty Over Time * Concluding Thoughts * Appendices * Fact Sheet: 2007 Provincial Welfare Rates Compared to the MBM
NOTE : the HTML version of the report also includes links to earlier editions of this report back to 1999

News Release:
Poverty line is being cracked, but not broken.
Cross-Canada action needed as economy worsens, National Council of Welfare says
News Release
Toronto, December 10 – While incomes for most Canadians on welfare were stuck far below the poverty line, some cracked that line in 2007, the newest report by the National Council of Welfare says. But tough economic times mean it will be tough to really break through, unless comprehensive, nationwide action is taken, says the advisory body to the federal government.
Welfare Incomes, 2006 and 2007 looked at the circumstances of Canadians on welfare in all provinces and territories. The study by the National Council of Welfare found that in the case of the lone parent with a pre-school age child living in Quebec, welfare income for 2007 reached 100 per cent of the Market Basket Measure (MBM), a poverty line measurement that takes into account the cost of meeting basic needs in different parts of Canada.

Related link:

Welfare recipients poorer than Canadians imagine: report
December 09, 2008
OTTAWA - Amid fears a souring economy will throw more Canadians onto provincial welfare rolls, a federal advisory body is issuing a bleak report that says most people living on social assistance are so impoverished that adequate housing, jobs and recreational activities are beyond their reach. With the exception of some residents of Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador, the country's 1.7 million welfare recipients subsist on incomes far below what most Canadians can imagine living on, the National Council of Welfare says in a massive report being released Wednesday which documents welfare incomes in 2006 and 2007.
Source:
Canada.com

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Welfare Incomes 2005 (PDF file - 1.4MB, 116 pages)
August 2006
"Welfare Incomes 2005 estimates total welfare incomes for four types of households in each province and territory, for a total of 52 scenarios. The four household types we use are a single employable person, a single person with a disability, a lone-parent with a 2-year-old child, and a two-parent family with two children aged 10 and 15. The National Council of Welfare has published similar estimates since 1986."

Related materials - incl. links to French report, news release, methodology notes, etc...

Related links:

Staggering losses in welfare incomes
Press release
August 24, 2006
"In Alberta, the income in real dollars of a single person on welfare has decreased by almost 50 percent since 1986. Since 1992 in Ontario, the welfare income of a lone parent with one child has decreased by almost $6,600 and a couple with two children has lost just over $8,700. The National Council of Welfare’s report, Welfare Incomes 2005, paints a dismal picture, and one that is getting worse. When adjusted for inflation, many 2005 welfare incomes were lower than they were in 1986. Most welfare incomes peaked in 1994 or earlier...."

Number of People on Welfare, March 1995 to March 2005 (PDF file - 133K, 1 page)

---

Bouquets to CBC Radio, who covered the release of this welfare incomes report right across the country starting at six a.m. in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador.

You can find links to CBC radio coverage of this story, in the form of written articles or an audio file as in the example below, adapted for each region's audience, with local reaction for each jurisdiction in Canada, by doing a Google.ca search using the search terms "welfare incomes, 2006, Ontario".
Remember to remove the quotation marks from your search terms and replace Ontario with the name of your province or territory, and be sure to try both the Web Search and the News Search buttons in Google.ca

Here's a sampling of coverage concerning the release of this report from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador:

CBC Radio - St. John's Morning Show (7-minute Real Audio file - requires speakers and RealPlayer)
Newfoundland and Labrador
Thursday, August 24
NOTE - if you're behind a corporate firewall in your government office or university, this audio stream probably won't work, for security reasons.

-----

Brickbats to the Citizen in my home town of Ottawa, who didn't even mention the release of the welfare incomes report. I'm not sure what people in the media call it (scoop? oversight? stoopid editorial board decision to take a pass on the story?), but the Citizen editorial board richly deserves the egg that's on their collective faces for having missed the boat on a report that's as significant as this one. Judging by the significant media coverage and public feedback in forums and letters to the editor - elsewhere in Canada - since the release, "this story's got legs" --- it'll be in the public consciousness for awhile longer.
No thanks to the Citizen, though...

---

More editorializing:

If you've read the Top Ten Reasons I Created This Site, you already know (#8) that I think there's too much of a slant from organizations like the Fraser Institute and Prime Minister Steve's earlier gig, the National Citizens' Coalition, in the mainstream media, and not enough from progressive non-governmental organizations like the Canadian Council on Social Development and Campaign 2000.

Another such organization that's actually part of government in an arm's-length kind of way is the National Council of Welfare. The Council came to life in the late sixties via an integral part of the statute that defined the activities of the Department of National Health and Welfare. After a few departmental restructuring initiatives and name changes over the years, the Council is currently the government advisory body to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development in matters pertaining to social development, i.e., well-being in Canada.

I have the highest regard for the Council as an advisory body, because it advocates on behalf of people, not corporations. The excellent reports produced by the Council's secretariat - especially the time series like Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profiles - offer up to twenty years' worth of cross-Canada information for use by both federal and provincial-territorial policy-makers to support their work. The reports are also for use by the social advocacy sector, to keep governments' feet to the fire --- fits right in with the concept of Accountability as one of the New Canadian Government's five priorities, doesn't it?

For about 25 of my 30 years as a welfare program information specialist with the federal government, I supported the work of the Council on the subject of welfare program information and welfare rates, and I think that their collection of historical, cross-Canada information on Canadian welfare programs is second to none. I spent a year on secondment with the Council secretariat starting in the summer of 1996, and I updated the numbers in Welfare Incomes 1995 as part of my work there. Now, ten years later, we find that after inflation, welfare incomes in '96 were more generous than they were in 2005 by several thousand dollars a year. And that includes thousands of families with kids...

For links to Canadian welfare program information, go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

Solving Poverty - It Can Be Done!
Press release
January 25, 2007
"In a report to the federal government made public today, the National Council of Welfare (NCW) advises Canadian governments that a workable solution to poverty is within their reach and that Canada can have the kind of success that other countries are achieving."

Complete report:

Solving Poverty: Four cornerstones of a workable national strategy for Canada (PDF file - 1MB, 29 pages)
Winter 2007
"(...) When the National Council of Welfare started looking into anti-poverty strategies, it became quickly apparent to us that if there is no long-term vision, no plan, no one accountable for carrying out the plan, no resources assigned and no accepted measure of results, we will continue to be mired in poverty for generations.

The four cornerstones:
1) creating a national anti-poverty strategy with targets and timelines;
2) developing a coordinated plan of action;
3) ensuring accountability; and
4) establishing official poverty indicators.

Related Link:

Report on responses to the
Poverty and Income Security Questionnaire
(PDF file - 1.1MB, 36 pages)
Prepared by MiroMetrica Inc.
January 2007

RECHERCHISTES FRANCOPHONES:
Vous pouvez accéder à la version française de ces textes en vous rendant
sur le site Web du Conseil national du bien-être social

---------------------------------------------------------------

Related Links:
- go to the Poverty Measures Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

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Canadian Council on Social Development
"The Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) is one of Canada's most authoritative voices promoting better social and economic security for all Canadians. A national, self-supporting, non-profit organization, the CCSD's main product is information and its main activity is research, focussing on concerns such as income security, employment, poverty, child welfare, pensions and government social policies."
Put an "X" on this one - it will be on the final exam. You must visit this site if you're looking for anything to do with poverty, welfare, income, health, family, social indicators, etc.
What's New on the CCSD site --- all new material is on the home page link (above)...
About the CCSD
Research
CCSD Publications
Free Statistics
Policy Initiatives
Key Events

CCSD Links
CCSD Subsites
- The Disability Research Information Page
- Crime Prevention Through Social Development
- The Cultural Diversity Page
- The Social Indicators Site
- The Social Inclusion Conference
- Community Social Data Strategy

Sample site content:

Recent developments in the
National Commission on Community Health and Social Services

October 23, 2011
[ NOTA : La version française de cette mise a jour se trouve au bas de la version anglaise au lien ci-dessus. ]

Are you aware of interesting innovations in service planning, organization or delivery; or of service success stories; or of cost savings through cooperative planning or use of resources; which might be a useful model for the Commission to consider? If so, please let us know.
Contact us at commission@ccsd.ca

The latest buzz:

* We have been approached by a research centre which is a joint initiative of the University of Montreal and the Government of Quebec, to develop a research partnership with the Commission. This centre focuses on community collaborative planning and “network governance” of services. As part of the agreement, the Commission would facilitate the development of a network of researchers in Canada who have similar research interests.

* It has been suggested that the commission look at the increasing involvement of for-profit organizations in service delivery.

* The project is being encouraged by a community health centre in Ottawa and recommended for funding support to a group of centre directors.

* We were invited to present the Commission project at a University of Victoria conference (October 14 and 15), as an example of linking the (essentially) non-profit service sector to multi-level governance.

* We now have more than forty volunteers across the country, helping with communications, research support and local coordination. More are welcome and your support is needed. Please join us and help as you can, and also forward this update to friends and colleagues.

Source:
National Commission on Community Health and Social Services
[ Version française :
Commission nationale sur les services de santé communautaires et services sociaux ]

The Canadian Council on Social Development and other national and provincial organizations wishing to join in, may organize a National Commission (a “non-royal” commission) on services for people who need the support of their community (including both publicly-mandated and community-mandated services). The Commission will be a catalyst for the thoughts and actions of thousands of local service organizations to tackle long-standing problems and impending new challenges, to improve service systems and the service environment.

On the Commission website's home page, you will find links to the following:
- the purpose and reasoning for a Commission
- how the Commission will be organised
- what can be achieved
- how you can become involved
- what people are saying about this initiative

Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development
Through our research and partnerships with organizations across the country, we continue to act as a catalyst for innovative, evidence-based approaches to reducing poverty and building resilient, hopeful thriving Canadian communities


From the Canadian Council on Social Development:

Canadian Social Forum
(Calgary, May 19-22, 2009)
The Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) hosted the first Canadian Social Forum, which took place in Calgary, May 19-22, 2009.

See the May 24, 2009 Special Canadian Social Forum Issue
of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter for more on the Forum.

Perception Magazine:
Volume 30, No. 1 & 2, 2008
(PDF - 2,4MB, 24 pages)
Fall 2008
Table of Contents:
* Editorial (by Peggy Taillon)
* Mapping Poverty-reduction Initiatives (by Pat Steenberg)
* Rising Tides: Anti-poverty Work Growing in Atlantic Canada (by David Jackson)
* An Interview with James Hughes, New Brunswick's Deputy Minister of Social Development (by Patrick Flanagan)
* Atlantic Summer Institute: Making the links
* Building Momentum for Real Change: the Canadian Social Forum
* Making Connections: Interview with Uzma Shakir
* Police Chiefs Speak Out Against Poverty (by Chief Edgar MacLeod)
* Update: Tracking Social Development (by Katherine Scott)
* The Weiler Award: 2009 Call for Nominations and 2008 Winner
Source:
Perception Magazine <=== incl. links to 35+ back issues of Perception
[ Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) ]

May 2008
The complete Poverty issue of Perception Magazine is now online, with pieces about national and provincial anti-poverty strategies, an article by Rob Rainer about a poverty-free Canada by the year 2020, a report by John Stapleton about why it's so tough to get ahead, an article on social data by Alanna Petroff, and much more. Plus we asked our readers and they told us what else they're reading these days.

Perception: Volume 29, No. 3 & 4, 2008 (PDF - 2.5MB, 28 pages)
Focus on Poverty :
* Defining the Problem * Working Strategies * Measuring Success
[ version française (PDF - 2,4Mo., 28 pages) ]
Table of Contents:
* Editorial (by Marcel Lauzière)
* Defining and re-defining poverty in Canada
* Towards a National Ideal: Canada Without Poverty by 2020 (by Rob Rainer)
* Four Cornerstones of a Workable National Strategy for Canada (by Sheila Regehr)
* Newfoundland and Labrador's Action Plan to Reduce Poverty (by Minister Shawn Skinner and Aisling Gogan)
* Quebec's Law Against Poverty and Social Exclusion: An Interview with Alain Noel
* "Why is it so tough to get ahead?" (A report by John Stapleton)
* Using social data for success (by Alanna Petroff)
* What's on your bookshelf?
* Resource: New report on economic well-being of children in North America
* Update: Canadian Social Forum
Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development
[ Conseil canadien de développement social ]

2006 Low-Income Cut-offs
[March 27, 2008]
("... more commonly known as Canada's unofficial poverty lines")

Stats & Facts fact sheets: A Profile of the Labour Market in Canada
[March 12, 2008]
- links to three fact sheets containing an abundance of national and provincial data about employment, earnings and labour force rates.

Attention, fans of the
Canadian Social Welfare Policy Conference!

Canadian Social Forum (PDF file - 58K, 1 page)
February 28, 2008
Mark Your Calendars!
The Canadian Council on Social Development is in the process of planning the first Canadian Social Forum which will take place in Calgary, Alberta, May 19-22, 2009.

NOTE: the Canadian Social Forum will replace the Social Welfare Policy Conference, a biennial event going back to 1982, but "will integrate the best of that 25-year tradition", according to the CCSD.

Related link:

Canadian Social Welfare Policy Conference
This is a link is to a page on the CCSD website that contains links to the 11th and 12th CSWP conferences in this mostly-biennial series that started way back in 1982. If you click each of the two conference links and check out the "Papers" link for each event, you'll find a list of presenters and the topics they covered; this will give you a good sense of the broad scope of this conference series.

Based on my own experience (I've attended all but one of the 12 events so far), CSWP is a four-day multi-sectoral gathering of several hundred people from academia, government and the NGO sector around social policy themes --- in brief, the perfect place to learn, to exchange ideas and to expand your list of social policy contacts.
I highly recommend this conference/forum. (Tell 'em Gilles sent you - I might get a discount on my registration fees...)

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November 15, 2007
Stats & Facts: Economic Security
Chock full of information about income, spending habits and poverty among Canadian families, the Economic Security Fact Sheets are the latest in our Stats & Facts series. Along with the earlier fact sheets on demographics, health, education and families, these latest fact sheets provide a wealth of useful statistical data and analysis about the realities of life in Canada.

Jason Mogus on the Web
Jason Mogus was the keynote speaker at the CCSD Annual General Meeting last month. He spoke about the ways in which the web is changing, and how non-profits can benefit from that change, providing they’re prepared to change with it. His speaking notes and an audio recording of his presentation are available on our website.

CCSD’s annual report for 2006-2007 is now available.

Jordan’s Principle
CCSD supports Jordan’s Principle, which urges a child-first approach to the resolution of jurisdictional disputes involving the care of First Nations children.

Urban Poverty 2007 - updated October 18/07
A fresh batch of Urban Poverty reports has been posted to the CCSD's Urban Poverty 2007 page. They include a report on populations vulnerable to poverty, one on education and employment, another on age, gender and family, and a final one on neighbourhood poverty. There's also a new urban poverty bibliography.

"Poverty is not only about the numbers. It's about the stark realities of daily life for millions of Canadians. We hope that the numbers provided here will help communities share information, leverage resources and create solutions to the blight of urban poverty in Canada. Products in the Urban Poverty Project include community profiles, a time-series analysis of urban poverty trends over the 1990s, and a detailed snapshot of urban poverty using the 2001 Census data."

Click the link above to access the project files listed below:

* Measuring Poverty: a backgrounder
* Media Release
* A Lost Decade - Urban Poverty in Canada, 1990-2000
o Factsheet # 1: Looking Back
o Factsheet # 2: Place Matters
o Factsheet # 3: Neighbourhood Poverty
* Detailed analyses of different dimensions of urban poverty in 2000, presented in the following reports:
o Poverty by Geography
o Dimensions of Income Among Poor Households
o Employment and Education
o Populations Vulnerable to Poverty
o Age, Gender and Family
o Neighbourhood Poverty
* Community Profiles - an online database containing demographic profiles of 111 communities across Canada;
* Poverty Data Tables: Another online database, organized by levels of geography
* A summary report on the Urban Poverty Project 2007 (forthcoming)
* UPP 2007 Bibliography

* Shelter - Homelessness in a growth economy: Canada's 21st century paradox (by Gordon Laird, for the Sheldon Chumir Foundation)
* Talking about urban poverty: CCSD's Katherine Scott speaks to Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (May 10, 2007)
* From the CCSD Archives: Urban Poverty Project 2000

Related links:

* Measuring Poverty
* Media Release
* Community Profiles

* From the CCSD Archives: Urban Poverty Project 2000

Final report of the meeting of
Social Planning Councils held in Toronto in May, 2006
(PDF file - 164K, 40 pages)
November 9, 2006
"A meeting of Canadian social planning organizations was convened by the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) in Toronto, Ontario in early May 2006 with the support of Human Resources and Social Development Canada. The planning group for the meeting group included representatives from CCSD and social planning organizations from across Canada. The [report] is a summary of discussion and next steps from this meeting."
- includes links to websites of 30+ social planning organizations and regional networks across Canada that participated in sessions to provide input on the development of a pan-Canadian network
- also includes some interesting contextual and historical information about the series of 12 (so far) biennial Social Welfare Policy conferences going back to 1989 (although people of *my* vintage recall that this series of conferences actually started in Calgary in 1982, and the role of social planning councils became more prominent starting in 1989). I attended every one of the conferences in this series except the 1997 event in Regina, even the latest (2005) conference in Fredericton that took place after I "retired". I always found - along with many of my Ivory Tower colleagues at the time - that this venue was invaluable in forging and nurturing good working relations with social researchers in academia, the non-governmental sector and other federal and provincial government officials. During my 30 years with the feds, I found that there were few other self-development opportunities that offered me such a rich diversity of views on government policy, and I was pleased and privileged to be a part of that. I think all governments should make attendance at these cross-sectoral events mandatory for their staff, as appropriate.

The Health of Canadians
December 5, 2006
The Health of Canadians is the newest addition to Stats & Facts, a series of popular CCSD fact sheets that also includes:
* Demographics * Family * Education * Health * Economic Security * Labour Market
- the health fact sheet includes graphics and tables on the following topics:
Health Care System
* Spending on Health Care * Spending on Prescription Drugs * Access to Doctors * Patient Satisfaction
Health Behaviours
* Physical Activity * Obesity * Smoking *
Health Status
* Self-rated Health
Chronic Health Conditions
* Asthma * Diabetes * Depression
Leading Causes of Death
* Circulatory Disease * Cancer
[
Source: Stats & Facts ]

The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector in Ontario (PDF file - 788K, 78 pages)
June 29, 2006
"This report kicks off a series of regional reports on the vital 'third pillar' of Canadian society. Written by Katherine Scott from the Canadian Council on Social Development, the research is based on the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, which was conducted by a consortium of organizations in partnership with Statistics Canada."

Some families losing ground
in effort to provide stable family incomes
Media Release
April 26, 2006
OTTAWA – One-third of Canadian children living in poverty have a parent who works at a full-time job, according to a new report by the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD). The Progress of Canada's Children and Youth 2006 also shows that this situation is deteriorating. In 1993, one-quarter of poor children had a parent who worked full time. "Family income is recognized as one of the keys to healthy child development," says Dr. Peter Bleyer, CCSD President. "Yet job security eludes many Canadian parents, and that has an enormous impact on what their kids eat, how they learn, and where they play." Temporary, part-time, contract, and seasonal employment now make up 37% of Canadian jobs, compared to 25% in the mid-1970s. The CCSD report also shows that investing in children through government transfers brought the child poverty rate down from 27% to 18% in 2003.

Complete report:

The Progress of Canada's Children & Youth 2006
HTML version

- incl. links to : Portrait - Family Life - Economic Security - Physical Safety - Community Resources - Civic Vitality - Health Status - Social Engagement - Learning - Labour Force Profile of Youth - Data Sources - Web-Only Supplementary Data - Tools - Contact Us - Français
PDF version (2.5MB, 84 pages)
Tools - links to individual PDF files for each chapter of the report, plus fact sheets, press release, etc.

Making Connections:
Social and civic engagement among Canadian immigrants

April 2006
By Katherine Scott, Kevin Selbee and Paul Reed

New Canadians participate, despite obstacles
Release
April 24, 2006
OTTAWA – Immigrants give larger donations, on average, than the Canadian-born population but they are slightly less likely to volunteer their time than people born in Canada, according to research by the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD). Making Connections: Social and Civic Engagement among New Canadians also shows that the rate of volunteering is increasing, particularly among recent immigrants.

* Full Report (PDF format, 1.5MB, 50 pages)
* Executive Summary (PDF file - 240K, 4 pages)

Related Links:

Go to the main page of the report for links to the following content:
* Powerpoint Slideshow
* Fact Sheet #1: Patterns in Participation, Engagement, and Informal Caring
* Fact Sheet #2: Profile of Volunteering
* Canadian Story #1: Building a Life in Canada
* Canadian Story #2: Organizing Ourselves
* Canadian Story #3: Finding a New Direction
* Canadian Story #4: Keeping Faith
* Appendix 1: The Changing Face of Canadian Immigrants, using 2001 Census data
* Appendix 2: Portrait of Canadian Immigrants, using 2000 NSGVP data
* Appendix 3: Data Sources
* Letter to the editor, March 3 2006
* Selected Charts
o Chart 1: Volunteer rate and average hours volunteered, by length of time in Canada, 2000
o Chart 2: Volunteer rate and average hours volunteered, by age group, 2000
o Chart 3: Volunteer rate and average hours volunteered, by level of education, 2000
o Chart 4: Donor rate and average donation, by length of time in Canada, 2000
o Chart 5: Donor rate by age group, 2000
o Chart 6: Membership rate by level of education, 2000
o Chart 7: Voting rate by age group, 2000

Stats & Facts - New!
[Added to the CCSD site April 13, 2006]
Stats & Facts, a new on-line service of the Canadian Council on Social Development, provides accessible and accurate statistical information. This site is intended for anyone with an interest in timely data on social and economic indicators. We anticipate that Stats & Facts will be frequently used by policy analysts, community planners, activists, journalists, and students. Users will find informative facts sheets organized by topic areas covering demographics, families, and education. Plans are underway to add more fact sheets on the labour market, health, and economic security in the coming months. All of these fact sheets will be regularly updated to reflect the most current data available.

Stats & Facts replaces the CCSD website's Free Statistics section. All historical poverty and income data, as well as welfare rates, will be archived and available in the economic security section of Stats & Facts.
[If you haven't checked out the Free Stats section of the CCSD site, you'll be impressed with the wealth of social program stats that you'll find there!]

Perception Magazine- Winter 2005
Cold Comfort - Volume 28, No. 1 & 2
(PDF file - 1.2MB, 28 pages)
Table of Contents:
* Editorial (by Peter Bleyer)
* Lessons from Katrina: Preserving a civil society in the face of disaster (by Paul Kovacs)
* Beyond wishful thinking: Emergency planning for persons with disabilities (by Gail Fawcett)
* Why must chronic illness mean poverty and isolation? (by Michel Martin)
* A cautionary tale from Australia (by Lynne Wannan, Australian child care expert)
* The Progress of Canada's Children and Youth 2006
* Battling stereotypes
* Changing from within
* Creating safe and supportive environments for young Canadians (by Pam Joliffe)
* CCSD Member Profile: St. Christopher House - A dynamo of social change
* A helping hand up for the working poor (by Don Drummond and Gillian Manning)
* The World We Have: Towards a new social architecture (by Katherine Scott)
* Rebuilding Social Programs (by Ben Carniol)

Child Poverty and the Canada Social Transfer: CCSD takes the Debate to the Prairies.
[October 6, 2005]

Let's Make Productivity Work for Canadians
CCSD's Presentation to the Finance Committee 2005 Pre-budget Consultation

[October 5, 2005]

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2004-2005 CCSD Annual report (PDF file - 174K, 8 pages)

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Funding Matters … For Our Communities:
Challenges and Opportunities for Funding Innovation
in Canada’s Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector
(PDF file - 242K , 22 pages)
[September 8, 2005]
This report summarizes the findings of workshops and presentations undertaken through this project, including common themes and innovative community practice. It also includes an analysis of the different proposals for funding reform raised over the course of the project.

Canadian Social Welfare Policy Conference Proceedings
Fredericton - June 16-18, 2005
[Proceedings posted September 2005]
- incl. links to complete proceedings and highlights for each of the three days of the conference; the link below is to the complete proceedings.

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Conference Proceedings with photographs (PDF file - 566K, 78 pages)
Related Links:
Canadian Social Welfare Policy Conference Home Page

Highlights from the Canadian Social Welfare Policy Conference in Fredericton:
* Day 1 - June 16
* Day 2 - June 17
* Day 3 - June 18
* (What conference?)

The Weiler Award goes to --- Michael Goldberg!
On Day 2 of the Canadian Social Welfare Policy Conference, the Weiler Award was presented to Vancouver-based children's advocate Michael Goldberg on Friday at the Social Welfare Policy Conference in Fredericton. This award honours Canadians who make outstanding contributions to social justice and community development. For more information about the Award, and about Mr. Goldberg and previous winners, see the Weiler Award Page.
[Congratulations, Michael --- well done!]

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On June 16, the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) released two papers in the New Social Architecture series.
This project is designed to highlight and examine key social challenges facing Canada, and set out some strategic options for change.

The World We Have: Towards a New Social Architecture (PDF file - 316K, 49 pages)
June 2005
by Katherine Scott, CCSD

Postponed Adulthood: Dealing with the New Economic Inequality (PDF file - 189K, 11 pages)
by John Myles, University of Toronto

Related Link:

The New Social Architecture Series and other CCSD Policy Initiatives

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Disability Information Sheet #20
June 2005
"In this Information Sheet, we examine the medication and health care patterns of children with disabilities."
PDF version - 221K, 8 pages
HTML version

Source:
Disability Research at the CCSD
NOTE: Click the link above for links to the complete collection of information sheets, covering a wide range of disability-related issues.

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Perception: Volume 27, No. 3 & 4 - 2005 (PDF file - 879K, 32 pages)
Table of Contents:
* The state of Canada's social programs (by Peter Bleyer)
* View from Down Under: Lessons from the New Zealand Experience (by Janet Creery)
* A New Social Partnership for Canada (by Ken Dryden)
* Addressing Child Poverty (by Ed Broadbent)
* A Strong Economy (by Monte Solberg)
* Poverty in Canada: A matter of government priorities and societal choices (by Christiane Gagnon)
* Universality of Social Programs versus Targeting: Either neither, or both (by Richard Shillington)
* New challenges in social development: Montreal, a case study (by Genviève Giasson, with assistance from Marcel Cajelait and Jacques Savard)
* When Taxes are Good (by Jim Stanford)
* The Canada We Want? (by Al Hatton)
* 2005 Weiler Award Winner: Michael Goldberg
* In Their Own Words (Terrace Anti-Poverty Group Society; Pluri-elles; E.Fry Ottawa; St. Joseph's Community Health Centre)
* George Davidson: Social Policy and Public Policy Exemplar (book review by Michael Clague)

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What Kind of Canada?
A Call for a National Debate on the Canada Social Transfer
April 8, 2004
"The CCSD is aware that the Canada Social Transfer, in and of itself, will not resolve all Canada's social challenges. But it can, and should, be a key instrument in our collective hands to help us address at least some of these challenges. It is a useful starting point to get a healthy debate going. A four-point agenda to renew the Canada Social Transfer is proposed:
1. The Canada Social Transfer should be split into two parts: one for social programs and the other for post-secondary education.
2. Funding for the Canada Social Transfer should be restored to 1994-95 levels, and predictability and stability of funding should be guaranteed.
3. Common principles and objectives for the social transfer should be agreed to by all parties through a broad engagement with Canadians.
4. A pan-Canadian body should be established to measure outcomes, share innovation and foster citizen involvement."
Related Links:
Go to the Canadian Social Research Links Canada Assistance Plan/Canada Health and Social Transfer /Canada Social Transfer Resources page

Proceedings and Final Report on the Working Conference on Strategies to Ensure Economic Security for All Canadians (PDF file - 150K, 24 pages)
November 28, 2003
by Sally Lerner (University of Waterloo)

Urban Poverty Project (part of the CCSD's Community Social Data Strategy)
November 27, 2003
- incl. data on urban poverty for municipalities and community-based organizations as a stand-alone product.
- provides
detailed information about low income down to the level of Census Tracts, which have a population of 2,500 to 8,000 persons. For smaller cities, available data will include Census dissemination areas, which allow analysis of 400- to 700-person neighbourhood tracts.
- demographic characterisitics :
Income - Age - Education - Occupation - Labour force status - Gender - Family status - Visible minority status - Aboriginal status - Ethnic ancestry - Immigration - Language - People with disabilities - Mobility
"This information package will allow cities and non-profit organizations to develop a more-thorough understanding of who in their area is living in low income, and what are the characteristics of this population, such as where and how they live, what their employment status is, and the like."

Related Report:

Urban Poverty in Canada: A Statistical Profile (April 17, 2000)
- Full Report

- Backgrounder

- Communiqué
(April 17, 2000)
- Highlights
- Resource People

Community Social Data Strategy
New CCSD Sub-site (November 7, 2003)
"The Community Social Data Strategy is a new and exciting project through which municipalities and community-based organizations can access and analyze detailed research findings from Statistics Canada cost effectively. It is an initiative of the Canadian Council on Social Development in partnership with Statistics Canada."
- incl. community-level data covering a broad range of social and economic factors, including: * Census * Urban Poverty * Small Area and Administrative Data * Business Register * Survey of Household Spending * Labour Force Survey and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics * Uniform Crime Reporting Survey * Canadian Community Health Survey * Population Projections * Geography Products
Community Social Data Strategy brochure (PDF file - 329K, 12 pages)
Partnering Primer (PDF file - 1MB, 6 pages) - "how you can get involved with the Community Social Data Strategy"

Canadians increasingly anxious despite positive indicators
Press Release
November 3, 2003

Personal Security Index 2003:
A reflection of how Canadians feel five years later

- incl. links to : Press Release - Full Report - Highlights (Economic Security, Health Security, Physical Safety and Regional Differences) - Backgrounders

Full Report [PDF file - 380K, 87 pages]


Imagining a Future of Inclusion: CCSD's submission to the
House Of Commons Standing Committee On Finance
2003 Pre-Budget Consultations
(PDF file, 130kb).
September 24, 2003

Funding Matters: The Impact of Canada's New Funding Regime on Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations (2003)
Katherine Scott
- incl. Summary Report, Communiqué, Fact Sheets and the [free!] complete report broken down into individual chapters. The full report is approx. 175 pages.
Communiqué (June 15, 2003)
"Society’s Third Pillar – the Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector – Shows Signs of Cracking Under Strain of New Funding Regime"
Sources:
Canadian Council on Social Development
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

When Worlds Collide: Implications of International Trade and Investment Agreements for Non-Profit Social Services
by Andrew Jackson and Matthew Sanger
Download Table of Contents and Introduction (PDF file - 205K, 15 pages)
Place an order for this report
Read the news release (June 16, 2003)
"When Worlds Collide: Canada's non-profit social services need to be protected in the new round of trade agreements
OTTAWA--A new study jointly released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) and the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) has concluded that government support for non-profit social services could be at risk despite Canadian government assurances that social policies will not be adversely affected by international trade obligations..."
Sources:
Canadian Council on Social Development
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

11th Canadian Social Welfare Policy Conference - It's Time to Act!
Ottawa
June 15, 16 and 17, 2003

CCSD research staff were responsible for the development of Chapter 5 (Young Children with Disabilities in Canada) of the Government of Canada's report The
Well-Being of Canada's Young Children.

Boomers Beware: People with Disabilities Falling Between the Cracks
Press Release
May 20, 2003
"Too many Canadians with disabilities are failing to get the medication or medical attention they need according to Gail Fawcett, Senior Research Associate at the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD). This situation is particularly worrisome at a time when the demographic bulge of the baby boomers is heading into age groups which are at higher risk for disabilities."

Disability Research Information (DRI) Page
[version française]
The Disability Research Information Page provides centralized access to all disability research of the Canadian Council on Social Development.
The collection of Disability Information Sheets (12 in all) provides information on the following topics : disability research sources, possible disability research themes, issues around longitudinal research, education and employment, children with disabilities and computers and technology.
- also includes links to the following articles and reports : Special Education in Canada (Fall 2001) - Children and Youth with Special Needs (November 2001) - Bringing Down the Barriers: The Labour Market and Women with Disabilities in Ontario (May 2000) - Living with Disability in Canada: An Economic Portrait (1996) - Urban Poverty in Canada: A Statistical Profile (April 2000 )
NOTE : I usually try to include direct links to online reports in these pages, but many of these information sheets include additional tables and charts that you can only find by going to the Disability Information page on the CCSD website (the link above). The contents of each of the eight information sheets appear below, but the links to each of them are on the DRI page.

Complete collection of Disability Information Sheets also provides information on the following topics : disability research sources, possible disability research themes, issues around longitudinal research, education and employment, children with disabilities and computers and technology.

A Lost Decade: Income Equality and the Health of Canadians
December 2, 2002

Presentation by Katherine Scott, Senior Policy and Research Associate, at the Social Determinants of Health conference in Toronto

Progress of Canada's Children 2002
November 4, 2002
- incl. links to : Communiqué - Highlights - Backgrounder - Ontario Backgrounder - Speaking Notes

Child Hunger Increasing in Canada as Gap Widens Between Haves and Have-nots, CCSD Report Concludes
November 4, 2002
Communiqué
"The number of Canadian children going hungry is on the rise and shows no sign of letting up, according to a report by the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD). The Progress of Canada’s Children 2002 says that approximately 75,000 families with children under the age of 12 reported being hungry in 1996 (the last year for which data are available) – an increase of one-third from 1994."

Related Link:

The Progress of Canada's Children 2001

CCSD Submission to the Three-Year Review of the Social Union Framework Agreement
November 1, 2002
HTML format
PDF format
(33K, 9 pages)


Canadian Council on Social Development's Checklist of Key Commitments in the Speech from the Throne
September 27, 2002
Includes proposals in the following areas:
Poverty:
- raise the annual child tax benefit from the current maximum of $2,440 to $4,200 per child, available to all low, modest and middle-income families.
- improve the plight of the poorest children in Canada by prohibiting the clawback of the National Child Benefit Supplement from families on social assistance.
- broaden the Early Childhood Development agreement to include meeting the needs of school-aged children in such areas as special education; recreation; health and safety.
- Increase the basic tax exemption for low-income working families.
- Invest in quality early childhood education and child care services that are universal, inclusive and accessible.
Housing:
- get back into the affordable housing business. Immediately increase the number of new affordable units produced to 20,000 annually and the number of refurbished units to 10,000 per year.
Disabilities:
-
introduce a refundable disability credit.
Community Non-Profits:
-
ensure support for Canada's non-profit community.
Background info:
"There is some evidence that the National Child Benefit, in combination with an improving job market, has slightly reduced the extent and depth of child poverty. But children in the very poorest families have actually become poorer."


With A Little Help from Your Friends
Op-ed by
Marcel Lauzière and John Anderson
September 27, 2002


Whatever Happened to Social Development?
Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance
by the Canadian Council on Social Development
Presented on May 21, 2002
Andrew Jackson, Director of Research,
Canadian Council on Social Development

"From the Red Book of 1993 to the most recent Speech from the Throne, the Liberals have correctly recognized that economic progress alone does not guarantee social development, and that investment in social development plays an important role in economic growth. In a knowledge-based economy and in the face of looming skill shortages, it is foolish as well as moral not to address social exclusion."



A Decade of Decline: Poverty and Income Inequality in the City of Toronto in the 1990s

March 13, 2002
"Despite the economic recovery in the late 1990s, Toronto experienced a significant increase in poverty. A new United Way report reveals Torontonians were financially worse off at the end of the 1990s than in the rest of Canada. Government benefits were cut. Housing costs rose. In Toronto's poorest neighbourhoods, the number of families making less than $30,000/year increased from 16.8% to 20%. In Toronto during the 1990s, two-parent family incomes declined 13%, single-parent family incomes dropped 18%, and single people's incomes fell 12.5%. Neighbourhoods became more segregated as the income gap widened between Toronto's wealthiest and poorest neighbourhoods."
Executive Summary (HTML)
Complete report (PDF file - 5525K, 90 pages)
Prepared jointly by :
United Way of Greater Toronto
Canadian Council on Social Development

Related Link :

A Community Growing Apart : Income Gaps and Changing Needs in the City of Toronto in the 1990s
October 2001
This report was prepared by the Canadian Council on Social Development for the United Way of Greater Toronto.

Social Development "Olympics" : Canada Beats USA - But Loses Gold to Sweden
March 8, 2002
"... a look at 25 key indicators of social development, nicely summarized in a table, with a bit of accompanying text and a medal ceremony to boot! Available in HTML format and also in PDF (acrobat reader) format."

Percentage of Persons in Low Income/Poverty Before Tax, Canada, 1990 and 1999
February 2002
From the Free Statistics section of the CCSD website


Reclaiming our Humanity (PDF file - 213K, 83 pages)
December 2001
"This is a new paper written by Sherri Torjman of the Caledon Institute on behalf of the Coalition of National Voluntary Organizations, the Canadian Council on Social Development and United Way Canada. It looks at the current context of social development in Canada and identifies future policy direction. The paper sets out a vision of vibrant communities that provide support, promote inclusion and encourage learning. [January 11, 2002]"
In partnership with :
Coalition of National Voluntary Organizations
Canadian Council on Social Development
United Way of Canada-Centraide Canada

Canadian Council on Social Development 2001 Budget Analysis (December 11, 2001)

Good Year Tops Off a Lost Decade: A Preliminary CCSD Analysis of Income Trends in Canada to 1999
November 29, 2001
Overall, the period from 1989 to 1999 stands as a lost decade in terms of the social progress of Canadians. Income inequality increased, particularly in terms of the distribution of market income – that is, income before the impact of income taxes and government transfers is taken into account. Poverty rose, then fell over this period, but overall, little or no progress was made. Child poverty has increased, even though the 1990s were supposed to be the decade in which poverty among children was to be eliminated...

A NEW WAY OF THINKING?
TOWARDS A VISION OF SOCIAL INCLUSION

Co-sponsored by the Laidlaw Foundation and the Canadian Council on Social Development
Conference
Ottawa, ON
November 8-9, 2001
Conference theme : the social inclusion/exclusion of children, families and communities as a potential framework for policy and program development in Canada.
Presenters included several international and national commentators on social inclusion, researchers and authors of social inclusion papers for the Laidlaw Foundation, and other public policy experts/practitioners from within and outside of government.
Final Conference Program

Focus Papers: Some of these are brief statements of presenters' views on the topic of their conference presentation, but others contain pages and pages of information. I've copied the whole list below to give you a sense of the content of the conference and the names of the presenters, but you'll have to go to the Focus Papers page to click on the individual links.
The Social Exclusion of Children in North America, by Shelley Phipps and Lori Curtis (Acrobat PDF file)
Speaking Notes, by David Miller
The Causes of Persistent Low Income: A Key Barrier to Social Inclusion, by Michael Hatfield
Housing and Social Inclusion: Asking the Right Questions, by Sharon Chisholm
Social inclusion through early childhood education and care, by Martha Friendly
Social Inclusion in Action - Transforming Public Policies and Institutional Practices as It Relates to Community Services, by Lois Yelland
The Role of Recreation in Promoting Social Inclusion, by Peter Donnelly and Jay Coakley
Social Inclusion as Solidarity: Re-Thinking the Child Rights Agenda, by Michael Bach
Focus Paper, by Josephine Grey
Focus Paper for A New Way of Thinking, by Wayne Helgason
Social Inclusion and Diversity: Fries or Stir-Fry?, by Jean Lock Kunz (Ph.D)
Social Inclusion, Citizenship and Diversity,by Anver Saloojee
Why social inclusion matters to me, by Marvyn Novick
Social Inclusion: The Role of School Boards, by Marie Pierce
Jeter les bases de sociétés sans pauvreté, c'est possible, à la condition de «rêver logique», par Vivian Labrie
Does Work Include Children?, by Andrew Jackson and Katherine Scott
Social inclusion in context: From experiences of exclusion to a vision of inclusion, by Catherine Frazee
Social Inclusion: The Foundation of Civic and Community Life, by Caroline Andrew
Social Inclusion and Community Participation, by Peter Clutterbuck
Social Inclusion: Foundation of a National Policy Agenda, by Stephan Klasen
The Dynamics of Social Inclusion and Exclusion in Public Education in Canada, by Terry Wotherspoon
Focus Paper, by John Godfrey

Related Link :

Brief to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance
by the Canadian Council on Social Development
October 22, 2001

CCSD’s Budget Brief, October 2001
– the CCSD’s budget brief calls for an annual federal commitment of at least $1 Billion to a flexible, capital grants program for the construction of affordable, rental housing.

Gaining Ground : The Personal Security Index 2001
July 9, 2001
This report - the third in a series - provides a regional comparison of a variety of indicators and perceptions of economic security and physical safety among Canadians.

The Progress of Canada's Children 2001
March 27, 2001
Communiqué
Backgrounder
Highlights
Section 1: Table of Contents, Intro, Highlights (Acrobat Reader required)
We need to build on the National Children's Agenda and take it beyond early childhood development, to create a national, coherent approach to providing supports for children of all age groups.

Low Income Trends in the 1990s
January 2001
Includes : Defining Low Income - The Causes of Low Income - An Overview of Low Income Incidence and Trends in the 1990s - Depth of Low Income - Duration of Low Income - Future Prospects

The Early Childhood Development Initiative : Challenges for the voluntary sector
Perception (CCSD newsletter) - Volume 24, No. 3 - December 2000
"...the level of funding is clearly insufficient, and there is a lack of clarity about exactly how the funds will be spent and how governments will report back to Canadians"
NOTE : Go to the Perception page of the CCSD site to see selected content from issues going right back to 1994.
Here's sampling of the topics covered : racism; reducing child and family poverty; school food programs; maternity leave & self-employment; disability and labour force; international conference on social development; welfare reform in BC; Aboriginal poverty; national children's agenda

Why We Don't Have to Choose between Social Justice and Economic Growth:
The myth of the equity/efficiency trade-off
Fall 2000
Complete report online - includes :
- Introduction
- The Equity/Efificiency Trade-off in Practice: Empirical evidence for North American and European OECD countries in the 1990s
- Which Model Works Best? A comparison of economic and social performance in the 1990s
- Causes of Success and Failure
- What About Globalization?
- Conclusion

Time to Debate Social Canada
October 31, 2000
It is our hope that this will be an occasion for a major public debate on social issues, and on the relative priority to be given to new social investments. It's in this context that the CCSD has drafted a short commentary entitled Time to Debate Social Canada.


CCSD Reaction to the October 2000 federal Economic Statement and Budget Update
October 18, 2000
'Mini-Budget' fails to address widening gap between rich and poor
Communiqué
CCSD Analysis of October 2000 Economic Statement / Mini Budget
October 19, 2000

Opinion articles submitted by Andrew Jackson, Director of Research, CCSD
September 20, 2000
- to the Globe & Mail: Can we grow together?
- to the Toronto Star: Soaring energy prices: what will happen when winter comes?

The Canadian Fact Book on Poverty 2000
July 19, 2000
Communiqué: Poverty trends call for new approach in government policy
Highlights
Note to readers
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 10: Conclusion
** Chapter 2: Working Definitions of Poverty (PDF file, 250K) - posted to the web August 3, 2000
Here are the main measures of poverty in Canada in 2000 discussed in this 32-page chapter:
- Statistics Canada's Low Income Cut-offs (LICO), calculated using both pre- and post-tax income;
- Statistics Canada's Low Income Measure (LIM);
- Canadian Council on Social Development Lines of Income Inequality;
- Market Basket Measure (MBM) under development by the federal, provincial and territorial governments;
- Fraser Institute poverty lines;
- Montreal Diet Dispensary guidelines;
- Social Planning Council of Metropolitan Toronto budget guides;
- The Cost of Living Guidelines developed by the Social Planning Council of B.C.
In Chapter 2, you'll find recent and detailed information about each one of the measures in the list above, plus an analysis of social assistance rates and public opinion as benchmark comparisons, the depth of poverty and other issues. Includes tables showing poverty levels in Canada according to each measure for 2000.

What's Behind a Poverty Line? Backgrounder on Statistics Canada's Income in Canada
June 9, 2000
Backgrounder

Personal Security Index 2000 (April 26, 2000)
- Communiqué
- Highlights
- Full Report (PDF file, 2643K - 35 pages)

Urban Poverty in Canada: A Statistical Profile (April 17, 2000)
- Full Report
- Backgrounder
- Communiqué
- Highlights
- Resource People

Position Paper on the 2000 Federal Budget
March 13, 2000
"On balance, Budget 2000 represents a step in the right direction, but much work remains to be done to address the needs of poor Canadians."

The Progress of Canada's Children into the Millennium
January 25, 2000
Progress 2000 tracks social and economic indicators in a number of areas affecting the lives of Canadian children at home, at school and in their neighbourhoods.
- includes links to Highlights - Backgrounder - Communiqué - List of Resource People - Français

Child Poverty in Canada: The time to act is now
A submission by David Ross to the Op-ed Page of the Saint John Telegraph-Journal
November 2, 1999
CCSD's submission to the Standing Committee on Finance, detailing our priorities for the 2000 federal budget - October 26, 1999
- "To lay the conditions for future social cohesion and sustainable economic prosperity shared by all, the CCSD is calling for a Children's Budget focused on the critical needs of Canadian children, youth and families"
- incl. "Reinvesting in the Social Infrastructure" - improvements to the NCA and NCB, for example...
"The CCSD also recommends that the government index the child benefit system to inflation (at an estimated cost of $200 million per year) and ensure that benefits flow to all poor children, including those living in families that rely on social assistance."
Income and Child Well-being: A new perspective on the poverty debate (May 1999)
David P. Ross and Paul Roberts


International Development Research Centre
"The International Development Research Centre is a public corporation created by the Canadian government to help communities in the developing world find solutions to social, economic, and environmental problems through research."

Check out these complete IDRC reports online:

A State of the Art Review of Income Security Reform in Canada
Jane Pulkingham & Gordon Ternowetsky (1998
International Development Research Centre*
(Click on the title of the report above to go directly to the table of contents.
The entire report is online)

- Includes an extensive, detailed overview of income security reforms in Canada in the 1990s, specifically around the Canada Health and Social Transfer, a review and typology of current research in virtually every area of federal and provincial/territorial social programs and a section on the impact of changes since the CHST and related social reforms. 
- Recommended reading for anyone looking for information about the critical forces that have shaped income security programs in Canada and that continue to do so as we approach the new millennium. 
- Topics covered include welfare reforms, the National Child Benefit and child poverty, unemployment/employment insurance reforms, pension reform and the retirement income system, labour market policies, the Social Union, income security reforms in the broader context of social security reform, etc. 
*The International Development Research Centre website also includes many links to information on similar reforms in developing countries 
"The International Development Research Centre is a public corporation created by the Canadian government to help communities in the developing world find solutions to social, economic, and environmental problems through research." 
Complete reports online include the following:

Social Policy Challenges in a Global Society
by Keith Banting (1995
- An extensive and excellent treatise on globalization, trade agreements, social need and reforms. 

 Establishing an Effective Social Policy Agenda with Constrained Resources
by Peter Hicks (1995
- An excellent article written by a senior HRDC official at the time. It presents some interesting historical information about the evolution of Canadian social programs from the sixties to the early nineties. 
- Social historians will be particularly interested in the author's analysis of the 1994 SSR discussion paper... 

Social Policy Reform in Canada Under Regional Economic Integration by Albert Berry
- This article covers issues such as the harmonization and convergence of social programs, rationalization, privatization, cost-saving, competitiveness and social policy reform


North-South Institute - "Research For A Fairer World" (Canada)
"For more than 20 years, the North-South Institute (NSI) has built a reputation for sound research and analysis of Canadian foreign policy, offered an independent voice on the urgent importance of world development issues, and brought those issues before the Canadian public and decision makers. Established in 1976, it is the only independent, non-governmental research institute in Canada focused on international development." 

Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS) - Canada
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards is a non-profit, national, independent organization that seeks to contribute to a better understanding of trends in and determinants of productivity, living standards and economic and social well-being through research.

Index of Economic Well-being
Has economic well-being increased or decreased in recent years, and is it higher or lower in one country compared to others? Traditionally these questions have been answered by looking at trends in and comparisons of GDP per capita, but this is a poor measure of economic well-being. It measures consumption incompletely, ignoring the value of leisure and longer life spans, and it also ignores the value of accumulation for future generations. Furthermore, since it is an average, GDP per capita gives no indication of the likelihood that an individual will share in prosperity nor of the degree of anxiety with which individuals contemplate their futures."
- incl. links to:
Introduction and Methodology - The Index for Canada -The Index for Canada and the United States - The Index for Canada and the Provinces - The Index for OECD Countries - An Index of Labour Market Well-being - Weighting tool for Canada and OECD Countries

CSLS Research reports - 100+ links

Selected site content :

CSLS Releases Two Reports on Happiness and Inequality and Redistribution in Canada
Ottawa - September 27, 2012
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS) has released two reports of general interest. Today the CSLS released a report entitled The Impact of Redistribution on Income Inequality in Canada and the Provinces, 1981-2010 [See the link below.]. The objective of the study is to provide an overview of trends in income inequality, defined as the Gini coefficient, in Canada and the provinces over the 1981-2010 period and to investigate the impact of redistributive policies – namely, taxes and transfers – on these trends.

On September 25 (2012), the CSLS released a report entitled Canadians Are Happy and Getting Happier: An Overview of Life Satisfaction in Canada, 2003-2011 [See the link below]. The objective of the report is to provide an update and overview of trends in self-reported life satisfaction in Canada, based on data from Statistics Canada’s Canadian Community Health Survey.

The two reports:

The Impact of Redistribution on
Income Inequality in Canada and the Provinces, 1981-2010
(PDF - 836K, 50 pages)
http://www.csls.ca/reports/csls2012-08.pdf
By Andrew Sharpe and Evan Capeluck
September 2012
The objective of the study is to provide an overview of trends in income inequality, defined as the Gini coefficient, in Canada and the provinces over the 1981-2010 period and to investigate the impact of redistributive policies – namely, taxes and transfers – on these trends.

Canadians Are Happy and Getting Happier:
An Overview of Life Satisfaction in Canada, 2003-2011
(PDF - 588K, 17 pages)
http://www.csls.ca/notes/Note2012-3.pdf
By Andrew Sharpe and Evan Capeluck
September 2012
- In 2011 more than 9 out of 10 Canadians aged 12 and over (92.3 per cent) reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied with their lives.
- According to a Gallup World Poll taken in February 2012, Canada is the second happiest country in the world preceded only by Denmark.
- includes (in the References section at the end) links to nine reports for further reading...

Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards

http://www.csls.ca/

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

CSLS Releases Study on Estimates of the Human Development Index
for the Canadian Territories and Provinces: Alberta Ranks First
(PDF - 168K, 2 pages)
http://csls.ca/PressReleaseMay182012.pdf
May 18, 2012
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards today released a major study entitled “The Human Development Index in Canada: Estimates for the Canadian Provinces and Territories.” This is the first study that has developed estimates of the Human Development Index (HDI) for the provinces and territories that are consistent with the official HDI estimates for Canada produced by the United Nations. The HDI is based on life expectancy, average years of education attainment, expected years of education, and Gross National Income.

Selected key findings:

* In 2011, Alberta ranked as the jurisdiction with the highest HDI in Canada, closely followed by Ontario, the Northwest Territories, and British Columbia. Nunavut ranked last, and Prince Edward Island second last.

* For both life expectancy and average educational attainment, British Columbia ranked first among the 13 provinces and territories and Nunavut ranked last. For expected years of schooling, Quebec ranked at the top and Nunavut came in last, while for GNI per capita, Northwest Territories was in first place and Prince Edward Island was in last place.
(...)

The report provides a comprehensive picture of developments in life expectancy, average education attainment, expected years of schooling, and Gross National Income per capita for all provinces and territories over the 2000-2011 period.

---

Complete report:

The Human Development Index in Canada:
Estimates for the Canadian Provinces and Territories, 2000-2011
(PDF - 1.7MB, 79 pages)
http://www.csls.ca/reports/csls2012-02.pdf

---
Comment (by Gilles):
Further down on this page, you'll find a collection of links around the issue of possible changes to the Employment Insurance program, including federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's dismissive rebuttal to the observations of Olivier de Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. Flaherty got all huffy about the rapporteur's critical observations regarding food security in Canada, bragging that Canada ranked high in the Human Development Index (6th in 2011).
According to the CSLS study, the HDI is based on life expectancy, average years of education attainment, expected years of education, and Gross National Income."
I see very little correlation between ranking 6th on the HDI and ensuring food security for all Canadians.
---

Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards
http://csls.ca/

On December 21, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released the
Fall issue of the International Productivity Monitor:
http://www.csls.ca/ipm/ipm22.asp

This issue contains five articles:
* Don Drummond : Confessions of a Serial Productivity Researcher
* Pierre Therrien and Petr Hanel : Innovation and Productivity: Summary Results for Canadian Manufacturing Establishments
* Daniel Lind : The Myths and Reality of Deindustrialization in Sweden: The Role of Productivity
* Michael-John Almon and Jianmin Tang : Industrial Structural Change and the Post-2000 Output and Productivity Growth Slowdown: A Canada-U.S. Comparison
* Ricardo de Avillez : A Half-Century of Productivity Growth and Structural Change in Canadian Agriculture: An Overview

Press release / Highlights:

Release of the Fall 2011 Issue of the
International Productivity Monitor
(small PDF file, 2 pages)
http://www.csls.ca/ipm/22/PressRelease.pdf

Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS)
http://www.csls.ca/

CSLS News - Autumn 2011 (PDF - 726K, 24 pages)
The Fall 2011 issue of the CSLS newsletter provides a comprehensive overview of CSLS activities. The newsletter includes summaries of ten recently released CSLS research reports, some of which are highlighted below. All reports are freely accessible at www.csls.ca

On September 6, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released two new reports on the Index of Economic Well-being:
* Beyond GDP: Measuring Economic Well-being in Canada and the Provinces, 1981-2010 (PDF - 3.7MB, 99 pages)
and
* Moving from a GDP-Based to a Well-being Based Metric of Economic Performance and Social Progress: Results from the Index of Economic Well-Being for OECD Countries, 1980-2009 (PDF - 1.3MB, 87 pages)

The first report finds that the Index of Well-Being (IEWB) for Canada was 1.4 per cent higher in 2010 than it was in 2009, but that it has not yet recovered to its 2008 level. The second report finds that Norway maintains its top standing in the 2009 IEWB rankings of the group of 14 OECD countries considered, while Canada remains in ninth place.

On August 30, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled Human Capital and Productivity in British Columbia (PDF - 1.3MB, 87 pages), prepared for the BC Progress Board, provides an assessment of human capital development in British Columbia.

On August 29, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled The Levy Institute Measure of Economic Well-Being: Estimates for Canada, 1999 and 2005. The report develops estimates of the Levy Institute Measure of Economic Well-being (LIMEW) for Canada in order to estimate the average Canadian household’s total command over economic resources. This report indicates that the LIMEW in Canada grew modestly between 1999 and 2005 at 1.08 per cent per year.

On August 22, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled Economic Activity of the On-Reserve Aboriginal Identity Population in Canada: Gross Domestic Product Estimates for Indian Reserves, 2000 and 2005. This report develops earnings based estimates of the GDP of reserves in 2000 and 2005 using two approaches: a "top-down" approach that employs provincial-level data and a "bottom-up" approach that employs reserve-level data.

On August 10, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released two reports: A Detailed Analysis of the Productivity Performance of the Canadian Primary Agriculture Sector (PDF - 2MB, 134 pages) and A Detailed Analysis of the Productivity Performance of Canadian Food Manufacturing (PDF - 963K, 105 pages). The reports analyze labour productivity and MFP trends over the 1961-2007 period, and discuss the main sources and drivers of productivity growth in each of these sectors.

On July 22, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards announced that a dinner will be held in Ottawa on September 16, 2011 in honour of long-time CSLS Chair Ian Stewart on the occasion of his 80th birthday. [More information].

Announcements & Recent Releases from the
Centre for the Study of Living Standards:

On May 18, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released the Spring issue of the International Productivity Monitor. This issue contains five articles on: productivity and economic growth in Europe; productivity growth in the Canadian transportation equipment industry; differences in the provinces’ productivity performance over the 1997-2007 period; parallels between Latin America’s and Canada’s productivity performance; and the effects of the ageing of the workforce on productivity.
[ Related press release (small PDF file) ]

On May 18, 2011, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released ten reports outlining the productivity performance of each province over the 1997-2007 period .

The reports discuss growth rates and levels of labour, capital, and multifactor productivity for the provinces’ market sector as a whole, as well as at the two-digit NAICS level.
[ Synthesis of the ten reports - (April 2011 - PDF file - 1.5MB, 170 pages) ]
Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards is a non-profit, national, independent organization that seeks to contribute to a better understanding of trends in and determinants of productivity, living standards and economic and
social well-being through research.

Recent Release of New Research Products from the
Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS)

The Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS), a national, independent, not-for-profit, economic research organization, recently released five new research reports and one new research note. The new research documents are briefly described below:

* On July 27, the CSLS released a new research note “Median Wages and Productivity Growth in Canada and the United States” (PDF - 434K, 12 pages).
Two key findings were that (1) the rise in inequality was a much more important factor for the divergence between the growth rates of labour productivity and real wages in the United States and that (2) ambiguity in the interpretation of labour share suggests the attention should be more appropriately focused on rising inequality as a key driver of the divergence between the growth of real wages and labour productivity.

* The Advisory Panel on Labour Market Information recently tabled its Final Report.
The CSLS has been an active participant to the Panel through its report Best Practices in Labour Market Information: Recommendations for Canada's LMI System (PDF - 858K, 55 pages), released in July 2009. The report presented 20 recommendations to improve the operation of LMI in Canada in the areas of LMI data, LMI analysis and forecasting, and LMI dissemination.

* On June 10, the Institute of Wellbeing and its signature product, the Canadian Index of Wellbeing were officially launched at the St. Lawrence Hall in Toronto. The CSLS has been an active participant in this important development, and in particular wrote the report on the living standards domain of the CIW.

* On May 21, the CSLS released a research report, The Effect of Increasing Aboriginal Educational Attainment on the Labour Force, Output and the Fiscal Balance (PDF - 1.6MB, 108 pages).
This report examines the potential economic gains of increased Aboriginal education, as well as the fiscal implications of increased education and improved Aboriginal social well-being for Canadian governments to 2026. Most notably, it concludes that if the Aboriginal population were to attain complete economic and social parity with the non-Aboriginal population, Canadian governments would improve their balance sheets by nearly $12 billion in 2026 alone.

* On May 13, the CSLS released a research report, The Ontario-Quebec Continental Gateway: A Situational Analysis of Human Resources Needs (PDF - 5.2MB, 173 pages).
This report examines human resource and skills issues pertaining to the Ontario-Quebec Continental Gateway and Trade Corridor over the short- to medium-term and concludes that despite the economic downturn, there may be shortages of skilled labour in certain occupations.

* On May 12, the CSLS released a research report, A Review of the Potential Impacts of the Métis Human Resources Development Agreements in Canada (PDF - 1.1MB, 80 pages).
The report concludes that the Métis Human Resources Development Agreements result in annual fiscal savings of $8.5 million to the federal and five provincial governments covered by the program, with total lifetime benefits of one year of Métis programming reaching $103 million.

* In addition, the CSLS recently released a new multifactor productivity database for Canada and the provinces. Unlike the earlier CSLS database, the new estimates adjust labour and capital inputs for changes in composition and are methodologically consistent with national estimates produced by Statistics Canada. The data cover the period 1997-2007 and 15 industries. All CSLS databases can be found in the Data section of the CSLS website.

International Productivity Monitor - Spring 2009 Issue
May 28, 2009
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS), a national, independent, not-for-profit, economic research organization, today released the Spring 2009 issue of the International Productivity Monitor.
Highlights of the issue:
* Serge Coulombe and Jean-Francois Tremblay of the University of Ottawa provide a synthesis of the literature on the relationship between education and productivity.
A key finding is that the macroeconomic returns to education depend on a country’s distance from the world technology frontier. Given that Canada is close to the frontier, the authors conclude that the returns to additional investment in post-secondary education could be substantial.
* Andrew Sharpe and Jean-Francois Arsenault from the Centre for the Study of Living Standards present new estimates of productivity for the Canadian provinces from 1997 to 2007.
Perhaps surprisingly, Newfoundland recorded the best productivity performance while Alberta had the worst. In both cases, the oil and gas sector was largely responsible, reducing productivity growth in Alberta as resources moved from into the lower productivity oil sands (relative to conventional oil and gas) and raising it in Newfoundland as the output expanded rapidly in the high productivity oil and gas sector.
* In late April the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) released the Expert panel report on business innovation in Canada.
The first article by CCA President Peter Nicholson summarizes the report, arguing that Canada's lagging productivity growth has been due to subpar innovation. He concludes that too many businesses in Canada are technology followers, not leaders, and that what is needed is a fresh discussion on factors that influence the adoption of innovation-based business strategies. Three commentaries on the report follow, by Richard Hawkins of the University of Calgary, Jorge Niosi from the University of Quebec at Montreal, and Ian A. Stewart, a former Deputy Minister of Finance.

International Productivity Monitor - Spring 2008
[ version française ]
On May 12, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS), a national, independent, not-for-profit, economic research organization, released the Spring 2008 issue of the International Productivity Monitor. The issue contains five articles : two on the productivity performance of the Canadian economy and three in a symposium on data needs for better productivity measurement.
* Editor’s Overview
* Business Sector Productivity in Canada: What Do We Know? By Paul Boothe and Richard Roy
* An Analysis of the Causes of Weak Labour Productivity Growth in Canada since 2000 - By Jean-François Arsenault and Andrew Sharpe
* Symposium on Data Needs for Better Productivity Measurement
--- What Is To Be Done for Better Productivity Measurement - By Erwin Diewert
--- The State of Data for Services Productivity Measurement in the United States - By Jack E. Triplett and Barry P. Bosworth
--- Data for Productivity Measurement in Market Services: An International Comparison - By Robert Inklaar, Marcel P. Timmer and Bart van Ark

Earlier Issues of the Monitor (16 issues , back to Fall 2000)

Canadian Centre for Policy Ingenuity (CCPI)
"The CCPI is a non-profit organization that solves significant social, economic and environmental problems by applying systems thinking to policy development and activation."
- someone from CCPI contacted me by e-mail to ask me to post a link to this site --- although there's not really much content on the site yet except for the full text of the (above) Globe article, which I found interesting enough to share.
[- an "About this Site" page would be very nice...]

Think-tanks changing their minds
Many top Canadian policy-makers are moving on.
Maybe it's time for a bit more edge or relevance, reports CAMPBELL CLARK
August 20, 2005
OTTAWA -- A generation of influential Canadian policy-makers are moving on. They're not politicians or bureaucrats, but the heads of think-tanks, the deep thinkers sought out for fresh ideas by government leaders. It is part of a widespread rollover that is leaving Canada's think-tank sector at a crossroads. Even some of the current crop say the field may be strong but it could use something more -- a bit more edge, a little worldliness, or a touch more relevance -- to fill a market of ideas undersupplied by a sterile political debate.(...) The think-tank positions certainly have influence. Brian Guest, a former senior aide to Paul Martin who left the prime minister's office to co-found the Canadian Centre for Policy Ingenuity, which deals with the issues of cities and the environment, said his interest in think-tanks was sparked because he had to keep up with Mr. Martin's demands for arguments about their papers or perspective from someone such as Ms. Maxwell."
Source:
The Globe and Mail

The Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy (CRISP) is a multi-disciplinary research organization based at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) in Fredericton. CRISP is dedicated to improving the effectiveness of social policy in Canada, to help Canadian communities provide better education and care for their children, and to contribute to capacity-building efforts in developing countries.

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIAR)
The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research spans a country and connects with the world to initiate and conduct basic research in the natural and social sciences. CIAR links some of the best Canadian and international research minds in dynamic networks that often include unanticipated and innovative combinations of  disciplines to collaborate on large questions from fresh perspectives. It constitutes Canada's research university without walls, creating communities of scholars from different places and divergent fields who are working at the frontier of knowledge and generating new insights.

CIAR has three research programs vital to human well-being (Human Development; Population Health; Economic Growth and Policy); three dealing with the physical and biological origins and preservation of the planet Earth (Cosmology and Gravity; Earth System Evolution; Evolutionary Biology) and two in materials science (Superconductivity; and Nanoelectronics).

Founders' Network
"The Founders' Network links a diverse group of individuals from across Canada and in other countries. We are an international collection of people interested in promoting the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIAR), science and technology, early childhood, economic issues, determinants of health and human development."

The Early Years Study - Three Years Later
From Early Child Development to Human Development: Enabling Communities
(PDF file - 1.5MB, 58 pages)
August 2002
by Margaret McCain and J. Fraser Mustard
"Ontario has the opportunity to provide leadership in enabling communities to put in place ECD programs to improve human development for the future. This investment is key for the future of our next generation communities and society."
The authors of the original study offer their comments on the response of the Government of Ontario to the recommendations in the report.

Here's the link to the original report, done for the Ontario (govt.) Children's Secretariat (which no longer exists, but the report is on the Founders' Network site):

Reversing the Brain Drain : The Early Years Study - Final Report (PDF file - 1.1MB, 207 pages)
February 1999 (Modified 06/2002, according to the Adobe file info)
Co-Chairs : Margaret McCain and J. Fraser Mustard


Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)
Arm's-length agency of the federal government responsible for funding basic research in the social sciences and humanities in Canada. SSHRC funds researchers at post secondary institutions, via a process of rigourous, non-partisan, peer review of their research proposals. SSHRC also supports young researchers ( MA, PhD, Post Doc)  through  a similar process of evaluation.

See the sitemap for : Research News - About SSHRC - Program Information - Human Sciences Links - Career Opportunities - Policy Documents

Satellite maps lead the way to healthier neighbourhoods:
$2.3 million SSHRC project analyzes impact of community resources on childhood development

May 6, 2003
"The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) is investing $2.3 million in a study that will examine the link between the location of neighbourhood resources and the health and school readiness of children. (...) The Consortium for Health, Intervention, Learning and Development (CHILD) Project—led by the University of British Columbia’s Hillel Goelman, associate director of the Human Early Learning Partnership—will examine the physical, intellectual and social development of young children in various neighbourhoods and map their growth and well-being in light of community resources."...more

Early Development in Vancouver: Report of the Community Asset Mapping Project (CAMP) - (PDF file - 137K, 52 pages)
Clyde Hertzman, Sidney A.McLean, Dafna E.Kohen, Jim Dunn, Terry Evans
August 2002
Executive Summary (small PDF file)
Accompanying Maps (PDF file - 2.7MB)
Related Link:
Human Early Learning Partnership

Court Challenges Program of Canada/Programme de Contestation Judiciaire du Canada 

National Crime Prevention Centre 

Canada 2020

Canada 2020 is a dynamic and networked “ideas generation council” that takes a unique approach to addressing Canada’s public policy opportunities and challenges.
Objectives:
a. to act as a non-partisan forum to address Canada’s policy opportunities and challenges;
b. to develop public policy solutions to address the opportunities and challenges Canada faces;
c. to promote and communicate ideas to government, media, and interested Canadians.

Canada 2020 a Counter to the Conservative Think Tanks
Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore will deliver his message about global warming as the keynote dinner speaker at the Canada 2020 Progressive Policies, Practical Solutions conference in Mont Tremblant, Quebec on Wednesday, June 14th. Mr. Gore joins internationally renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs, Harper's Magazine Editor Lewis Lapham and former President of the European Bank Jacques Attali as part of a stellar program of progressive Canadian and international thinkers that is expected to be one of the most thought provoking and exciting forums in recent memory. More than 150 prominent Canadians from business, government, and academia will discuss ideas and debate progressive policies during the two-day session, June 13-15, 2006 at the Fairmont Tremblant Hotel. [See the Canada 2020 link below for more info about this conference.]
Source:
Canadian Democratic Movement

("Alternative News Media on Democracy, Energy, Politics, Trade, Environment, Military and Money")

Miscellaneous

Atkinson Charitable Foundation - Established in 1947, this private Canadian foundation provides grants for innovative, Ontario-based projects that focus on either early childhood education and development or economic justice. The list of funded projects for 1998 alone is impressive...

Donner Canadian Foundation - The Donner Canadian Foundation was established in 1950 by William H. Donner. In the mid-1960s, the Foundation began to focus on specific program interests, among these, research on public policy. The Donner family chose Canada’s centennial year, 1967, to embark on a course of professional grantmaking that has contributed well over $100 million to more than 1,000 projects across Canada and around the world. In addition to ongoing funding of public policy research, the Foundation supports environmental, international development, and social service projects.

Trillium Foundation (Ontario)

Humanities and Social Sciences Federation of Canada
The Humanities and Social Sciences Federation of Canada promotes teaching, research, and scholarship in the humanities and social sciences and a better understanding of the importance of such work for Canada and the world.

The Wellesley Institute
The Wellesley Institute is a Toronto-based non-profit and non-partisan research and policy institute. Our focus is on developing research and community-based policy solutions to the problems of urban health and health disparities. We are committed to advancing the health of urban populations.


See also Selected Canadian Social Research Organizations II
Go to  Non-Governmental Organizations

Go to Ontario NGOs and Municipalities
Go to Other Countries for international groups
Go to Union Pages

 

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