Canadian Social Research Newsletter
February 26, 2018

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the recent past week..

You can find the online version of this (February 26, 2018) newsletter at this link:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal/news260218.htm

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,868 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy.
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

* Two recent articles by Nick Falvo, PhD:
--- Ten things to know about homelessness in BC
- February 16, 2018
--- Ten proposals from the 2018 Alternative Federal Budget
- February 23, 2018
* 2018 Provincial, territorial and federal budgets
* [Ontario] From ‘Barely Surviving’ (on welfare) to Thriving (on Basic Income): Less Stress, Better Health with basic income - February 24 (Toronto Star)
* Resources of the Language Portal of Canada
* Time Out : Child care fees in Canada 2017 - December 12, 2018 (By David Macdonald Martha Friendly for the Canadian Centre on Policy Alternatives)
* What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, January 2018 - February 23
--- Insights on Canadian Society: Long-term job vacancies in Canada - February 16
--- Employment Insurance, December 2017 - February 15
--- Charitable donors, 2016 - February 14
--- Canada's population estimates: Subprovincial areas, July 1, 2017
--- Labour Force Survey: revisions, 2017 - February
* 2017: The year in statistics - December 21
* What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit
* Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
* CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm

2018 Provincial, territorial and federal budgets

2018 Provincial, territorial and federal budgets
http://canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2018.htm

Clicking the link immediately above will take you to a page containing links to budget information for each province/territory and for the federal government as budget documents are tabled in the respective provinces and territories. The source for all budget summaries identified as "EY" (formerly Ernst & Young), is a multinational professional services firm headquartered in London England. EY staff read and analyse the budgets as they are tabled, and they post EY budget summaries on EY's website and disseminate those summaries literally around the world via EY's network of 700 offices.

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NOTE: This section is a work in progress --- sez Captain Obvious...
As at February 26AM, New Brunswick and BC are the only two jurisdictions that have tabled their budgets.

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From the
Canadian Centre on Policy Alternatives

[ https://www.policyalternatives.ca/ ]:

Alternative Federal Budget 2018 : Getting There (PDF - 156 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2018/02/Alternative_Federal_Budget2018.pdf

Budget fédéral alternatif 2018 : Objectif en vue (PDF - 180 pages)
21 février 2018
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2018/02/Le_Budget_fe%CC%81de%CC%81ral_alternatif2018.pdf

Alternative federal budget 2018: Getting there
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/18/02/alternative-federal-budget-2018-getting-there
22 Feb 2018 | Canada
The CCPA's Alternative Federal Budget for the 2018-2019 fiscal year aligns with evidence-based social policy and with what child care advocates have been demanding. Authors draw attention to the fact that federal funding for early childhood education and care (ECEC) represents just 0.3% of Canadian GDP; maintaining Canada's status as one of the lowest spenders on ECEC among peer OECD countries, where the minimum international benchmark sits at 1% of GDP. The report cites evidence of inefficient use of federal funds-- with the Canada Child Benefit providing little, if any, incentive for second income earners in two-parent families to enter the labour force due to the high cost of child care and the potential loss of income tax benefits. The report recognizes that the government's Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework has appropriate principles, but underscores that a lack of funding does not enable them to become operational. CCPA condemns the government's current targeted approach, which it says does not reflect action on gender equity, and instead espouses a universal approach to child care that would see the rights of children and families recognized through access to high-quality ECEC, regardless of income or geography. Authors propose $1 billion in federal spending on ECEC in the current fiscal year, going up by $1 billion each succcessive year until spending reaches the established international standard of 1% of GDP. Importantly, the CCPA asserts that federal transfers to the provinces and territories be conditional upon actualization of principles of universality, high-quality and comprehensive services. Adherence to these, authors show, hinge on operational-funding (not parent-payment measures) for non-profit and publicly planned and managed systems of early learning and child care, with secure accountability measures. Attention to strengthening the federal-provincial/territorial approach to maternity and parental leave through amendments to eligibility, flexibility, adequacy of benefits, special considerations, and leave for parents who are not the birth parent is also outlined in the Employment Insurance chapter. Paternity leave and more on a universal child care program are expounded upon in the Gender Equality chapter.

---

[ Ontario ]
How to make Ontario’s Budget 2018 the Income Security Budget
Submission to the Ontario Minister of Finance regarding Budget 2018

https://maytree.com/publications/make-ontarios-budget-2018-income-security-budget/
By Hannah Aldridge, Noah Zon
Published February 8, 2018
(...)
Maytree offers recommendations in four areas:
1. Modernizing Ontario’s response to working poverty
2. Protecting the poorest from falling further behind
3. Delivering housing affordability by investing in supply and demand
4. Preparing for the future by renewing investment in care and carers

Read the full submission (PDF, 7 pages)
https://maytree.com/wp-content/uploads/How-to-make-Ontarios-Budget-2018-the-Income-Security-Budget-1.pdf

---

British Columbia 2018 Budget
http://bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2018/default.htm
February 20, 2018
- includes all budget documents

News Release
http://bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2018/newsrelease/2018_News_Release.pdf

Budget highlights
http://bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2018/highlights/2018_Highlights.pdf

Previous Years Budgets and Fiscal Plans
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/default.htm

---

Media coverage of BC Budget 2018:

B.C. budget 2018: 11 things you need to know
https://globalnews.ca/news/4035005/11-things-need-to-know-2018-b-c-budget/
By Richard Zussman
Online Journalist based at B.C. Legislature Global News

B.C. Budget 2018: Big spending on child care, housing; foreign buyer tax expanded
http://vancouversun.com/news/politics/live-b-c-budget-has-big-investments-and-big-tax-hikes
By Rob Shaw
February 20, 2018
The B.C. government is offering modest relief on the rising cost of child care, housing and medical services plan premiums, funded by a raft of new tax hikes that target businesses, foreign buyers, housing speculators and expensive homes.
Source:
Vancouver Sun

http://vancouversun.com/

Also from the Sun :

BC Budget at a glance (selected highlights)
http://vancouversun.com/news/politics/live-b-c-budget-has-big-investments-and-big-tax-hikes
• A new child care program that makes care effectively free for some low-income families, and offers modest subsidies for others based on income. There’s no mention of when, or even if, government will meet its $10-a-day child care election promise.

• An immediate increase to the foreign buyer tax from 15 per cent to 20 per cent, and an expansion to Kamloops, Kelowna, Greater Victoria and the Fraser Valley.

• The elimination of Medical Services Plan premiums by 2020 to be replaced by a payroll health tax for businesses.

• $6.2 billion over 10 years to create 33,700 affordable housing units.

• A crackdown on fraud and tax evasion in the housing market, as well as a new two per cent speculation tax on those who don’t pay income tax in B.C.

• A hike on the property transfer tax on Feb. 21 from three per cent to five per cent on properties worth more than $3 million, as well as an increase on school taxes.

• A steep hike on tobacco taxes, as well as on taxes for luxury vehicles worth more than $150,000.

• $5.2-billion in new spending over three years, and $5.5-billion in new taxes.

• An estimated $219-million surplus in fiscal 2018/19.

More (click the link above)...

[Ontario] From ‘Barely Surviving’ (on welfare) to Thriving (on Basic Income): Less Stress, Better Health with basic income - February 24 (Toronto Star)

From ‘Barely Surviving’ to Thriving : Less Stress, Better Health
https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2018/02/24/from-barely-surviving-to-thriving-ontario-basic-income-recipients-report-less-stress-better-health.html
February 24, 2018
Ontario basic income recipients report less stress, better health. The three-year basic income pilot project, which began last summer, is testing whether no-strings-attached cash support can boost health, education and housing for people living in poverty. Basic income is a monthly, no-strings-attached payment of up to $1,400 for people living in poverty. Those with disabilities receive an additional $500 a month.

(Basic income = guaranteed income)

Source:
Toronto Star

https://www.thestar.com/

Related links:

Handing out money for free harder than it look
https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/09/17/handing-out-money-for-free-harder-than-it-looks.html
September 17, 2017

Opinion | Jennifer Wells: Wynne’s basic income experiment deserves to live a full life
https://www.thestar.com/business/2017/04/25/wynnes-basic-income-experiment-deserves-to-live-a-full-life-wells.html

Ontario launches basic income pilot for 4,000 in Hamilton, Thunder Bay, Lindsay
https://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/2017/04/24/ontario-launches-basic-income-pilot-for-4000-in-hamilton-thunder-bay-and-lindsay.html

---

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

Resources of the Language Portal of Canada

Government of Canada online resource:

Resources of the Language Portal of Canada
https://www.noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca/en
This one-stop window for free language resources provides Canadians with a wide range of writing tools, quizzes and links to help them improve their English and French.

Version française:
Ressources du Portail linguistique du Canada
https://www.noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca/fr

---

- Go to the Reference Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reference.htm

Time Out : Child care fees in Canada 2017 - December 12, 2018
(By David Macdonald Martha Friendly for the
Canadian Centre on Policy Alternatives
)

Time Out:
Child care fees in Canada 2017
Abstract:

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/timeout
Complete study (PDF - 1MB, 31 pages):
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2017/12/Time%20Out.pdf
By David Macdonald Martha Friendly
December 12, 2017
The study provides an annual snapshot of median parental child care fees in Canada’s 28 biggest cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. For the first time ever, the study also includes child care fees in selected rural areas. The study finds that child care fees have risen faster than inflation in 71% of the cities since last year, and in 82% of cities since 2014.

NOTA : Cette étude est disponible en français:
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/%C3%A7a-suffit

Source:
Canadian Centre on Policy Alternatives
 
[ https://www.policyalternatives.ca/ ]

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, January 2018 - February 23
--- Insights on Canadian Society: Long-term job vacancies in Canada - February 16

--- Employment Insurance, December 2017 - February 15
--- Charitable donors, 2016 - February 14
--- Canada's population estimates: Subprovincial areas, July 1, 2017 - February
--- Labour Force Survey: revisions, 2017 - February 2
--- 2017: The year in statistics - December 21

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/a-daily-quotidien-eng.htm

Past issues of The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select day / month / year to access issues of The Daily going back to 1995.

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February 23, 2018
Consumer Price Index, January 2018
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180223/dq180223a-eng.htm
The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 1.7% on a year-over-year basis in January, following a 1.9% increase in December. Excluding energy, the CPI increased 1.7%, matching the gain in December.

---

February 16, 2018
Insights on Canadian Society:
Long-term job vacancies in Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2018001/article/54917-eng.htm
By Manon Langevin
February 20, 2018
This study uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine the characteristics of long-term job vacancies, defined as positions for which recruitment efforts had been ongoing for 90 days or more on the day of the survey. Specifically, the study aims to answer the following questions: What is the prevalence of long-term job vacancies in Canada? How do these vacancies differ from other vacant jobs? Is there a link between the duration of the vacancy and the offered wage?

---

February 15, 2018
Employment Insurance, December 2017
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180215/dq180215a-eng.htm
In December, 500,100 people received regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits, down 1.1% from November. The number of EI recipients has been on a downward trend since October 2016.

---

February 14, 2018
Charitable donors, 2016
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180214/dq180214a-eng.htm
Total donations reported by Canadian tax filers fell to $8.9 billion in 2016, down 2.7% from 2015. The largest decreases were in Alberta (-10.7%), Prince Edward Island (-5.3%), Nunavut (-4.4%) and Saskatchewan (-4.1%). Yukon (+4.5%) had the largest increase in donations in 2015.

---

February 13, 2018
Canada's population estimates: Subprovincial areas, July 1, 2017
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180213/dq180213a-eng.htm
On July 1, 2017, 7 in 10 Canadians (70.5%), or 25,893,686 people, were living in a census metropolitan area (CMA). Canada's three largest CMAs—Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver—were home to more than 1 in 3 Canadians (35.6%).

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February 2, 2018
Labour Force Survey: revisions, 2017
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/180202/dq180202b-eng.htm
As is the standard practice, the Labour Force Survey seasonally-adjusted estimates for the previous three years have been revised using the latest seasonal factors. These revised estimates for 2015 to 2017 are now available in CANSIM.

---

December 21, 2017
2017: The year in statistics
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/blog/cs/2017-year-stats
2017 was a year of many firsts at Statistics Canada. The agency released a rich array of new data products and analyses, expanding its scope to cover new ground and respond to the questions of importance to Canadians. 2017 was also a year of self-reflection for Canada, as the agency released data from its latest census, and social and economic surveys, providing Canadians with a detailed portrait of our country.

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
[ http://www.childcarecanada.org ]

February 26, 2018
What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Alternative federal budget 2018: Getting there
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/18/02/alternative-federal-budget-2018-getting-there
22 Feb 2018 | Canada
The CCPA's Alternative Federal Budget for the 2018-2019 fiscal year aligns with evidence-based social policy and with what child care advocates have been demanding. Authors draw attention to the fact that federal funding for early childhood education and care (ECEC) represents just 0.3% of Canadian GDP; maintaining Canada's status as one of the lowest spenders on ECEC among peer OECD countries, where the minimum international benchmark sits at 1% of GDP. The report cites evidence of inefficient use of federal funds-- with the Canada Child Benefit providing little, if any, incentive for second income earners in two-parent families to enter the labour force due to the high cost of child care and the potential loss of income tax benefits. The report recognizes that the government's Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework has appropriate principles, but underscores that a lack of funding does not enable them to become operational. CCPA condemns the government's current targeted approach, which it says does not reflect action on gender equity, and instead espouses a universal approach to child care that would see the rights of children and families recognized through access to high-quality ECEC, regardless of income or geography. Authors propose $1 billion in federal spending on ECEC in the current fiscal year, going up by $1 billion each succcessive year until spending reaches the established international standard of 1% of GDP. Importantly, the CCPA asserts that federal transfers to the provinces and territories be conditional upon actualization of principles of universality, high-quality and comprehensive services. Adherence to these, authors show, hinge on operational-funding (not parent-payment measures) for non-profit and publicly planned and managed systems of early learning and child care, with secure accountability measures. Attention to strengthening the federal-provincial/territorial approach to maternity and parental leave through amendments to eligibility, flexibility, adequacy of benefits, special considerations, and leave for parents who are not the birth parent is also outlined in the Employment Insurance chapter. Paternity leave and more on a universal child care program are expounded upon in the Gender Equality chapter.

Voices of child care providers
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/18/02/voices-child-care-providers
21 Feb 2018 | United States
This report explores the real world impacts of legislation and regulations on the quality and provision of child care. The voices of providers are often missing in child care discourse, but given the impact regulations can have on care, this report recommends involving child care providers in the policy making process.

Budget 2018: Working for you
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/18/02/budget-2018-working-you
21 Feb 2018 | British Columbia
British Columbia's 2018 budget commits $1 billion over three years for a 'made-in-BC' child care plan including a child care benefit; a fee reduction program; 22,000 new spaces; and a workforce strategy. Further details available here.

Will fathers in Switzerland soon have access to leave?
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/18/02/will-fathers-switzerland-soon-have-access-leave
21 Feb 2018 | Europe
Several motions have been put forward in Switzerland in support of parental or paternity leave but have not been passed. “Le congé paternité maintenant !” (Paternity leave now!) is proposing a motion for paternity leave with a minimum of 4 weeks, paid at 80% of the salary, which the author feels is a step towards gender equality.

The effects of family-friendly policies on job satisfaction and organizational commitment: A panel study conducted on South Korea’s public institutions
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/18/02/effects-family-friendly-policies-job-satisfaction-and-organ
21 Feb 2018 | Asia
Using a South Korean sample, the effects of family-friendly policies (i.e. child care leave, maternity leave, and child care subsidies) on job satisfaction or organizational commitment were studied and the author found a significant positive relationship. Employees benefit from family-friendly policies, and based on social exchange theory are then willing to put more back into their organization.

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MORE research, policy & practice
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

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2. Child care in the news
Use the keyword search below for searching child care in the news in the online documents database.

Boston schools shift to more play-based, kid-led curriculum in early grades
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/18/02/boston-schools-shift-more-play-based-kid-led-curriculum-early-grades
21 Feb 2018 | United States

Budget marks ‘historic change’ in B.C. child care, says advocate
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/18/02/budget-marks-%E2%80%98historic-change%E2%80%99-bc-child-care-says-advocate
21 Feb 2018 | British Columbia

B.C. commits $1-billion to launch ‘universal’ child-care initiative
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/18/02/bc-commits-1-billion-launch-%E2%80%98universal%E2%80%99-child-care-initiative
21 Feb 2018 | British Columbia

Give both parents six weeks paid leave after childbirth: Dutch council
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/18/02/give-both-parents-six-weeks-paid-leave-after-childbirth-dutch-counci
21 Feb 2018 | Europe

A stunning chart shows the true cause of the gender wage gap
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/18/02/stunning-chart-shows-true-cause-gender-wage-gap
21 Feb 2018 | International

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MORE child care in the news
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org

Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Child Rights Information Network - CRIN
http://crin.org/
CRIN is a global children’s rights advocacy network. Established in 1995, we press for rights - not charity - and campaign for a genuine shift in how governments and societies view and treat children. We link to nearly 3,000 organisations that between them work on children’s rights in every country in the world and rely on our publications, research and information sharing.

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NOTE: (by Gilles)
I've decided to suspend any further updates to the CRINMAIL newsletter archive because of Internet gremlins. If you click on "Gilles' CRINMAIL Archive" below, you'll note that the latest issue of CRINMAIL is dated December 2016 because that's when I ceased updating the Archives pages for several online newsletters, some that went right back to Y2K. I've left those pages online but I won't be updating them.

Here (below) is the link to the latest issue of CRINMAIL:

21 February 2018 - CRINmail issue 1570
http://mailchi.mp/1699e7cd9334/the-week-in-childrens-rights-699681-e4qudyz4fb-699821?e=007dcf26d9
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Political rights and freedoms
- Bodily integrity and health
- Refugees and displacement
- Corporal punishment
Upcoming events
Employment

Gilles' CRINMAIL Archive I (2014-2015- 2016)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue in 2014 and 2015, as per the above latest issue.
NOTE: I stopped updating this archive in December 2016

Gilles' CRINMAIL Archive II (2011-2013)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive2.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue of the newsletter for 2011, 2012 and 2013

CRINMAIL Archive (from the CRIN website)
Check here for links to more recent issues of CRINMAIL:
https://www.crin.org/en/crin-mail/864
- incl. links to the complete collection of CRINMAIL newsletters right back to #1 in July 2006
BUT there's no table of contents, so you must click each link to see the content of each issue.

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Subscribe to CRINMAIL English
http://www.crin.org/en/node/293
NOTE : In addition to CRINmail English, you can subscribe to the following newsletters:
* Armed Conflict CRINmail
* Child Rights at the United Nations
* Children in Court CRINmail
* CRINmail EN ESPAÑOL
* CRINmail Francais
* CRINmail in Arabic
* CRINmail in Russian
* Violence CRINmail

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CRIN News Archive
http://crin.org/en/library/news-archive

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CRIN Country Pages : CANADA
http://crin.org/en/library/countries/canada

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Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place. The purpose of the project is to make the huge volume of information that exists on children's rights more accessible, assist children's rights advocates in identifying persistent violations, and inspire collective action. This is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project.

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Canada and Children's Rights
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Canada
- from the Children's Rights Wiki

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

---

You can find the online version of this (February 26, 2018) newsletter at this link:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal/news260218.htm
.