Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 23, 2016

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1625 subscribers.
Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. Ten things to know about the CPP debate - October 2016 (Behind the Numbers (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives blog)
2. Hugh Segal’s basic income report expected next week, likely to target middle-aged women, disabled adults for most help
- October 29, 2016 (National Post)
3. The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016
- 20 October 2016 (The Homeless Hub)
4. Media & Policy News for 28 October 2016 (Jennefer Laidley, Income Security Advocacy Centre)
5. Chief Actuary Confirms Canada Pension Plan Is Solid, and Sustainable Over the Long Term
- October 25 (Department of Finance Canada)
6. Federal Government Introduces Legislation Advancing Plan to Support the Middle Class and Those Working Hard to Join It
- October 25
7. News Release : Ontario Helping Lift People Out of Poverty : Province Supporting Innovative Solutions to Housing, Employment, and Skills Development (October 26, 2016)
8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]

--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, August 2016 - October 27
--- Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, Second quarter 2016 - October 26
---

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International Content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Ten things to know about the(Canada Pension Plan debate - October 2016
(Behind the Numbers (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives blog)

October 27, 2016
Ten things to know about the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) debate
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2016/10/27/ten-things-know-cpp-debate/
By Allan Moscovitch, Richard Lochead and Nick Falvo
This fall, Canada’s Parliament will debate a recent proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). Indeed, since the 2008-2009 world financial crisis, Canada has witnessed a renewed public debate on the CPP. Two factors have prompted this. First, as a result of the crisis, employer-sponsored pension plans lost substantial value. Second, partly in response to this loss in value, many employers either reduced their pension coverage or stopped offering them to workers altogether.
With all of the above in mind, here are 10 things to know about the CPP:
1. The CPP is a mandatory social insurance program, compulsory for all Canadian workers.
2. Politically, one can usually predict which groups will oppose, and which will favour, CPP expansion.
3. The CPP was established in 1965 and implemented in 1966.
4. The introduction of the CPP required a constitutional amendment in July of 1964.
5. One advantage of a publicly-administered pension plan is that administrative fees are lower.
6. By the 1990s, a serious concern emerged: not enough money had been contributed to cover the liability that the fund was incurring (largely due to an aging population).
7. CPP tends to advantage workers with strong labour market attachment; put differently, it’s not redistributive.
8. Self-employed individuals pay ‘double premiums’—that is, they must pay both the employer and worker contributions.
9. Today, CPP covers a smaller percentage of retiree income than similar schemes in most other OECD countries.
10. One pension expert has proposed that CPP be sufficiently expanded to the point where the need for private plans could be virtually eliminated.

Source:
Behind the Numbers
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives blog)
http://behindthenumbers.ca/

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

2. Hugh Segal’s basic income report expected next week, likely to target middle-aged women, disabled adults for most help - October 26, 2016
(National Post)

Basic Income (guaranteed annual income)

Hugh Segal’s basic income report expected next week, likely to target middle-aged women, disabled adults for most help
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/ontario-report-touting-basic-income-likely-to-target-middle-aged-women-disabled-adults-for-most-help
October 26
Ontario report touting basic income likely to target middle-aged women, disabled adults for most help.

Andew Coyne: How a guaranteed minimum income could work in Canada
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/canadian-politics/the-trudeau-liberals-just-prioritized-one-of-richard-nixons-favourite-conservative-policies-mincome

The Trudeau Liberals just prioritized one of Richard Nixon’s favourite conservative policies: ‘mincome’
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/canadian-politics/the-trudeau-liberals-just-prioritized-one-of-richard-nixons-favourite-conservative-policies-mincome

---

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

3. The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016 - 20 October 2016
(The Homeless Hub)

October 20, 2016
The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016
By Stephen Gaetz; Erin Dej; Tim Richter and Melanie Redman

Full report (PDF - 85 pages)
http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/SOHC2016.pdf
Can we prevent and end homelessness in Canada?
This is the central question that guides our work as we move into a new phase of responding to Canadian homelessness. In The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016, the third report of this kind produced by the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness ( http://homelesshub.ca/CanadianObservatoryOnHomelessness ) and the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness ( http://caeh.ca/ ), we address this question.

Executive summary (PDF - 9 pages)
http://www.homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/SOHC2016_ExecSummary.pdf

Recommendations
http://www.homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/SOHC2016_Recommendations.pdf

Communiqué (PDF - 2 pages)
http://www.homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Press_Release_SOHC16FR.pdf

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

Media & Policy News for 04 2016
(Jennefer Laidley, Income Security Advocacy Centre)

From Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre:
[
http://www.incomesecurity.org/ ]

Latest Media & Policy News: 28 October 2016

http://us4.campaign-archive1.com/?u=095b12c98935ecaadd327bf90&id=4d3619a382&e=0507578ecc

Click the link above to access any of the articles below.

Top Stories

Finance Minister Morneau says young Canadians should get used to precarious employment
Trudeau gets rough ride from crowd at young workers’ summit
Morneau may be suffering from millennial blindness
Young people are right to be angry about Morneau’s acceptance of “job churn”
Hugh Segal’s basic income report expected next week, likely to target middle-aged women, disabled adults for most help:
WSIB’s devastating compensation policy all about the board’s bottom line, lawyers charge
Child care costs in Canada among the highest in the world, OECD says
Attawapiskat without permanent mental health workers, due to lack of housing, months after suicide crisis
Hydro One is offering a new service model to Ontario First Nation communities (incl. link to press release)
Ottawa could end homelessness in ten years: Report
National housing strategy must reflect women’s experiences
Report: Including Healthy Housing within the National Housing Strategy
Minister Morneau warns of economic challenges as slow economy said to add billions to deficit
Why is Canada still privatizing public services when most of the world is going in the other direction?
Health benefits for retirees are steadily disappearing
And, for Hallowe’en Monday, here’s why using mental illness to scare people must stop

Ontario

Only 14% of Ontarians approve of the job Premier Wynne is doing
Ontario signs deal for electricity from Quebec in bid to defuse anger over hydro bills
The persistence of poverty in Ontario
New grant to provide legal aid to suspended and expelled black students
Letter to the editor: Ontario Electricity Support Program doesn’t help renters with hydro in their rent
Too many Ontario children growing up in poverty
If you thought you’d pay much less with Ontario’s new hydro deal, think again

Reports, Events, Campaigns and Other Good Things

United Way of Montreal study: Working while poor: 40% of people in poverty in Montreal work
Could you live in poverty for one month? United Way puts you to the test
Send a letter to your MP
Homeless Hub: The State of Homelessness in Canada 2016
Stapleton: Solitary Confinement: Battling the headwinds
Stats Can Daily: Job vacancy rates and wages

Around the Province

Poverty activists say delays to low-income Toronto transit pass due to lack of political will
Protesters say they want fares to be lower, more accessible
Fight for free education continues at Ryerson
Toronto agency gets $400,000 grant from Local Poverty Reduction Fund
Average rent for a one-bedroom condo in Toronto shoots up to $1,777
Community laundry cooperative helps vulnerable communities in Ottawa
SAMS software snafu slowing Ottawa welfare audit follow-up
Niagara’s refugees need more federal support
17% of Chatham residents live below poverty line
Seniors poverty is increasing in Belleville
What’s in a name? asks the DSSMSSAB

Across the Country

Vancouver-area renters being pushed away from transit corridors
Anti-poverty protesters disrupt Vancouver housing conference
New campaign takes aim at poverty in Calgary
Calgary organizations launch poverty reduction campaign
BC’s Welfare Challenge leaves participants intellectually drained and emotionally exhausted
Welfare Food Challenge highlights hardships of those in need
Tired and hungry, Welfare Food Challenge participants struggle to finish line
Media release: BC human rights groups call for increased welfare rates, protection of the right to food

National

Ottawa asks for provinces’ help to reform First Nations child welfare
Removing poverty as a reason for apprehension would be a good step, says Indigenous child advocate
Four in ten university students lack food security as education costs skyrocket
The Wente vs Eng debate: Are we coddling Canadian seniors?
Internal document says beefing up CPP will hurt economy longer than disclosed
Figuring out actual benefits of federal spending could take years: Poloz
Vanier Institute says federal government needs to update policies around awarding family benefits
Canada’s cowardly CEOs are sitting on billions, rather than investing in the economy
Canadian cities pushing back on federal infrastructure bank plans
Coyne: Keep tax dollars and public pension plans away from infrastructure spending

International

Podcast: Life and death under austerity
UK Councils “tell homeless to sleep on streets so they can get help”
UK benefit sanctions force half of welfare claimants to turn to food banks
It takes a special arrogance to say the poverty in Ken Loach’s film “I, Daniel Blake” is unrealistic
Call for new fuel poverty definition in the UK
Middle aged white Americans are dying of despair
Small factories emerge as a weapon in the fight against poverty in the US
US think tank proposes converting Child Tax Credit into program like Canada’s Canada Child Benefit
With 3 million Australians below the poverty line, government says the answer is to get people off welfare, not increase payments
Expectations on welfare recipients “miserably low” as government seeks to impose tighter regulation
Netherlands basic income experiment design meets criticism
Poverty drops to 21.6% in the Philippines
Pakistan’s largest social safety net program puts money in the hands of women
One in ten young Italians now live below the poverty line
Energy poverty is a real problem. Coal is a bogus solution

Source:
Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre:
[
http://www.incomesecurity.org/ ]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All of our mailings back to 2012 online:
http://incomesecurity.org/media-and-policy-news/
.

Check the ISAC Media and Policy News archive:
http://goo.gl/I32FD
(Back to August 2012, does not include a table of contents for each issue)

Check Gilles' expanded Media and Policy News archive:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/isac_media_scan.htm
(Back to April 2012, includes a table of contents for each issue)

Subscribe to ISAC's Latest Media and Policy News mailing list:
http://goo.gl/XEGZg

Subscribe to the main ISAC E-List (to receive info on ISAC's law reform work, the social assistance review, and other OW / ODSP -related information):
http://goo.gl/j3gzt

---

- Go to the Income Security Advocacy Centre Media Scan page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/isac_media_scan.htm

Chief Actuary Confirms Canada Pension Plan Is Solid, and Sustainable Over the Long Term - October 25
(Department of Finance Canada)

Chief Actuary Confirms Canada Pension Plan Is Solid and Sustainable Over the Long Term
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n16/16-142-eng.asp
October 28, 2016
Middle class Canadians are working harder than ever, but many are worried that they won’t have enough put away for their retirement.(...) Today, Minister of Finance Bill Morneau tabled the Chief Actuary’s 28th Actuarial Report on the CPP in Parliament. The report confirms that the contribution and benefit levels proposed under the CPP enhancement agreed upon by Canada’s governments on June 20, 2016 will be sustainable over the long term, ensuring that Canadian workers can count on an even stronger, secure CPP for years to come.

Source:
Department of Finance Canada
[ http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp ]

28th Actuarial Report on the Canada Pension Plan
Supplementing the Actuarial Report on the Canada Pension Plan (PDF - 1MB, 47 pages)
http://www.osfi-bsif.gc.ca/Eng/Docs/cpp28.pdf
As at 31 December 2015
Submitted 26 October 2016

27th Actuarial Report on the Canada Pension Plan (PDF - 140 pages)
http://www.osfi-bsif.gc.ca/eng/docs/cpp27.pdf
Prepared as at 31 December 2015

Source:
Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions
[ http://www.osfi-bsif.gc.ca/ ]

Associated Links:

Government Introduces Legislation for a Stronger
Canada Pension Plan and a More Secure Retirement for Canadians

http://www.fin.gc.ca/n16/16-122-eng.asp
October 6, 2016

Canadians Can Count on a Stronger,
Financially Sustainable Canada Pension Plan

http://www.fin.gc.ca/n16/16-115-eng.asp

Source:
Department of Finance Canada
[ http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp ]

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

News Release : Ontario Helping Lift People Out of Poverty - October 26
(Ontario Government Newsroom)

News Release : Ontario Helping Lift People Out of Poverty
Province Supporting Innovative Solutions to Housing, Employment, and Skills Development

https://news.ontario.ca/prs/en/2016/10/ontario-helping-lift-people-out-of-poverty.html
October 26, 2016
Ontario is investing in 30 community projects across the province that are supporting new ways to help people break the cycle of poverty, find good jobs and end homelessness in Ontario.

Local Poverty Reduction Fund
https://www.ontario.ca/page/local-poverty-reduction-fund
The fund is a $50 million, 6-year initiative created to support innovative, community-driven projects that measurably improve the lives of those most affected by poverty.

More info about the Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy
https://news.ontario.ca/en/search?keywords=&entry_blog_ids%5B%5D=102

Realizing Our Potential: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy (2014-2019)
https://www.ontario.ca/page/realizing-our-potential-ontarios-poverty-reduction-strategy-2014-2019-all

---

- Go to the Ontario Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

Government Introduces Legislation Advancing Plan to Support the Middle Class and Those Working Hard to Join It - (Canada Child Benefit) October 25

Canada Child Benefit

Government Introduces Legislation Advancing Plan to Support the Middle Class and Those Working Hard to Join It
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n16/16-140-eng.asp
October 25, 2016
The Government of Canada knows that a strong middle class means hard-working Canadians can look forward to a good standard of living throughout their lives and a better future for their children. With Budget 2016, the Government of Canada introduced a bold plan that puts people first and delivers the help middle class Canadians need to prosper and grow the Canadian economy.
(...)
Included in Budget Implementation Act, 2016, No. 2 is a measure that will ensure the new Canada Child Benefit (CCB) grows in line with inflation as of July 1, 2020 so that its real value is not eroded over the long term. Since July, nine out of ten Canadian families are receiving more than under the previous system of child benefits, and hundreds of thousands of children are being lifted out of poverty. The CCB is simpler, tax-free, better targeted and more generous than previous child benefits. The CCB will help parents with the high costs of raising their kids, whether this be for such things as buying healthy food or preparing their kids for winter.

Related Products:

Government Introduces Plan to Grow Canada’s Middle Class
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n16/16-054-eng.asp
April 20, 2016

Budget 2016: Growing the Middle Class
http://www.budget.gc.ca/2016/docs/plan/toc-tdm-en.html
March 22, 2016

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Canada Revenue Agency:
[ http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/menu-eng.html ]

Canada Child Benefit
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/ccb/menu-eng.html
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/t4114/t4114-e.html#cctb
The Canada child benefit (CCB) is a tax-free monthly payment made to eligible families to help them with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. The CCB might include the child disability benefit and any related provincial and territorial programs. (...)
Benefits are paid over a 12-month period from July of one year to June of the next year. Benefit payments are recalculated every July based on information from a taxpayers' income tax and benefit return from the previous year.

Effective July 1, 2016, the Canada child benefit (CCB) replaced the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB), the national child benefit supplement (NCBS), and the universal child care benefit (UCCB).
Source :
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/cctb/bfrppl-eng.html

Related provincial
and territorial programs:
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/t4114/t4114-e.html#P257_18104
- includes links to info about the following provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs
*** Alberta child benefit
*** Alberta family employment tax credit
*** BC early childhood tax benefit
*** BC family bonus
*** New Brunswick child tax benefit
*** Newfoundland and Labrador child benefit
*** Northwest Territories child benefit
*** Nova Scotia child benefit
*** Nunavut child benefit
*** Ontario child benefit
*** Yukon child benefit

---

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
---
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, August 2016 - October 27
--- Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, Second quarter 2016
- October 26

Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/a-daily-quotidien-eng.htm

Past issues of The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select day / month / year to access issues of The Daily going back to 1995.

---

October 27, 2016
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, August 2016
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/161027/dq161027a-eng.htm
Average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $960 in August, up 0.8% from the previous month. Compared with 12 months earlier, weekly earnings increased 1.6%, partly as a result of relatively low earnings in August 2015.Average earnings have been relatively stable since the beginning of 2016.Canadian employers reported 392,000 job vacancies in the second quarter, and the job vacancy rate was 2.5%.
Compared with the second quarter of 2015, the number of job vacancies declined by 45,000 (-10.3%), and the job vacancy rate decreased by 0.3 percentage points.

October 26, 2016
Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, Second quarter 2016

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/161026/dq161026a-eng.htm
Canadian employers reported 392,000 job vacancies in the second quarter, and the job vacancy rate was 2.5%.Compared with the second quarter of 2015, the number of job vacancies declined by 45,000 (-10.3%), and the job vacancy rate decreased by 0.3 percentage points.

StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.

----------

Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

October 30, 2016

What's new online this week:
[ CRRU's online documents database contains thousands of resources relevant to ECEC policy and practice in Canada and internationally.
CRRU's website allows the user to quickly search or browse the database of documents.]

Proposed changes to Canadian maternity and parental leave
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/10/proposed-changes-canadian-maternity-and-parental-leave
19 Oct 2016 | Canada
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit has created an Issue File to inform discussion about maternity and parental leave. The Government of Canada has released a discussion paper and online consultation for considering two new options for eligible Canadians on leave from work to care for a newborn or a newly adopted child, in addition to the current possibility option of a combined 12 months of maternity and parental benefits. A new table has been added to the File that provides a comparison between Canadian and Quebec Family Leave Benefits including type, length and payment.

Parental and maternity EI benefits: The position of the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada with respect to the Government of Canada’s Proposals for Reform
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/10/parental-and-maternity-ei-benefits-position-child-care-advo
26 Oct 2016 | Canada
New position paper from the CCAAC considers maternity and parental EI benefit reform. The group highlights that limited access to child care for children under 18 months is making parents desperate for solutions that the lower paid longer leave provisions proposed will not fix. Instead the CCAAC urges the federal government to undertake more comprehensive reform, drawing on experience with the ten year old Quebec Parental Insurance Plan,specifically, reducing eligibility requirements so benefits became as accessible as Quebecs, increasing benefit levels from 55% to 70% of wages and introducing a leave earmarked for the second parent in a couple.

Taking care with child care
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/10/taking-care-child-care
26 Oct 2016 | Manitoba
Recent Probe Research poll shows that there is significant public support for child care in Manitoba. Three in every four of those surveyed through telephone interview support the idea of a universal child care system. Other findings include that 75% think child care is too expensive for many parents. Probe Research is completing three additional surveys for the Manitoba Child Care Association who will share these results with federal and provincial government and policy makers to ensure they are aware of the need to develop a child care system in the province.

"I'm more than 'just' an ECE": Decent work from the perspective of Ontario's early childhood workforce
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/10/im-more-just-ece-decent-work-perspective-ontarios-early-chi
26 Oct 2016 | Ontario
New report from the Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario on the planning and implementation of the Professional Pay and Decent Work for All Project has been released. The project, supported through the Atkinson Foundation’s Decent Work Fund and in partnership with the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care, sought to address and understand the inadequate wages and working conditions experienced by Ontario’s ECEC sector. Through community mobilization forums, professionals working in the ECEC sector shared their experiences and thoughts on the possibilities of a strong and well-supported early childhood workforce in Ontario.

Rhetoric vs. reality: Child care
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/10/rhetoric-vs-reality-child-care
26 Oct 2016 | United States
Recent issue brief from the Center for American Progress considers and debunks five common myths about child care including that it is just babysitting, is affordable for the middle class, does not require government standards, is a simple business equation and that is it not something the United States can afford to invest in. In doing this, the authors demonstrate how access to high-quality care is a necessity for working families.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

---------------------------------------------------

Child care in the news
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news
[ Use the keyword search below for searching child care in the news in the online documents database. ]

Majority of Manitobans want universal child care, poll says
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/10/majority-manitobans-want-universal-child-care-poll-says
26 Oct 2016 | Manitoba

It's about time we give parental leave a much-needed facelift
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/10/its-about-time-we-give-parental-leave-much-needed-facelift
26 Oct 2016 | Canada

Provincial pledge for 100,000 new daycare spots leaves questions unanswered
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/10/provincial-pledge-100000-new-daycare-spots-leaves-questions-unanswer
26 Oct 2016 | Ontario

Toronto daycare: A system in trouble
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/10/toronto-daycare-system-trouble
26 Oct 2016 | Ontario

Child-care case rejected
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/10/child-care-case-rejected
26 Oct 2016 | Ontario

MORE child care in the news
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Click the link above, then (on the next page) select a date on the calendar to see media items for that date.

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Welfare in Canada vs the U.S. Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm

Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://crin.org/
CRIN is a global children’s rights advocacy network. Established in 1995, we press for rights - not charity - and campaign for a genuine shift in how governments and societies view and treat children. We link to nearly 3,000 organisations that between them work on children’s rights in every country in the world and rely on our publications, research and information sharing.

Our Vision
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all their human rights guaranteed by the United Nations, regional organisations and national governments.

--------------------------------------------------

Latest issue of CRINMAIL:

26 September 2016 - CRINmail issue 1503
http://us12.campaign-archive2.com/?u=76b57aa44a860d071c2e9bf2f&id=b55f9db814&e=007dcf26d9
In this issue:
Expert appointed to lead UN’s Global Study on children deprived of liberty
Latest news and reports
- Refugees
- Armed conflict
- Counter-terrorism and radicalisation
- Health
Upcoming events
Employment

Also in this issue:
World news
Publications
Events
Issues
Law
Advocacy
- Challenging violations
- Take action
- Campaigns
Guides

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE: To see a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL going back to 2011,
click the link below to the period you wish to examine:

Gilles' CRINMAIL Archive I (2014-2015- 2016)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue in 2014 and 2015, as per the above latest issue..

Gilles' CRINMAIL Archive II (2011-2013)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive2.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue of the newsletter for 2011, 2012 and 2013

CRINMAIL Archive (from the CRIN website)
https://www.crin.org/en/crin-mail/864
- incl. links to the complete collection of CRINMAIL newsletters right back to #1 in July 2006
BUT there's no table of contents, so you must click each link to see the content of each issue.

--------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to CRINMAIL English
http://www.crin.org/en/node/293
NOTE : In addition to CRINmail English, you can subscribe to the following newsletters:
* Armed Conflict CRINmail
* Child Rights at the United Nations
* Children in Court CRINmail
* CRINmail EN ESPAÑOL
* CRINmail Francais
* CRINmail in Arabic
* CRINmail in Russian
* Violence CRINmail

--------------------------------------------------

CRIN News Archive
http://crin.org/en/library/news-archive

--------------------------------------------------

CRIN Country Pages : CANADA
http://crin.org/en/library/countries/canada

--------------------------------------------------

Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place. The purpose of the project is to make the huge volume of information that exists on children's rights more accessible, assist children's rights advocates in identifying persistent violations, and inspire collective action. This is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project.

--------------------------------------------------

Canada and Children's Rights
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Canada
- from the Children's Rights Wiki

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm



Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research
Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com