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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 4, 2016


Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2855 subscribers.
Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

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IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. The Cost Of Poverty In Toronto - November 2016 (Social Planning Toronto)
2. Ten things to know about Canadian attempts to count homelessness through Point-in-Time Counts - November 30 (Calgary Homeless Foundation)
3. 2016 annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada (Campaign 2000) - November 24
4.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- Labour Force Survey, November 2016 - December 2
--- Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, third quarter 2016 - December 2
--- Gross domestic product, income and expenditure, Third quarter 2016 - November 30
5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
7. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN


Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. The Cost Of Poverty In Toronto - November 2016
(Social Planning Toronto)

The Cost Of Poverty In Toronto
By John Stapleton, Alexa Briggs and Celia Lee
November 2016

Abstract:
This report estimates the price of inaction. Regardless of the strategy used to address poverty, it asks, “What does it cost us to allow poverty to persist in Toronto?” It estimates how much more we may be spending in the health care and justice systems simply because poverty exists, and how much we lose in tax revenue, simply because poverty exists. This preliminary analysis conservatively estimates that the overall cost of poverty in Toronto ranges from $4.4 to $5.5 billion per year. This estimate is largely comparable, with the exception of intergenerational costs, with estimates of the cost of poverty in Ontario at $32 to $38 billion and for Canada at $72 to $85 billion.

Complete report (PDF - 5.5MB, 20 pages)
https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/socialplanningtoronto/pages/523/attachments/original/1480338070/Cost-of-Poverty-R10-Final-forweb.pdf

Related links

Poverty costs Toronto up to $5.5 billion each year
http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/poverty_costs_toronto_up_to_5_5_billion_each_year
November 28, 2016
A new report estimates poverty is costing Toronto between $4.5-$5.5 billion each year due to increases in cost to the health and justice system as well as lost tax revenue.:

Cuts to low-income services proposed as new report says Toronto is Child Poverty Capital of Canada.
http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/new_report_says_toronto_is_child_poverty_capital_of_canada

Source:
Social Planning Toronto
http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/

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From the
Toronto Star:

Cost of poverty in Toronto pegged at $5.5 billion a year
https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/11/28/cost-of-poverty-in-toronto-pegged-at-55-billion-a-year.html
Low-income residents pay less tax, are more likely to be unemployed or under-employed and have higher health costs and interactions with the justice system, according to new report.
November 28, 2016

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From the CBC:

Poverty is costing Toronto billions a year, report says
'Spending on poverty reduction is a good economic investment,' report concludes

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/poverty-toronto-cost-billions-1.3870594

Source:
CBC News
November 28, 2016

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- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (O-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk4.htm

2. Ten things to know about Canadian attempts to count homelessness through Point-in-Time Counts - November 30
(Calgary Homeless Foundation)

Ten things to know about Canadian attempts to count homelessness through Point-in-Time Counts
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/ten-things-know-canadian-attempts-count-homelessness-point-time-counts-nick-falvo/
November 30, 2016
By Nick Falvo, Ph.D, Director, Research and Data

The ten things:

Click the link above for more on each of the ten things below...

1. Local officials already keep basic information about persons sleeping in emergency shelters and other provisional housing; but they typically have very little information about persons sleeping outside.

2. For more than a decade, there have been communities in Canada conducting counts of homelessness in their community. Such points are also known as Point-In-Time Counts or PIT counts (a measure of the number of homeless people on a specific day).

3. In 2016, there was a national effort to coordinate such counts across Canada.

4. Canada’s most populous cities chose not to participate in the 2016 nationally-coordinated effort.

5. PIT Counts combine research and advocacy—and that can be messy.

6. Officials in some communities may (quietly) hope they end up with a smaller ‘count size;’ officials in other communities may (quietly) hope to end up with a larger ‘count size.’

7. One challenge with PITCounts is the need to balance methodological consistency and rigour, on the one hand, with community flexibility and need, on the other.

8. One unresolved methodological question with PIT Counts is whether the outdoor (i.e. rough sleeper) component of a community’s PIT Count results should be interpreted as being representative of that community’s outdoor homeless population.

9. The federal government could add methodological rigour to PIT Counts by asking Statistics Canada to assist with a federally-coordinated PIT Count effort.

10. There are several advantages to the status quo approach.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
[ http://calgaryhomeless.com/ ]

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- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

3. 2016 annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada - November 24
(Campaign 2000)

Campaign 2000 releases 2016 Report Card
http://campaign2000.ca/490-2/
November 24, 2016
Campaign 2000 released its 2016 annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada on Thursday, November 24, in Ottawa. This date marks 27 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada and seven years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

Press Release (English)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseENGLISH.pdf

Communiqué - Français
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseFRENCH.pdf

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Complete report (English) (PDF - 1.9MB, 20 pages)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Campaign2000NationalReportCard2016Eng.pdf
The 2016 national report card, A Road Map to Eradicate Child & Family Poverty, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to adopt a child and family poverty reduction lens on all policy, program and spending decisions.
NOTE : The complete report is available in English only.)

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://campaign2000

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The national report card release corresponds with several Campaign 2000 partners releasing provincial report cards on child and family poverty in the following cities:

Vancouver, British Columbia:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016-BC-Child-Poverty-Report-Card.pdf

Regina, Saskatoon:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/SASKReportCard2016.pdf

Winnipeg, Manitoba:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MBChildFamilyReportCard2016.pdf

Toronto, Ontario:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/ReportCardOntarioNov182016.pdf
(French version : http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/FrenchOntRepCardNov232016.pdf )

Halifax, Nova Scotia
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/NovaScotiaReportCard2016.pdf

Saint John, New Brunswick:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/NewBrunswichReportCard2016English-1.pdf

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/PEIReportCard2016.pdf

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Campaign 2000 Infographic : Issues and Solutions (small PDF file)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/NationalC2000Infographic2016.pdf

Earlier issues of the Campaign 2000 national report card:
http://campaign2000.ca/report-cards/national/

Earlier issues of the Campaign 2000 provincial report cards:
http://campaign2000.ca/report-cards/provincial/

Take the Campaign 2000 Poverty Quiz!
http://campaign2000.ca/our-work/poverty-quiz/

4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- Labour Force Survey, November 2016 - December 2
--- Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, third quarter 2016 - December 2
--- Gross domestic product, income and expenditure, Third quarter 2016 - November 30

Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/a-daily-quotidien-eng.htm

Past issues of The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select day / month / year to access issues of The Daily going back to 1995.

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November 2, 2016
Canada's population estimates: Census families, July 1, 2016
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/161102/dq161102b-eng.htm
Canada's population estimates: Age, sex and marital status, July 1, 2016
Estimates of the number of census families as of July 1, 2016, for Canada, the provinces and territories are now available.

Labour Force Survey, November 2016
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/161202/dq161202a-eng.htm
December 2, 2016
After two consecutive months of notable increases, employment was little changed in November (+11,000 or +0.1%). With fewer people searching for work, the unemployment rate fell by 0.2 percentage points to 6.8%. Compared with November 2015, overall employment rose by 183,000 (+1.0%), with the number of people working part time increasing by 214,000 (+6.4%). Over the same period, the total number of hours worked was up 1.1%

December 2, 2016
Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, third quarter 2016
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/161202/dq161202b-eng.htm
Labour productivity of Canadian businesses rose 1.2% in the third quarter, after declining 0.2% in the second quarter. Although this was the highest rate of growth since the second quarter of 2014 (+1.9%), the increase in productivity reflects a rebound in business output following a decline in the second quarter.

November 30, 2016
Gross domestic product, income and expenditure, Third quarter 2016
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/161130/dq161130a-eng.htm
Real gross domestic product (GDP) grew 0.9% in the third quarter, following a 0.3% decline in the second quarter. Exports of energy products, rebounding from a second quarter decline, boosted growth. Growth in final domestic demand decelerated to 0.2%.

StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.

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Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

December 4, 2016

A road map to eradicate child & family poverty
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/11/sober-child-poverty-stats-should-prompt-action-advocates-say
30 Nov 2016 | Canada
Campaign 2000 has released its 2016 Annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada. The report card highlights reasons why the federal government needs to adopt a child and family poverty reduction lens to apply to all policy, program and spending decisions. It provides multiple policy solutions as a road map to guide eradication including the development of a universal, high quality, comprehensive early childhood education and care program in Canada. More information about this can be found on page 11 of the report.

2016 Gideon Rosenbluth Memorial Lecture with Pierre Fortin
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/11/2016-gideon-rosenbluth-memorial-lecture-pierre-fortin
30 Nov 2016 | Quebec
Recent lecture by Pierre Fortin, hosted by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, presented a summary and discussion of Quebec's child care reform between 1997 and 2000 which sought to provide universal coverage for all children from ages 0 to 5 at a fixed fee. The impact of these reforms and policy alternatives are explored. Please find audio of this lecture as well as presentation slides on this page.

Money, love and identity: Initial findings from the National ECEC Workforce Study
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/11/money-love-and-identity-initial-findings-national-ecec-work
30 Nov 2016 | Australia and New Zealand
May 2016 report presents information shared as part of a policy workshop on the initial findings from the National ECEC Workforce Study in Australia. The aim of the ongoing study is to identify personal, professional and workforce factors that influence the recruitment, retention and engagement of educators in centre-based early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. This report provides a summary of the initial study findings and also draws together key points from conversations held throughout the workshop capturing participants' responses, observations and insights on emerging themes and their implications for ECEC policy and practice.

Child-centred educational practice in different early education settings: Associations with professionals’ attitudes, self-efficacy, and professional background
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/11/child-centred-educational-practice-different-early-educatio
29 Nov 2016 | Europe
Recent journal article investigated whether educator beliefs (self-efficacy and attitudes) mediate the impact of professional background on child-centred educational practice. A total of 265 professionals from different early education and care settings participated. Results suggest that self-efficacy positively predicts educational practice, while professionals’ attitudes are not associated with educational practice. As well, family daycare providers who participated reported lower self-efficacy and lower levels of child-centred educational practice than other professionals. These results suggest that promoting knowledge of teaching approaches may be a promising way to promote early childhood educators’ child-centred educational practice through increasing their self-efficacy.

How are Canadians really doing? The 2016 CIW national report
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/16/11/how-are-canadians-really-doing-2016-ciw-national-report
23 Nov 2016 | Canada
The Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW) has launched its 3rd national report examining trends in eight domains of wellbeing from 1994 to 2014. The report provides a comprehensive analysis of what Canadians see as vital to their quality of life. The CIW reports on fluctuations in community vitality, democratic engagement, leisure and culture, education, environment, healthy populations and time use to measure what matters most to Canadians. Of note, researchers found that despite improvements, child care in Canada remains inadequate; there are only child care spaces to cover one in four children in regulated centre-based care.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

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Child care in the news
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

Sober child poverty stats should prompt action, advocates say
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/11/sober-child-poverty-stats-should-prompt-action-advocates-say
30 Nov 2016 | Canada

La déconfiture d’une bonne idée
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/11/la-d%C3%A9confiture-d%E2%80%99une-bonne-id%C3%A9e
30 Nov 2016 | Quebec

Parents forced to put babies in childcare for more than 42 hours a week
30 Nov 2016 | Australia and New Zealand
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/11/parents-forced-put-babies-childcare-more-42-hours-week

Childcare workers are underpaid because we’re women. We are the working poor
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/11/childcare-workers-are-underpaid-because-we%E2%80%99re-women-we-are-working-0
30 Nov 2016 | Australia and New Zealand

Seven in 10 childcare centres forced to hike fees, others cut staff pay
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/16/11/seven-10-childcare-centres-forced-hike-fees-others-cut-staff-pay
30 Nov 2016 | Australia and New Zealand

MORE child care in the news
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Click the link above, then (on the next page) select a date on the calendar to see media items for that date.

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Welfare in Canada vs the U.S. Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm

7. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://crin.org/
CRIN is a global children’s rights advocacy network. Established in 1995, we press for rights - not charity - and campaign for a genuine shift in how governments and societies view and treat children. We link to nearly 3,000 organisations that between them work on children’s rights in every country in the world and rely on our publications, research and information sharing.

Our Vision
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all their human rights guaranteed by the United Nations, regional organisations and national governments.

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Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

30 November 2016 - CRINmail issue 1508
http://us12.campaign-archive1.com/?u=76b57aa44a860d071c2e9bf2f&id=de99da50c8&e=007dcf26d9
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Sexual violence and the sale of children
- Child labour
- Education and civil liberties
- Armed conflict and unaccompanied children
Upcoming events
Employment
Also in this issue:
World news
Publications
Events
Issues
Law
Advocacy
- Challenging violations
- Take action
- Campaigns
Guides

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* NOTE: Ignore the numbering scheme for CRINMAIL issues; there is NO missing content.

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To see a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL going back to 2011,
click the link below to the period you wish to examine:

Gilles' CRINMAIL Archive I (2014-2015- 2016)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue in 2014 and 2015, as per the above latest issue..

Gilles' CRINMAIL Archive II (2011-2013)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive2.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue of the newsletter for 2011, 2012 and 2013

CRINMAIL Archive (from the CRIN website)
https://www.crin.org/en/crin-mail/864
- incl. links to the complete collection of CRINMAIL newsletters right back to #1 in July 2006
BUT there's no table of contents, so you must click each link to see the content of each issue.

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Subscribe to CRINMAIL English
http://www.crin.org/en/node/293
NOTE : In addition to CRINmail English, you can subscribe to the following newsletters:
* Armed Conflict CRINmail
* Child Rights at the United Nations
* Children in Court CRINmail
* CRINmail EN ESPAÑOL
* CRINmail Francais
* CRINmail in Arabic
* CRINmail in Russian
* Violence CRINmail

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CRIN News Archive
http://crin.org/en/library/news-archive

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CRIN Country Pages : CANADA
http://crin.org/en/library/countries/canada

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Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place. The purpose of the project is to make the huge volume of information that exists on children's rights more accessible, assist children's rights advocates in identifying persistent violations, and inspire collective action. This is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project.

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Canada and Children's Rights
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Canada
- from the Children's Rights Wiki

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm