Canadian Social Research Links

Researcher's Guide
to Welfare in Ontario

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

L'aide sociale en Ontario:
un guide de recherche

Links checked December 15, 2014
Liens vérifiés le 15 décembre 2014

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


NOTE: This page is a snapshot of how the welfare system works in Ontario.
If you're looking for the latest Ontario welfare info, try one of the following pages
from the Canadian Social Research Links website:

--- Provincial government
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [A-C]
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [D-N]
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [O-Z]
--- Review of social assistance in Ontario
--- The Ontario Special Diet Allowance
--- The Drummond Commission report
--- Drug testing people who apply for or receive welfare
--- Spouse-in-the-house
(54) (welfare cohabitation rules for single people & single parents) 
--- Government Budget Links page - incl. Ontario budget links
--- Federal, provincial and territorial budgets - incl. Ontario budgets +analysis & critiques
--- Ontario anti-poverty strategies and poverty reduction
---
Early Learning and Child Care (for all Ontario ECD links)
--- Case Law / Court Decisions / Inquests - incl. information on the Kimberly Rogers inquest.
--- Provincial-Territorial Political Parties and Elections in Canada - incl. Ontario election links
--- Drug Testing for Welfare Recipients in Ontario

--- Gouvernement de l'Ontario - page d'accueil (version française)


SEARCH
FREE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER


To search the complete
Canadian Social Research Links website ,
use the text box below:


To search ONLY the page you are now reading,
use Ctrl + F to open a search window.


SUBSCRIBE TO THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER

Sign up to receive this free weekly newsletter by e-mail or read it online
(including archives back to January 2005).
Each issue includes all links added to this site during the previous week.
(2800+ subscribers in January 2017)



Weekly Media Scan page (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/isac_media_scan.htm

[ Toronto - Ontario - Canada - (some) international ]
- dozens of new links in each issue

UPDATED TO 06 JANUARY, 2017

 


WELFARE IN CANADA 101

If you're not sure how welfare works in Canada, I highly recommend the following resource:

Social Assistance in Canada: An Overview * (7 pages)
*This is the second chapter of:

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008
July 2011
Produced by the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Directors of Income Support
This report includes a description of, and statistics related to, the welfare system in each province and territory, information about federal-provincial-territorial jurisdictional and funding issues, a bit of historical info on the Canada Assistance Plan and the Canada Health and Social Transfer, etc.

Source:
[ Human Resources and Skills Development Canada ]

Social Assistance (Welfare) in Ontario


Social assistance / welfare in Ontario comprises two programs:
the Ontario Disability Support Program and Ontario Works.

1. Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP)
The Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) provides, for eligible people with disabilities, financial assistance and other benefits and/or services to remove disability-related barriers to competitive employment.
*
ODSP Income Support Policy Directives - financial assistance
* ODSP Employment Supports Policy Directives - a continuum of supports intended to remove disability-related barriers to employment and lead to competitive employment.

---

2. Ontario Works (OW)
(General provisions applying to all municipalities/regions providing Ontario Works assistance)
Ontario Works provides financial and employment assistance for single people, couples with and without children, sole support parents, and people aged 60 to 64 years
* Ontario Works Policy Directives (welfare policy manual)

Ministry responsible:
Community and Social Services

---

City of Toronto : Ontario Works Directives (Specific OW policies regarding the application of Ontario Works in Toronto)
Click this link and then (on the next page) click "Policies and Procedures" in the left margin for Toronto's Ontario Works policy directives.

Source:
City of Toronto
http://www.toronto.ca/

---

How Welfare Works in Ontario for clients of the system

Social Assistance Today (Archived copy via Archive.org)
Posted June 9, 2011
(...)Ontario’s social assistance system is made up of two programs: Ontario Works for people in temporary financial need, and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), which is intended to help people with disabilities live as independently as possible and to reduce or eliminate disability-related barriers to employment. Together, Ontario Works and ODSP serve approximately 857,000 Ontarians each month. In 2009–10, total provincial expenditures on social assistance were about $6.6 billion, about six per cent of the provincial budget.
*Recommended reading!
- Click the link above, then use the links in the left margin of that page to find out more about:
* Eligibility
* Income Assistance and Other Benefits (incl. Total Annual Income for Selected Households, OntarioWorks and ODSP as at December 2010)
* Employment Services and Supports
* Program Delivery and Cost-sharing
* Other Programs
* Profile of People Receiving Ontario Works
* Profile of People Receiving ODSP

Source:
Commission for the Review
of Social Assistance in Ontario
Website launched June 9, 2011
Led by Frances Lankin and Munir A. Sheikh, the Commission is charged with examining social assistance in Ontario through engagement, research and analysis to provide the government with a concrete action plan to improve the system for the people who need it.



According to the 2011
Annual Report of the Auditor General of Ontario:

Ontario Works (OW)
The Ontario Works program is delivered on behalf of the Ministry by 47 Consolidated Municipal Service Managers and District Social Services Administration Boards as well as 101 First Nations, all referred to as service managers. A service manager is typically either a large municipality or a grouping of smaller ones, and each is accountable to one of the Ministry’s nine regional offices. The Ministry and the service managers share the total financial and employment assistance costs of the Ontario Works program. The Ministry, which currently pays 81% of these costs, has committed to start gradually increasing its share in 2010 until it pays 100% in 2018. Administrative costs will continue to be shared on a 50/50 basis.

---

Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP)
The Ministry of Community and Social Services (Ministry) administers the Ontario Disability Support Program Act (Act), which provides income and employment support to more than 270,000 individuals with eligible disabilities as defined by the Act. Total annual Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) benefit payments made in the 2010/11 fiscal year amounted to over $3.5 billion ($3 billion in 2008/09—which was a 42% increase since the time of our last audit in 2004). ODSP income support is intended to assist with basic living expenses such as food, shelter, clothing, and personal-needs items.
Source:
2011 Annual Report of the Auditor General of Ontario


From
CLEO - Community Legal Education Ontario
:

Social Assistance
In Ontario, if you have a low income or no income, you may qualify for help from one of these social assistance programs:
1. Ontario Works (OW), which some people call welfare. This program is delivered by municipal governments. In other words, it is run by the local government of the town, city, county, district, or region you live in.

2. The Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), which some people call disability benefits. This program is for people with serious health problems. It is run by the Ontario government's Ministry of Community and Social Services."

Click the above link to read the rest of the OW and ODSP general descriptions, then select the program that interests you in the dark green horizontal band at the top of the page. Clicking Ontario Works, for example, opens a new subset with the following links:
* Qualifying for OW * Participation Agreements * Living with a spouse * Support payments and OW * If you are under 18 * Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit * OW and working * Proving you still qualify * Refused, reduced, or cut off * Health benefits when you go off OW

Source:
CLEO Legal Rights Guides (social assistance and rental housing) - August 2010
[
CLEO - Community Legal Education Ontario - CLEONet is a web site of legal information for community workers and advocates who work with low-income and disadvantaged communities.]


From the provincial ministry
responsible for welfare in Ontario:

About social assistance in Ontario
- general information about Ontario's two social assistance programs, with links to more detailed info.
Source:
Ontario Ministry of
Community and Social Services
(MCSS)

---

Information on Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support programs appears in the first two columns in the table below. The third column is the City of Toronto's application of the Ontario Works program; because Ontario Works is delivered by municipalities, you'll find similar web pages for many other Ontario cities and towns by doing a Google Search of the name of the town or city.


How Welfare Works in Ontario:
A Very Brief and Recent History

"The Social Assistance Reform Act, 1997, created two separate statutes, the Ontario Works Act (OWA), 1997, and the Ontario Disability Support Program Act (ODSPA), 1997. The OWA was proclaimed May 1, 1998, replacing the General Welfare Act (GWA). ODSPA was proclaimed June 1, 1998. People with disabilities and permanently unemployable people under the Family Benefits Act were transferred to the Ontario Disability Support Program on June 1, 1998. Sole-support parents under FBA have been transferred to Ontario Works.

Ontario Works provides employment assistance and financial assistance to eligible persons in temporary financial need. The municipalities and First Nations communities deliver Ontario Works. Basic assistance and benefits are cost-shared with Consolidated Municipal Service Managers and First Nations Delivery Agents. The Government of Canada covers the 20 percent First Nations share.

The Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) provides income and employment supports to people with disabilities. The province delivers ODSP and the program is cost-shared with municipalities at a rate of 80/20." (There's more detail in the source - click the next link below)

Source:
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights - Fourth Report of Canada
Covering the period October 1994 - September 1999
NOTE : This link is dead --- try Googling the title
October 2004
[ Canadian Heritage ]

--------------------------------------

Not-so-recent history:

Social Services in Ontario [from 1791 to the early 2000s]: The historical context,
changing themes, movements and innovations over two centuries (PDF - 1.8MB, 40 pages)
http://openpolicyontario.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Final-History-for-June-2007.pdf
By John Stapleton
June 2007
Powerpoint overview of the evolution of social services and social assistance in Ontario, covers the period from 1791 to the early 2000s

Source:
Open Policy - John Stapleton's blog

http://openpolicyontario.com/

Check John Stapleton's website for many more historical nuggets on poverty and welfare in Toronto, in Ontario and across Canada.



Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy:

On December 4, 2008, the Government of Ontario committed itself to reducing the number of children living in poverty by 25 per cent over the next 5 years.
For a large and current collection of links to up-to-date online resources about the Ontario strategy from the Ontario government and from NGOs, go to the Canadian Social Research Links Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

(click on "Ontario" in the list of provinces at the top of the page.)



 

Program Name
and Description


Ontario Disability Support Program

The Ontario Disability Support Program provides income support for people with disabilities and employment supports for people with disabilities who want to work. The Ontario Disability Support Program meets the long-term needs of people with disabilities and supports them toward independence.

Ontario Works

Ontario Works, the government's welfare-to-work program, provides financial and employment assistance to single people, couples with and without children, and sole support parents. Mandatory participation in Ontario Works activities assists people in moving as quickly as possible to a job.


City of Toronto - Employment and Social Services

Working under the Ontario Works Act, Employment and Social Services provides employment services, social supports and financial benefits. Staff in 14 community-based offices deliver the Ontario Works program and support City initiatives. Each office has an Employment Resource Centre, open to all residents

 
Type of Applicant

 


Person in financial need with a disability anywhere in the province
 
Non-disabled people in financial need
(program designed by the province and delivered by all municipalities)


Non-disabled people in financial need living in Toronto


Ministry Responsible


Community and Social Services



Community and Social Services
and municipalities


City of Toronto 

 

News Releases


- Key Ontario Government Links (a Canadian Social Research Links page of selected links, incl. recent releases)
- Ontario Government Home Page (includes What's New on front page)
- Ministry of Community and Social Services Home Page (includes In the News on front page)
- MCSS News Room - incl. links to : News Releases - Backgrounders - Fact Sheets - Speeches

 

Service Delivery/Funding


"The cost of Ontario Works financial and employment assistance is currently shared by the province (81.2 per cent) and municipalities (18.8 per cent). As part of a plan to upload these costs incrementally, the province will cover 100 per cent of these costs by 2018. Administration costs are shared on a 50-50 basis between the province and municipalities. The province covers 100 per cent of the costs of ODSP."

Source:
Ontario Social Assistance Review Commission (2011) [dead link]

---

Province Eases Financial Pressures on Municipalities and Property Taxpayers
Provincial and municipal partners reach agreement
News Release
October 31, 2008
The McGuinty government is moving to upload all social assistance benefits and court security costs from municipalities, as stated in an agreement announced today by the Province of Ontario, the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) and the City of Toronto.

Complete report:

Report of the Provincial-Municipal Fiscal
and Service Delivery Review - Facing the Future Together
(PDF - 1.6MB, 64 pages)
Fall 2008

Provincial uploads
As a result of the Provincial Municipal Fiscal and Service Delivery Review, Ontario municipalities will see a net benefit of $1.5 billion a year by 2018.
- includes a graphic representing the social assistance benefit program costs uploaded by the Province arising from the Review.

Some contextual information:
* Ontario is the only Canadian province that still requires a direct municipal government contribution towards the cost of providing welfare (known as the Ontario Works Program or OW) to the able-bodied needy population residing within their municipal boundaries. Municipalities pay 20% of the total OW bill on their territory.
* Last-resort financial assistance for people with disabilities is provided under the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP). Municipalities also pay 20% of the total ODSP bill on their territory.
* The Ontario Government has already announced that the cost of ODSP will be gradually be transferred to the provincial government between 2009 and 2011.
-----

Source:
Provincial Municipal Fiscal and Service Delivery Review
[ Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing ]

Related links:

Hefty housing costs stay local in "good news / bad news" provincial funding deal
October 31, 2008
By Michael Shapcott
Good news: The Ontario government, along with the Association of Municipalities of Ontario and the City of Toronto, jointly announced earlier today a plan to upload the costs of several provincial income assistance programs back to the provincial level over the next decade. This will give municipalities some significant fiscal breathing room – as it takes the cost of this income-distributive program off the municipal tax base and returns it to the provincial tax base, where it belongs. The timing is good as the demand for income assistance programs may well increase with the current economic crisis. Bad news: The cost of the provincial social housing program – which was downloaded to municipalities under the former Harris government starting in 1998 – remains at the local level.
Source:
The Wellesley Institute
The Wellesley Institute advances the social determinants of health through community-based research , community engagement , and the informing of public policy.

Uploading move good but slow
November 1, 2008
It won't happen as quickly as urban advocates would like, but a newly announced deal between Ontario and its hard-pressed municipalities goes a considerable way toward lifting a historic burden from them. In the deal announced yesterday, the province has agreed to "upload" the cost of all welfare benefits from municipalities (which now pay 20 per cent of the cost) by 2018. An important principle is thus underlined – income support programs are best paid through the income and sales taxes, not through property taxes. Collectively, Ontario's municipalities stand to save more than $400 million yearly from this shift.
Source:
The Toronto Star

---------------------------------

The Municipal Act (Consolidated statute)


Results-based Plan Briefing Book 2010-11
NOTE : APPENDIX I of this report contains Annual Report 2009-10
Source:
Ministry of Community and Social Services


Historical:

Recent changes in provincial-municipal relations in Ontario : a new era or missed opportunity? (PDF file - 50K, 22 pages)
April 2003
By David Siegel, Department of Political Science - Brock University
- analysis of the change in provincial-municipal relations and responsibilities in Ontario since the Mike Harris Common Sense Revolution
Source:
Institute of Intergovernmental Relations

School of Policy Studies

----------------------------------------------------------

Local Services Realignment : A User's Guide
November 1999
- detailed information about the shift in responsibilities for delivering and paying for
services between the Government of Ontario and municipalities throughout the province.
Source : Ministry of Municipal Affairs

Related Links:
Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO)

Ontario Municipal Social Services Association (OMSSA)

 

Caseload and Expenditure  Statistics
- Current


Quarterly Statistical Reports - Caseloads and Beneficiaries

- 30 months (formerly five years) of statistics on ODSP and OW caseloads (i.e., number of households) and beneficiaries (i.e., number of individual recipients)
- includes breakdowns by family type (singles / couples / sole support parents)
- the two links below will take you to the most recent version of the statistics in each case

* Ontario Disability Support Program Quarterly Statistical Report

* Ontario Works Quarterly Statistical Report.

N/A

 

Caseload and Expenditure Statistics
- Historical


Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces
1978-79 to 2002-03

http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page00.shtml
http://goo.gl/B5rgvQ

NOTE: Since January 2012, this report is no longer available on the website of Human Resources and Skills Development (HRSDC) or its successor, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). This report and many others were moved to the web archive collection at Library and Archives Canada) All of the content in the report was indeed transferred to the Government of Canada Web Archive: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/index-e.html
...but when I checked today (March 1, 2014), the link to collectionscanada.gc.ca was broken.
Dead.
Bereft of life.
Gone to meet its maker.
It was a late report.

I've had to replace all of the broken links below with active ones, to a complete copy of Social Security Statistics housed at Archive.org

[By Gilles, March 1, 2014]

-------------------------------------------

This report is a goldmine of statistical information (beneficiary data and expenditure data) on current and defunct Canadian federal social programs, and even some on provincial/territorial programs.

This report offers 25 years of longitudinal data on costs and numbers of beneficiaries for most programs - over 100 tables - covering a large number of programs --- here's a partial list:
- Child Tax Benefit, Family Allowances, the Child Tax Credit, Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement/Spouse's Allowance ("The Allowance"), Federal Training and Employment Programs, Federal Goods and Services Tax Credit, the Canada/Quebec Pension Plans, War Veterans' and Civilian War Allowances, Veterans' and Civilians' Disability Pensions, Unemployment/Employment Insurance, the Canada Assistance Plan, Workers' Compensation, Youth Allowances, Social Assistance and Social Services for Registered Indians --- and more...

---------------------------

NOTE : All links below are functional.
Click any link and you'll find the desired content on the website of Archive.org

Preface (short blurb only)
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page01.shtml

List of Tables
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page02.shtml
Read the Introductory notes at the top of the page and in Appendix A:
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page03.shtml
of this report for all methodological notes.
"...Tables in this report have been organized into two parts. Part I presents three Overview Tables which illustrate the trends in social security expenditures by all levels of government for Canada. Part II comprises Component Tables which provide data on beneficiaries and expenditures for individual programs."

Overview Tables:
Table 1:
Total Social Security Expenditures in Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table1a.shtml

Table 2:
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table2.shtml
Social Security Expenditures by Welfare Program and Total Health and Education Expenditures, Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03

Table 3
Expenditure Analyses of Social Security Programs, Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table3.shtml

A number of older tables were removed from this edition of the Social Security Statistics report, including some tables with info on Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances and Unemployed Assistance.
Check older editions of this report for those older stats:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090219214655/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/statistics/index.shtml

Many of the tables are historical and likely of little interest except to historians and CAP-o-philes --- they offer historical caseload and expenditure statistics on each of the CAP cost-sharing components (General Assistance - Homes for Special Care for Children and Adults - Child Welfare - Health Care - Other Welfare Services and Work Activity).

Scroll down the list of tables
[ http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page02.shtml ]
... to find a particular program, then click on its name to access the HTML version of the table (the HTML page includes links to the PDF and Excel versions of the table).

You'll find many key stats tables and some interesting analyses here - only a few of which appear below
- includes links to over two dozen tables (Tables 352-911) with info on federal contributions under the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) and the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) to the cost of provincial and territorial welfare programs.
NOTE: for more info about CAP, the CHST and the Canada Social Transfer (CST, which replaced the CHST in April 2004), see the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

A few sample tables:

Table 360
Total Federal-Provincial Cost-Shared Program Expenditures, 1978-79 to 1999-2000
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab360.shtml
NOTE: Table 360 traces the evolution/devolution of transfers under the Canada Assistance Plan (in dollars) from 1976 to 1999. No new claims were paid out under CAP after the Canada Health and Social Transfer came into effect in April 1996; amounts shown as CAP expenditures for the fiscal years after 1995-96 are final settlements with each jurisdiction for all outstanding commitments by the federal government.

Table 361
Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) - Number of Beneficiaries of General Assistance (including dependants), as of March 31, 1979 to 1996

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab361.shtml
- This is a key table for research on welfare programs - welfare dependency statistics by jurisdiction over the years. These are the final, definitive numbers.

Table 362
Total Federal-Provincial Cost-Shared Expenditures for General Assistance, by Province/Territory, 1978-79 to 1995-96

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab362.shtml
- this table should be of special interest for welfare historians and number-crunchers - it shows exactly when Canadian government spending on welfare (by the federal and provincial/territorial governments) started looking a little fuzzier. When the feds imposed the cap on CAP (max. 5% annual increase in total CAP payments) in Ontario, Alberta and BC in the early 1990s, those three provinces stopped reporting how much of their CAP dollars were going to welfare (vs. other CAP components covered under the same federal contribution). Table 362 shows that as of 1991-92, the federal contribution to those three provinces for General Assistance appears as "n/a" - so it's been impossible to produce a national figure since then. Unless, of course, one wanders over into the minefield of provincial government welfare statistics, where welfare programs (and related expenditures) have undergone a major transformation. If you *do* want to check out welfare stats for each Canadian jurisdiction, your best starting point is the Key Welfare Links Page of this website - http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm - which includes links to welfare stats in each province and territory where they're available.

Table 434
Total Federal Payments under CAP, 1978-79 to 1999-2000

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab434.shtml
[The note under table 360 also applies to this table. ]

Table 435
Number of Beneficiaries (including dependants) of Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance, as of March 31, 1997 to 2003
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab435.shtml

Table 438
Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance Program Expenditures, 1980-81 to 2002-03
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab438.shtml

Table 526
Provincial and Territorial Children's Benefits and Earned Income Supplements, Expenditures for Fiscal years 1978-79 to 2002-03
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab526.shtml

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml
Dept. name changed to Employment and Social Development Canada

Archive source:
Archive.org
https://archive.org/

Official Source:
Collections Canada
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/
[Library and Archives Canada]


N/A 

Enabling Legislation

- Statute
[Not always the latest version]

NOTE: if these links don't work, try the Ontario Government e-Laws web site

Ontario Disability Support Program Act

Ontario Works Act

Ontario Works Act


- Regulations


 

Ontario Regulation 222/98
(Ontario Disability Support Program General Regulation )

Other regulations under the same statute:

- Administration and Cost-sharing
- Assistance for Children with severe Disabilities
- Employment Supports
- Prescribed Policy Statements

 

Ontario Regulation 134/98
(Ontario Works General Regulation)

Other regulations under the same statute:

- Administration and Cost-sharing
- Designation of Geographic Areas and Delivery Agents
- Prescribed Policy Statements

 

Ontario Regulation 134/98
(Ontario Works General Regulation)


Online Policy Manual

 

ODSP Income Support Policy Directives

ODSP Employment Support - Policy Directives

 

Ontario Works Policy Directives


City of Toronto : Ontario Works Directives
[Click this link and then (on the next page) click "Policies and Procedures" in the left margin for Toronto's Ontario Works policy directives)


Social Assistance Rates


Part V of the Ontario Disability Support Program Regulation

+ for families with children:
Ontario Child Benefit
- from the Ministry of Children and Youth Services

---

ODSP Income Support Policy Directives

 


Section 41 of the Ontario Works Regulation

+ for families with children:
Ontario Child Benefit
- from the Ministry of Children and Youth Services

---

Ontario Works Policy Directives

See Toronto Social Services Policy



Welfare benefit levels in Ontario
and much more...

------------------------

Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates
Updated quarterly
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm#rates
[This link will take you to a section of the Ontario Government Links page, where you'll find the latest benefit levels for 15 federal and provincial/territorial financial assistance programs.]

Prepared by the
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services

[ http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/ ]

Found in:
Tip Sheet List - (check this link for more recent updates)
[ Community Advocacy & Legal Centre - a non-profit community legal clinic
serving low income residents of Hastings, Prince Edward and Lennox & Addington counties.]

 

Related links:


Legal Guide : Welfare (Ontario Works) Law

Updated to August 15, 2012

Table of contents:
* Overview * Claimants * Basic Assistance*. Benefits * Information Eligibility * Income Rules * Asset Rules * Applications and Procedures * Administrator Decisions * Appeals and Other Remedies * Workfare * Fraud and Prosecutions * Advocacy

Legal Guide : Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Law
Updated to November 1, 2012

Table of contents:
* Overview * Claimants * Income Support * Benefits * Severely Handicapped Children * Information Eligibility * Income Rules * Asset Rules * "Person With a Disability" * Applications and Procedures * Director Decisions * Appeals and Other Remedies * Workfare * Fraud and Prosecutions * Advocacy * Appendices (Sources and Forms, Currency of Law, Cases Considered)

Source:
Guides to Ontario and Canadian Law
http://www.isthatlegal.ca/index.php?name=homepage
Click the link to access guides in the following areas:
* Income Maintenance : Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program (see the links above) * Civil and Administrative Litigation * Family Law * Estates and Related Law * Consumer Law * Constitutional, Human Rights and Related * Criminal and Regulatory Offences * Property Law * Animal Law * Employment Law * Freedom of Information and Privacy Law * Legislative Process * Miscellaneous Law
NOTE : Some of the above guides are produced and maintained by Simon Shields, while others are from outside sources (the source of each guide is duly noted.)

Guides to Ontario and Canadian Law is part of
Isthatlegal.ca (Ontario)
Legal Guides to Ontario and Canadian Law
Simon Shields, LLB :
Online lawyer and Isthatlegal.ca author



Ministry of Community and Social Services:
Supporting Ontario's communities since 1930

The year 2005 was the 75th anniversary of the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services. To mark the occasion, the Ministry posted to its website a collection of six historical factoids and vignettes about welfare as it existed in the first quarter of the 20th century and even before.

TIP : Click the link above, then scroll down to "Stories from our Past" for links [you have to click on the word "more" in each case]
to the following six short historical bits about welfare and social services in Ontario in the last century:

* Origins of the welfare department (1930)
* Breaking 650 lbs. of rocks to qualify for welfare in 1915
* houses of refuge
* the Mothers' Allowance Act (1920)
* the first foray into the field of day care in the mid-40s
* the Soldier's Aid Commission (est. 1915).

NOTE: this page is no longer on the MCSS website.
The source of this link is
Archive.org.
For more information about how to use Archive. org - The Internet Archive - to find lost Internet content, go to:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reference.htm

You can use this same technique to retrieve many (but sadly, not all) "404" pages that have disappeared from the Web.


Toronto Social Services' Employment Assistance Renewal Strategy (PDF file - 35K, 11 pages)
April 5, 2004
Report to the Community Services Committee by the Commissioner of Community and Neighbourhood Services for the City of Toronto
"The report will describe Toronto Social Services' (TSS') successful delivery of quality employment programs and services to Ontario Works (OW) [welfare] clients, as well as new approaches to providing
Employment Assistance (EA) services based on lessons learned and experiences gained over the past several years. The report will discuss key directions required to further improve EA services for clients, and briefly describe the process for consulting with stakeholders (including clients)."
Source:
2004 Council and Committee Schedule
[ City of Toronto ]
Related Links:
City of Toronto Social Services
- Toronto Social Services [Ontario Works] Welfare Policy

Ontario Non-Governmental Organizations and Municipalities - This Canadian Social Research Links page includes links to a few municipal governments' websites, but what you'll find there are mainly sites of social groups and networks - from the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty to Workfare Watch. You'll also find a number of links to reports and studies on welfare and welfare reforms in Ontario produced by these groups or, in some cases, by municipal governments.

Ontario Government Links - On this Canadian Social Research Links page, you'll find links to the main Ontario government ministries and agencies in the field of social programs, and links to some annual reports, budgets and suchlike.


The Adequacy of Welfare Benefits in Canada
by Joel Emes and Andrei Kreptul
Fraser Institute
April 1999

- Compares welfare benefits in 1998 by province with Christopher Sarlo's Basic Needs Lines. Includes information on earnings exemptions and special assistance, plus Pre-Tax Wage Equivalence charts explaining how much a working person would have to earn to end up with the same annual "net income" as an income assistance (IA) recipient.
Executive Summary

Complete Report (PDF file - 427K, 30 pages)
- incl. a chapter on Ontario



From the
National Council of Welfare (NCW):

---
*
NOTE : The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

The links to the three reports below are functional because the files are copied to my web server.
---

Over the years, the Council has produced many reports on poverty and welfare, but there are three that stand out in my mind as milestone reports on the history of welfare in Canada, at least since the 1980s.

1. 1987
Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
November 1987
Tangled Safety Net examines the following issues in Canadian social assistance network of programs:
* Complex rules * Needs-testing * Rates of assistance * Enforcement * Appeals * Recommendations
This report is the first comprehensive national analysis of social assistance programs operated by the provincial, territorial and municipal governments. These programs function as the safety net for Canadians and are better known by their everyday name ‘welfare’.

Version française :
Le bien-être social au Canada : Un filet de sécurité troué (PDF - 3Mo., 138 pages)
Novembre 1987
[ NOTA : Si vous trouvez un lien vers ce fichier en français, veuillez communiquer avec moi pour le partager.
Merci! gilseg@rogers.com ]

____________

2. 1992
Welfare Reform
(PDF - 2.8MB, 61 pages)
Summer 1992
This report is an update of the 1987 Tangled Safety Net, but it presents information by jurisdiction rather than by issue - covers all provinces and territories.

Version française:
Réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 3,5Mo., 63 pages)

____________

3. 1997
Another Look at Welfare Reform
(PDF - 6.75MB, 134 pages)
Autumn 1997
- an in-depth analysis of changes in Canadian welfare programs in the 1990s. The report focuses on the provincial and territorial reforms that preceded the repeal of the Canada Assistance Plan and those that followed the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer in April 1996.
[Proactive disclosure : I did the research for, and wrote the provincial-territorial section of, this report while I was on a one-year secondment to the Council. Gilles ]

Version française:
Un autre regard sur la réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 8Mo., 148 pages)

Source:
National Council of Welfare
[ Conseil national du bien-être social ]
Established in 1969, the Council is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (originally the Minister of Health and Welfare Canada). The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

-------------------------------------------------

October 6 (2012) update:
The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

------------------------------------------------------------

See also:

--- Guide to welfare in Ontario
--- Provincial government
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [A-C]

--- NGO/Municipal govt. [D-N]

--- NGO/Municipal govt. [O-Z]

--- Review of social assistance in Ontario
--- The Ontario Special Diet Allowance
--- The Drummond Commission report
--- Drug testing people who apply for or receive welfare
--- Spouse-in-the-house
(54) (welfare cohabitation rules for single people & single parents) 
--- Government Budget Links page - incl. Ontario budget links
--- Federal, provincial and territorial budgets - incl. Ontario budgets +analysis & critiques
--- Ontario anti-poverty strategies and poverty reduction
--- Provincial-Territorial Political Parties and Elections in Canada

--- Gouvernement de l'Ontario - page d'accueil (version française)

 PAGE D'ACCUEIL - SITES DE RECHERCHE SOCIALE AU CANADA

SEARCH
FREE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER


To search the complete
Canadian Social Research Links website ,
use the text box below:


To search ONLY the page you are now reading,
use Ctrl + F to open a search window.


SUBSCRIBE TO THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER

Sign up to receive this free weekly newsletter by e-mail or read it online
(including archives back to January 2005).
Each issue includes all links added to this site during the previous week.
(2800+ subscribers in January 2017)

Site created and maintained by:
Gilles Séguin (This link takes you to my personal page)
E-MAIL: gilseg@rogers.com