Canadian Social Research Links

Food Banks and Hunger

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Les banques alimentaires et la faim

Updated October 24, 2017
Page révisée le 24 octobre 2017

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----- UPDATED MARCH 19, 2017-----



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Who's Hungry: 2017 Profile of Hunger in Toronto

http://homelesshub.ca/resource/whos-hungry-2017-profile-hunger-toronto
Despite an improved economy and much on-paper prosperity, the need for food banks is higher in 2017 than it has been before. Food bank use in Toronto is back to levels not seen since the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. The urgency of the need seen at local food banks shows that focusing solely on long-term policy change or on small-scale initiatives, such as community kitchens or gardens, will not meet the immediate food needs of a city population that is struggling right now.

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
http://www.dailybread.ca/

Download the report (PDF, 40 pages)
http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Whos-Hungry-2017.pdf

Snapshot (PDF, 2 pages)
http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Whos-Hungry-Snapshot-2017.pdf

Found in the newsletter
of the Homeless Hub:
http://homelesshub.ca/

------------------------------------------------------------

Food bank usage in Toronto:

Homeless Hub newsletter:
http://mailchi.mp/edu/costs-managing-homelessness-too-high-2883341?e=6da7d6f883

Newsletter Sign Up
http://homelesshub.ca/submit-resources
Sign up to receive the weekly Homeless Hub newsletter, featuring the most recent Canadian research delivered directly to your inbox.

Source:
Homeless Hub
http://www.homelesshub.ca/
The Homeless Hub is a web-based research library and information centre representing an innovative step forward in the use of technology to enhance knowledge mobilization and networking.

------------------------------------------------------------

Canadian Observatory On Homelessness
http://homelesshub.ca/CanadianObservatoryOnHomelessness
The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness is a non-profit, non-partisan research institute that is committed to conducting and mobilizing research so as to contribute to solutions to homelessness.

-----------------------------------

Food Security in the Canadian North : Recent Advances and Remaining Knowledge Gaps and Research Opportunities (PDF, 13 pages)
http://www.polarcom.gc.ca/sites/default/files/food_security_summary.pdf
March 31, 2014
This summary presents food security-related research gains, gaps and opportunities gathered by the Canadian Polar Commission in fulfillment of its mandate to monitor and communicate polar knowledge in Canada and around the world.

Source:
Canadian Polar Commission

http://www.polarcom.gc.ca/

--------------------------

Canada's Action Plan for Food Security (1998)
--- Executive Summary
--- Complete report
(PDF - 8.5MB, 60 pages)

Source:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

----------------------------------------------------------

Household Food Insecurity in Canada
Selected content:
* Health & Nutrition Surveys
* Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS)
* Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children
* Canadian Health Measures Survey
* National Population Health Survey (NPHS)
* Provincial Nutrition Surveys
* Healthy Canadians
Source:
Health Canada

----------------------------------------------------------

Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada (formerly the Canadian Association of Food Banks) is a national charitable organization representing the food bank community across Canada. Our members and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing emergency food programs nationwide. We continue to work to find short term and long term solutions for the nearly 870,000 Canadians who are assisted by a food bank every month.

----------------------------------------------------------

Food statistics
from Statistics Canada

This publication contains information on food available for consumption and food nutrition.

-------------------------------------------------------

World Food Day - October 16, 2013
(This link takes you further down on the page you're now reading - includes Canadian content)




FreeRice.com
http://freerice.com/
Each correct answer wins a donation of
10 grains of rice through the
World Food Programme to help end hunger

---


The Hunger Site
Click on the graphic or text link to donate food

 

 

 

FACTOID:
The Vatican manages a banking empire with approximately $7 Billion in assets.
[ Source ]

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food insecurity as key contributor to poor health and higher costs in Canada
https://foodtank.com/news/2017/06/researchers-find-food-insecurity-key-contributor-poor-health-higher-costs-canada/
June 2017

www.international.gc.ca/development-developpement/priorities-priorites/ifs-asa.aspx
Sep 12, 2016 ... Increasing food security is one of CIDA's three priority themes, as outlined in Canada's Aid Effectiveness Agenda. ...
Food Security | Canadian Best Practices Portal - CBPP

Food Security in the Canadian North : Recent Advances and Remaining Knowledge Gaps and Research Opportunities (PDF, 13 pages)
http://www.polarcom.gc.ca/sites/default/files/food_security_summary.pdf

Food Security (Click this link to access all four reports below)
***
Canada's Third Progress Report on Food Security: In Response to the World Food Summit Plan of Action (November 2004)
*** Canada's Fourth Progress Report on Food Security: In Response to the World Food Summit Plan of Action (May 2006)
*** Canada's Fifth Progress Report on Food Security: In Response to the World Food Summit Plan of Action (2008)
*** The Consequences of a Strong Depreciation of the U.S. Dollar on Agricultural Markets (September 2010)

Canada's Action Plan for Food Security (1998)
--- Executive Summary
--- Complete report
(PDF - 8.5MB, 60 pages)

Source:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

----------------------------------------------------------

Household Food Insecurity in Canada
Selected content:
* Health & Nutrition Surveys
* Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS)
* Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children
* Canadian Health Measures Survey
* National Population Health Survey (NPHS)
* Provincial Nutrition Surveys
* Healthy Canadians
Source:
Health Canada

----------------------------------------------------------

Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada (formerly the Canadian Association of Food Banks) is a national charitable organization representing the food bank community across Canada. Our members and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing emergency food programs nationwide. We continue to work to find short term and long term solutions for the nearly 870,000 Canadians who are assisted by a food bank every month.

----------------------------------------------------------

Food statistics
from Statistics Canada

This publication contains information on food available for consumption and food nutrition.

-------------------------------------------------------

World Food Day - October 16, 2013
(This link takes you further down on the page you're now reading - includes Canadian content)

 

 

 

Links are organized in reverse chronological order on this page, except where they're not...

Who's Hungry: 2017 Profile of Hunger in Toronto

http://homelesshub.ca/resource/whos-hungry-2017-profile-hunger-toronto

Despite an improved economy and much on-paper prosperity, the need for food banks is higher in 2017 than it has been before. Food bank use in Toronto is back to levels not seen since the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. The urgency of the need seen at local food banks shows that focusing solely on long-term policy change or on small-scale initiatives, such as community kitchens or gardens, will not meet the immediate food needs of a city population that is struggling right now.

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
http://www.dailybread.ca/

Download the report (PDF, 40 pages)
http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Whos-Hungry-2017.pdf

Snapshot (PDF, 2 pages)
http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Whos-Hungry-Snapshot-2017.pdf

Found in the newsletter
of the Homeless Hub:
http://homelesshub.ca/

---

Food bank usage in Toronto:

Homeless Hub newsletter:
http://mailchi.mp/edu/costs-managing-homelessness-too-high-2883341?e=6da7d6f883

Newsletter Sign Up
http://homelesshub.ca/submit-resources
Sign up to receive the weekly Homeless Hub newsletter, featuring the most recent Canadian research delivered directly to your inbox.

Source:
Homeless Hub
http://www.homelesshub.ca/
The Homeless Hub is a web-based research library and information centre representing an innovative step forward in the use of technology to enhance knowledge mobilization and networking.

Related link:

Canadian Observatory On Homelessness
http://homelesshub.ca/CanadianObservatoryOnHomelessness
The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness is a non-profit, non-partisan research institute that is committed to conducting and mobilizing research so as to contribute to solutions to homelessness.

United States

Food and agriculture data
http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/
FAOSTAT provides free access to food and agriculture data for over 245 countries and territories and covers all FAO regional groupings
from 1961 to the most recent year available.

March 23, 2017
Out Today: The 2017 Global Food Policy Report
http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=93ac90ba409f6d49d0e4ba408&id=4b0353b5e0&e=8db05a2444

IFPRI released today the 2017 Global Food Policy Report, an evidence-based analysis of the latest developments in food policy across the developing world. With rapid urbanization dramatically shifting demographics in the developing countries in recent years, this year’s report examines how urbanization is changing food systems, health, and development.

The Global Food Policy Report
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2017-global-food-policy-report
- includes a table of contents with links to all six chapters

The 2017 Global Food Policy Report (PDF - 6.8MB, 148 pages)
[ http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getfile/collection/p15738coll2/id/131085/filename/131296.pdf ]
...features chapters on the importance of investing in rural-urban linkages and value chains; the increasing shift of poverty, food security, and nutrition issues from rural areas to cities; the urban food environment's influence on diets; and the role of the informal sector in feeding Africa's urbanites. Also featured are updated data sets and infographics on global hunger, agricultural investment, public expenditures, and more.
Read the Report on our new Interactive Website

Watch Live: Global Launch Event
http://www.ifpri.org/event/launch-2017-global-food-policy-report
3/23/2017 • 12:15 PM EST

Previous reports (back to 2011)
http://gfpr.ifpri.info/2017/03/21/previous-reports/

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute
http://www.ifpri.org/
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), established in 1975, provides research-based policy solutions to sustainably reduce poverty and end hunger and malnutrition.

Hunger Count 2016
https://www.foodbankscanada.ca/hungercount2016
November 15, 2016
A comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada and recommendations for change.
- includes links to: * complete report * Executive Summary * Results (Community Profiles: Wabush, NL - Surrey, BC - Edmonton, AB) * Our recommendations for change * Detailed national and provincial findings * Methodology

Complete report (PDF - 250K, 36 pages)
https://www.foodbankscanada.ca/getmedia/6173994f-8a25-40d9-acdf-660a28e40f37/HungerCount_2016_final_singlepage.pdf

Source:
Food Banks Canada
https://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada supports a unique network of over 3,000 food-related organizations in every province and territory, assisting more than 800,000 Canadians each month.

---

Related link from
Huffington Post Canada:

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

Canadian Food Bank Use Is On the Rise: Report
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/11/15/report-suggests-more-canadians-are-using-food-banks_n_12979380.h0000000000000000000t0000000000000000000000000000000000ml
November 15, 2016
More Canadians are relying on food banks to feed themselves, a report (See Hunger Count 2016 link below) released Tuesday suggests. The report by Food Banks Canada says last March some 863,492 people turned to a food bank, a 1.3 per cent increase over March 2015 and a 28 per cent rise over 2008.
(...)
The report recommends that the bar be lowered in terms of the value of liquid assets a household is allowed to have while getting welfare, and that benefits not be reduced if welfare recipients are able to earn extra cash through work. For the longer term, [the report] calls for creation of a basic income for Canadians that would be administered through the tax system, allowing governments to "dismantle existing provincial/territorial social assistance bureaucracies.''

Related CBC coverage
http://www.cbc.ca/gsa/?q=Hunger+Count+2016&gns=SEARCH
- extensive collection of links to CBC coverage...

Now is the time to act on hunger in Ontario:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ontario-association-of-food-banks/now-is-the-time-to-act-on-hunger_b_11821796.html

Half a million people are going hungry in BC:
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/half-a-million-families-are-going-hungry-in-b-c-report-says

Finding healthy food a struggle for many families on Vancouver Island
http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/for-many-families-on-island-finding-healthy-food-a-struggle-report-1.2335122

Northern BC families have highest levels of food insecurity
https://www.biv.com/article/2016/9/northern-bc-families-have-highest-levels-food-inse/

Deaf man’s human rights case against BC’s social assistance program settled but problem persists:
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/deaf-mans-human-rights-case-against-b-c-settled-but-problem-persists

There’s a food security crisis in Canada and it’s worse than you think:
http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/theres-a-food-security-crisis-in-canada-and-its-worse-than-you-think

Food Price Report 2016
https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodinstitute/food-price-reports
By Sylvain Charlebois et al.
Every December, a team of University of Guelph researchers predict, in the Food Price Report, where Canadian food prices are headed for the upcoming year. For 2016, the Food Institute is forecasting food inflation rates across the country to be anywhere between 2.0% to 4.0%. Our forecast predicts the average household could spend up to $345 more on food in 2016.

Think groceries have become expensive? Expect more sticker shock in 2016
http://www.thestar.com/business/2015/12/29/think-groceries-have-become-expensive-expect-more-sticker-shock-in-2016.html
Experts give advice on how to cut your bill.
The University of Guelph’s Food Institute estimates the average Canadian household spent an additional $325 on food this year. On top of that, consumers should expect an additional annual increase of about $345 in 2016.

Food Price Report 2016 (PDF - 300KB, 21 pages)
https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodinstitute/system/files/Food%20Price%20Report%202016%20English.pdf

Rapport sur les Prix Alimentaires à la Consommation 2016 (PDF - 300Ko., 19 pages)
https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodinstitute/system/files/Rapport%20sur%20les%20Prix%20Alimentaires%20a%CC%80%20laConsommation2016.pdf

Food Price Report in the news
https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodinstitute/news-item/food-price-report-news
Links to seven articles re. the Food Price Report for 2016 from various media sources

Source:
University of Guelph
Food Institute
https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodinstitute/

Five Things To Know About Food Insecurity In Canada
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/carolyn-shimmin/food-insecurity-in-canada_b_8913414.html
January 4, 2016
Authors:
Carolyn Shimmin, Knowledge Translation Coordinator with EvidenceNetwork.ca and the George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation
Valerie Tarasuk, Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; advisor, EvidenceNetwork.ca
---
Here are five things Canadians need to know about food insecurity:
1. Food insecurity significantly affects health
2. Household food insecurity is a strong predictor of healthcare utilization and costs
3. Food bank use is a poor indicator of food insecurity
4. An adequate and secure level of household income is strongly linked to food security
5. Relatively modest increases in income have been found to lessen food insecurity among low-income families

Source:
Huffington Post Canada

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

HungerCount 2015 : A comprehensive report
on hunger and food bank use in Canada,
and recommendations for change
(PDF - 2.5MB, 36 pages)
https://www.foodbankscanada.ca/getmedia/01e662ba-f1d7-419d-b40c-bcc71a9f943c/HungerCount2015_singles.pdf
November 17, 2015

What is the HungerCount?
The HungerCount is the only comprehensive Canadian study of food banks and the people who access them. It shows the scope of the problems of hunger and food insecurity in Canada, and offers policy recommendations to reduce the need for food banks.

HungerCount 2015 video (duration 1 min 36 seconds)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ekigv3ZmGzo

Source:
Food Banks Canada
https://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada supports a unique network of over 3,000 food-related organizations in every province and territory, assisting more than 800,000 Canadians each month.

Related links:

Food bank use on rise in Canada with more children, seniors
Food Banks Canada wants to dismantle bureaucracies that oversee social benefits, such as disability payments, and use savings for tax measures to help poor.
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2015/11/17/food-bank-use-on-rise-in-canada-with-more-children-seniors.html
November 17, 2015

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

Food bank usage report shows Alberta pushed up national numbers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/food-bank-report-spike-alberta-national-1.3322398
November 17, 2015

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news

The “Welfare Diet” 20 years later:
The growing nutrition crisis for Ontario’s poorest people
(PDF - 2.1MB, 13 pages)
http://openpolicyontario.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Welfare-Diet-20-years-later.pdf
October 2015
By John Stapleton
with Jamille Clarke-Darshanand
with assistance from
Richard Matern and Anne Tweddle
(...)
In today’s Ontario, the four big prerequisites for healthy eating are safe, secure, and energy efficient facilities for:
* Storage
* Cooking
* Refrigeration
* Freezing.
The very poor seldom have access to all of these things. Without refrigeration, fresh produce spoils. Without secure housing, there is nowhere to store food safely and protect it from theft. In public housing, appliances break down regularly and take a long time to get fixed. Hydro costs are very high, and are often exacerbated by monthly interest on unpaid bills.

Source:
Open Policy Ontario
http://openpolicyontario.com/

Related links:

Cost of Ontario’s 1995 ‘welfare diet’ soars amid inadequate rates
What seemed like an impossibly meagre food budget in 1995 has become even more unattainable today.

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/10/10/cost-of-ontarios-1995-welfare-diet-soars-amid-inadequate-rates.html
By Laurie Monsebraaten
October 10, 2015
Welfare diet by the numbers:
$681 - Monthly welfare rate for a single, able-bodied person starting Nov. 1
$962 - What that person would be receiving if rates weren't cut in '95 and were increased by inflation.
$90.81 - Monthly cost of food items in 1995 “welfare diet.”
$189.91 - Monthly cost of food items in welfare diet in 2015.
45% - Inflation since 1995.
107 - Percentage increase in cost of items in the welfare diet since

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

The original CBC story
from 20 years ago this past week:

1995: ‘Tsubouchi diet’ causes uproar in Ontario - CBC Archives (video, 2 minutes)
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/entry/1995-tsubouchi-diet-causes-uproar-in-ontario

Who's Hungry 2015:
Daily Bread Food Bank's
Annual Report on Hunger in Toronto
September 21, 2015

Summary and infographics
http://www.dailybread.ca/whoshungry/

Complete report (PDF - 1.7MB, 31 pages)
http://www.dailybread.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/2015-WH-FINAL-WEB.pdf

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank

http://www.dailybread.ca/

Media coverage:

Toronto Star:
Hunger in Toronto is a tale of two cities

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/09/21/hunger-in-toronto-is-a-tale-of-two-cities.html
September 21,, 2015
Food bank use in the city’s inner suburbs — Scarborough, North York, York and Etobicoke — has spiked 45 per cent since the 2008 recession with a corresponding 16 per cent drop in the old city of Toronto, according to the Daily Bread Food Bank’s annual Who’s Hungry report.
(...)
Toronto food bank use by the numbers:
* 25 Percentage who have been in Canada less than four years (down from 40 per cent in 2008.)
* 48 Average number of months a person uses a food bank (up from 24 months in 2008.)
* 65 Percentage who rely on social assistance as their main source of income.
* 34 Percentage who rely on the Ontario Disability Support Plan.
* more (scroll to the bottom of the article)

---

Globe and Mail:
Toronto's food banks see rising demand in inner suburbs

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/torontos-food-banks-see-rising-demand-in-inner-suburbs/article26449685/
(...)
In total, 896,900 people visited a food bank across Toronto in the year to March, a 1.4-per-cent increase from a year earlier and a level still 12 per cent higher than during the recession, according to the annual count by the Daily Bread Food Bank.

From the
Auditor General of Canada
:
http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/index.htm

IMPROVEMENTS NEEDED TO ENSURE THAT HEALTHY FOODS ARE ACCESSIBLE AND AFFORDABLE FOR NORTHERNERS
http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=7928007&Language=e&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2
News Release
May 6, 2015

REPORT: CHAPTER 6, NUTRITION NORTH CANADA —ABORIGINAL AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN
DEVELOPMENT CANADA, OF THE FALL 2014 REPORT
*(see below), OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL OF CANADA
(PDF - 530KB, 24 pages)
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/412/PACP/Reports/RP7928002/412_PACP_Rpt16_PDF/412_PACP_Rpt16_PDF-e.pdf
May 2015

* 2014 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada
http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_201411_e_39950.html

March 25, 2015
Study: Food insecurity in Canada, 2007 to 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150325/dq150325e-eng.htm
About 1.1 million Canadian households experienced food insecurity in 2011–2012, meaning that they did not have the variety or the quantity of food they needed, because of a lack of money. The proportion of food insecure households remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2012, at about 8%. Food insecurity was more common among adults (8%) than children (5%) in Canada each year from 2007 to 2012.

Complete report:

Food insecurity in Canada (PDF - 2.5MB, 7 pages)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-624-x/2015001/article/14138-eng.pdf
By Shirin Roshanafshar and Emma Hawkins
Release date: March 25, 2015

Ontario

Rising disability caseloads = more people vulnerable to hunger?
http://www.dailybread.ca/rising-disability-caseloads-more-people-vulnerable-to-hunger/
December 2014 (blog post)
In September 2014, over 895,000 Ontarians, or approximately 6.5 per cent of the population, were receiving social assistance. However, the month of September also marks for the first time in recent memory that the majority of those individuals were receiving the disability portion of social assistance – known in Ontario as the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP). Food banks across the GTA are seeing similar trends to that of provincial social assistance caseloads. The latest Who’s Hungry survey (see the next item below) noted a steady increase in people receiving ODSP coming to food banks: in 2005 it was 17 per cent of respondents, whereas in 2014 it is nearly 30 per cent. Living with incomes that have fallen far behind the rate of inflation, people with disabilities receiving ODSP are requiring food banks in greater numbers.
(...)
Social policy expert John Stapleton predicted a year and a half ago that it wouldn’t be long before the number of individual people receiving ODSP would exceed that of Ontario Works. In his paper “The Welfarization of Disability Incomes in Ontario”, it was shown that social assistance is increasingly becoming the only means of income support available to people with disabilities in Ontario

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
(Toronto)

[ http://www.dailybread.ca/ ]

Related links:

The 2014 “Who’s Hungry” report by Daily Bread Food Bank
http://www.dailybread.ca/learning-centre/whos-hungry/

“The Welfareization of Disability Incomes in Ontario” (PDF)
http://metcalffoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Welfareization-of-Disability-Incomes-in-Ontario.pdf
By John Stapleton and the Metcalf Foundation

“The Brighter Prospects” (PDF)
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/documents/en/mcss/social/publications/social_assistance_review_final_report.pdf
Report by the Social Assistance Review Commission

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-N) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

NEW from the
Ontario Association of Food Banks:

2014 OAFB Hunger Report
http://www.oafb.ca/hungerreport2014
News Release
December 1, 2014, Toronto, ON - The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) released its 2014 Hunger Report today, revealing that almost 375,000 individuals - more than one third children - are turning to food banks each month. This year's report also finds a 20 per cent spike in first time use and illustrates some surprising statistics about who is going hungry, and why poverty and hunger numbers haven't dipped since the 2008 recession.

OAFB Hunger Report 2014:
Going hungry to pay the bills : the root causes
behind the pervasive cycle of hunger in Ontario
(PDF - 4.2MB, 19 pages):
http://www.oafb.ca/tiny_mce/plugins/filemanager/pics_cms/97/297/OAFB__Hunger_Report_Dec._1_2014.pdf

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)
http://www.oafb.ca/
The OAFB is a network of 125 direct member food banks and over 1,100 affiliate hunger-relief programs and agencies across the province, including breakfast clubs, school meal programs, community food centres, community kitchens, food pantries, emergency shelters, and seniors centres.

NEW from
Food Banks Canada:

November 4, 2014
HungerCount 2014 offers a deep look at the root causes of the need for food banks
The report shows that in a typical month, food banks in Canada now provide food and other supports to more than three quarters of a million separate individuals – 841,000 people. This means 170,000 more people each month are seeking assistance, compared to when the economic downturn started in 2008 – a 25% increase.

HungerCount 2014 (PDF - 23.6MB, 40 pages)
http://goo.gl/WYT1v5
841,191 Canadians turn to food banks every month.
In a country as wealthy as Canada, close to a million people need food banks just to make ends meet each month. Why have we not seen any significant change to this situation after so many years, and after so much has been written about hunger? HungerCount 2014 uncovers the hard data on food bank use, tells the story behind the numbers, and digs deep to explore the root causes of hunger in our country. It then provides our recommendations to bring about real and lasting change.

Food Banks Canada: HungerCount 2014 (YouTube video, duration 1:26)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0GB_YDamjQ

Food Bank use in Canada by the numbers (JPG file, 3.5MB)
http://goo.gl/hmLU17
Graphic showing food bank use in March 2014, by province and territory

What Food Banks Do (Infographic)
http://goo.gl/9OENtK

HungerCount 2014 Infographic
http://goo.gl/5ATnwY

Earlier editions of HungerCount (back to 2008)
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/HungerCount
[Scroll down just past the video on the home page.]

Source:
HungerCount
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/HungerCount
The HungerCount report is the only comprehensive study of food bank use in Canada.It offers a snapshot of the people helped by food banks and other charitable food programs, looks at the causes of hunger and food insecurity, and offers recommendations to reduce hunger.

HungerCount is a project of
Food Banks Canada
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada supports a unique network of over 3,000 food-related organizations in every province and territory, assisting more than 800,000 Canadians each month. Together our network shares over 200 million pounds of essential, safe, quality food annually, provides social programs that help to foster self-sufficiency, and advocates for policy change that will help create a Canada where no one goes hungry

--

Related link from CP24:

Food banks side with NDP in debate over child care versus tax benefits
http://www.cp24.com/news/food-banks-side-with-ndp-in-debate-over-child-care-versus-tax-benefits-1.2085524
November 4, 2014
OTTAWA -- Canadian food banks are wading into the hot political debate over how best the federal government can help families with kids: give them tax breaks, as the Conservatives are doing, or invest in regulated child care, as the NDP proposes. In its annual HungerCount report, Food Banks Canada comes down squarely on the side of the NDP.
It says the use of food banks remains 25 per cent higher than it was before the devastating global recession in 2008 and that 37 per cent of those helped are children.
According to the report, almost half of the households helped are families with kids and nearly half of those are two-parent families.
(...)
According to the HungerCount 2014 report, 841,191 people received food from a food bank in Canada last March, a month that is considered average for food bank use. That's up one per cent over the same period last year and remains 25 per cent higher than in 2008.

Source:
CP24

http://www.cp24.com/

---

From
PressProgress:

Jason Kenney and the child poverty report that didn't quite say what he says it said
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/jason-kenney-and-child-poverty-report-didnt-quite-say-what-he-says-it-said
November 5, 2014
You can criticize Jason Kenney for a lot of things.
But you can't criticize the Employment Minister for lacking in wishful thinking.
This week in the House of Commons, the Opposition asked Kenney about the rise in the number of people visiting food banks since 2008.
(...)
Kenney's response? He rejected the "premise of the question," and turned to a recent report from UNICEF, claiming it showed the Conservative government as a world leader in the fight to end child poverty. But if Kenney had read the UNICEF report closely, he would have discovered it actually says that in 2013, "one-third of food bank users were children, despite representing less than a quarter of the total population." This reflects "higher poverty rates and a more difficult labour market" among marginalized groups. UNICEF's source for that statistic is Food Banks Canada -- the same organization Kenney was asked about during Question Period and tried to debunk by citing the UNICEF report.

Watch this YouTube video [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs3eXocZ1jM ] (duration 1:47)
to see how Kenney's attempts to tout his government's record on child poverty fall down on the facts.

Source:
PressProgress

http://www.pressprogress.ca/

First World Hunger Revisited:
Food Charity or the Right to Food? (280 pages)
http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/first-world-hunger-revisited-graham-riches/?K=9781137298720
Second Edition
Edited by Graham Riches, Tiina Silvasti
Click the link above, then scroll down the next page to see the table of contents of this book and the list of contributors.
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
http://www.palgrave.com/
Publication Date : September 2014

* Paperback edition : $32.00 + delivery
* Hardcover edition : $100 + delivery
This book will also be available online in Ebook (EPUB) and Ebook (PDF) editions

First World Hunger Revisited exposes the hidden functions and limits of food charity and corporately sponsored food banks as primary responses to widespread domestic hunger and income poverty in twelve rich 'food-secure' societies and emerging economies: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Estonia, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, the UK and the USA. Who wins, who loses when governments violate their Right to Food obligations under international law to ensure the food security of their vulnerable populations? It challenges the effectiveness of food aid and argues for integrated income redistribution, agriculture, food, health and social policies informed by the Right to Food, whilst critiquing the lack of public policy and political will in achieving food security for all.

---

Graham Riches is Emeritus Professor and former Director of the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Tiina Silvasti is Professor of Social and Public Policy in the Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä, Finland

From
Food Banks Canada:

Food Banks and the Dependence Myth (PDF - 268K, 6 pages)
http://goo.gl/sUQPqD
June 26, 2014
Do food banks cause dependence? The idea that food banks create dependence among the people they help is a common one. Many see food banks as providing – to use a well-worn phrase – a "hand out, not a hand up."

Source:
Food Banks Canada
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada supports a unique network of over 3,000 food-related organizations in every province and territory, that assists more than 800,000 Canadians each month.

Version française:

Les banques alimentaires et le mythe de la dépendance (PDF - 272Ko., 6 pages)
http://goo.gl/YEim0I
Juin 2014
Source:
Banques alimentaires Canada

[ http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/Accueil.aspx ] soutient un réseau unique de plus de 3 000 organismes alimentaires dans chacune des provinces et territoires, venant en aide à quelque 800 000 Canadiens et Canadiennes par mois.

Prince Edward Island

Healthy diet not possible on social assistance:
Social assistance food rates up only 10 per cent since 2002

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/healthy-diet-not-possible-on-social-assistance-1.2676690
June 16, 2014
P.E.I. government documents show social assistance rates in the province provide, on average, only 61 per cent of the money required for a healthy diet, CBC News has learned. The analysis comes from a government presentation to anti-poverty groups obtained through a freedom of information request. The government estimates it was last providing a sufficient budget for a healthy diet in 2002. Since then it has increased the food rate just once, by 10 per cent in 2009. Meanwhile, food costs are up almost 40 per cent.

Two years called too long for social assistance increase:
Province needs to do its own food cost study, says nutrition professor

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/2-years-called-too-long-for-social-assistance-increase-1.2620194
CBC News Posted: April 24, 2014
P.E.I. Social Services Minister Valerie Docherty announced Wednesday she is looking at raising rates as early as this summer, but big increases to food allowances will likely not come until two years in to a five-year plan.
Professor Jennifer Taylor said people should not have to wait that long. Taylor's recent food costing study in Charlottetown showed families on assistance are short almost $150 a month trying to buy a monthly basket of 66 basic food items.
- includes links to four more related articles in the left-hand margin.
- also includes 32 comments (at the bottom of the article) reflecting different perspectives about improvements to social assistance

Source:
CBC News PEI

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island

TIP: Keep scrolling down four or five red bars on the page you're now reading for the PEI Food Security Network's Pilot Food Costing Project Report (November 2013)

The Cost of Eating in BC 2011 Report (PDF file - 4.6MB, 16 pages)
http://www.dietitians.ca/Downloadable-Content/Public/CostofEatingBC2011_FINAL.aspx
February 2012
Excerpt:
The Cost of Eating in BC has been published for over a decade to detail how much it costs for individuals and families in BC to access an adequate amount of food, to relate this cost to income, and to consider the reasons why many people cannot meet this basic need.

In 2011, the provincial average cost of the nutritious food basket for a family of four is $868.43 per month. Those earning minimum wage, receiving income assistance, or facing other challenges (high rents, child care, or transportation costs, for example) struggle to find ways to purchase food as well as meet their other basic needs.

In the ten years that the Cost of Eating in BC Report has been published, the situation has only gotten worse for individuals and families earning low wages or receiving government assistance...

From the Dietitians of Canada:
http://www.dietitians.ca/

New from
Statistics Canada:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

December 12, 2013
Health Indicators
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131212/dq131212g-eng.htm
Health Indicators have been updated to include information on household food insecurity as well as selected Canadian Cancer Registry and Vital Statistics indicators by census metropolitan area.

Household food insecurity, 2011-2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-625-x/2013001/article/11889-eng.htm
Food security is commonly understood to exist in a household when all people, at all times, have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food for an active and healthy life.1 Conversely, food insecurity occurs when food quality and/or quantity are compromised, typically associated with limited financial resources. (...) The 2011-2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) collected national data on household food insecurity, with a focus on whether members of a given household could afford to buy the food they need. The food insecurity questions resulted in an overall household measure of food insecurity, as well as separate adult and child measures.
(...)
In 2011-2012, 8.3% of households, or almost 1.1 million households, experienced food insecurity. Of that amount, 5.8% was reported as moderate and 2.5% was severe. Lone parent households had the highest incidence of food insecurity for all living arrangements, for both adult and child measures. Couples without children had the lowest rate.

CANSIM Data Tables:

105-0545 : http://goo.gl/9RUoVV
105-0546 : http://goo.gl/FDMrh4
105-0547 : http://goo.gl/ulN644

From the
Ontario Association of Food Banks:

2013 Hunger Report Reveals 375,000 Rely on Food Banks Each Month (small PDF file)
http://www.oafb.ca/tiny_mce/plugins/filemanager/pics_cms/49/249/OAFB_Hunger_Report_2013_News_Release_FINAL_Dec_2-13-1.pdf
Press Release
December 2, 2013
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) 2013 Hunger Report, released today, reveals that 375,000 Ontarians rely on food banks each month. The comprehensive annual report also sheds light on some surprising statistics about who uses food banks and how those users are being helped by the wide range of community services offered by community food banks across the province.

Complete report:

Hunger Report 2013: A comprehensive report on
hunger and food bank use in Ontario and recommendations for change
(PDF - 1.2MB, 16 pages)
http://www.oafb.ca/tiny_mce/plugins/filemanager/pics_cms/55/255/Hunger_Report_-_Final.pdf
By Amanda King and Erin Fotheringham
Highlights and Rising Trends
- More than 375,000 Ontarians to turn to food banks every month. That accounts for 2.8 per cent of the province’s population, making Ontario the most intensive user of food bank services in Canada.
- 45 per cent of all people who use food banks in Canada live in Ontario.
- This past year, 35 per cent of those served by food banks in Ontario were children under 18 years old.
- One of the fastest growing groups of food bank users is post-secondary students at 3.7 per cent. This rising trend is seen particularly in rural communities (up from 0.2 per cent to 1.2 per cent in one year).

Source:
OAFB Research Studies
http://www.oafb.ca/indexstudies.html
OAFB releases a number of key research studies throughout the year, including their annual Ontario Hunger Report.

Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)
http://www.oafb.ca/
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) is a network of over 127 food banks, and over 1,100 hunger-relief agencies, across Ontario. This includes: breakfast clubs, school meal programs, community kitchens, emergency shelters, and senior centres. Together, they serve 375,000 individuals every single month.

---

The OAFB is calling all Ontarians to support their local food bank and help spread the word about the face of hunger.
Visit Ontario Hunger [ http://ontariohunger.com/ ] for an infographic explaining this year’s findings and how to donate to the cause.

---

Related link:

Food bank use near record level in Ontario, report says
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/food-bank-use-near-record-level-in-ontario-report-says-1.2447361
2013 Hunger Report says that 375,789 people visited food banks in the month of March
December 2, 2013

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

From the
PEI Food Security Network:

PEI Pilot Food Costing Project Report Released
http://peifoodsecurity.wordpress.com/2013/11/22/pei-pilot-food-costing-project-report-released/
November 22, 2013
A University of Prince Edward Island/PEI Food Food Security Network project undertaken by UPEI researchers, Colleen Walton and Jennifer Taylor (also members of the PEIFSN) has been released, and demonstrates the importance of monitoring the costs of a healthy diet through a food costing process.

Complete report:

Prince Edward Island
Pilot Food Costing Project Report
(PDF - 780K, 22 pages)
http://peifoodsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/upei-fsn-food-costing-report-nov-21-2013.pdf

By Colleen Walton, PhD, Jennifer Taylor, RD PhD.
November, 2013
(...)
The objectives of this project were:
1) to determine the 2013 cost of the Nutritious Food Basket for PEI for various family types;
2) to compare 2013 Nutritious Food Basket costs for PEI to those assessed previously by the
Department of Community Services and Seniors (in 2003 and 2005).

Source:
PEI Food Security Network
http://peifoodsecurity.wordpress.com/
The PEI Food Security Network is an education and action organization committed to achieving food security in Prince Edward Island.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Related links from CBC News:

P.E.I. eyes food cost study to help set assistance rates---Expert says too many Islanders can't afford healthy food
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/p-e-i-eyes-food-cost-study-to-help-set-assistance-rates-1.2430934
November 18, 2013
The Prince Edward Island government is looking for fresh data to help set social assistance food rates and is restarting research into the cost of food — eight years after the analysis was abandoned. (...) Community and Social Services Minister Valerie Docherty said she doesn't know why the food cost research hasn't been done in nearly a decade, but she has asked for it start again.

---

Food price increases worry food bank
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/food-price-increases-worry-food-bank-1.1221784
August 20, 2012
Officials with the Upper Room Food Bank in Charlottetown are concerned about the predicted increase in food prices.

---

Child food insecurity 'an embarrassment'
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/child-food-insecurity-an-embarrassment-1.1398821
August 1, 2013
It is time to make sure all P.E.I. children have enough healthy food to eat, says the head of the P.E.I. Food Security Network. Jennifer Taylor, who is also chair of the department of human sciences at UPEI, was reacting to a study this week that showed more than one child in four on P.E.I. faces some level of food insecurity

---

More than 1 in 4 children food insecure on P.E.I.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/more-than-1-in-4-children-food-insecure-on-p-e-i-1.1362206
July 31, 2013
P.E.I. worst province for food insecurity.
The P.E.I. government is relaunching research into the cost of food.

Related link:
Household Food Insecurity in Canada, 2011 (PDF - 1.6MB, 26 pages)
http://www.homelesshub.ca/ResourceFiles/foodinsecurity2011_final.pdf
By Valerie Tarasuk, Andy Mitchell and Naomi Dachner
July 2013

---

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

HungerCount 2013

Food bank use still at record highs
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/Media/News-Releases/Food-bank-use-still-at-record-highs.aspx
News Release
November 5, 2013
Too many Canadians are struggling just to put food on the table, and food bank use continues to hover at record levels according to HungerCount 2013, a national study released today by Food Banks Canada. The report highlights that in a typical month, food banks in Canada now provide food to more than three quarters of a million separate individuals – 833,000 people – and nearly 4 in 10 of those helped are children.

Complete report:

HungerCount 2013 (PDF - 2.3MB, 40 pages)
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/getmedia/b2aecaa6-dfdd-4bb2-97a4-abd0a7b9c432/HungerCount2013.pdf.aspx?ext=.pdf
A comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada, and recommendations for change
November 2013
Excerpt (page 15):
Canada has lost hundreds of thousands of well-paid blue collar jobs over the past 30 years, as manufacturing has fled to parts of the world where things can be made more cheaply. The jobs that have replaced them are more likely to be low-paid, part-time, and temporary.

---
Version française:
Bilan-Faim 2013
(PDF - 2,4Mo., 40 pages)
http://foodbankscanada.ca/FoodBanks/MediaLibrary/HungerCount/Bilan-Faim2013.pdf
Communiqué (5 novembre 2013):
http://foodbankscanada.ca/Media/News-Releases/Food-bank-use-still-at-record-highs.aspx?lang=fr-CA
---

HungerCount 2013 (High Resolution PDF - 8.5MB, 21 pages)
http://goo.gl/NLSFGJ
NOTE : This is the high-resolution version of the same report; the pages are side-by-side in this version, which is why it appears to have only half the number of pages as the 2.3MB version. The contents are identical in both versions.

Food Banks Use in Canada, 2013 (Map, .JPG format)
http://goo.gl/Y85O6s

Food Bank Use, Unemployment and Poverty 2003-2013 (Graph, .JPG format)
http://goo.gl/OBh9df

What Food Banks Do (Infographic, .JPG format)
http://goo.gl/9OENtK

---

Past editions of HungerCount (back to 2008)
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/Learn-About-Hunger/Publications/Research.aspx

---

Media coverage of the
release of HungerCount 2013
:

Globe:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/food-bank-usage-still-near-record-levels-in-canada-study-says/article15258855/

La Presse:
http://www.lapresse.ca/le-droit/economie/actualites/201311/05/01-4707417-plus-de-800-000-canadiens-font-encore-appel-aux-banques-alimentaires.php

The Star:
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/11/05/canadas_food_banks_stretched_to_limit_report.html

Global News:
http://globalnews.ca/news/948411/food-bank-usage-remains-near-record-highs/

Source:
Food Banks Canada
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada supports a unique network of over 3,000 food-related organizations in every province and territory, assisting more than 800,000 Canadians each month.

World Food Day - October 16, 2013
(This link takes you further down on the page you're now reading - includes Canadian content)

Measuring the food security environment in Canada (PDF - 1MB, 88 pages)
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/sc-hc/H164-155-2012-eng.pdf
2013
Canadian context and the evidence available to date on the association of food environments with diet-related outcomes. The report points out unresolved issues and gaps in the existing research methodology, with an emphasis on research approaches needed to address uniquely Canadian food environments, such as in the North.
The report then takes a closer look at the Canadian context, with a review of 19 Canadian community food assessments. Through interviews with key informants across Canada, the report highlights the experiences and analysis of food researchers in communities across the country.

Source:
Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

From Community Foundations of Canada:

Food is ground zero for Canada’s most challenging issues, says new report
http://www.cfc-fcc.ca/news/news-releases_view.cfm?id=2180
News Release
October 1, 2013 – Food is at the epicenter of our nation’s most pressing issues – from poverty and poor health, to the environment and economy – and communities need to make these critical connections so Canadians can mobilize more effectively, says a new report from Community Foundations of Canada.
(...)
Fertile Ground: Sowing the seeds of change in Canada’s food system, released today as part of CFC’s national Vital Signs program, calls food a defining issue for the century ahead. Among the report’s key findings:
* Fighting the symptoms isn’t working.
* Our choices are hurting our health.
* And taking a toll on our environment.
* First nations are hit hardest.
* Canadians are driving change.
* Canada has the potential to be a leader on the world stage.

Complete report:

Fertile Ground: Sowing the seeds of change in Canada’s food system (PDF - 2.4MB, 28 pages)
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/files/report/nationalreports/2013_NationalReport_EN.pdf
October 2013

Source:
Community Foundations of Canada

http://www.cfc-fcc.ca/
The vitality of our communities, or community vitality, is something community foundations care about a great deal. Community vitality is the unique spirit that flourishes when people believe their community holds possibilities for everyone.

From the
Daily Bread Food Bank (Toronto):

Who’s Hungry 2013: A Tale of Three Cities
http://www.dailybread.ca/whos-hungry-2013-a-tale-of-three-cities/
September 24, 2013
For a fifth year in a row, food banks in the GTA saw over a million client visits. Underneath that figure hides very different numbers for different parts of the GTA, depending if people live in the city core, the former inner suburbs, or the 905 region. The former inner suburbs of Toronto (Scarborough, North York and Etobicoke) saw an increase of nearly 40 per cent since 2008 in numbers of visits to food banks. Those numbers include highly educated, but underemployed, newcomer families with children living in apartments that are barely affordable. In the city core, it is single baby boomers with disabilities who are more often turning to a food bank for support, as they struggle with fixed incomes and rising food costs.

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank (Toronto)
http://www.dailybread.ca/

Complete report:

Who’s Hungry: A Tale of Three Cities
2013 Profile of Hunger in the GTA
(PDF - 2.2MB, 28 pages)
http://www.dailybread.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/WhosHungry2013FINAL.pdf
September 2013
(...)
This report talks about three “cities” within the GTA. These cities, the city core, the former inner suburbs, and the 905 area, are seeing different trends in regards to who is coming through the doors of their local food banks. These trends illustrate what many already know, that the GTA and the City of Toronto are rapidly evolving and there are challenges that are emerging as a result of that evolution.

Almost 4 million Canadians struggle to afford food
http://www.news.utoronto.ca/almost-4-million-canadians-struggle-find-food
July 25, 2013
A new report by researchers at the University of Toronto shows that almost four million Canadians are struggling to put the food they need on the table because of food insecurity. “The impact of this situation on children, families, communities, the health care system and our economy cannot be overstated,” said Dr. Valerie Tarasuk, a nutritional sciences professor at U of T’s Faculty of Medicine and principal investigator for PROOF, an international team of researchers committed to the reduction of household food insecurity.

Source:
University of Toronto News

http://www.news.utoronto.ca/

Complete report:

Household Food Insecurity in Canada, 2011 (PDF - 1.6MB, 26 pages)
http://www.homelesshub.ca/ResourceFiles/foodinsecurity2011_final.pdf
By Valerie Tarasuk, Andy Mitchell and Naomi Dachner
July 2013
In 2011, the Household Food Security Survey Module was administered in all provinces and territories as a component of Statistics Canada’s annual Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Examining the results of this survey provides an opportunity to deepen our understanding of the prevalence, distribution and relative severity of household food insecurity across the country. The Annual Report on Household Food Insecurity is designed to provide a tool, using Statistics Canada data, to monitor trends and identify priorities for interventions to address this major public health issue.

Source:
PROOF
http://nutritionalsciences.lamp.utoronto.ca
PROOF is an international, interdisciplinary team of researchers committed to a program of research to identify effective policy interventions to address household food insecurity. PROOF involves the participation of the University of Toronto, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Calgary, and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

Found in:
Homeless Hub

http://www.homelesshub.ca/
Building on the success of the Canadian Conference on Homelessness (2005), the Homeless Hub was created to address the need for a single place to find homelessness information from across Canada.

May 30, 2013
Food availability, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130530/dq130530f-eng.htm
Data on food availability per person for selected products, as well as on the supply and disposition of these products, are now available for 2012.
[The food availability data series is the result of a partnership between Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Statistics Canada.]

Available in CANSIM tables
CANSIM table 002-0010 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=002-0010&p2=31
CANSIM table 002-0011 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=002-0011&p2=31

Definitions, data sources and methods:
Survey number 3475

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/imdb-bmdi/3475-eng.htm

Related subjects:

Agriculture
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=920&id=920&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Manufacturing
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=4005&id=4005&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Food, beverage and tobacco
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=4005&id=1504&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

The Hunger Game:
Food banks may compound the very problems they should be solving
http://thewalrus.ca/the-hunger-game/
By Nick Saul
April 2013
(...) Each time I visit food bank warehouses, I find myself alternating between hope and despair. Hope born of the understanding that all of this is motivated by the human urge to help others with that most basic of needs: food. Despair because this effort, and that of food banks all over Canada, has not solved the problem of hunger. On the contrary, I believe food banking makes it worse.
(...)
Food banks, with all of their collecting and sorting and distributing and thanking, are meeting the needs of everyone except the people they were set up to help: the poor and hungry. This emergency handout approach divides us as citizens, breaking down our society into us and them, givers and takers. The former feel generous and kind, while the latter feel ashamed, their agency, their health, and their dignity diminished. We not only can do better, we must do better.

Source:
April 2013 issue of
The Walrus

http://thewalrus.ca/
The magazine about Canada and its place in the world, published by the non-profit charitable Walrus Foundation [ http://thewalrus.ca/foundation/ ].

The author of the above article, Nick Saul, is president and CEO of
Community Food Centres Canada
http://www.cfccanada.ca/
Community Food Centres Canada provides ideas, resources and a proven approach to partner organizations across Canada so they can establish responsive, financially stable Community Food Centres. These centres work to bring people together to grow, cook, share, and advocate for good food. With our partners and communities, we are working toward a healthy and fair food system.
A Community Food Centre is a welcoming space where people come together to grow, cook, share and advocate for good food. CFCs provide people with emergency access to high-quality food in a dignified setting that doesn’t compromise their self-worth.

UN Rapporteur: Harper's agenda contributing to food insecurity in Canada
http://rabble.ca/news/2013/03/un-rapporteur-harpers-agenda-contributing-food-insecurity-canada
March 4, 2013
'Mission to Canada', Report presented to the 22nd Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council
---
Food Secure Canada [ http://foodsecurecanada.org/ ] is hosting over 50 events across Canada Monday, part of a webinar with Olivier De Schutter, the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, who will be delivering his report on Canada in Geneva to the UN Human Rights Council.
"Food is a human right that belongs to every one of us," said Diana Bronson, Executive Director of Food Secure Canada, who are organizing the country-wide webinar.
The Canadian Press is reporting that De Schutter's 21-page report:
takes direct aim at some of the core items of the Harper government's agenda, saying they undermine access to food.
These include the controversial decision to cancel the long-form census in 2009, the ongoing Canada-EU free trade negotiations, the scrapping of the Canadian Wheat Board, and how Ottawa oversees the money it transfers to the provinces for social services.
De Schutter visited Canada on a fact-finding mission in May 2012

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the right to food (PDF - 604K, 21 pages)
http://www.srfood.org/images/stories/pdf/officialreports/20121224_canadafinal_en.pdf
By Olivier De Schutter
Addendum : Mission to Canada
24 December 2012
Summary
The present report, submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution 13/4, contains the findings and recommendations of the Special Rapporteur on the right to food on his country visit to Canada from 6 to 16 May 2012. The report first examines the state of food security in Canada (chap. II) and the legal and policy framework for the realization of the right to adequate food (chap. III). It then outlines specific issues related to agricultural policies (chap. IV); protection of the poorest segments of the population (chap. V); access to adequate diets and the growing incidence of overweight and obesity (chap. VI); Canada’s contribution to global food security (chap. VII); and specific problems faced by indigenous peoples (chap. VIII).

Earlier related reports:

May 16, 2012
Canada: national food strategy can eradicate hunger amidst plenty – UN rights expert (PDF - 48K, 2 pages)
http://www.srfood.org/images/stories/pdf/press_releases/20120516_canada_en.pdf

End of mission statement ‘Mission to Canada’, from 5 to 16 May 2012 (PDF - 96K, 9 pages)
http://www.srfood.org/images/stories/pdf/officialreports/201205_canadaprelim_en.pdf

Source:
United Nations Human Rights Council

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/Pages/HRCIndex.aspx
Twenty-second session, Agenda item 3
Promotion and protection of all human rights, civil, political, economic,
social and cultural rights, including the right to development

From
TheTyee.ca:

Time for a CBC Right to Food Day
Public broadcaster should launch it instead of pushing the failed food bank charity model.
http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2012/12/28/Time-For-CBC-Right-to-Food-Day/
By Graham Riches
December 28, 2012
Now that this year's CBC's Food Bank Day in B.C. is over surely it's time to rethink this annual event stretching back more than 25 years. In light of persistent and growing hunger in our affluent province, there's a compelling argument to reconsider our national broadcaster's decades long public support for charitable food banks. This year the CBC raised a record setting $567,085 to be distributed to food banks across the province. In appreciation, CBC studios in Vancouver, Victoria, Kelowna, Kamloops and Prince George opened their doors to donors, of whom 5,000 in Vancouver met national and local broadcasting personalities, billed as stars, including Peter Mansbridge and George Stroumboloupoulos, the first Canadian Ambassador Against Hunger for the United Nations World Food Program. A fun time to be sure, not bad for the ratings and all for a very good cause. What's not to like?
(...)
The problem is that food banks have become the publicly accepted way of meeting this basic human need, with the CBC over the years fostering this widely held perception. How has this come about when food poverty remains deeply entrenched and widening income inequality, grossly inadequate welfare benefits and social program cutbacks highlight the continuing failure of public policy and government accountability for addressing domestic hunger?
(...)
If overcoming food poverty is the goal, hungry people require adequate purchasing power to go into a store like anyone else and buy the foods of their choice. Why not income security, a rebuilt social safety net and a Poverty Reduction Plan for B.C as the focus of next year's CBC Right to Food Day?

[ Author Graham Riches is director of the UBC School of Social Work and Family Studies with an interest in food security, welfare policy and human rights. ]

---

NOTE: This is the eighth of The Tyee's Inspiring Ideas for 2013 series:
http://thetyee.ca/Series/2012/12/19/Big-Ideas-2013/
[Click the link above to access all of the following ideas.]
Idea #1: 'MOOC': Saviour of Higher Ed?
Idea #2: Turn Complex Problems into Games
Idea #3: Want to Defeat Harper? Force Cooperation
Idea #4: Teach Teachers How to Be Advocates
Idea #5: 'You Are Not a Loan'
Idea #6: Assess the Public Health Impact of New Laws
Idea #7: Make 'Affordable' the New 'Livable'
Idea #8: Time for a CBC Right to Food Day

---

Source:
The Tyee

http://thetyee.ca/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

Corporate tax breaks are not the answer to hunger in Canada
December 19, 2012
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1304824
By Elaine Power, Graham Riches and Valerie Tarasuk
Could a corporate tax break help feed hungry Canadians? Ottawa is now considering a proposal by Food Banks Canada allowing food businesses donating surplus food to food banks to write off up to twice the cost of producing the food. It sounds like a win-win-win proposal. Given that food banks never have enough food to meet the needs of hungry Canadians, why not offer such an incentive? Corporations would win because they get more reward for the food they donate. Food banks would win by having more food available to distribute to hungry Canadians. And food bank users, 38 per cent of whom are children, would win because they would be less hungry. At least that is how it appears.

The first problem is that it gives tacit government approval to a charitable “solution” to hunger. But food banks are not a solution to this problem.
(...)
The second problem is that tax breaks undermine government’s fiscal ability to actually address the problem in any serious way.
(...) The Harper government has already cut corporate tax rates from 22.1 per cent in 2007-08 to 15 per cent today.
Why do food corporations need another tax break?

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

Corporations prosper while food banks overwhelmed
November 4, 2012
The economics department of the Toronto-Dominion Bank [ http://www.td.com/economics/analysis/economics-index.jsp ] had good news for investors amid a late-October downgrade of growth forecasts, heightened concerns about Canada’s record level of household debt, gale-force winds and lashing rain.
“Canadian corporate balance sheets are solid as a rock,” the bank assured its clients in a special report. “Unlike households and governments, companies are less vulnerable today than they were heading into the 2007-2008 financial crisis.”

Food Banks Canada, which represents the nation’s 4,500 hunger relief programs — food banks, soup kitchens, school breakfast initiatives — issued a comprehensive report the same day [ http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/getmedia/3b946e67-fbe2-490e-90dc-4a313dfb97e5/HungerCount2012.pdf ] . It was unremittingly grim. Food bank use has increased 31 per cent since the economy plunged into recession four years ago and it continues to climb. In the past 12 months alone, an additional 20,000 Canadians turned to charity to eat.
(...)
The two snapshots — one from a Bay Street office tower, one from a Mimico warehouse — depict starkly different Canadas. Not only are they separated by a yawning income chasm. Their priorities and values are so far apart that there is no common ground, no basis for conversation. That is the everyday reality behind phrases such as “the growing gap,” “a polarized society” and “an hourglass economy.”
(...)
An increasing number of employed people can no longer feed their families. The reason, the report suggests, is that 18 per cent of employed Canadians — almost one in five — earn less than $17,000 a year.
(...)
Food bank users are not impervious to the logic of setting money aside for hard times. But these are hard times for them. What the nation needs are bridge-builders with credibility in both camps to connect people, get them talking, show them there is common ground.
Canadians shouldn’t have to pick sides.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/


HungerCount 2012
October 30, 2012

From
Food Banks Canada:

Food Banks Canada reports record number of Canadians using food banks; 38% are children
HungerCount 2012 provides essential information on levels of food bank use in Canada, profiles communities hit by economic change
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/Media/News-Releases/Un-nombre-record-de-Canadiens-se-tournent-vers-les.aspx
October 30, 2012
News Release
– The number of Canadians turning to food banks for help is at an all-time high, according to the HungerCount 2012 national study released today by Food Banks Canada. After dipping slightly in 2011, food bank use in Canada increased by 2.4% this year, and is now a staggering 31% higher than before the 2008-2009 recession.

Complete report:

HungerCount 2012 : A Comprehensive Report on Hunger and
Food Bank Use in Canada, and Recommendations for Change
(PDF - 2.6MB, 36 pages)
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/getmedia/3b946e67-fbe2-490e-90dc-4a313dfb97e5/HungerCount2012.pdf

---

Media coverage:

Recession’s legacy has food-bank usage soaring in Canada
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/recessions-legacy-has-food-bank-usage-soaring-in-canada/article4748510/
By Tavia Grant
October 30 2012
A record number of Canadians visited a food bank this year, an indication the recession’s legacy continues to bite. More than 882,000 people used a food bank this March, a 2.4-per-cent increase from last year. Demand is now 31-per-cent higher than before the recession, a study to be released Tuesday says. Food banks were never supposed to be a permanent part of Canada’s landscape. They sprang up during tough economic times in the early 1980s as a temporary way to alleviate hunger. Thirty years later, more than three quarters of a million Canadians are using food banks each month.

48 comments about this article
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/recessions-legacy-has-food-bank-usage-soaring-in-canada/article4748510/comments/

Source of the article:

The Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

Source of the report:

Food Banks Canada
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada is the national charitable organization representing and supporting the food bank community across Canada. Our membership and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing essential food programs nationwide.

Children in Greater Toronto Area going hungrier more often, according to new Daily Bread report (PDF - 44K, 1 page)
http://www.dailybread.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/RELEASE-DailyBread-Thanksgiving-Drive-Launch-2012.pdf
September 19, 2012
TORONTO — As Daily Bread Food Bank launches its Thanksgiving Drive, a new report released today shows why it’s more important than ever to give. “While there has been a slight decrease in the percentage of children having to get food from a food bank, there has been an increase in the percentage of those children who are going hungry at least once a week. Same is true for adults—the hungry are getting hungrier,” said Richard Matern, acting director of research and the author of the newest Who’s Hungry: Faces of Hunger report.

Complete report:

Who’s Hungry: Faces of Hunger
2012 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
(PDF - 2.4MB, 28 pages)
http://www.dailybread.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/WhosHungryReport2012LowRes.pdf
By Richard Matern and Susie Kim
Every year Daily Bread conducts a survey across the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) of people who access food banks. Over 100 volunteers go out to over 40 food banks across the city to conduct one-on-one interviews with food bank clients. The only project of its kind in Canada, Daily Bread’s annual survey is a crucial tool that helps to raise awareness of the issues that contribute to hunger and poverty by listening to the people that it is affecting the most.

Hunger Snapshot : Faces of Hunger (PDF - 408K, 4 pages)
http://www.dailybread.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/HungerSnapshot2012.pdf
- contains some statistical highlights from the 2012 survey to provide you with a brief picture of poverty and hunger in the GTA.

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank, Toronto

http://www.dailybread.ca/

Hunger on Our Doorstep
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/olivier-de-schutter/developed-countries-hunger_b_1627559.html
June 26, 2012
By Olivier De Schutter
UN Special Rapporteur for the Right to Food

What is a U.N. human rights expert doing examining food systems in the developed world while millions are starving in poor countries? This was the first question many people raised when in May of this year, after having visited a range of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia, I conducted my first right-to-food mission in a developed country -- Canada.

The question is itself a legitimate one. Given the wealth that abounds in Europe and North America, many have assumed that poverty has, and must have been, eradicated. Yet this assumption is the measure of just how well our societies have managed to keep the uncomfortable fact of food poverty out of sight and out of mind. The two-track economic processes that have mired some communities in disadvantage have in fact marginalized them far enough as to make them invisible to the rest of society.
(...) Just as it is our duty to speak out against hunger in poor and developing states, it is our duty not to forget about those who, on our own doorstep, find themselves unemployed, unable to pay their bills, and whose children shall pay the price for poor diets.

---

Olivier De Schutter is the UN Special Rapporteur for the right to food. In May 2012 he conducted an official visit to Canada.
His preliminary findings:
* http://www.srfood.org/images/stories/pdf/officialreports/201205_canadaprelim_en.pdf
* http://www.ohchr.org/en/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=12159&LangID=E

---

Source:
Huffington Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

---

United Nations food envoy blasts inequality, poverty in Canada
Olivier De Schutter, the UN right-to-food envoy, said in Ottawa on Wednesday that Canada's "rates of food insecurity are unacceptable."
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1179208--jason-kenney-blasts-un-food-envoy
May 16, 2012
By Sean Kilpatrick
OTTAWA—Despite Canada’s riches, many Canadians are suffering from poverty, inequality and the inability to afford daily food needs, says a scathing United Nations report released Wednesday
[ http://goo.gl/tLwmj ]. “What I’ve seen in Canada is a system that presents barriers for the poor to access nutritious diets and that tolerates increased inequalities between rich and poor, and aboriginal non-aboriginal peoples,” Olivier De Schutter, the UN right-to-food envoy, said. “Canada has long been seen as a land of plenty. Yet today one in 10 families with a child under 6 is unable to meet their daily food needs. These rates of food insecurity are unacceptable, and it is time for Canada to adopt a national right-to-food strategy,” said De Schutter. His report was based on an 11-day mission to Canada, his first investigation of what he called “a rich, developed country.”
(...)
He also said the situation in many aboriginal communities is desperate [ http://goo.gl/WkjxT ]. “A long history of political and economic marginalization has left many indigenous peoples (in Canada) with considerably lower levels of access to adequate food relative to the general population,” he said in his report.
(...)
Immigration Minister Jason Kenney said it’s a waste of the UN’s money to be investigating developed countries like Canada. (...) Kenney said Canada ranks as one of the best developed countries in the world in the UN’s own rankings. As well, Canada gives billions of dollars a year to developing nations. Kenney dismissed De Schutter’s mission as a political exercise.

But the official parliamentary opposition urged the Conservatives to act quickly to put together a national food strategy in the wake of the UN study.
“Like it or not, the situation is bleak for millions of Canadians. Food security is a right. Hunger and malnutrition are unacceptable anywhere, but especially in a country as wealthy as Canada,” said NDP aboriginal affairs critic Jean Crowder. “It’s the least fortunate who must choose between paying their rent and putting food on the table. That’s not a choice Canadians should have to make,” Crowder added. The NDP said the government must do more to address food affordability issues among First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

-------------------------------------------

Brief Presented to the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food (PDF - 216K, 9 pages)
http://goo.gl/eOqn8
By Bruce Campbell
May 7, 2012
This brief, presented to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, analyzes the impact of key measures in the 2012 federal budget on poverty and inequality—and by extension, on food insecurity in Canada.

"Since the crisis hit in 2008, the Conservative government, far from taking measures to reduce poverty and food insecurity, has brought in policies that are making the situation worse. This brief focuses on several key policy changes in the 2012 budget, notably to unemployment insurance; to the Temporary Foreign Workers Program; to the pension system. These changes will increase poverty levels for low income seniors, force unemployed workers into low wage jobs, and increase hardship and insecurity for the most vulnerable members of our society."

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

--------------------------------------------------

Canada first wealthy nation to be probed by UN food monitor
http://www.canada.com/business/Canada+first+wealthy+nation+probed+food+monitor/6554582/story.html
By Sarah Schmidt
May 2, 2012
OTTAWA — Canada has the dubious distinction of being the first wealthy nation in the world to face a probe by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food. The 11-day mission begins Saturday, and will take Olivier De Schutter to Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Winnipeg and Edmonton, as well as remote aboriginal communities in Manitoba and Alberta. Until now, the independent expert appointed by the UN's Human Rights Council has been dispatched to countries such as South Africa, Cuba and Lebanon to probe those nations' records on ensuring people have access to food.
Source:
Canada.com

http://www.canada.com/

--------------------------------------------------

From the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights:
UN Right to Food Mission Coming to Canada May 6--16, 2012

Canada: Hunger amidst plenty? First visit to a developed country by the UN right to food expert
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=12104&LangID=E
News Release
GENEVA (3 May 2012) – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Olivier De Schutter, will conduct an official visit to Canada from 6 to 16 May 2012 in order to gain an understanding of the steps taken by the authorities to implement the right to food. The visit will mark the first visit that the UN expert has undertaken to a developed country.

---

The Right to Adequate Food : Fact Sheet No. 34 (PDF - 544K, 57 pages)
http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/FactSheet34en.pdf
April 2010 (PDF file creation date)
(...) Combating hunger and malnutrition is more than a moral duty or a policy choice; in many countries, it is a legally binding human rights obligation. The right to food is recognized in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights as part of the right to an adequate standard of living, and is enshrined in the 1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Source:
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Pages/WelcomePage.aspx
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. We have a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

--------------------------------------------------

Website of the
Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food

http://www.srfood.org/

--------------------------------------------------

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
http://www.fao.org/righttofood/
The Right to Food Unit supports the implementation of the human right to adequate food, using FAO’s Right to Food Guidelines
[ http://www.fao.org/righttofood/publi_en.htm ].

--------------------------------------------------

From Food Secure Canada:

Common questions regarding the Special Rapporteur's visit:
HTML:

http://foodsecurecanada.org/un-right-food-mission-coming-canada

PDF (308K, 4 pages)
http://foodsecurecanada.org/sites/foodsecurecanada.org/files/FSC_RTF_briefing_note_%281%29.pdf
* What is the right to food?
* Who is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food?
* What will happen during the Special Rapporteur’s country mission to Canada?
* How has Canadian civil society engaged with the mission so far?
* How can you be involved?
* What does this have to do with the People’s Food Policy and Food Secure Canada?
Making the link between Canada’s current failure to respect, protect and fulfill the right to food for all – and the need for the People’s Food Policy – is a powerful message to bring to our elected officials and the media across the country at this key time.

---

Joint civil society submission to the Special Rapporteur (PDF - 480K, 50 pages)
http://foodsecurecanada.org/sites/foodsecurecanada.org/files/RTFCanadaJointCivilSocietySubmission2r.pdf
December 15, 2011
[Read the Intro on p. 3 for context and authorship information]

---

Resetting the Table: A People's Food Policy for Canada
HTML:

http://foodsecurecanada.org/policy/resetting-table-peoples-food-policy-canada
PDF (1.6MB, 36 pages):
http://foodsecurecanada.org/sites/foodsecurecanada.org/files/FSC-resetting2012-8half11-lowres-EN.pdf
First Published April 2011
Contents:

Why Canada Needs a Food Policy
The Wider Context
Changing Courses
Introducing the People’s Food Policy
Food Sovereignty
The People’s Food Policy Platform:
--- Indigenous Food Sovereignty
--- Food Sovereignty in Rural and Remote Communities
--- Access to Food in Urban Communities
--- Agriculture, Infrastructure and Livelihoods
--- A Sustainable Fishery and Reasonable Livelihood for Fishers
--- Environment and Agriculture
--- Science and Technology for Food and Agriculture
--- Food Trade and International Aid
--- Healthy and Safe Food for All
--- Food Democracy and Governance
Conclusion

Source:
Food Secure Canada

http://foodsecurecanada.org/

Rethinking the food bank:
It’s no longer just about handing out food to the hungry

http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1177697
May 12, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
(...) Nick Saul, who 14 years ago transformed a dreary west Toronto food bank into a centre for social change, is leaving The Stop Community Food Centre to spread the model nationally.
As founding president of Community Food Centres Canada, Saul’s goal is to raise $20 million to open 15 affiliate centres across the country by 2017 — and revolutionize the way Canadians view food, health and poverty. (...) “We need a more honest conversation about food banks and how they aren’t a solution to hunger,” he says. “They have become such a part of our culture that we don’t actually stop to question what they are doing."
(...)
Do the Math [ http://dothemath.thestop.org/ ], a campaign championed by The Stop, challenges politicians and community leaders to live on the meagre income of someone receiving social assistance. A similar campaign, Put Food in the Budget [ http://putfoodinthebudget.ca/ ], born out of the province’s poverty reduction initiative, urges Queen’s Park to introduce a healthy food benefit to help those on welfare buy food and pay the rent.
(...)
Food Facts:
• 900,000 Number of Canadians used food banks in 2010
• 50 Percentage of people who need food banks but stay away out of shame
• $6.6 billion Annual estimated cost of unhealthy eating in Canada
• 38 Percentage increase in number of working poor in Canada between 1998 to 2008
• 33 Percentage of greenhouse gas emissions generated by agriculture and our industrial food system
• 22 Number of Canadians diagnosed with diabetes every hour
[Source: Community Food Centres Canada]

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

Related links:

The Stop Community Food Centre
http://www.thestop.org/
The Stop strives to increase access to healthy food in a manner that maintains dignity, builds health and community and challenges inequality. Operating in two locations in Toronto, The Stop strives to meet basic food needs and, at the same time, foster opportunities for community members to build mutual support networks, connect to resources and find their voices on the underlying causes of hunger and poverty.

Community Food Centres Canada
http://cfccanada.ca/
The Stop has proven that food can be the beginning of an ongoing transformation in the health and quality of life of low-income communities. Individuals and organizations from across the country are now calling for The Stop’s community food centre model in their own communities. Momentum generated in a pilot phase starting in early 2011 has led to the creation of Community Food Centres Canada, a new national organization with the mandate to further the community food centre model across the country.

British Columbia

The Problem with Food Banks : Hungry people must be fed.
But critics say framing food as charity takes the root issues off government's plate.
http://thetyee.ca/News/2012/04/25/Problem-With-Food-Banks/
April 25, 2012
By Colleen Kimmett
It's true that Canada signed and ratified the UN Declaration of Human Rights in 1967 -- and other international agreements following -- that guarantee the right to food. But it's not entrenched in our constitution, our domestic law. The right to food is particularly problematic in the Canadian context, because social rights, like welfare for example, are provincial responsibilities."It's the old problem of Canadian federalism," says Graham Riches, professor emeritus at UBC's School of Social Work. "It becomes messy in terms of whose government is really responsible for this." Graham was one of the first academics looking at food banks from a social justice perspective. In 1986 he published Food Banks and the Welfare Crisis, linking the proliferation of food banks throughout the 1980s to the recession of that era, followed by the rise of neo-liberalism and the erosion of the social welfare system.

Source:
The Tyee
http://thetyee.ca/

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food will Visit Canada in May
From May 6 to 16 (2012), Olivier de Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, will be conducting a formal country mission to Canada. He and his team will be looking at issues including: economic accessibility and poverty; Aboriginal peoples and the right to food; organization of food chains; governance, policies and programs; and international development, trade and investment. A coordinating committee, including FSC, is assisting in convening a series of meetings with civil society across the country.

Briefing note:
(Question-and-answer format)
HTML version:
http://foodsecurecanada.org/un-right-food-mission-coming-canada
PDF version (1.5MB, 4 pages)

http://foodsecurecanada.org/sites/foodsecurecanada.org/files/FSC_RTF_briefing_note.pdf

Contents of the briefing note:
What is the right to food?
Who is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food?
What will happen during the Special Rapporteur’s country mission to Canada?
How has Canadian civil society engaged with the mission so far?
How can you be involved?
What does this have to do with the People’s Food Policy and Food Secure Canada?
Making the link between Canada’s current failure to respect, protect and fulfill the right to food for all – and the need for the People’s Food Policy – is a powerful message to bring to our elected officials and the media across the country at this key time.

Sign up to participate in a pan-Canadian call about
how to promote the People's Food Policy to your MP:
http://foodsecurecanada.org/webform/resetting-table-stirring-pot

People's Food Policy Project home page
http://peoplesfoodpolicy.ca/
The People’s Food Policy Project is a pan-Canadian network of citizens and organizations that is creating Canada’s first food sovereignty policy.Thirty years ago, a group of activists created the People’s Food Commission (PFC). The Commission toured the country, holding hearings in 75 communities which explored how food systems affected ordinary Canadians: farmers, fisherpeople, housewives, poor people, trade unionists, academics, artists and others. The People’s Food Policy project starts where the People’s Food Commission left off.

Source:
Food Secure Canada

http://foodsecurecanada.org/
Food Secure Canada is a national voice for the food security movement in Canada. It is a nonprofit organization with individual and organization members across Canada. The organization is based on three interlocking commitments to:
*
Zero Hunger
*
Healthy and Safe Food
*
A Sustainable Food System.

Related links:

Website of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food
http://www.srfood.org/

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
http://www.fao.org/righttofood/
The Right to Food Unit supports the implementation of the human right to adequate food, using FAO’s Right to Food Guidelines
[ http://www.fao.org/righttofood/publi_en.htm ].

Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Pages/WelcomePage.aspx
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. The OHCHR has a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

---

Related link from
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

April 2, 2012
Food availability, 2011

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120402/dq120402c-eng.htm
Data on the food availability per person of selected animal products, including meats, poultry, eggs and fish, and data on the supply and disposition of these products are now available for 2011.
Note to readers: The food availability data series is the result of a partnership between Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Statistics Canada. Food availability data for the remaining commodities will be released on May 28, 2012.

Available without charge in CANSIM.
Data tables are also available from the Key Resource module of our website under Summary tables:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/famil102d-eng.htm

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

Ontario food bank use down slightly in 2011, but on the rise again
http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1148851
March 19, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
A slight dip in food-bank use across the province in 2011 may be short-lived, says the Ontario Association of Food Banks. Although the number of food-bank users in March 2011 was down slightly from March 2010, food banks collecting data this month for next year’s report say demand is up again, the association said. (...) Amid steady increases since the 2008 recession, 395,000 Ontarians were forced to rely on food banks in March last year, according to the association’s latest report released Monday. That is down from a record of 402,000 in March 2010. (...) Single adults remain the largest percentage of users, at 39 per cent, followed closely by children younger than 18. They are among almost one in 33 Ontarians who go hungry each month, the report says. Expected cuts to provincial and federal budgets later this month may make the situation even worse, the association said.

From the
Ontario Association of Food Banks
:

Combating Hunger : A Snapshot of Hunger in Ontario in 2011 (PDF - 976K, 9 pages)
http://oafb.ca/assets/pdfs/OAFB_CombatingHunger2011.pdf
December 2011

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks
http://www.oafb.ca/
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) is a network of 20 regional food banks and over 100 community food banks representing over 1,100 hunger relief programs across the province, from Windsor to Ottawa, and Niagara Falls to Thunder Bay, working towards a hunger-free Ontario.

New from the
Dietitians of Canada:

The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011
http://www.dietitians.ca/Secondary-Pages/Public/The-Cost-of-Eating-in-British-Columbia.aspx
On February 28, 2012, Dietitians of Canada, BC Region released the report The Cost of Eating in BC 2011.Dietitians publish the report to bring attention to the fact that many British Columbians don’t have enough money to buy healthy food.
And, it’s not getting any better.

TIP : Click the link above and scroll down the page for links to earlier editions of this report for 2009, 2007, 2006 and 200.

2011 Cost of Eating in BC Report Released: Nothing is Improving
http://www.dietitians.ca/News-Releases/2012/Cost-of-Eating-report.aspx
News Release
February 28, 2012

The complete report:

The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011 (PDF - 4.7MB, 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/U7CGh
Ensuring that individuals and families are food secure is more than addressing the immediate need to feed our hungry citizens. The solution rests in addressing the underlying factors that cause food insecurity, specifically poverty and the food system.
Recommendations for change outlined in this report:
1. Establish a provincial poverty reduction strategy
2. Build affordable housing
3. Update income assistance to reflect the cost of living
4. Enact a living wage policy
5. Work toward sustainable food systems that no longer require food banks

Source:

Dietitians of Canada:
http://www.dietitians.ca/
Dietitians of Canada (DC) is the national professional association for dietitians, representing almost 6000 members at the local, provincial and national levels. DC is one of the largest organizations of dietetic professionals in the world.

Related links:

Plight of poor in B.C. a shame
http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Plight+poor+shame/6256342/story.html
By Mariann Burka
March 6, 2012
Re: Families' buying power eroding, Feb. 28
I am ashamed to read in the Dieti-tians of Canada report that British Columbians on income assistance, and many low-income wage earners, are unable to meet basic nutritional needs. Although governments of all stripes claim to put children and families first, B.C. has a disgraceful record with the highest child poverty rate in Canada for eight years. While the cost of food has risen substantially, income assistance support allowances for food have not increased since 2001. How can anyone say rates are adequate? Research has shown that poverty has long-term consequences for both individuals and society. Hungry or undernourished children do not learn or develop as well mentally or physically. It is also difficult finding a job when you are skipping meals or worrying about feeding your kids. As tax-payers, we also pay with lower educational achievement, lower economic productivity, higher health care costs and increased crime and policing costs. I applaud the dietitians for their report and recommendations. It is time we joined other provinces in establishing a clear poverty-reduction strategy and, as a first step, let's update our income-assistance rates to reflect the true cost of living.
[ Author Mariann Burka is former director of the BC Employment and Assistance Program (social assistance).]

Source:
Vancouver Sun
http://www.vancouversun.com/

---

The above letter to the editor of the Vancouver Sun
was written in response to the following article:

Families' buying power eroding:
47 per cent of income needed to eat well: report
http://www.vancouversun.com/health/empowered-health/Families+buying+power+eroding/6220382/story.html
By Randy Shore
February 28, 2012
A family of four on income assistance in B.C. would have to spend 47 per cent of its income to buy the minimum amount of food needed to remain healthy, according to a new report by the Dietitians of Canada B.C. region.
Cost of Eating in British Columbia 2011, released today, puts the monthly cost of a basic food basket for a typical family, without any takeout meals or prepackaged foods, at an average of $868.43 across B.C.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

Toronto Regional Hunger Statistics
Posted December 12, 2011

From Toronto's
Daily Bread Food Bank:

Who's Hungry : Fighting Hunger
2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area

Greater Toronto Area Hunger Statistics - Google Map
http://www.dailybread.ca/learning-centre/hunger-statistics/
Scroll down the page to "Regional Statistics" and click on a coloured section of the map for statistics for that region of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).
Stats include demographics (age groups, household composition, education, disability), hunger, income, housing, and transportation barriers.
- includes links to previous editions of the Daily Bread's annual Who's Hungry reports and key hunger statistics for the GTA back to 2005.

http://goo.gl/YcNya <=== This link takes you to a full-screen version of the same Google Map as above, with links to the same stats as above for each of six Toronto's regions.

Related links:

Who's Hungry : Fighting Hunger
2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
(PDF - 1.6MB, 15 pages)
http://www.dailybread.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/WhosHungryReport2011-FINAL.pdf
September 21, 2011
Unlike food, paying the rent every month is non-negotiable. The cost of housing is a key reason people go hungry and have to come to a food bank, regardless of any other circumstances...

Key findings in the 2011 report

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
The Daily Bread Food Bank is a non-profit, charitable organization that is fighting to end hunger in our communities. As Canada’s largest food bank, Daily Bread serves people through neighbourhood food banks and meal programs in approximately 170 member agencies.

More links related to the 2011 Who's Hungry report - this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading

From the Look-what-I-found file:

I was poking my way through some links when I stumbled upon this journal site called Esurio.
Even though the content of the two only issues of the journal date back to 2008 and 2009, I felt it was worth sharing because there's some excellent information in these articles.

Esurio: Journal of Hunger and Poverty
Esurio is a student refereed academic journal published by the Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) with the proud support of Direct Energy.

Esurio publishes articles on issues of hunger and poverty through a youth lens. The journal features articles written and reviewed by graduate and undergraduate students and is published twice annually.

Vol 1, No 2 (2009)
Table of Contents:
Invited Contributions:
* The Future of Food Charity - By Valerie Tarasuk
* The Crisis of Food Security: Building a Public Food System - By Debbie Field
* What is Poverty? - By Susan Eckerle Curwood, Ph.D.
Student Articles:
* Disrupting the "Traditional Student" Discourse: Poverty, Education, and the State - By Jennifer Ajandi
* Immigrant Settlement and the Use of Food Banks - By Chen Che
* To Feed A City - By Zsuzsi Fodor
* Motivations of Volunteers in a Food Bank Program: A Pilot Investigation - By Vivien E. Runnels
* The Influence of New Public Management on Three Ontario Municipal Governments and its Impact on Poverty Reduction and Social Service Programming - By Zac Spicer
* Canadian Women and Children Hit Hard by the Impacts of Food Insecurity - By Leisha Zamecnik

----------------------

Vol 1, No 1 (2009)
Introductory Issue

Table of Contents:
Welcome from Premier Dalton McGuinty [PDF] and Deb Matthews, Chair of Ontario's Cabinet Committee on Poverty Reduction
Student Articles:
* Struggles, strengths and solutions: Exploring food security with young Aboriginal moms - By Cyndy Ann Baskin et al.
* Energy Poverty as Ideological Poverty in Canada - By Kristen Meredith Forbes Cairney
* Housing as a Human Right: Understanding the Need to Align Toronto's Legal Planning Framework with City Council's Vision to End Homelessness & the Affordable Housing Crisis - By Caroline Cormier
* The Orphaned Child: Homelessness as Social Policy in Ontario - By Greg Mann
* Causes and Consequences of an Unsustainable Food System - By Chryslyn Pais
* Community Responsibility For Social Welfare: A Beneficial or Negative Shift for Communities? - By Meaghan Ross
* Food reclamation as an approach to hunger and waste: A conceptual analysis of the charitable food sector in Toronto, Ontario - By Helen Thang
* Canadian Women and Children Hit Hard by the Impacts of Food Insecurity (Part One) - By Leisha Zamecnik
Invited Contributions:
* Welcome Message & Notes from Richard Florida - By Vass Bednar
* Energy Poverty is Poverty - By Deryk King
* Welcome Message - Judith Maxwell
* Why Food Banks? - By Geoffrey Lougheed
* A Response To: Why Food Banks? - By Robert White and Karyn Cooper
* Welcome Message - Toronto Food Policy Council - By Wayne Roberts
* A Vision for Esurio: Change the World with Words - By Adam Spence

From John Stapleton:

Less on their plates:
Canada's poorest people are facing a frightful food crisis

September 2011
The Welfare Diet of 1995, introduced by then Minister of Social Services Dave Tsubouchi, is a useful tool to measure the changes of the cost of food since 1995. It is not a good diet in its own right. The Toronto Star noted, “Back in 1995, the opposition Liberals scorned the Mike Harris government’s ‘welfare diet,’ which purported to show that a single person on social assistance could eat for $90 a month… That meagre Tory shopping list included pasta but no sauce, and bread but no butter…” The cost of the welfare diet has gone up by 63% since 1995, at the same time as CPI inflation has risen 35%, but the Ontario Works (welfare) single rate has gone up by just 13.7%.
Source:
CCPA Monitor (September 2011 issue)
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) ]

NOTE : If you wish to obtain the original welfare diet and Excel spreadsheet,
please contact John Stapleton at jsbb@rogers.com

Source:
New Writings from John Stapleton
[ OpenPolicyOntario - John Stapleton's website

--- Check out John's Publications - Media Commentaries - Presentations ]

From Food Banks Canada:

Hunger Count 2011 (PDF - 4.2MB, 36 pages)
A comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada, and recommendations for change

Selected HungerCount Information 1999-2011 (Microsoft Excel 2007 file - 626K)

Chart : Food bank use in Canada (March 2011)
Food Banks Canada has released data detailing how many Canadians used food banks across the country in March 2011. Hover over the chart to read how many people used food banks in each province that month, and what percentage of those people were children.

Provincial HungerCount 2011 Reports
Click this link to access all HungerCount reports for 2011 as well as reports for 2008 to 2010.
NOTE: HungerCount 2011 reports are available for the following provinces only:
* British Columbia * Alberta * Saskatchewan * Manitoba * Ontario * Nova Scotia

Source:
Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada is the national charitable organization representing and supporting the food bank community across Canada. Our Members and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing food banks and food programs nationwide. Our mission is to help food banks meet the short-term need for food, and to find long-term solutions to hunger.

---

Media coverage:

Food bank use stays high
November 1, 2011
Food bank use across Canada remained more than 25 per cent above pre-recession levels in March, the group representing food banks said Tuesday. Food Banks Canada said an annual survey of its members showed a slight decrease in the number of food recipients from the same month a year earlier — two per cent to 851,014 — but little change over all. The steady numbers show the effects of recession are still being felt across Canada, and the organization says that means economic recovery isn't working for everyone.
Source:
CBC News

---

Stretched food banks a measure of Canada’s frail recovery
By Tavia Grant
November 1, 2011
The number of Canadians using food banks has declined slightly, but persistent demand indicates many are struggling in a frail economic recovery. More than 851,000 individuals visited a food bank in March alone, a number that’s little changed from last year’s record and still 26 per cent above prerecession levels, Food Banks Canada’s annual survey, to be released Tuesday, shows.

[ 397 comments ]

Related Globe and Mail articles:

* Feed a student, feed the future
* Food bank use drops, but still higher than before recession
* It's time to close Canada's food banks

Source:
Globe and Mail

Ontario

Daily Bread food report says rents trump hunger
Study suggest 72% of clients' monthly income spent on housing

September 22, 2011
The majority of people relying on Toronto's Daily Bread Food Bank to feed themselves and their families are facing such high rental rates that they often have little money left over for food. So says a new report from the non-profit charitable organization, which has urged the provincial government to help fight hunger in the Greater Toronto Area. The Daily Bread Food Bank has released a report that says over 70 per cent of its clients can't afford food because their income is going towards housing.
Source:
CBC News

The Daily Bread Food Bank report:

Who's Hungry : Fighting Hunger
2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
(PDF - 1.6MB, 15 pages)
September 21, 2011
Unlike food, paying the rent every month is non-negotiable. The cost of housing is a key reason people go hungry and have to come to a food bank, regardless of any other circumstances...

Key findings in the 2011 report

Toronto Hunger Statistics, 2005 to 2011

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
The Daily Bread Food Bank is a non-profit, charitable organization that is fighting to end hunger in our communities. As Canada’s largest food bank, Daily Bread serves people through neighbourhood food banks and meal programs in approximately 170 member agencies.

Related link:

From the
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)

OAFB's 2011 Election Ontario Priorities
The 2011 Ontario Provincial Election takes place on October 6th, 2011!
We need the Ontario government to address the root causes of hunger, and implement long-term sustainable solutions that will end hunger in our province and make food banks unnecessary!
Our top three issues and recommendations
to this year's provincial party candidates
:
We respectfully request your party to take action on the following three issues to help make fighting hunger in Ontario a priority:
Issue #1 – Food Bank Donation Tax Credit for Farmers
Issue #2 – Housing Benefit for Low-Income Tenants
Issue #3 – Access to Affordable, Nutritious Food

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) is a network of over 100 food banks from Windsor to Ottawa, and Thunder Bay to Niagara Falls. Since 1992, we have been committed to reducing hunger across the province

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

Ontario

Closing food banks dumb idea
By Glen Pearson
July 30, 2011
The food bank world was suddenly hit with a broadside this week with the Elaine Power's Toronto Globe and Mail article headlined "It's time to close Canada's food banks." Nothing comes closer to irrelevance than her opening statement that food banks represent a serious obstacle in the fight against poverty in Canada. As the London Food Bank's co-director for the last 25 years, and a past chair of the Ontario Association of Food Banks, I have never encountered one food bank director who believed they were ending hunger or that they were the ultimate solution.
Source:
London Free Press

Ontarians need a housing benefit (PDF - 156K, 1 page)
June 15, 2011
Media release
TORONTO – Despite an improving economy, people visiting food banks in the Greater Toronto Area are still struggling. The Hunger Snapshot report, released today, shows that food bank clients spend 72 per cent of their income on housing costs. When families are struggling to make ends meet and have to make a choice between paying the rent and putting food on the table, it is usually food that is sacrificed.

Housing Benefit --- find out more about the proposed Ontario Housing Benefit and how you can help make it a reality.

Hunger Snapshot:
Fighting Hunger
(PDF - 1.3MB, 6 pages)
2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
June 15, 2011
This snapshot here is just that – some statistical highlights from the 2011 survey to provide you with a brief picture of poverty and hunger in the GTA. This year, we will be releasing the full report on the results of the survey on September 21, 2011 at the launch of Daily Bread’s Fall Drive.
[ Publications - links to earlier Toronto hunger reports back to 2005 ]

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
(Toronto)

Bad policy creates the poverty trap
By Judith Maxwell
March 22, 2011
Feeding the hungry. It’s a global problem. It’s also a local problem and a sign of costly malfunctions in housing and labour markets.
In 2010, food banks in Ontario provided emergency food for 3.1 per cent of the population, up from an average of 2.4 per cent from 2000 to 2007, according to Running on Empty: A Decade of Hunger in Ontario published Tuesday by the Ontario Association of Food Banks. In the midst of so much plenty, there is hunger. Why?
[ 38 comments ]

Source:
Globe and Mail

--------

The report:

Running on Empty: A Decade of Hunger in Ontario (PDF - 450K, 16 pages)
March 2011
Author : Judith Maxwell

Excerpt:

Key Facts
• 402,000 Ontarians a month were forced to turn to food banks in 2010, up sharply from 374,000 in 2009
• Since the recession hit in 2008, food bank use in Ontario has grown by 28 percent, an unprecedented increase
• In 2010, 3.1 percent of the Ontario population accessed food banks, making the province of Ontario the third most intensive user of food bank services, after
Newfoundland and Labrador and Manitoba
• In an effort to balance fixed incomes with rising costs of living, more Ontario seniors are turning to food banks to make it through the month – 12 percent of
the adults served were over 65 in 2010, up from 4 percent in 2009.
Seniors also make great use of meal programs offered by food banks

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) is a network of 20 regional food banks and over 100 community food banks across the province from Windsor to Ottawa and Niagara Falls to Thunder Bay working towards a hunger-free Ontario. It is our mission to provide food, funding, and solutions to reduce hunger in the province.

Hunger on the rise in Canada, report warns
March 3, 2011
By Isabel Teotonio
The number of malnourished and chronically hungry people in Canada is “growing at an alarming rate,” according to a report to be released Thursday. And people should be able to buy their own food rather than rely on charity, the report says.“Immediate changes are needed in provincial and federal income security programs in order to ensure that all people have the resources required to buy nutritious food,” according to the Recession Relief Coalition’s report. Titled Hunger Crisis, it follows a public inquiry the coalition organized in late November 2010. A panel of experts heard evidence from social service providers, researchers studying the issue and people who have experienced hunger.

Complete report:

Hunger Crisis:
Report of the Hunger Inquiry
(PDF - 1MB, 21 pages)
March 2011
The Recession Relief Coalition (RRC) held an all day Hunger Inquiry in downtown Toronto on November 23, 2010. The RRC now presents Hunger
Crisis: Report of the Hunger Inquiry (2011). This report contains shocking testimony about hunger in Ontario as well as recommendations to help resolve this preventable crisis.
Source:
Recession Relief Coalition
The Recession Relief Coalition is a Toronto-based group of organizations and individuals concerned about the impact of the recession on Canada’s most vulnerable and marginalized residents

New from the
Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity:

The poor still pay more:
Challenges low income families face in consuming a nutritious diet

Press Release
December 21, 2010
The Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity, in collaboration with Open Policy Ontario’s John Stapleton and research consultant from Toronto Public Health, Brian Cook, releases its report recommending initiatives to help low income families overcome challenges in consuming a nutritious diet.

The report:

The poor still pay more: Challenges
low income families face in consuming a nutritious diet
(PDF - 941K, 20 pages)
December 2010
Report recommendations:
* A new housing benefit geared to income and rental costs to free up constrained finances to purchase food
* Improved incentives for retailers and community groups to increase accessibility by low income communities to lower priced and healthier food options, particularly in urban “food deserts”
* The eventual elimination of the price influence of dairy marketing boards

Related links:

* Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity
The Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity is an independent, not-for-profit organization that deepens public understanding of macro and microeconomic factors behind Ontario’s economic progress. We are funded by the Government of Ontario and are mandated to share our research findings directly with the public.
The Institute serves as the research arm of the Task Force on Competitiveness, Productivity and Economic Progress.

* Toronto Public Health

* Open Policy - personal website of John Stapleton, co-author of The Poor Still Pay More
--- Check out John's Publications - Media Commentaries - Presentations

---

CTV News coverage:

Poor are hit hardest by rising food prices: study
December 21, 2010
Although social assistance in Canada has more or less kept pace with inflation in recent years, it has not kept up with the speed at which food prices have increased, making it more and more expensive for poor Canadians to eat healthy.A study from the Toronto-based Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity released a report Tuesday looking at some of the major issues low-income Canadians face when grocery shopping.
[ Comments (75) ]
Source:
CTV News

New from
Food Banks Canada:

Food Banks Canada’s HungerCount study reports highest level of food bank use on record
HungerCount 2010 provides unique, essential information on levels of food bank use in Canada, profiles people in need of food assistance

November 16, 2010
Ottawa – The results of the HungerCount 2010 survey released today show food banks across Canada helped 867,948 separate individuals in March 2010, an increase of 9.2%, or more than 73,000 people, compared to March 2009. This is 28% higher than in 2008, and is the highest level of food bank use since 1997.

Complete report:

HungerCount 2010 (PDF - 2MB, 48 pages)
A comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in
Canada, and recommendations for change

In March 2010, 867,948 people were assisted by food banks in Canada. This is a 9% increase over 2009 – and the highest level of food bank use on record.

HungerCount 2010 - Figures 1-8 (Excel files)

Source:
HungerCount 2010
Initiated in 1989, HungerCount is the only national survey of emergency food programs in Canada. The information the survey provides is invaluable, forming the basis of many Food Banks Canada activities throughout the year. Among many benefits, HungerCount allows Food Banks Canada to operate the National Food Sharing System on a "fair share" basis, present accurate, timely information to government, donors and media, and represent members' key concerns at a variety of public forums.
- includes links to info from earlier editions of this report back to 1999, along with general survey information and the survey guide .

Source:
Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada is the national charitable organization representing and supporting the
food bank community across Canada. Our members and their respective agencies serve
approximately 85% of people accessing emergency food programs nationwide.

The cost of eating:
Saskatchewan and Alberta

The Cost of Eating in Alberta in 2008 (PDF - 1.8MB, 28 pages)
February 2009 (PDF file date)
The Alberta Community / Public Health Nutritionists Food Security Subcommittee has done a remarkable job in producing a document that shows you exactly why low -income individuals and families in Alberta cannot meet the requirements of Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide.
Source:
Growing Food Security in Alberta
Our Vision : All children and families in Alberta have healthy food.
Our Mission : Engaging Albertans – groups, organizations, business, governments and individuals - in strategies to ensure secure access to adequate amounts of safe, nutritious, culturally appropriate food for everyone, produced in an environmentally sustainable way and provided in a manner that promotes human dignity.

---------------

The Cost of Healthy Eating in Saskatchewan 2009:
Impact on Food Security
(PDF - 1.3MB, 24 pages)
April 2010
Written by the Public Health Nutritionists of Saskatchewan Working Group with the support of
Saskatchewan Regional Health Authorities
Source:
Food Secure Saskatchewan
Food Secure Saskatchewan is a coalition of individuals and groups working toward, or interested in, achieving food security for all Saskatchewan citizens by way of a healthy and sustainable food system. This coalition includes community-based organizations, nutritionists, health professionals, hunger groups, First Nations residents, government departments, community leaders, farmers, producers, and others.

Related links:

Dietitians of Canada (DC)
DC is the professional organization representing over 5500 dietitians in Canada including approximately 650 dietitians in Alberta and the Territories. Dietitians of Canada speaks out on food and nutrition issues important to the health and well-being of Canadians.

People's Food Policy Project - "Creating food policy from the ground up"
The People’s Food Policy Project is a pan-Canadian network of citizens and organizations that is creating Canada’s first food sovereignty policy.

From
The Salvation Army:

Salvation Army Reports High Demand for Food Service
October 5, 2010
Toronto, ON – For many Canadians, the recession is not over. A mid-year, national survey of more than 140 Salvation Army food service workers from across the country indicates that demand for food programs, including food banks, , meal programs and street ministry units, are on the rise. More than three-quarters of all respondents indicated that requests for food service increased this year. At the same time, food donations in most areas either remained the same or decreased in 2010. (...) The second annual report, “Restocking the Shelves 2010,” surveyed 143 Salvation Army officers, employees, staff members and administrators across Canada with firsthand experience in The Salvation Army’s food service programs between July 15th and August 15th 2010. The survey helps to gauge current food stock levels at Salvation Army feeding centres nationwide.

The complete report:

Restocking the Shelves 2010 - 8 pages

[ NOTE : This report is also available here
in case you have difficulty with the above version.]

Source:
The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army is an international Christian organization that began its work in Canada in 1882 and has grown to become the largest non-governmental direct provider of social services in the country. The Salvation Army gives hope and support to vulnerable people today and everyday in 400 communities across Canada and 117 countries around the world.

Ontario

Fall Drive launches with release of
new report on hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
(PDF - 24K, 1 page)
Media Release
September 23, 2010
TORONTO — Daily Bread Food Bank launched its annual Fall Drive today with a new report on hunger in the GTA showing the largest increase in food bank use in fifteen years. With food bank use at an all time high, the need to give is stronger than ever. While donors and supporters dug deep last year, donations have also flat lined, meaning Daily Bread Food Bank is trying to do more with less. (...) The report, Who's Hungry: 2010 Profile of Hunger in the GTA, shows an overall increase of 15 per cent in client visits. For Daily Bread’s member agencies, there were an extra 123,000 visits last year. The average person coming to a food bank spends 68 per cent of their income on rent and utilities. With an average monthly income of $1000, that leaves just over $300 for everything else: school supplies for the kids, clothes for winter, medications and food. The research shows most people are going into debt to make up the shortfall: 59 per cent have borrowed from family or friends and 28 per cent have used credit cards recently in order to pay the bills. The issue with hunger isn’t about food security, it’s about income security. There is enough food for everyone, but people on low incomes do not have enough money to purchase the food that is available.

The report:

Who's Hungry: 2010 Profile of Hunger in the GTA (PDF - 7.4MB, 32 pages)
This past year, food banks experienced the largest increase in client visits since social assistance rates were cut by 21.6 per cent in 1995. The percentage of children 18 years of age and under requiring food banks remains the same, while the percentage of people 45 years of age or older using food banks is getting larger.

Key Findings (60K, 1 page)

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank is a non-profit, charitable organization that is fighting to end hunger in our communities. As Canada’s largest food bank, Daily Bread serves people through neighbourhood food banks and meal programs in over 170 member agencies across Toronto.

New from Statistics Canada:

Food Statistics 2009
May 2010
HTML version
PDF version
(314K, 44 pages)

Table of contents:
1. Highlights
2. Analysis
3. Tables
4. Data quality, concepts and methodology
5. Appendices
6. User information
7. Related products
[ earlier editions of this report - back to 2003]
[ Food Statistics Main Page ]
On a per capita basis, the Canadian diet in 2009 included more fresh fruit and vegetables, cereals, coffee and fish compared with 2008.
(No mention of food insecurity, in case you're wondering...)

The OSAP diet and the student lifestyle
Just how well should students expect to live while in school?
By Jeff Rybak
March 8, 2010
Okay, I’ll be the one to say it. I have no problem at all with the “OSAP Diet” as exposed by the Toronto Star. Apparently students funding their studies entirely on government loans are expected to survive on $7.50/day for food. And my reaction, mainly, is a big “so what?”
(...)
Source:
Macleans OnCampus

Related link:

$7.50 a day is all you get on the student OSAP diet
By Louise Brown
March 7, 2009
Source:
Toronto Star
NOTE: Don't forget to click the "Comments" link at the top of the article to access 100+ reactions.
The most pathetic comments are the well-intentioned food shopping suggestions from frugal shoppers (Tsubouchi Tuna, anyone?).
The commenter who said "My family of 5 lives on about $4 per day for food" should be summarily dispatched to the Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) to help them re-draft their food cost reports. Case studies in a 2008 OAFB study (see the link below) show that the cost of healthy food purchased from the grocery store was almost $40 per week for a single person and, for a family of two adults and a 7-year-old child, $85 weekly. Maybe the commenter's "family of five" consisted of one adult and four cats. Curiously, though, the $40/wk. amount for a healthy diet for a single person would actually leave $12.50 in the OSAP student's pocket at the end of each week.

Related link:

A Gathering Storm: The Price of Food, Gasoline, and Energy,
and Changing Economic Conditions in Ontario, 2008
(PDF - 1.2MB, 24 pages)

We can end hunger. Think about it.
Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks

Low-income families in BC can’t afford healthy food
December 15, 2009
Vancouver, British Columbia – Imagine being $127 ‘in debt’ after your monthly rent is paid and you’ve bought groceries for you and your family, leaving no money for other necessities such as clothing, transportation and school supplies. According to the latest The Cost of Eating in BC report, this is the situation for a family of four living on income assistance in this province.

The Cost of Eating in BC 2009 by the Dietitians of Canada and the Community Nutritionists Council of BC demonstrates that it is impossible for families or individuals on income assistance or earning a low wage to afford enough healthy food. While shelter and food costs have risen significantly over the past decade, income assistance rates have remained virtually unchanged and minimum wage, once the highest in the country, has remained at $8.00/hour.

Complete report:

The Cost of Eating in BC 2009 (PDF - 4.6MB, 12 pages)
December 2009
Why do dietitians publish The Cost of Eating in BC report?
The purpose of the report is to bring attention to the fact that not all residents of British Columbia have enough money to purchase healthy food.
The facts in BC:
• The 2009 monthly cost of the nutritious food basket for a family of four is $872
• A family of four on income assistance would need more than 100% of their income for shelter and food only

Source:
Dietitians of Canada (includes links to a one-page media backgrounder and to earlier reports in this series (2001-2007)
[The Community Nutritionists Council of BC doesn't appear to have a website]

Related link:

‘It makes a huge difference’ [expired link]
By Kelly McManus
December 17, 2009
(...) With a monthly disposable income of $1,773, a family of four living on income assistance spends 49 per cent of its monthly income on food and 58 per cent of that cash on shelter. That leaves them $127 in the red, the [Cost of Eating] report says. The report also found that for those on low incomes, high costs for housing leave little money left over for food each month. In more remote communities, food can be more expensive and healthy choices can be limited.
Source:
North Shore Outlook - "Bringing BC’s Communities together"

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

What's new from the Daily Bread Food Bank and the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Developing a Deprivation Index: The Research Process (PDF - 548K, 27 pages)
December 2, 2009
This paper tells the story of the development of the Ontario Deprivation Index by the Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy. A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

A three-stage community-based research process was used to develop the measure, engaging those with lived experience of poverty. Statistics Canada has now refined this list and incorporated it as a supplement to their Labour Force Survey, under the sponsorship of the Government of Ontario. The result of the process was the creation of the Ontario Deprivation Index, which constitutes one part of the multi-indicator “Child and Youth Opportunity Wheel” in the Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy. This is the first poverty measure to be developed through a unique partnership of a community organization, a policy think tank, government and Statistics Canada. It is also the first time a deprivation index has been developed in North America . The deprivation index is an innovative way of measuring poverty, different than all the other measures now used in Canada .

Testing the Validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index (PDF - 122K, 13 pages)
December 2, 2009
Using an empirical methodology based on a series of surveys and focus groups, Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy have developed a deprivation index for Ontario . A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

This paper is a preliminary test of the validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index using the results of a Statistics Canada survey of 10,000 Ontario households. We look at the performance of the index against 6 variables: income, education, employment status, immigration, family type and housing tenure. A similar method for testing the validity of the new Irish deprivation index was also used, although in this paper we are presenting only the most basic tests. Based on this early analysis, the Ontario Deprivation Index fully meets the tests of validity in relation to these variables.

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
and
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
[NOTE: You'll also find links to both reports on the Caledon Institute website.]

Related links:

New measure for the pain of poverty
December 3, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten and Tanya Talaga
One in eight Ontario children live in families that can't afford fresh fruits and vegetables every day, or can't afford to replace a broken appliance or share the occasional meal with friends or family.
These are a few of the 10 indicators listed in a new provincial poverty measure called the Ontario Deprivation Index, introduced Wednesday by Children's Minister Laurel Broten as part of the government's first annual report on the province's poverty reduction plan. The 10 "deprivation indicators" are not intended to be a comprehensive list. Instead, they are a sample of items and activities common to most Ontarians but out of reach for poor households, the report says.
Source:
Parent Central
[ Toronto Star ]

Where are you on the Deprivation Index?
By Laurie Monsebraaten
December 2, 2009
One in eight Ontario children is living in poverty, according to a new provincial measure released Wednesday that looks at whether families can afford items on a list of basic necessities. Families not able to afford two or more items from a list of 10 indicators on the Ontario Deprivation Index are considered as "having a poverty level standard of living," the McGuinty government says in its first annual report on Ontario's poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

National Post editorial board: A new way to overstate poverty
December 4, 2009
(...) The McGuinty government has chosen to use a measure of relative poverty known as a “deprivation index,” popular in England, Scotland, New Zealand and elsewhere. Any Ontarian unable to eat fresh fruit and vegetables daily, or meat, fish or “a vegetarian equivalent” every second day is considered poor. (...) We have long argued that Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut Off (LICO) — a commonly cited measurement of poverty in Canada — was a useless, relativist index. But we think Ontario’s deprivation index is even worse. No doubt, however, the bureaucrats like it just fine — for it justifies the case for more government intervention in the economy.
Source:
National Post

HUNGER COUNT 2009:
A comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada,
and recommendations for change
(PDF - 2MB, 44 pages)
November 17, 2009
In the month of March 2009, 794,738 people were assisted by a food bank in Canada.
This is an 18% increase compared to the same period in 2008 – the largest year-over-year increase on record.

[ previous Hunger Count reports - annual, back to 1997 ]

Source:
Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada is the national charitable organization representing the food bank community across Canada. Our Members, Affiliate Member food banks, and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing emergency food programs nationwide. We continue to work to find short term and long term solutions for the over 700,000 hungry Canadians who are assisted by a food bank every month.

Related links:

Recession's toll seen in record food bank spike
2009 survey finds largest-ever increase in food bank use
November 17, 2009
By Richard J Brennan
OTTAWA – Canadians devastated by the recession are turning to food banks in record numbers. Results of the HungerCounts 2009 survey, released Tuesday, show that food banks across the country helped almost 800,000 individuals in March, representing an increase of 120,000 or 20 per cent more than March 2008. "This is the largest increase in food bank use on record," Katherine Schmidt, executive director of Food Banks Canada, told reporters. The need for food banks increased in every region with the biggest jump in Alberta, which experienced an increase of 61 per cent.
Source:
Toronto Star

A Comparison of Household Food Security in Canada and the United States
By Mark Nord and Heather Hopwood
December 2008
Food security—consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life—is essential for health and good nutrition. The extent to which a nation’s population achieves food security is an indication of its material and social well-being. Differences in the prevalence of household-level food insecurity between Canada and the United States are described at the national level and for selected economic and demographic subpopulations. Associations of food security with economic and demographic characteristics are examined in multivariate analyses that hold other characteristics constant. Comparable measures of household food security were calculated from the nationally representative Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.2 (2004) and the U.S. Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement (2003-05). Based on the standard U.S. methodology, the percentage of the population living in households classified as food insecure was lower in Canada (7.0 percent) than in the United States (12.6 percent). The difference was greater for the percentage of children living in food-insecure households (8.3 percent vs. 17.9 percent) than for adults (6.6 percent vs. 10.8 percent). These differences primarily reflected different prevalence rates of food insecurity for Canadian and U.S. households with similar demographic and economic characteristics. Differences in population composition on measured economic and demographic characteristics account for only about 15 to 30 percent of the overall Canada-U.S. difference.

Report summary (HTML)

Complete report (PDF - 917K, 50 pages)
December 2008

Source:
U.S. Dept of Agriculture (USDA)
[ See the international links section of this page for a more recent US study of food security ]

Ontario:

In the Midst of the Storm:
The Impact of the Economic Downturn for Ontario's Food Banks
(PDF - 2.9MB, 16 pages)
October 2009
(...) There can be no doubt that Ontario’s food banks are struggling to respond to the collateral damage caused by the global economic downturn. The challenge of hunger was already staggering before we were hit by the Great Recession: hundreds of thousands of our neighbours were turning to food banks. We are now faced with an even greater challenge: tens of thousands more Ontarians are turning to us for support, and many food banks are faced with a decline in donations.

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)
OAFB is a network of food banks in 100 communities across Ontario.

More OAFB reports:

OAFB Research Studies
OAFB releases a number of key research studies throughout the year, including their annual Ontario Hunger Report.

OAFB Government Submissions
OAFB provides the provincial government with thoughtful research and policy solutions on a regular basis related to issues important to food banks and those they serve across the province.

Put Food in the Budget
March 3, 2009
By Brian Eng
Fighting poverty is the best medicine money can buy according to the Association of Local Public Health Agencies (alPHa). They partnering with the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction in an Ontario-wide campaign to urge the Ontario government to add a Healthy Food Supplement to the Basic Needs Allowance for all adult recipients of social assistance, as part of its Spring 2009 budget. (...) alPHa’s 36 member public health units have endorsed two separate resolutions since 2001 urging the Ontario Government to set social assistance rates according to the true costs of basic needs. The Put Food in the Budget campaign calls for the addition of a $100.00 Healthy Food Supplement to the Basic Needs Allowance as a down-payment on closing the gap between social assistance incomes and the cost of healthy eating. The campaign was launched on February 19 in Toronto by Toronto Medical Officer of Health Dr. David McKeown, with representatives from the Stop Community Food Centre and the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction.
Comment found in:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]

Source:
Association of Local Public Health Agencies
We are a non-profit organization that provides leadership to boards of health and public health units in Ontario. Our members include board of health members of health units, medical and associate medical officers of health, and senior public health managers.

Related links:

* Put Food in the Budget campaign
* The Stop Community Food Centre
* 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction

Daily Bread Food Bank
Fighting Hunger : Who’s Hungry
2009 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area

June 18

Report illustrates food bank use spike to over 1 million visits
Food bank clients going into debt and selling assets to pay for food and rent

June 18, 2009
TORONTO - Government programs are failing to support people ravaged by the recession, according to Daily Bread Food Bank's latest Who's Hungry: Profile of Hunger in the GTA. Client visits to GTA food banks over the past year exceeded 1 million for the first time ever. Total client visits were 1,030,568, a rise of 8% over last year. More disturbingly, the increase in client visits in the first three months of 2009 averaged 17%. The spike in food bank use is directly related to the current recession. Over half of new clients surveyed accessed a food bank for economic reasons due to job loss (35%), reduced hours at work (6%), or had no current source of income and were living on savings (11%).
Source:
Canada Newswire

Complete report:
Fighting Hunger : Who’s Hungry
2009 Profile of Hunger in the GTA
(PDF - 798K, 28 pages)
June 2009

Key findings (PDF - 51K, 1 page)
[there's more info on each finding below in the PDF file.]
* Food bank use in the GTA has rapidly increased in the past year due to the recession.
* The largest portion of new clients is people who have lost their jobs or have had their hours cut. A substantial number are not accessing welfare because of their savings.
* The majority of people using food banks do so for a relatively short period of time.
*
Over one third of food bank clients are children. However, single adults remain the largest household type using a food bank.
* The majority of respondents are Canadian citizens, and many are immigrants who have been in Canada for 10 years or more.
* A significant percentage of respondents are highly educated, and include newcomers who cannot get work in their field.
* The cost of housing is the largest expense for most people.
* Hunger in the GTA is the result of lack of money, not lack of food.
* Being employed is not always a ticket out of poverty.
* People living in poverty have a high level of vulnerability to costly forms of debt in order to pay for their basic needs

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank (Toronto)

Ontario

New from the Ontario Association of Food Banks:

Recession budget needs to fight poverty : report
Press Release
March 12, 2009
Toronto - Recession could push Ontario’s poverty rate up by four per cent in 2010 if the provincial government does not make key investments in this month’s stimulus budget, says a report released by the Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB). Fighting Poverty: The Best Way to Beat the Recession proves that the provincial government must make strategic investments in social infrastructure, such as affordable housing and income supports, for the poorest Ontarians in order to stimulate the economy and contain poverty rates.

Complete report:

Fighting Poverty: The Best Way to Beat the Recession (PDF - 587K, 20 pages)
March 2009

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)

Other recent releases from the OAFB:

Ontario Hunger Report 2008: The Leading Edge of the Storm (PDF - 2MB, 24 pages)
December 2008

The Cost of Poverty: An Analysis of
the Economic Cost of Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 1.3MB, 36 pages)
November 2008

Related link:

'Paycheque to paycheque,' five kids to feed
500,000 in Ontario facing poverty without budget help, report finds

March 12, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Toronto construction worker Mark Merner has been struggling to support his young family since his hours were slashed in half last fall. And he's worried it could get worse. "The construction industry is really slowing down and I've been told there might not be much work this summer," says the father of five children age 5 and younger, including a baby and a set of twins. The Merners are among about 500,000 Ontarians who will be driven into poverty by the recession unless this month's provincial budget boosts incomes and expands programs that support low-income families, says a report by the Ontario Association of Food Banks.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Food Insecurity in Canada and the United States:
An International Comparison
(PDF file - 315K, 33 pages)
May 2007
"(...) The higher overall prevalence of food insecurity in the U.S. reflects primarily higher prevalence rates in the lower-middle, middle, and upper-middle income adequacy categories—corresponding to incomes ranging from the U.S. poverty line to about three times the U.S. poverty line. (...) Food insecurity is more strongly associated with lower educational attainment in the U.S. than in Canada. In particular, among households lacking an adult with at least secondary (i.e., high school) graduation, food insecurity is about twice as prevalent in the U.S. as in Canada."
Source:
New York City Coalition Against Hunger (NYCCAH)
See also:
- Top 10 myths about Food Stamps
- 1.3 million New Yorkers (one in six) live in food insecure households. 417,000 of them are children.

Understanding the Link Between Welfare Policy and the Use of Food Banks (PDF - 401K, 34 pages)
April 2009
By Michael Goldberg and David A. Green
This report examines who uses food banks in Canada and how food bank use relates to changes in government welfare policy. Data collected by Food Banks Canada show that food bank use increased dramatically from just over 700,000 Canadians using food banks during March 1998 to over 840,000 in March 2004. This increase occurred in spite of increases in employment rates and average wages and decreases in the number of welfare recipients over this period. Since then, the numbers using food banks have declined to levels near those in the late 1990s but this indicates that the prolonged economic boom simply by-passed a substantial number of the least well-off in our society. Now that the boom appears to be over, the number of persons using the food banks will almost certainly swell. The report makes several recommendations to help ensure that all residents have a right to adequate and appropriate food.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Related link:

Welfare cuts drive up food bank use, study confirms
April 30, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Canada's booming economy helped reduce food bank use before the recession, but it didn't erase the surge that followed provincial welfare cuts of the 1990s, says a study to be released today. And unless federal and provincial governments repair the country's tattered social safety net, more Canadians will be forced to rely on food banks as the economic crisis deepens, the study warns.The study, by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, is the first national analysis of how welfare policy affects food bank use.
Source:
Toronto Star

More working families using food banks: study
November 25, 2008
More working families are availing themselves of food banks than ever before as Canada's economy continues to slump, according to an annual survey of the country's emergency food programs. Food Banks Canada's Hunger Count 2008 survey, released on Tuesday, found more than 14 per cent of all food-bank users have income from employment, an increase from 11 per cent in 2002.
Source:
CBC News

Complete report:

Hunger Count 2008:
A Comprehensive Report on
Hunger and Food Bank Use in Canada
(PDF - 1.4MB, 40 pages)
November 2008
Food bank use has persistently remained above 700,000 people per month since 1997, throughout some of the most economically prosperous years this country has ever seen. With economic uncertainty ahead, there is concern that this number could climb higher still. If we are to figure out how to significantly reduce hunger in Canada, we need to understand who is turning to food banks for help, and why. That is the purpose of HungerCount.
- incl. Provincial perspectives on hunger, a 1-2 page overview of food security in each province prepared by someone doing front-line work in the area of hunger and food security

More about Hunger Count - background notes and links to earlier versions of this report back to 1997

Source:
Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada (formerly the Canadian Association of Food Banks) is a national charitable organization representing the food bank community across Canada. Our members and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing emergency food programs nationwide. Our mission is to meet the short-term need for food and find long-term solutions to reduce hunger.

Nova Scotia

Healthy food costs too steep: report
April 16, 2009
A Halifax university reports low-income families are struggling to put nutritious food on the table. The latest food costing report from Mount St. Vincent University researchers puts the cost of a basic nutritious food basket for a four-person family at just over $670 a month.
Dr. Patty Williams, the Canada Research Chair in food securities and policy change says that's an 18 per cent increase in the last six years. (...) The report, titled "Cost and Affordability of a Nutritious Diet in Nova Scotia," encourages all levels of government to examine price protection for staple foods, and cost sharing in order to address deficiencies in social assistance.

Complete report:

Cost and Affordability of a Nutritious Diet in Nova Scotia:
Report of 2007 Food Costing
(PDF - 1.3MB, 28 pages)
A project of the Nova Scotia Food Security Networking partnership with community partners,
the Department of Health Promotion and Protection, and Mount Saint Vincent University
Released April 2008

"(...) The reasons for concern about income-related food insecurity can be understood when we examine the following statistics:
• 14.6% of Nova Scotians households (approximately 132,400 households) reported either moderate or severe income-related food insecurity in 2004. Nova Scotia is the only province with significantly higher levels than the national
average (9.2%).
• Although Nova Scotia has seen modest increases in minimum wage and Income Assistance rates in the past couple of years, these rates have consistently been shown to be inadequate to allow individuals and families to meet their basic needs.
• 18,417 Nova Scotia citizens accessed a food bank in March 2007.5 Research shows this represents only 1/4 to 1/3 of those experiencing food insecurity."

[ More reports and publications
about food security and food costing
]

Source:
Nova Scotia Food Security Network

Related link:

Rising food costs hitting home
Already many in Nova Scotia can’t afford to eat properly
[expired link]
June 11, 2008
"(...) The 2007 food costing research found that many households in our province, especially families who are getting by on low-wage incomes or social assistance, simply cannot afford to fill their cupboards and refrigerators with healthy foods.
(...) A woman raising two children on a minimum wage paycheque is at especially high risk for food insecurity, according to the project’s 2007 findings released this spring. Every month, after all the expenses of shelter, utilities, transportation, clothing and food are factored in, this young mother would be in a deficit of $8.31. She’d be even worse off when her little girl turned six and she no longer received the Universal Child Care Benefit of $100 a month. If that same woman were on welfare, she would have $127.96 a month to spend on "extras," but only if she were receiving additional financial assistance to go to school or look for work. Without that extra money, she would be even further behind...."
Source:
Halifax Chronicle-Herald

COMMENT : The Welfare Wall
[By Gilles]
The preceding paragraph comparing the financial situation of a woman with two kids on welfare vs minimum wage income is a good illustration of what is called "the welfare wall" in welfare reform parlance. All Canadian welfare programs offer some types of non-cash assistance assistance to their clients, such as coverage for prescription drugs, dental and vision care - although these types of aid are generally limited by restrictive terms and conditions (e.g., some provinces require an employable person to be in receipt of welfare for a specified time period before they qualify for non-emergency dental care).

In the above example, the household on welfare would have just under $130/month left after paying for shelter, utilities, transportation, clothing and food. If the head of that household gets a full-time job at minimum wage (which is not likely, since most minimum wage earners don't work for the full year), the family would be $8 in the hole each month --- hardly an incentive for someone to make the leap to the workforce. Recognizing this, several jurisdictions offer special work-related allowances for such things as transportation and work-appropriate clothing to encourage people to join or rejoin the labour force, and many also offer extended coverage for some non-cash health-related benefits. Note that these are not new options in the ongoing efforts to reform Canadian welfare programs --- the Canada Assistance Plan (federal legislation that enabled federal contributions to provincial welfare costs) shared in the cost of these incentives from 1966-67 until it was replaced in 1996 by the Canada Health and Social Transfer.

- Go to the Nova Scotia Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nsbkmrk.htm

From Health Canada:

Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, Nutrition (2004):
Income-Related Household Food Security in Canada

HTML version
PDF version
- 2.9MB, 124 pages
The Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, is pleased to release Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, Nutrition (2004)—Income-Related Household Food Security in Canada. This report provides, for the first time in Canada, national and provincial estimates of income-related food security at the household, adult and child level based on a standard multiple-indicator measure of food security. This report will be of value to policy analysts, public health professionals, researchers, academic faculty and students with an interest in nutrition and healthy eating, social determinants of health and population health.
Source:
Canadian Community Health Survey
The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) initiative began in 2000 with its main goals being the provision of population-level information on health determinants, health status and health system utilization. This series of surveys is a joint effort of Health Canada, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)

Related Health Canada links:

Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Topics of Interest:
* Canada's Food Guide * Dietary Reference Intakes * Healthy Weights * Nutrition Labelling * Food & Nutrition Surveillance * Healthy Eating Research * Nutrition Policy Reports

Health Canada Population health surveys
* Canadian Community Health Survey * National Population Health Survey * Canadian Health Measures Survey * Joint Canada /United States Survey of Health * Health Services Access Survey
2003
- incl. links to more info for each survey

Related external links:

Canadian Community Health Survey - Nutrition (from Statistics Canada)
Canadian Institute for Health Information

Centre for Studies in Food Security - Ryerson Polytechnic University (Toronto)
- incl. links to : Food Security Toronto - News - Food Security Course - About the Centre - Conferences - Toronto Food Research Network - Publications - Resources

Extensive collection of links to Canadian, American and international sites, organized by theme.

Food statistics
from Statistics Canada

FoodLink Waterloo Region
"
FoodLink Waterloo Region is a non-profit organization linking farmers and citizens together to create a more sustainable food system in Waterloo Region. We are working together to promote local agriculture and to support local growers, by creating new urban-rural relationships among members of the farming community, consumers, and various health and social service groups. These partnerships are being cultivated to raise awareness of agricultural issues, create new markets for local farmers, and enhance food security in the Region of Waterloo."


Alberta Food Bank Network Association

- incl. links to : Home - Mission - Projects - People - Members - Newsletter - Bulletin - Resources - Contact
Resources
- several dozen links and to organizations and online resources

Food Security: More Than a Determinant of Health (PDF file - 60K, 6 pages)
by Lynn McIntyre
February 2003
"In Canada hunger became a subject of investigation in the 1980s, when food banks began to emerge and children's feeding programs in schools became more common. Even though nutritional adequacy can be regarded as the single most important determinant of health, Canada's response to food insecurity has remained community-based, ad hoc and largely focused on the provision of free or subsidized food."
Source : Policy Options (February 2003)
[Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)]

Dietitians of Canada
"Dietitians of Canada represents over 5500 dietitians across Canada and is committed to promoting the health and well-being of consumers through food and nutrition."
NOTE: I was unable to find a website for the
Community Nutritionists Council of BC

Sample reports:

Food costs take a big bite of the income pie for low-income British Columbians
News Release
November 28, 2007
Vancouver, British Columbia – Imagine spending 42% of your income after taxes on food. That’s how much a family of four receiving income assistance in BC would need to spend to purchase enough healthy food. Combine this with the estimated 65% required for shelter, and this family is in the hole before purchasing any other necessities of daily living, such as clothing, transportation, and personal care items. Compare these circumstances with a family of four with an average income; that family would spend about 17% of their income on food and 33% on shelter.

The Cost of Eating in BC 2007 Report (528K, 12 pages)
"... profiles the hardships faced by families trying to purchase healthy food while living on a low-income"

Cost of Eating Reports for earlier years (back to 2001)

Source:
Dieticians of Canada
This report was produced by Dietitians of Canada, BC Region
in partnership with the Community Nutritionists Council of BC

Related link:

Poor in B.C. eat the worst
Government must raise welfare: Report
November 29, 2007
British Columbians have little access to healthy food because welfare cheques and minimum wage are too low, according to a report released Wednesday.The annual release from the Dieticians of Canada and the Community Nutritionists Council of B.C. say this province has more families than any other facing substantial barriers when trying to access healthy food.
Source:
Canada.com

The Cost of Eating in BC - 2006
November 23, 2006
Dietitians of Canada, BC Region in partnership with the Community Nutritionists Council of BC produced this 2006 report to demonstrate that some groups within our population are denied the right to safe and nutritious food due to limited financial resources. Individuals and families receiving income assistance and those working in low paying jobs are at high risk for food insecurity. The 2006 report was endorsed by 17 provincial agencies.
- the link above includes all of the links below as well as links to the same report for earlier years (annual, back to 2001)

* The Cost of Eating in BC - 2006 - Media Backgrounder (PDF file - 268K, 1 page)
* The Cost of Eating in BC - 2006 - Complete report
(PDF file - 1.56MB, 19 pages)
* The Cost of Eating in BC - 2006- Overview
(PDF file - 481K, 2 pages)

Low income British Columbians can't afford to buy healthy food
News Release
October 6, 2003

"With rising food and housing costs, low-income families are more desperate than ever. A low income family would need to spend up to 44% of their disposable income on a nutritious diet compared to the average Canadian spending 17%. Twenty percent of the population has been defined as low income ... that's more than 800,000 British Columbians! The Cost of Eating in BC 2003 report profiles the struggles of many low-income families in BC. According to 2003 report, published by the Community Nutritionists Council of BC and Dietitians of Canada - BC Region, the monthly cost to feed a family of four increased by 9% since 2000 yet the income for the same family on income assistance declined by 6%."

Complete report:
The Cost of Eating in BC 2003 (PDF file - 147K, 25 pages)

A Workbook on Food Security & Influencing Policy
Developed by the Food Security Projects
- incl. links to: Intro (Food for Thought) - What are we talking about? - Why care about food insecurity - What can we do about it? - What is policy? - How can we influence policy? - Strategies for Action - Resources and Tools - Fact Sheets and Handout - About this Workbook - How to use this Workbook - Questions Behind the Workbook - Acknowledgements - Bibliography

Bibliography and Useful Resources
- links to 50+ sites organized under the following headings : General Food Security Websites -
Defining Food Security - Food Security, Families & Children, Communities, & Health - Food Security, the Environment and the Economy - Addressing Food Security - The Policy Process, Implementing Policy & Influencing Public Policy - Provincial/Territorial Food Security Groups

Source:
Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre
Nova Scotia Nutrition Council

FoodShare - "Working with communities to improve access to affordable, nutritious food"
FoodShare is a non-profit food security organization based in Toronto founded in 1985 to co-ordinate emergency food services and to collect and distribute food. Over the years, Foodshare has expanded to include a volunteer Hunger Hotline, advocacy for policies to ensure adequate employment and income and a number of self-help models like co-operative buying systems, collective kitchens and community gardens to address short-term issues of household hunger while also providing longer-term benefits by building the capacity of individuals and communities.

Explore the main sections of this site (Growing - Cooking - Learning - Working - Food 2020 - Good Food Box) for further links to online resources

Welfare falls short of food costs, says study
Researchers call for review of welfare benefit levels
"March 12, 2002 -- A nutritional diet - as defined by the Ontario government's own standards - is out of reach for Toronto's welfare recipients, says a U of T study"
Source : University of Toronto News and Events


Food insecurity in Canadian households, 1998/99

About 8% of Canadians, or just under 2.5 million people, had to compromise the quality or the quantity of their diet at least once in 1998/99 because of a lack of money, according to the National Population Health Survey.
Source: The Daily, Statistics Canada (Wednesday, August 15, 2001)
NOTE : Go to the Statistics Canada website and do a search on "food" to find related reports and studies.

Food and Hunger Action Committee (Toronto)
The Food and Hunger Action Committee was formed in December 1999 to study food security in Toronto and recommend ways to reduce hunger, improve the nutritional health of Torontonians, and support food-based initiatives that benefit Toronto's economy, environment and quality of life. The Committee took a collaborative approach to its work, bringing together City councillors, City staff, the staff of non-profit agencies, food program participants, volunteers, clergy and interested members of the public to discuss the wide range of issues related to food and hunger in Toronto.
The Committee's work resulted in the release of two reports, one for each phase of this initiative
Planting the Seeds - May 2000
- includes information gathered from the community consultations, an inventory of food and hunger-related initiatives in which the City of Toronto is involved, a review of current literature in this area and recommendations on how to proceed. The above link takes you to the executive summary and a link to the report itself in PDF format -- 59 pages, 433K.
The Growing Season - February 2001
Phase II action plan: City Council asked the Committee to create a food charter for the City and to present an action plan to improve Torontonians' access to safe, affordable and nutritious food, and enhance the coordination and delivery of services related to food and hunger. The above link takes you to the executive summary and a link to the report itself in PDF format -- 1055K, 56 pages. There's also a link to Toronto's Food Charter (in PDF format - 110K, 4 pages) on this page.


Daily Bread Food Bank
(Toronto)
"The Daily Bread Food Bank is a non-profit, non-denominational charitable organization working to eliminate hunger in the Greater Toronto Area. It is Canada's largest food bank, serving 170 food programs. In addition, we work together to try to end the root causes of hunger through public education and research.
"

Publications

Sample recent publications:

Research shows food bank clients spend 77% of income on rent
TORONTO, June 24, 2008
People accessing food banks in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) are unable to get ahead because of the high cost of housing, according to a report released today by Daily Bread Food Bank. Who's Hungry: 2008 Profile of Hunger in the GTA found that food bank clients pays an average of 77% of their income on housing alone, which crowds out money available for other basic necessities such as food.

Complete report:

Who’s Hungry:
2008 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
(PDF - 672K, 32 pages)
June 2008

Hungry City> Make Your Mark!
Toronto's Daily Bread Food Bank Blog
Launched in June 2007
"(...) It is time to take the next steps in the fight against hunger and that is where Hungry City> Make Your Mark comes in. It is also where you come in. We are armed with information and we have realistic policy solutions outlined in A New Deal to Fight Hunger. Now, we need to come together for real political change. You are invited to post your concerns about hunger and poverty in your community on this blog. Keep visiting hungrycity.ca to see where people stand on this important issue. Daily Bread Food Bank is committed to ending the need for food banks and we are excited to work with our community and start mobilizing to have our voices heard. No one should go hungry in our great city, province or country. I’ve made my mark…have you?" [Excerpt from the Hungry City Blog Welcome Message, June 5/07)
Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank

Who's Hungry: 2007 Profile of Hunger in the GTA (PDF file - 1.8MB, 32 pages)
June 5, 2007
Read a detailed report about the current hunger crisis in the GTA. It features Daily Bread's A New Deal to Fight Hunger, a significant next step toward solving the hunger crisis.

Who's Hungry 2007 : Key Statistics (PDF file - 63K, 1 page)
June 5, 2007
Check out the key statistics drawn from the survey over 1,800 food bank clients from across the GTA.

A New Deal to Fight Hunger (PDF file - 60K, 2 pages)
June 1, 2007
Daily Bread's call for a comprehensive anti-poverty strategy

Related link:

Hungry City - A Daily Bread Food Bank Initiative
There is no excuse for hunger and poverty in a country as wealthy as Canada, the Hungry City initiative is your chance to take action. Join with thousands of others to make your voice heard for real political change, to elect a provincial government committed to ending hunger and poverty on October 10th, 2007. Hungry City is about you. Find out how you can participate, make your mark here...

National Hunger Awareness Day
June 6th, 2006 marks the launch of the inaugural National Hunger Awareness Day in Canada. The goal is to raise public awareness of domestic hunger at both the National and Local level. A cross-sector of sponsors and stakeholders will be engaged ranging from media, faith-based groups, national corporations, politicians and the general public. Local activities will also take place in an effort to raise food and funds through our various members. Learn more about Hunger Awareness Day and how you can take part!
- incl. links to : Our Mission - Events - Photo Album - Media Room - Related Links - FAQs

Related Links:

Canada:
Canadian Association of Food Banks
Daily Bread Food Bank - Toronto

U.S.:
National Hunger Awareness Day
America's Second Harvest - The Nation's Food Bank Network
- Hunger in America 2006
"The America's Second Harvest Network produced "Hunger in America 2006 ," a comprehensive profile of the incidence and nature of hunger and food insecurity in the U.S. Our study provides extensive demographic profiles of emergency food clients at charitable feeding agencies and comprehensive information on the nature and efficacy of local agencies in meeting the food security needs of clients.The study is the largest of its kind. More than 52,000 individuals agreed to share their personal stories with us through face-to-face interviews at charitable emergency hunger-relief agencies like pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters. Nearly 31,000 local emergency hunger-relief agencies completed survey questionnaires about their efforts to serve millions of hungry Americans."

-------------------------------------

Daily Bread’s Who’s Hungry report illustrates depth of hunger crisis
Survey examines hunger in the GTA and Daily Bread advances solutions
(PDF file - 96K, 1 page)
News Release
June 6, 2006
TORONTO, ON ? Food bank use across the GTA has risen a dramatic 79% since 1995, according to the report Who’s Hungry: 2006 Profile of Hunger in the GTA released today at BCE Place. The results of Daily Bread’s annual survey paint a picture that cannot be ignored of the struggles and financial plight of the diverse population relying on food banks. The 894,017 people who accessed emergency food services last year through GTA food banks, 38% of whom were children, would not go hungry if the issue of poverty were addressed. So, in conjunction with the report, Daily Bread advances the Blueprint to Fight Hunger.

Complete report:

Who's Hungry:
2006 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area

(PDF file - 1.9MB, 13 pages)

Blueprint to Fight Hunger (PDF file - 214K, 1 page)
June 2006

Fact Check:
Does anybody really know how many Torontonians rely on food banks?
October 17, 2007
The plight of the urban poor is one of the Toronto Star's most cherished issues—so much so, apparently, that of late they've taken to cloning them.
Source:
Macleans Magazine

The Daily Bread Food Bank announces education savings program to help break poverty cycle
Canadian Scholarship Trust Foundation facilitates starting an RESP for Daily Bread clients

TORONTO, April 10, 2006/CNW/ - The Daily Bread Food Bank announced today a newpartnership designed to help break the poverty cycle through an accessible education savings program. Recognizing the importance of saving for post-secondary education in reducing the barriers to higher education and encouraging self-sustainability, Daily Bread and Canadian Scholarship Trust Foundation (C.S.T.) have partnered to help low-income families take advantage of the Canada Learning Bond (CLB) program by setting up a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP).
Source:
Newswire.ca

Related Links:

Daily Bread Food Bank
Canadian Scholarship Trust Foundation
Canada Education Savings Grant
Registered Education Savings Plan
Canada Learning Bond

Working people go hungry
Low pay, no health benefits drive families to welfare, says Sue Cox
Jun. 28, 2005
"Food banks are on a treadmill; we have to run faster just to stay in the same place. After 16 years of working at the Daily Bread Food Bank, I have never seen the food bank network as strained as it is now. We can't keep running more and more food drives to keep up to demand. So the time is right for fair and sensible welfare policies that make work pay and eliminate hunger. As Bob Geldof said this week, 'charity is always worth it, but it can never deal with the structure of poverty. That's politics.'"
Sue Cox is executive director of the Daily Bread Food Bank in Toronto.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Who's Hungry: 2005 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area (PDF file - 393K, 28 pages)
June 07, 2005
"Daily Bread Food Bank insists that charitable food relief programs are only a temporary solution to hunger. Food banks have consistently advocated that government programs ensure a decent standard of living for everyone. Despite this work, food banks are still entrenched as a necessary social service for low-income people, compensating for the government cutbacks of the 1990s and the increasingly tenuous labour market."

Survey results indicate drastic overhaul of social assistance required (PDF file - 60K, 2 pages)
Report looks at who’s hungry in Toronto in 2005 and how to help them
News Release
June 7, 2005
"TORONTO, ON – Thirty-four per cent of people on Ontario Works are discouraged from working because of the deduction of employment income from their social assistance, according to the results of Daily Bread’s 2005 survey of people relying upon food banks. As a result, just thirteen per cent of this group reports work income (virtually identical to the 14% who do so across the province). The loss of dental and drug benefits is another major barrier to getting back to work as shown by the experience of people relying upon food banks who are working full-time—46 per cent of them have no dental coverage and only 43 per cent have an employer drug plan."

Rebuilding Lives:
Taking children off welfare and encouraging their parents to work
(PDF file - 390K, 18 pages)
March 15, 2005
"Daily Bread's detailed proposal on the best way for the provincial government to keep its promise to end the clawback of the National Child Benefit Supplement from social assistance cheques. To do so, it recommends changing how social assistance benefits are calculated so that adults have a greater incentive to work their way off welfare and their children receive the NCBS whether their parents are on or off welfare."

Governments Failing Newcomers:
Highly Skilled Immigrants Being Forced to Use Food Banks
(PDF file - 26K, 4 pages)
March 26, 2005
"Preliminary results from the 2005 Annual Survey on skilled immigrants being forced to rely upon foodbanks to survive in Toronto. This report builds a strong and compelling case for greater financial support from the federal government to help the province of Ontario aid immigrant settlement to quicken the pace of their integration into the Canadian economy--benefitting both the immigrants and the long-term health of the Canadian economy."

Housing Report Update: Rising Food Bank Use Linked to Tenant Protection Act (PDF file - 142K, 3 pages)
Toronto
November 02, 2004
"Daily Bread has taken a closer look at our research statistics to determine the correlation between rent increases and food bank use. The results are included in the attached an update to our August report on housing. The data shows that there is a strong link between rising food bank use and the Tenant Protection Act. "

How much difference would the NCBS make for food bank families? (PDF file - 138K, 2 pages)
A review of the impact of the "clawback" of the National Child Benefit Supplement is affecting children whose families are on social assistance
Research Bulletin #4
Toronto
August 31, 2004
"...it is possible to extrapolate that approximately 13,500 children in the Greater Toronto Area alone would no longer need to use a food bank if their families received the National Child Benefit Supplement."
Source:
Publications
[ Daily Bread Food Bank ]

Somewhere to Live or Something to Eat: Housing Issues of Food Bank Clients in the Greater Toronto Area
August 2, 2004
- based on housing statistics from the Daily Bread Food Bank's Annual Survey of Food Bank Clients.
"This 22-page paper looks at the key housing issues affecting food bank clients. Set against the context of the Welfare Rates cut in 1995 and the Tenant Protection Act in 1998, the paper focuses on rent and income problems many food bank clients are facing now. (...) It is particularly timely given that the Ontario government has just completed its consultation process for new landlord-tenant legislation and is currently engaged in writing a new act in which new rent control guidelines will be established. This paper should be viewed as a contribution to that process."

Complete Report (PDF file - 766K, 22 pages)
Summary of Housing Report (PDF file - 24K, 2 pages)

July 20, 2004
Who's Who? (PDF file - 56K, 1 page)
"This profile of food bank clients looks specifically at family groups, sources of income, immigration and gender by age. This information is collected from our 2004 Annual Survey."

June 21, 2004
Who’s Hungry? (PDF file - 39K, 1 page)
"This updated fact sheet answers the question Who’s hungry? by examining data provided by Daily Bread’s annual survey of food recipients. The report provides statistics on the issues impacting low-income people in the GTA."

Disabled demand aid from province
Short of food following blackout

August 27, 2003
By Kevin Connor
"Low-income, disabled shut-ins say they are the forgotten souls after last week's blackout. Because government offices were closed last week, they couldn't receive assistance from the
Ontario Disability Support Program office."
Source: Toronto Sun

Sample reports from 2000, 2001

Government Fails the Test: Most Welfare Recipients Aren’t Using Drugs (PDF) - Spring 2001

A Report From the 2001 Survey of Food Recipients
How Food Recipients Deal With Poverty (PDF) - April 16, 2001

Who's Hungry Now? (PDF) - April 14, 2001

Looking After Our Kids (PDF) - April 13, 2001

Working Harder, Falling Behind (PDF) - April 12, 2001

Hunger in Ontario in the Year 2000 : Common, but Senseless (PDF file - 50K, 12 pages)
Prepared for the Ontario Association of Food Banks
October 2000
- includes statistical data on food bank use in Ontario during March 2000 and an opinion poll (June 2000) on the opinions of Ontarians regarding hunger and food banks and who is responsible for solving the hunger problem.

Seniors Losing Ground in Poverty Battle: A Stealth attack on Seniors (PDF) - April 20002002 Publications (all released in April 2002):
No Money, No Food (PDF file - 19K, 3 pages)
Poorer People, Poorer Health (PDF file - 57K, 2 pages)
Hunger Scandal Sheet (PDF file - 21K, 2 pages)
Who's Hungry Now? (PDF file - 30K, 3 pages)

Government Fails the Test: Most Welfare Recipients Aren’t Using Drugs (PDF) - Spring 2001

How Food Recipients Deal With Poverty (PDF) - April 16, 2001
Who's Hungry Now? (PDF) - April 14, 2001
Looking After Our Kids (PDF) - April 13, 2001
Working Harder, Falling Behind (PDF) - April 12, 2001

Hunger in Ontario in the Year 2000 : Common, but Senseless (PDF file - 50K, 12 pages)
Prepared for the Ontario Association of Food Banks
October 2000
- includes statistical data on food bank use in Ontario during March 2000 and an opinion poll (June 2000) on the opinions of Ontarians regarding hunger and food banks and who is responsible for solving the hunger problem.

Seniors Losing Ground in Poverty Battle: A Stealth attack on Seniors (PDF) - April 2000


Ontario Association of Food Banks

All activities of the Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) are guided by a clear vision : to help food banks relieve hunger in Ontario.

Selected reports:

Ontario Hunger Report 2008: The Leading Edge of the Storm (PDF - 2MB, 24 pages)
December 2008
"(...) Key Trends:
1. Hundreds of thousands of Ontarians are forced to turn to food banks every month.
2. Working Ontarians, Ontario’s children, and Ontarians with disabilities are hit hard by hunger.
3. We have witnessed an alarming increase in the number of Ontarians turning to food banks this fall.
4. The price of food and energy has risen substantially in the past year and is the likely cause of increased usage coupled with economic decline.
5. Many food banks are struggling to meet demand."

The Cost of Poverty: An Analysis of
the Economic Cost of Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 1.3MB, 36 pages)
November 2008
By Nathan Laurie
Key Facts:
* Poverty disproportionately affects certain populations, and has a complex mix of institutional and individual causes.
* Poverty has a price tag for all Ontarians.
* The cost of poverty is reflected in remedial, intergenerational, and opportunity costs.
* Reducing poverty with targeted policies and investments over the life course generates an economic return. This return is equal to a proportion of the assessed cost of poverty.

Related link:

Everyone pays the province's $38 billion cost
Toll of health care, crime, social assistance $2,900 per household, economic analysis finds
November 20, 2008
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Poverty costs Ontario a staggering $38 billion a year – and we all pay the price, says a new report that offers the first-ever analysis of the problem's economic impact on everyone. Although the province's 905,000 poorest households bear the brunt of the cost, everyone feels the pinch, says the report written by a group of leading economic and public policy experts to be released at Queen's Park today.
Source:
Toronto Star

Ontario's Food Banks present plan to cut poverty in half by 2020
News Release
August 19, 2008
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) released a new report today, entitled Our Choice for a Better Ontario, in response to a call for submissions from the provincial government's Cabinet Committee on Poverty Reduction. The report sets a goal of cutting poverty in half by 2020 through a renewed investment by the federal and provincial governments.

Complete report:

Our Choice for a Better Ontario:
A Plan to Cut Poverty in Half by 2020
(PDF - 1.4MB, 64 pages)
August 2008 (PDF file date)
"(...) Our challenge is great. Hunger and poverty disproportionately affects certain populations and places in Ontario. Ontario’s economy is also in a period of significant transition. Hundreds of thousands of Ontarians lack the basics of life, including food, shelter, and education. We believe that our universal goal must be to cut poverty in half by 2020, with a focus on reducing the deepest poverty. In order to meet this goal, we have established twelve supportive goals focusing on key sectors, people, and places. "
- goals cover the following areas:
* Housing * Education * Financial Inclusion * Employment & Enterprise * Energy * Health * Neighbourhoods and communities * New Canadians * Single parents * First Nations * Ontarians with Disabilities * Children

Related link:

We must spend to fight poverty: report
Low-fee credit unions for the poor and a plan to help low-income households pay for heat and hydro are among a broad series of initiatives needed to fight poverty in Ontario, say the province's food banks in a report released recently. Cutting poverty in half by 2020 would lift more than half a million Ontarians out of poverty and should be the McGuinty government's "commitment of a generation," says the report by the Ontario Association of Food Banks.
Source:
Sudbury Star
September 2, 2008

Food banks warn of `growing storm'
Government must act as prices rise, report says
June 26, 2008
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Ontario's weakening economy coupled with the rising cost of food, fuel and energy should be a "wake-up call" to action on poverty reduction in both Ottawa and at Queen's Park, say the province's food banks. The federal government must increase employment insurance benefits and expand eligibility for Ontarians, where currently just 27 per cent of unemployed workers qualify, says the report to be released today by the Ontario Association of Food Banks.

Complete report:

A Gathering Storm: The Price of Food, Gasoline, and Energy,
and Changing Economic Conditions in Ontario, 2008
(PDF - 1.2MB, 24 pages)

Related OAFB links:

Ontario Hunger Report 2007 (1.2MB, 32 pages)
November 8, 2007

Discussion Paper : Towards a New Perspective on Hunger & Poverty (PDF - 736K, 40 pages)
September 13, 2007

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)
We unite over 100 communities across Ontario in a network of food banks from Windsor to Ottawa and Thunder Bay to Niagara Falls to relieve hunger.

Difficult Economic Climate Increases Stress on Canadian Food Banks (Word file- 94K, 3 pages)
Food Banks Canada asking Canadians and Government to take action to help on National Hunger Awareness Day, June 2
TORONTO - June 1, 2009 – Food Banks Canada is reporting an approximately 20 per cent increase in the number of Canadians turning to food banks each month and, as a result, food banks across the country are facing unprecedented challenges providing essential food to those in need. On National Hunger Awareness Day (June 2), Food Banks Canada is calling on Canadians to donate funds, food or time to ensure Canadian food banks can continue to meet the needs of Canada’s hungry during this difficult economic time.
Source:
Food Banks Canada
(formerly the Canadian Association of Food Banks)
Food Banks Canada is the national organization that represents the food bank community across Canada. Our members and their respective agencies serve approximately 85 % of people accessing emergency food programs nation-wide. In an average month in 2008, over 704,000 different people accessed food banks, 37% of whom are children.

Food Banks Canada is urging all Canadians, who are able, to make a positive choice to donate food and funds,
volunteer at a local food bank or sign a petition to encourage government action, available online at the
National Hunger Awareness Day website:
www.hungerawarenessday.ca

[ more websites about hunger in Canada ]

Empty Spaces on Pantry Shelves: Food Insecurity in a Nation of Wealth
December 21, 2007

Transition Magazine : Families & Food
Winter 2007-2008, vol. 37-4

[includes Canadian Families Deserve Food Security [PDF file - 110K, 4 pages]]
by David Northcott
[David Northcott is executive coordinator of Winnipeg Harvest and a Board member of The Vanier Institute of the Family.]

Public Lecture:
A Place in time, Families, Family Matters & Why They Matter

October 18, 2007
by Robert Glossop, Ph.D.

Source:
Vanier Institute of the Family (VIF)
"...our vision: to make families as important to the life of Canadian society as they are to the lives of individual Canadians."


People- & Planet-Friendly
"People- & Planet-Friendly is a unique, nonprofit service, "bringing people together over ideas that matter". Our themes include peace, environment, sustainable living, food, community, communication, democracy, activism and human rights. People- & Planet-Friendly – gateway to environment and sustainable living in Canada and beyond. Employment listings and Calendar with thousands of subscribers. Also: Portals & Guides on environmental and social themes; Forum and Bulletin Board; popular E-mail Newsletter. Look for our Green Products & Services directory, launching in late 2004."

Housing, Hunger and Health Statistics : What’s Available and Where to Find It
January 2004
- incl. links to online resources
PDF version
HTML version

Source:
CSPC-T Research & Policy Updates
[ Community Social Planning Council of Toronto (CSPC-T) ]

Looking for a Hand Up: A Profile of Food Bank Recipients in Four Ontario Communities
September 2003
Executive Summary (PDF file - 68K, 3 pages)
Full Report (PDF file - 325K, 47 pages)
Source : Community Social Planning Council of Toronto (CSPC-T)



Winnipeg Harvest
(Food Bank)

- don't miss the excellent collection of links to food and hunger sites


Food Security Websites
Links to 18 sites dealing with food security issues, mostly Canadian, many reviewed.
Note: this page is part of a larger site of online resources from cyber@ctivist ("social policy and activism on the web"), a site created by a team in the School of Social Work at Laurentian University. The site uses frames, so you'll have to go to the Cyber@ctivist Home Page and click on Issues, Government or Organizations to see this fine collection of links.
In addition to food security, the Issues section offers links in the following areas: education - environment - globalization - poverty - shelter - social activism - work and welfare


The Food Grains Bank
Canadian Foodgrains Bank is a Christian-based food aid and development organization that works through 13 Canadian church partners to collect donations of grain, cash and other agricultural commodities for distribution to the world's hungry.

"Healthy Minds"
Breakfast Pilot Program Evaluation
October 1999-March 2000
New Brunswick Department of Education
As a means for addressing the nutritional needs of students in the elementary school years, a "Healthy Minds" Breakfast Program was piloted in two school districts (Tracadie-Sheila & Saint John) in K-5. The program was designed to provide basic breakfast food items to students in a non-stigmatizing environment. All schools in District 8 (Saint John) and District 9 (Tracadie-Sheila), with kindergarten to grade five, were chosen to pilot the "Healthy Minds" breakfast program from October 1999 to March 2000. District 8 participated with 31 schools, representing 6,638 students and District 9 participated with 21 schools, representing 3,836 students.

Greater Vancouver Food Bank Society 

 

International Links
(links below are added in reverse chronological order)

Hungry for Change (report on the relationship between food and poverty in the UK) - October 2015
(
Fabian Commission on Food and Poverty)

Hungry for Change (report on the relationship between food and poverty in the UK) - October 2015

The Fabian Commission on Food and Poverty [ http://foodandpoverty.org.uk/ ] has just launched its final report,
Hungry for Change
(PDF - 1MB, 48 pages) http://www.fabians.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Hungry-for-Change-web-27.10.pdf

The independent commission - made up of experts in food policy, the environment, poverty and education - was tasked with investigating the relationship between food and poverty in the UK. For the past 12 months, commissioners have travelled around the country talking to those impacted by the flaws in our food system.

NOTE: This report was released in October of 2015.
http://www.fabians.org.uk/events/final-report-food-poverty/

[United States]

2016 National Anti-Hunger Policy Conference (February 28 to March 1, 2016)
http://spotlightonpoverty.org/news/february-28-march-1-2016-national-anti-hunger-policy-conference/
Washington, D.C.
Posted on January 27, 2016
The National Anti-Hunger Policy Conference, co-sponsored by the Food Research and Action Center [ http://frac.org/ ] and Feeding America [ http://www.feedingamerica.org/ ], convenes anti-hunger and anti-poverty advocates, government officials, advocates, and service providers to discuss and advocate for effective policies to end hunger in the United States. Featured speakers include Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, and Kathryn Edin. The conference will be held at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C.

Registration:
http://www.antihungerpolicyconference.org/

[International] Middle Income Countries Play Key Role in Eliminating Hunger and Malnutrition:
Findings from IFPRI’s 2014–2015 Global Food Policy Report
(small PDF file, 3 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/pressrel20150318.pdf
Press Release
March 18, 2015, Washington, DC
Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, and Mexico may be rising economic powerhouses, but these five fast-growing, middle income countries are still home to nearly half of the world’s hungry, or 363 million people. That is why we must also pay attention to those living in the “economic middle” as part of any strategy to effectively combat hunger and malnutrition on a global scale, according to a new report published today by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). The 2014–2015 Global Food Policy Report (GFPR) calls on governments of middle income countries to reshape their food systems to focus on nutrition and health, close the gender gap in agriculture, and improve rural infrastructure to ensure food security for all.

NOTE : The report covers mainly Asian and African countries; Canada is mentioned only four times in it.

Complete report:

2014–2015 Global Food Policy Report (PDF - 13MB, 139 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/gfpr20142015.pdf
March 2015
IFPRI’s flagship report puts into perspective the major food policy issues, developments, and decisions in 2014 and highlights challenges and opportunities for 2015. Drawing on rigorous research, IFPRI researchers and other distinguished food policy experts consider a wide range of crucial questions.
(...)
The 2014–2015 Global Food Policy Report also presents data for several key food policy indicators, including country-level data on hunger, agricultural research spending, and capacity for food policy research. In addition to illustrative figures, tables, and a timeline of food policy events during the past year, the report also presents the results of a global opinion poll on the current state of food policy.

Interactive version of the report
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/gfpr/2015/index.html

More info about the Global Food Policy Report:
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2014-2015-global-food-policy-report
- includes a summary of the crucial questions re. the major food policy issues, developments, and decisions in 2014
- Scroll halfway down the page for links to each chapter in the 2014–2015 GFPR
- Check "RELATED PUBLICATIONS" in the right-hand margin of the page for infographics and booklets about food policy

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

http://www.ifpri.org/
IFPRI seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI was established in 1975 to identify and analyze alternative national and international strategies and policies for meeting the food needs of the developing world, with particular emphasis on low income countries and on the poorer groups in those countries.

---------------------------

Version française du site:

Institut international de recherche sur les politiques alimentaires
http://www.ifpri.org/french
NOTA : L'étude sur les politiques alimentaires n'avait pas été téléchargé au site de l'Institut lorsque j'ai vérifié le 20 mars.
Dès que les documents seront téléchargés au site, l'avis de publication paraîtra sur la page d'accueil en français.

United States

From the Washington Post Wonkblog:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/

How big food brands are boosting profits by targeting the poor
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/02/07/how-big-food-brands-are-boosting-profits-by-targeting-the-poor/
By Roberto A. Ferdman
February 7, 2015
(...)
In order to offer the facade of affordability, manufacturers like Kraft are selling food in smaller packages. These granola bars, sauces, cereals, and prepared meals look like they cost less, but actually are far more expensive on a per ounce basis, according to Reuters.
(...)
... people go to Dollar General to save, because they have to. And according to this Reuters story, they're buying food that looks cheaper but is ultimately costing them more.

Source:
Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/

Childhood Food Insecurity in the U.S. : Trends, Causes, and Policy Options (PDF - 3.1MB, 24 pages)
http://futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/docs/ResearchReport-Fall2014.pdf
By Craig Gundersen and James P. Ziliak
Fall 2014
In 2012, nearly 16 million U.S. children, or over one in five, lived in households that were food insecure, which the U.S. Department of Agriculture defines as “a household-level economic and social condition of limited access to food.”1 Even when we control for the effects of other factors correlated with poverty, these children are more likely than others to face a host of health problems, including but not limited to anemia, lower nutrient intake, cognitive problems, higher levels of aggression and anxiety, poorer general health, poorer oral health, and a higher risk of being hospitalized, having asthma, having some birth defects, or experiencing behavioral problems.

Source:
The Future of Children
http://futureofchildren.org/
The Future of Children promotes effective policies and programs for children by providing timely, objective information based on the best available research. Our Research Report series complements The Future of Children journal by focusing in depth on a contemporary issue of children’s wellbeing, presenting the latest research and explaining its implications for policy in a succinct and accessible format.

August 19, 2014
New release
from Feeding America:

Hunger in America 2014
National Report Prepared for Feeding America
(PDF - 2.6MB, 176 pages)
http://help.feedingamerica.org/HungerInAmerica/hunger-in-america-2014-full-report.pdf

Excerpt from the Intro:
Feeding America, the nation’s leading domestic hunger-relief organization, has conducted the most comprehensive study of hunger in America every four years since 1993. Like the prior studies, Hunger in America 2014 (HIA 2014), the latest iteration, documents the critical role that the charitable food assistance network plays in supporting struggling families in the United States.

Excerpt, page 44:
Feeding America member food banks partner with more than 46,000 charitable agencies. These partner agencies operate more than 58,000 food programs, including nearly 19,000 programs that provide meals for onsite consumption, and more than 39,000 programs that provide groceries for use at home.

Agencies also provide many other services, including outreach and application assistance to help clients access food-related benefits programs such as the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), nutrition education, and non-food assistance with clothing, job training, or legal issues.

Source:
Feeding America

http://feedingamerica.org/
Feeding America is the nation's leading domestic hunger-relief charity. Our mission is to feed America's hungry through a nationwide network of member food banks and engage our country in the fight to end hunger.

---

Related links

One In Six Food Charities Could Close Down Soon,
And 5 Other Disturbing Facts From A New Hunger Report
http://www.mintpressnews.com/1-in-6-food-charities-could-close-down-soon-and-5-other-disturbing-facts-from-a-new-hunger-report/195580/
A revealing new report on the plight of America's hungry.
By Alan Pyke (Think Progress)
August 19, 2014

The Six Disturbing Facts
About Hunger in America in 2014:

1. About 1 in 6 Feeding America charities are worried they’ll have to shut down
2. Millions are forced to eat expired food.
3. Tens of millions of people have to choose between buying food and keeping up with bills.
4. There are nearly 5 million households who could be getting food stamps but aren’t.
5. Men and women use the food charity system in very different ways.
6. The families that rely on food charities are almost never homeless.

Source:
MintPress

http://www.mintpressnews.com/

---

From
Poverty Dispatch (University of Wisconsin):

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch

August 18, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/08/18/
Hunger in America Report (3 articles)

World Food Clock
http://worldfoodclock.com/
How much food is being consumed around the world right now? It's a vast question that can be answered by the World Food Clock. This interesting website draws on information provided by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and presents a streaming set of data on global food consumption, global food waste, and other informative topics. It's visually arresting and users can scroll down to look through different "clocks" that track statistics such as the land used to grow wasted food and the stages of food waste, which include production, processing, and consumption. This is a wonderful tool for folks with an interest in food security, environmental studies, public health, and international relations. It could also be used in any number of design courses to illustrate a range of techniques and visualization strategies.

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2014.

https://www.scout.wisc.edu/

United States

Ten Things You Can't Buy With Food Stamps
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sue-kerr/10-things-you-cant-buy-with-food-stamps_b_5079780.html
April 3, 2014

NOTE : The Food Stamp Programs is now known as the
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
:
http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap

Ten thingsYou Can't Buy Using Food Stamps:

* Toilet paper.
* Laundry detergent.
* Toothpaste, toothbrush, dental floss.
* Soap.
* Diapers.
* Tampons and pads.
* Deodorant.
* Hair-care products.
* Cleaning products.
* Lotion, powder, sunscreen, lip balm, etc

Source:
Huffington Post
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Food Banks Anticipate Impact of Cuts to Food Stamps:
Pantries across the country are preparing for increased demand as
Congress prepares to cut billions of dollars more from the food stamp program.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/22/us/politics/food-banks-anticipate-impact-of-cuts-to-food-stamps.html
January 21, 2014
Late last year, staff members at the Capital Area Food Bank here began fielding requests for larger deliveries from the dozens of soup kitchens and food pantries that it supplies as more and more people showed up seeking help. The food bank said it was not unusual to see a surge before Thanksgiving or Christmas. But this time the lines were caused not by the holidays but by a $5 billion cut to the federal food stamp program that took effect in November when a provision in the 2009 stimulus bill expired.

Now the food bank, which provided about 45 million pounds of food last year, says it is preparing for even greater demand as Congress prepares to cut billions of dollars more from the food stamp program, which is included in a farm bill that has yet to pass. About 47 million Americans receive food stamps.

Source:
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/

Making the poor — and the U.S. — poorer still
http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/making-the-poor--and-the-us--poorer-still/2013/12/08/cda50c26-5dd1-11e3-95c2-13623eb2b0e1_story.html
By Robert E. Rubin, Roger C. Altman and Melissa Kearney
December 8, 2013
Congress may take up legislation this week to cut food stamps. The Senate passed a bill in June mandating $4?billion in cuts over 10 years; the House version, passed in September, imposes nearly $40?billion in reductions. A conference committee has been charged with resolving these differences. Somehow, this negotiation is occurring amid the worst poverty levels in two decades, a weak overall economy and rapidly falling budget deficits. Under these circumstances, it would be economically and morally unsound to carry out the cuts.

NOTE: This article contains almost two dozen links
to related and contextual information from the Washington Post.

252 comments about this article:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/making-the-poor--and-the-us--poorer-still/2013/12/08/cda50c26-5dd1-11e3-95c2-13623eb2b0e1_allComments.html

Source:
Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/

Six Myths About Food Stamps
http://billmoyers.com/2013/10/08/six-myths-about-food-stamps/
October 8, 2013
By Dave Johnson
In the middle of the worst economy and job situation in decades Republicans in the House voted to cut $40 billion from food stamps. This will kick 3.8 million people out of the program by 2014, then 3 million more each year after. Republicans in Congress have blocked every effort to help the economy. (...). In the months leading up to this vote, right-wing outlets such as Fox News, Rush Limbaugh, RedState and the rest of the far-right propaganda machine invented a number of justifications for cutting the program.

NOTE : The formal name of the food stamp program is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.
For more info, see Everything You Need to Know About the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (the second link below)

Click the link above for a rebuttal of each of the following myths and lies.

Myth #1: Food stamps* are “growing exponentially” because of waste and fraud.
Myth #2: Cutting food stamps will make people get jobs because able-bodied people are getting food stamps instead of working.
Myth #3: Food stamps make people “dependent.”
Myth #4: Food stamps are about politicians “buying votes” with other people’s money.
Myth #5: Food stamp recipients take drugs.
Myth #6: People use food stamps to buy cigarettes and alcohol.
[ * Class project : in the text above, substitute the words "social assistance" for "food stamps".
Voila --- Six Myths about Social Assistance in Canada! ]

Source:
Moyers & Company
http://billmoyers.com/

---

Everything You Need to Know About
the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
formerly known as the Food Stamp Program)
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/round-up-everything-you-need-to-know-about-snap/
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/

Free to Be Hungry
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/23/opinion/krugman-free-to-be-hungry.html
By Paul Krugman
September 22, 2013
The word “freedom” looms large in modern conservative rhetoric. Lobbying groups are given names like FreedomWorks; health reform is denounced not just for its cost but as an assault on, yes, freedom. Oh, and remember when we were supposed to refer to pommes frites as “freedom fries”?

Source:
New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/

Mindlessly Gutting Food Stamps
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/09/opinion/mindlessly-gutting-food-stamps.html
September 8, 2013
Among the many scars of the recession, the most intolerable should be the pangs of chronic hunger that still assail a stunning 14.5 percent of the nation’s households, according to the Department of Agriculture’s latest survey (See the next link below the red bar)
. A decade ago, the figure was 11 percent — a group defined as regularly suffering food “insecurity,” or having 26 percent less to spend on food than households not going hungry. The survey shows that food insecurity rose with the recession and has remained stubbornly high.

Source:
New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/

More info:
U.S. Dept of Agriculture

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome

United States Department of Agriculture : Many Americans struggling to find enough to eat
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/09/04/americans-hunger-study/2764955/
By Christopher Doering
September 5, 2013
The Department of Agriculture said Wednesday 14.5 percent of U.S. households, or about 49 million people, were food insecure in 2012, close to the record rate from 2011.

Source:
USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/

---

From the Agriculture Department website:

The report:

Household Food Security in the United States in 2012
http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err-economic-research-report/err155.aspxB
By Alisha Coleman-Jensen, Mark Nord, and Anita Singh
September 2013
- main report page, includes links to the complete report, an executive summary, related topics, related data and more

---

Complete report (PDF 719K, 41 pages):
http://www.ers.usda.gov/ersDownloadHandler.ashx?file=/media/1183208/err-155.pdf

Executive summary (small PDF file):
http://www.ers.usda.gov/ersDownloadHandler.ashx?file=/media/1183204/err-155-report-summary.pdf

---

Related links:

This is Why Food Stamp Reliance Has Exploded
http://www.newrepublic.com/article/114609/congress-fights-over-food-stamps-dont-worry-about-growth-snap
The New Republic
September 5, 2013

This chart shows why $270 billion in housing aid hasn’t solved homelessness
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/09/04/this-chart-shows-why-270-billion-in-housing-aid-hasnt-solved-homelessness/
Washington Post, Wonkblog
September 4, 2013

On the Edge of Poverty, at the Center of a Debate on Food Stamps
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/05/us/as-debate-reopens-food-stamp-recipients-continue-to-squeeze.html
New York Times
September 4, 2013

U.S. households still going hungry
http://www.politico.com/story/2013/09/us-households-still-going-hungry-96263.html
Politico
September 4, 2013

Food Stamp Cuts Could Bite Food Makers
http://stream.wsj.com/story/latest-headlines/SS-2-63399/SS-2-313492/
Wall Street Journal
August 30, 2013



Everything You Need to Know About
the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/round-up-everything-you-need-to-know-about-snap/
July 12, 2013
Yesterday, the House of Representatives broke from the long-standing, bipartisan practice of pairing food assistance and agriculture programs when it passed a stand-alone farm bill reauthorizing agriculture programs, but removed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp program).

Click the link above for the following compilation of analyses and blog posts that provide background about the SNAP program:
---
Introduction to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) - March 28, 2013
--- SNAP Is Effective and Efficient - January 29, 2013
--- SNAP Responded to the Recession and Will Shrink as the Economy Improves - May 15, 2013
--- SNAP Benefits Will Be Cut for All Participants in November 2013 - May 1, 2013
--- The Relationship Between SNAP and Work Among Low-Income Households - January 29, 2013

TIP : go to the home page of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities [ http://www.cbpp.org/ ] for links to five more related articles/analyses.

Source:
Off the Charts Blog
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
(CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is a nonprofit, nonpartisan policy organization working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.


End food stamps, with a caveat
http://goo.gl/UbPrJ
By Charles Lane
July 1, 2013
Congress is in an uproar over the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) [ http://goo.gl/SIhKO ], commonly known as food stamps. In the past half-decade, mostly because of the recession, enrollment grew to 21.1 million U.S. households — encompassing one-seventh of the population when you include children and other dependents — at a cost of $78 billion in fiscal 2011, according to the Department of Agriculture. House Republicans want to cut SNAP by at least $20?billion over the next decade, and Democrats want to preserve it pretty much as is. The dispute sent the 2013 farm bill — legislation in which SNAP has traditionally been twinned with subsidies for farmers — down to an unexpected defeat last month.

Fortunately, there is a solution. Abolish food stamps, on one condition: Congress would have to distribute the SNAP budget among other programs for the poor, for which many SNAP recipients also qualify.

Source:
Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/

From the
U.S. Dept of Agriculture:

Food Insecurity in Households With Children:
Prevalence, Severity, and Household Characteristics, 2010-11
(PDF - 1MB, 59 pages)
http://www.ers.usda.gov/media/1120651/eib-113.pdf
By Alisha Coleman-Jensen, William McFall, and Mark Nord
May 2013
An estimated 79 percent of households with children were food secure throughout the year in 2011, meaning that all the household members had consistent access to adequate food for active, healthy lives. This report examines the prevalence and severity of food insecurity in households with children by selected household characteristics.

Report Summary (small PDF file)
http://www.ers.usda.gov/media/1120647/eib113-summary.pdf

Related Topics and Data
http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/eib-economic-information-bulletin/eib113.aspx

Source:
U.S. Dept of Agriculture

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome

More than One in Six Americans Report Inability to Afford Enough Food:
New Food Hardship Data Reflect Continuing Struggles and Highlights Need for Congress to Protect Nation’s Nutrition Safety Net
http://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/5118/p/salsa/web/common/public/content?content_item_KEY=10884
February 28, 2013
Washington, D.C. – Millions of Americans continued in 2012 to struggle to afford enough food, according to new, up-to-date food hardship data from the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC). More than one in six Americans (18.2 percent) said in 2012 that there had been times over the past 12 months that they didn’t have enough money to buy food that they or their families needed.

Food Hardship in America is FRAC’s food hardship report. It analyzes data that were collected by Gallup and provided to FRAC. The data were gathered as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project, which has been interviewing almost 1,000 households daily since January 2008.

Complete report:

Food Hardship in America, 2012 (PDF - 224K, 32 pages)
http://frac.org/pdf/food_hardship_2012.pdf

Source:
Food Research and Action Center (FRAC)
http://frac.org/
The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) is the leading national nonprofit organization working to improve public policies and public-private partnerships to eradicate hunger and undernutrition in the United States.

SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) Online:
A Review of State Government SNAP Websites
Updated January 8, 2013
All states make information available to the public via the Internet regarding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, including their applications, state policy manuals or regulations, and general program information. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities reviewed all the states’ web pages to determine what information and services they offer regarding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

View the full report:
HTML :
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=618
PDF (20 pages) : http://www.cbpp.org/files/8-23-05fa.pdf

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

Hunger in Times of Land, Water, and Energy Pressures (PDF - 268K, 3 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/pressrel20121011.pdf
October 11, 2012
Press release
Washington, D.C.—Unsustainable use of land, water, and energy is threatening the food security of the poorest and most vulnerable around the world, according to the 2012 Global Hunger Index, released for the seventh year by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Welthungerhilfe, and Concern Worldwide. According to the 2012 Index, The Challenge of Hunger: Ensuring Sustainable Food Security under Land, Water, and Energy Stresses, hunger on a global scale remains serious with 20 countries having levels of hunger that are “alarming” or “extremely alarming.”

NOTE: this report doesn't cover North America or Europe.

Complete report:

2012 Global Hunger Index
The Challenge of Hunger:
Ensuring Sustainable Food Security U
nder Land, Water, and Energy Stresses (PDF - 4.3MB, 72 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ghi12.pdf

2012 Global Hunger Index - main page
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2012-global-hunger-index
- includes links to country reports for all participating countries
- also includes links to an interactive version of the report, a related brief, media materials, maps, data, video and more

Background Facts and Key Findings
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2012-global-hunger-index-background-facts-and-key-findings

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

http://www.ifpri.org/
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI is one of 15 centers supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) [ http://www.cgiar.org/ ], an alliance of 64 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations

Breadline Britain: councils fund food banks to plug holes in welfare state:
Local authorities asking 'big society' to deliver crisis aid to vulnerable people after social fund budget is cut next April
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/aug/21/councils-invest-food-banks-welfare-cuts
By Patrick Butler
21 August 2012
Local authorities are preparing to invest in charity-run food banks to cope with an expected deluge in demand for crisis help from low income families hit by welfare cuts:
[ http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/welfare ]
... raising the spectre of depression-era US "breadlines". Cuts next year to the social fund:
[ http://www.dwp.gov.uk/publications/specialist-guides/technical-guidance/sb16-a-guide-to-the-social/ ]
... which provides emergency aid to vulnerable people, mean that from April 2013 many councils will no longer be able to provide cash help to applicants. Instead they will offer "in kind" support such as referring clients to food banks and issuing electronic food vouchers.

502 comments about this article:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/aug/21/councils-invest-food-banks-welfare-cuts#start-of-comments

Source:
The Guardian (U.K.)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

Australian welfare agencies report nationwide food shortage for people in need
http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/international/2012-08-21/welfare-agencies-report-nationwide-food-shortage-for-people-in-need/1003066
21 August 2012
A new survey of Australian welfare agencies shows they are struggling to meet the demand for food relief. The Chief Executive of Foodbank New South Wales, John Webster says the Organisation's report "End Hunger" is being released today at Federal Parliament and it shows there is a hidden problem with hunger in Australia.
Two and a half thousand welfare agencies were surveyed and Mr Webster says the figures are worrying...

Source:
Radio Australia

http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/

Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012
Every five years, Congress passes a bundle of legislation, commonly called the "Farm Bill" that sets national agriculture, nutrition, conservation, and forestry policy. The last Farm Bill was passed in 2008, and expires on September 30, 2012. The Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry passed the bill by a vote of 16-5. The bill will now be discussed in the Senate before the final vote. It's an important bill because it's the legislative authority for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP (formerly known as the Food Stamp Program), and the bill cuts SNAP funding by $4.49 billion over 10 years.

---

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

SNAP Working as Intended to Fight Hunger and Lift Families Out of Poverty
http://goo.gl/7Q0pg
May 8, 2012
Testifying today before the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Nutrition and Horticulture, Stacy Dean, the Center’s Vice President for Food Assistance Policy, explained that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) “is working as it’s supposed to work” to meet the critical needs of one in seven Americans — a figure that speaks both to the extensive need across the country and to SNAP’s important role in addressing it.

The main findings of her testimony:

SNAP does an admirable job of meeting its core purpose — to provide a basic nutrition benefit to low-income Americans. The program has largely eliminated severe hunger and malnutrition in the United States.
SNAP is highly responsive to need. As an entitlement, it responds quickly and effectively to support low-income families and communities during times of economic distress. Since December 2007, when the recession began, SNAP enrollment has increased by 19 million people.

---

Introduction to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2226

---

House Agriculture Committee Proposal Would Cut 2 Million
Off Food Stamps, Reduce Benefits for More Than 44 Million Others

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3749
By Stacy Dean and Dottie Rosenbaum
April 18, 2012

Source:
Off the Charts Blog

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

NOTE : For more articles by CBPP about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program,
go to the International section of the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm#international

Related link:

The Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 (PDF - 1.2MB, 980 pages)
http://goo.gl/w7Fp7
[See Title IV—Nutrition - Subtitle A : Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

NOTE : Keep scrolling down the page you're now reading for more articles on SNAP...

New from the
International Food Policy Research Institute:

Inaugural Global Food Policy Report Synthesizes
Food Policy Actions and Events in 2011 and Provides Outlook for 2012

http://goo.gl/Z5qWN
Press Release
April 23, 2012
Washington D.C.— As policymakers gather for the upcoming G8 and G20 meetings, and as decisionmakers, international organizations, and civil society meet for Rio+20, major food policy developments from 2011 can provide lessons and guidance for 2012 and the future. Today the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) launches the inaugural Global Food Policy Report, the first in a new annual series. The Report provides a comprehensive overview of major policy changes at the global, regional, national, and local levels, as well as their significance for food and nutrition security.

Complete report:

2011 Global Food Policy Report
HTML version
:
Scroll down the page for a table of contents and links to download the report [PDF] by chapter):
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2011-global-food-policy-report
PDF version (7.4MB, 126 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc72.pdf

Aperçu de l'étude en français (PDF - 956Ko, 23 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc72afr.pdf
[Le texte complet n'est pas disponible en français.]

Source:
2011 Global Food Policy Report
http://www.ifpri.org/gfpr/2011

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute
(Washington, DC)
http://www.ifpri.org/
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI is one of 15 centers supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), an alliance of 64 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations.
[ Source : http://www.ifpri.org/ourwork/about ]

April 9, 2012
New study from the Economic Research Service of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture:
http://www.ers.usda.gov/

Alleviating Poverty in the United States: The Critical Role of SNAP Benefits
By Laura Tiehen, Dean Jolliffe, and Craig Gundersen
April 2012
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is one of the largest safety net programs in the United States, serving 44.7 million individuals in an average month in 2011. We used Current Population Survey data to examine the effect of SNAP on poverty from 2000 to 2009, by adding program benefits to income and calculating how SNAP benefits affected the prevalence, depth, and severity of poverty.

Complete report (PDF - 3.48MB, 30 pages):
http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/ERR132/ERR132.pdf

Report summary (PDF - 1.2MB, 2 pages):
http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/ERR132/ERR132_ReportSummary.pdf

Report abstract:
http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err132/
- includes a Zip file with all charts and graphs (in .png format) from this report

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Related links:

Food Stamps Helped Reduce Poverty Rate, Study Finds
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/10/us/food-stamp-program-helping-reduce-poverty.html
By Sabrina Tavernise
April 9, 2012
WASHINGTON — A new study by the Agriculture Department has found that food stamps, one of the country’s largest social safety net programs, reduced the poverty rate substantially during the recent recession. The food stamp program, formally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, reduced the poverty rate by nearly 8 percent in 2009, the most recent year included in the study, a significant impact for a social program whose effects often go unnoticed by policy makers.

Source:
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP):

http://www.cbpp.org/

Chartbook:
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
Helps Struggling Families Put Food On The Table
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3744
April 9, 2012
[formerly the Food Stamp program]
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the nation’s most important anti-hunger program. SNAP reaches millions of people in need of food assistance. It is one of the few means-tested government benefit programs available to almost all households with low incomes. For more detail on the program’s basics, see http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2226.

SNAP is an efficient part of the nationwide safety net. Payment accuracy – the delivery of the correct amount of benefits to eligible households – is at an all-time high. For more on the program’s efficiency, see http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3239.

This chartbook highlights some of the key characteristics of the approximately 46 million people using the program as well as trends and data on program administration and use.
Part I: SNAP is highly responsive to poverty and the economy
Part II: Benefits are modest
Part III: SNAP serves very vulnerable people
Part IV: SNAP supports working families and those unable to work
Part V: With some important exceptions, SNAP reaches most eligible people
Part VI: SNAP is efficient and effective
Part VII: SNAP is an important public/private partnership

It is intended to complement more detailed analysis on particular aspects of SNAP, available on our website:
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=31

Related areas of CBPP research:

Food Assistance
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=31

Food Stamps
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=69

Poverty and Income
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=36

Trends
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=83

---

March 9, 2012
New from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

On SNAP (food stamps):
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/under-2-dollars-a-day-in-america-part-2/
Stacy Dean showed that SNAP (food stamps) is a powerful antidote to extreme poverty, and Barbara Sard explained that proposals to raise rents on the poorest recipients of federal housing assistance would add to the hardships of families in extreme poverty [ http://www.offthechartsblog.org/under-2-a-day-in-america-part-3/ ].

Source:
Off the Charts Blog

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

Also from CBPP:

U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly known as the Food Stamp Program)

Five Things You Probably Don’t Know About Food Stamps
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/five-things-you-probably-dont-know-about-food-stamps/
January 20, 2012
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, is in the news these days because of comments made by some Republican presidential candidates. Below are five things you probably don’t know about the program.
1. A large and growing share of SNAP households are working households.
2. SNAP responded quickly and effectively to the recession.
3. Today’s large SNAP caseloads mostly reflect the extraordinarily deep and prolonged recession and the weak recovery.
4. SNAP has one of the most rigorous quality control systems of any public benefit program.
5. SNAP’s recent growth is temporary.

---

Policy Basics: Introduction to SNAP

In 2011, SNAP helped almost 45 million low-income Americans to afford a nutritionally adequate diet in a typical month. Nearly 75 percent of SNAP participants are in families with children; more than one-quarter are in households with seniors or people with disabilities. While SNAP’s fundamental purpose is to help low-income families, the elderly, and people with disabilities afford an adequate diet and avoid hardship, it promotes other goals as well, such as reducing poverty, supporting and encouraging work, protecting the overall economy from risk, and promoting healthy eating.

View the full Policy Basic:

HTML:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2226

PDF (8 pages):
http://www.cbpp.org/files/policybasics-foodstamps.pdf

-------------------------

SNAP Is Effective and Efficient

SNAP caseloads have risen significantly since late 2007, as the recession and lagging recovery battered the economic circumstances of millions of Americans and dramatically increased the number of low-income households who qualify and apply for help from the program. Yet, despite the rapid caseload growth, SNAP payment accuracy has continued to improve, reaching all-time highs. Moreover, the Congressional Budget Office predicts that SNAP spending will fall as a share of the economy in coming years as the economy recovers and temporary benefit expansions that Congress enacted in 2009 expire.

View the full analysis:

HTML:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3239

PDF (7 pages):
http://www.cbpp.org/files/7-23-10fa.pdf

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

From the
U.S. Conference of Mayors:

Hunger and Homelessness Survey
A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities
A 29-City Survey
(PDF - 9.2MB, 107 pages)
http://www.usmayors.org/pressreleases/uploads/2011-hhreport.pdf
December 2011

News Release
Joblessness leads to more hungry and homeless families in the U.S. cities (PDF - 192K, 3 pages)
http://www.usmayors.org/pressreleases/uploads/20111215-release-hhr-en.pdf
December 15, 2011
Washington, D.C. – In the midst of a struggling economy and continuing high levels of unemployment, U.S. cities are feeling the pressure from increased numbers of hungry and homeless families according to a U.S. Conference of Mayors (USCM) report on the status of Hunger and Homelessness in 29 cities in America (below) that was released today by the U.S. Conference of Mayors on a news conference call.

Source:
U.S. Conference of Mayors
http://www.usmayors.org/
The U.S. Conference of Mayors is the official nonpartisan organization of cities with populations of 30,000 or more. There are 1,139 such cities in the country today, each represented in the Conference by its chief elected official, the Mayor.

---

From CBS News:

Census data : Half of U.S. poor or low income
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57343397/census-data-half-of-u.s-poor-or-low-income/
December 15, 2011
WASHINGTON - Squeezed by rising living costs, a record number of Americans — nearly 1 in 2 — have fallen into poverty or are scraping by on earnings that classify them as low income. The latest census data* depict a middle class that's shrinking as unemployment stays high and the government's safety net frays. The new numbers follow years of stagnating wages for the middle class that have hurt millions of workers and families.
(...) Mayors in 29 cities say more than 1 in 4 people needing emergency food assistance did not receive it. Many middle-class Americans are dropping below the low-income threshold — roughly $45,000 for a family of four — because of pay cuts, a forced reduction of work hours or a spouse losing a job. Housing and child-care costs are consuming up to half of a family's income. (...) A survey of 29 cities conducted by the U.S. Conference of Mayors being released Thursday points to a gloomy outlook for those on the lower end of the income scale.

---------------------------
* "Latest Census data" refers to the release of the following report by the Census Bureau:
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010 (September 13, 2011)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm#income_poverty_and_health_insurance_coverage
NOTE : This link will take you to a section of the U.S. Government Links page of this website, where you'll find a link to the report itself, along with a collection of ~50 links to related fact sheets, NGO analysis of the report, media coverage, historical tables and much more
---------------------------

Related links from CBS News:

* New data shows poverty at an all-time high (Video, duration 2:33)
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7387553n
(Undated, likely September 2011)

* Poverty in America: The faces behind the figures
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/09/19/national/main20108085.shtml
September 19, 2011

* Poverty continues to rise in U.S., now 15.1%
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/09/13/national/main20105376.shtml
September 13, 2011

* Most U.S. unemployed no longer receive benefits
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57319258/
November 5, 2011

Source:
CBS News

2011 Global Hunger Index Launched
The challenge of hunger: Taming price spikes and excessive food price volatility

News Release October 11, 2011
Today marks the launch of the 2011 Global Hunger Index (GHI) report, the sixth in an annual series, which presents a multidimensional measure of global, regional, and national hunger. This year's report shows that although the world has made some progress in reducing hunger, the proportion of hungry people remains high. The 2011 GHI has improved by slightly more than one-quarter over the 1990 GHI, but globally, hunger remains at a level categorized as “serious.”

Complete report:

2011 Global Hunger Index
The Challenge of Hunger: Taming Price Spikes and Excessive Food Price Volatility
(PDF - 3.7MB, 64 pages)
October 2011
This year’s Global Hunger Index (GHI) shows that global hunger has declined since 1990, but not dramatically, and remains at a level characterized as “serious.” Across regions and countries, GHI scores vary greatly. The highest GHI scores occur in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. South Asia reduced its GHI score substantially between 1990 and 1996, but this fast progress could not be maintained. (...) Food prices will always fluctuate in response to shifts in supply and demand, but excessive volatility in food prices greatly complicates efforts to reduce hunger among the world’s poorest people and among food producers themselves.

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI is one of 15 centers supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), an alliance of 64 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations.

Related links:

World Hunger Education Service (WHES)
For the past 34 years, since its founding in 1976, the mission of World Hunger Education Service is to undertake programs, including Hunger Notes (see the next link below), which:
*
inform the community of people interested in issues of hunger and poverty, the public, and policymakers, about the causes, extent, and efforts to end hunger and poverty in the United States and the world.
* further understanding, which integrates ethical, religious, social, economic, political, and scientific perspectives on hunger and poverty.
* facilitate communication and networking among those who are working for solutions.
* promote individual and collective commitment to solutions to the hunger and poverty that confront hundreds of millions of the people of the world.

World Hunger Notes - An online publication of the World Hunger Education Service

Sesame Street’s newest Muppet is poor and hungry
New Sesame Street muppet Lily will be introduced in a one-hour primetime special on Oct. 9.
Iconic children's show Sesame Street has introduced a new character so young people can learn about the issues of poverty and hunger.
October 4, 2011
At a time when the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates nearly one in four American children – an estimated 17 million – may be going hungry, Sesame Street is introducing Lily, a new character who will highlight their plight.
Source:
Toronto.com

BRAVO, Sesame Street!

[United States]

Trends in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Participation Rates: 2002 – 2009

Summary (PDF - 63K, 2 pages)
Complete report (PDF - 6.3MB, 131 pages)
August 2011
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) [formerly known as the Food Stamp program] helps low-income individuals purchase food so that they can obtain a nutritious diet. One important measure of program performance is the ability to reach its target population, as indicated by the percentage of people eligible for benefits who actually participate. This report is the latest in a series on SNAP participation rates. Estimates are based on the March 2010 Current Population Survey and program administrative data for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. The findings represent national participation rates for FY 2009.
Source:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
We help put healthy food on the table for over 40 million people each month.
[ Office of Research and Analysis ]
[ Food and Nutrition Service ]
[ U.S. Department of Agriculture ]
NOTE : Click any of the source links above to browse related research reports and more...

Related link:

More Americans Hungry For Food Stamps
By Marilyn Geewax
About 46 million people get government help in the form of food stamps when buying food. That's roughly 15 percent of the population.
This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is expected to release its latest update on the food stamp program [see the link above]. It's an important indicator of the nation's economic health — and the prognosis is not good. Food stamp use is up 70 percent over the past four years and that trend is expected to continue.

The spike began in late-2008 and early-2009 when the worst of the recession was triggering massive layoffs and home foreclosures. Although the economy has been growing since mid-2009, the pace has been too slow to absorb the nearly 14 million people without jobs. Nearly half of those have been out of work more than six months.

As a result, the number of people seeking federal help with groceries has been soaring. At this time four years ago, before the recession hit, about 27 million people were using food stamps. Today 46 million get help through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program — what most people call food stamps — which is roughly 15 percent of the population.
Source:
National Public Radio (NPR)
A thriving media organization at the forefront of digital innovation, NPR creates and distributes award-winning news, information, and music programming to a network of 900 independent stations. Through them, NPR programming reaches 26.8 million listeners every week.

TED - Ideas worth spreading [Technology, Entertainment, Design] - link added to this site August 1, 2011
TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design. Since then its scope has become ever broader. (...) The annual TED conferences bring together the world's most fascinating thinkers and doers, who are challenged to give the talk of their lives (in 18 minutes or less). On TED.com, we make the best talks and performances from TED and partners available to the world, for free. More than 900 TEDTalks are now available, with more added each week. All of the talks are subtitled in English, and many are subtitled in various languages.

Themes
- include * Technology * Entertainment * Design * Business * Science * Culture * Arts * Global issues

TED Talks - 997 talks!

Selected TED Talks (from the above link):

Josette Sheeran: Ending hunger now (video, duration 19:10)
Josette Sheeran, the head of the UN's World Food Program, talks about why, in a world with enough food for everyone, people still go hungry, still die of starvation, still use food as a weapon of war. Her vision: "Food is one issue that cannot be solved person by person. We have to stand together."

October 11, 2010

2010 Global Hunger Index
The challenge of hunger: Focus on the crisis of child undernutrition
As the world approaches the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – which include a goal of reducing the proportion of hungry people by half – the 2010 Global Hunger Index (GHI) offers a useful and multidimensional overview of global hunger. The 2010 GHI shows some improvement over the 1990 GHI, falling by almost one-quarter. Nonetheless, the index for hunger in the world remains at a level characterized as “serious.” The result is unsurprising given that the overall number of hungry people surpassed 1 billion in 2009, even though it decreased to 925 million in 2010, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
- includes links to a half-dozen related resources

Improve Child Nutrition to Reduce Global Hunger, Says New Global Hunger Index
Press Release
October 11, 2010

Complete report:

2010 Global Hunger Index
The Challenge of Hunger:
Focus on the Crisis of Child Undernutrition
(PDF - 3.4MB, 56 pages)
October 2010

Background Facts and Key Findings

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI is one of 15 centers supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), an alliance of 64 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations.

New at the
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI):

Food Security Portal
This open access policy information portal has been established to provide comprehensive and detailed information country-by-country on food policy developments. We note that currently a lot of information is being collected in an un-coordinated fashion by different international and regional organizations. This portal is designed to pool such information in structured ways and check for data quality and relevance.

The portal will contain relevant food crisis response information initially on its 20 partner countries (mostly in Sub-Sahara Africa, but also in Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean) and shall be expanded beyond these pre-selected countries in the context of the project.

The Food Security Portal is facilitated by the
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

U.S. Department of Agriculture Report Outlines Food Access in America
Study Underscores the Important Role of Federal Nutrition Assistance Programs

News Release
November 15, 2010
USDA Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services Kevin Concannon emphasized the results of an annual report released today by USDA's Economic Research Service that demonstrate that federal nutrition assistance food programs are providing a valuable safety net to the most vulnerable Americans. The report "Food Security in the United States 2009" found that 17.4 million households in America had difficulty providing enough food due to a lack of resources, about the same as in 2008.

Household Food Security in the United States, 2009
By Mark Nord, Alisha Coleman-Jensen, Margaret Andrews, and Steven Carlson
November 2010
Report Summary - HTML
Complete report (PDF (685K, 68 pages)

Key Statistics and Graphs

Additional Resources

Food Security in the United States

Related media coverage:

Record Number of U.S. Households Face Hunger
By Pam Fessler
November 15, 2010
The number of Americans who struggled to get enough food last year remained at a record high, according to a report released Monday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. More than 50 million Americans lived in households that had a hard time getting enough to eat at least at some point during 2009. That includes 17 million children, and at least a half-million of those children faced the direst conditions. They had inadequate diets, or even missed meals, because their families didn't have enough money for food.
Source:
NPR (National Public Radio)

Food Research And Action Center
The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), based in Washington DC, is "working to improve public policies and public-private partnerships to eradicate hunger and under-nutrition in the US...[as it] works with hundreds of national, state and local nonprofit organizations, public agencies, and corporations to address hunger and its root cause, poverty." Visitors to the FRAC website will find that the "Hunger in the U.S." link located in the middle green box on the homepage has a lot of good information on hunger that many people may be unfamiliar with, including a definition of "Hunger and Food Insecurity" and how it is typically measured. The link to the 2010 Anti-Hunger Policy Conference Presentations at the bottom left of the homepage allows visitors to view PowerPoint presentations on such topics as "Running on Empty: Nutritional Access for Children in Cook County, IL", "Making the Case for Anti-Hunger Priorities in Tight State Budgets", and "Obesity, Poverty and Hunger". The Disaster Food Resources link informs visitors of the extra food stamps made available to food stamp recipients in a disaster situation, as well as the disaster food stamps that are made available to those who do not normally receive food stamps.
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2010.

More than 49 million Americans 'food insecure': study
September 2, 2010
WASHINGTON (AFP) - More than 49 million people in the United States do not have regular access to nutritious meals, putting them at risk for a raft of physical, psychological and social problems, a report said Thursday. Nearly 15 percent of households in the United States, representing 49.1 million individuals, experienced food insecurity sometime during 2008, the report published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association says.
Source:
Rogers/Yahoo! News

Related link:

Position of the American Dietetic Association: Food Insecurity in the United States
September 2010
(...)Negative nutrition and non–nutrition-related outcomes have been associated with food insecurity in children, adolescents, and adults, including substandard academic achievement, inadequate intake of key nutrients, poor health, increased risk for and development of chronic disease, poor disease management, and poor psychological and cognitive functioning.
Source:
Abstract
HTML / PDF Full text - if you click either of these links in box on the right-hand side of the page, you'll be asked to register your email with the Journal. When you do, you'll have free access to select full text articles, including the food insecurity article whose abstract appears above on the page you're now reading.

Source:
Journal of the American Dietetic Association
[ American Dietetic Association

From
The New York Times
:

THE SAFETY NET:
Once Stigmatized, Food Stamps Find Acceptance
By Jason Deparle and Robert Gebeloff
February 10, 2010
A decade ago, New York City officials were so reluctant to give out food stamps, they made people register one day and return the next just to get an application. The welfare commissioner said the program caused dependency and the poor were “better off” without it.
Source:
The New York Times

Related NY Times coverage:

The Safety Net
(series of feature articles on poverty in New York)
With millions of jobs lost and major industries on the ropes, America’s array of government aid — including unemployment insurance, food stamps and cash welfare — is being tested as never before. This series examines how the safety net is holding up under the worst economic crisis in decades.

Other articles in this series:

* Living on Nothing but Food Stamps (January 3, 2010)
* Food Stamp Use Soars, and Stigma Fades (November 29, 2009)
* Jobless Checks for Millions Delayed as States Struggle (July 24, 2009)
* Slumping Economy Tests Aid System Tied to Jobs (June 1, 2009)
* For Victims of Recession, Patchwork State Aid (May 10, 2009

See also:

* A History of Food Stamps Use and Policy
* Once Scorned, a Federal Program Grows to Feed the Struggling (slideshow)

The Safety Net
With millions of jobs lost and major industries on the ropes, America's array of government aid - including unemployment insurance, food stamps and cash welfare - is being tested as never before.
This series examines how the safety net is holding up under the worst economic crisis in decades.

Food Stamp Usage Across the Country - (interactive U.S. map)
The number of food stamp recipients has climbed by about 10 million over the past two years, resulting in a program that now feeds 1 in 8 Americans and nearly 1 in 4 children.

More NY Times articles
about the U.S. Food stamp program

Source:
New York Times

From the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization:

Economic crisis is devastating for the world's hungry
1.02 billion hungry people in 2009 - FAO hunger report published
Number of hungry people "intolerable"

14 October 2009, Rome

The sharp spike in hunger triggered by the global economic crisis has hit the poorest people in developing countries hardest, revealing a fragile world food system in urgent need of reform, according to a report released today by FAO and the World Food Programme (WFP). The combination of food and economic crises has pushed the number of hungry people worldwide to historic levels — more than one billion people are undernourished, according to FAO estimates. Nearly all the world's undernourished live in developing countries. In Asia and the Pacific, an estimated 642 million people are suffering from chronic hunger; in Sub-Saharan Africa 265 million; in Latin America and the Caribbean 53 million; in the Near East and North Africa 42 million; and in developed countries 15 million, according FAO's annual hunger report, The State of Food Insecurity, produced this year in collaboration with WFP. The report was published before World Food Day, to be celebrated on 16 October 2009.

The report:

The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2009
Economic crises - impacts and lessons learned

Rome, 2009
HTML version - table of contents and links to individual sections of the report
PDF Version (2.1MB, 61 pages)
"(...) As a result of the economic crisis, estimates reported in this edition of The State of Food Insecurity in the World show that, for the first time since 1970, more than one billion people – about 100 million more than last year and around one-sixth of all of humanity – are hungry and undernourished worldwide."

Source:
Food and Agriculture Organization
of the United Nations (FAO)

Related link:

United Nations World Food Programme
Among the Millennium Development Goals which the United Nations has set for the 21st century, halving the proportion of hungry people in the world is top of the list. (...) WFP is the United Nations frontline agency in the fight against global hunger.

Household Food Security in the United States, 2008
By Mark Nord, Margaret Andrews, and Steven Carlson
November 16, 2009
By Mark Nord, Margaret Andrews, and Steven Carlson
Eighty-five percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year in 2008, meaning that they had access at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households (14.6 percent) were food insecure at least some time during the year, including 5.7 percent with very low food security—meaning that the food intake of one or more household members was reduced and their eating patterns were disrupted at times during the year because the household lacked money and other resources for food.

USDA Report reveals highest rate of food insecurity since report was initiated in 1995
Economic Research Service Report Demonstrates Need for Action
News Release
WASHINGTON, November 16, 2009

Summary of the report (HTML)

Complete report (PDF - 403K, 66 pages)
November 2009
Download the complete report in one PDF file, or see the table of contents and download individual sections of the report (also in PDF format)
Table of contents:
* Abstract, Contents, and Summary
* Introduction
* Household Food Security
* Household Spending on Food
* Use of Federal and Community Food and Nutrition Assistance Programs
* References
* Appendix A—Household Responses to Questions in the Food Security Scale
* Appendix B—Background on the U.S. Food Security Measurement Project
* Appendix C—USDA’s Thrifty Food Plan
* Appendix D—Food Security During 30 Days Prior to the Food Security Survey

[ USDA Briefing Room: Food Security in the United States ]
[ Food Security in the United States: Recommended Readings - includes links to previous food security annual reports and technical reports]

Source:
Household Food Security in the United States
[ Economic Research Service ]
[ U.S. Dept of Agriculture ]

Related links:

America's economic pain brings hunger pangs
USDA report on access to food 'unsettling,' Obama says
By Amy Goldstein
November 17, 2009
The nation's economic crisis has catapulted the number of Americans who lack enough food to the highest level since the government has been keeping track, according to a new federal report, which shows that nearly 50 million people -- including almost one child in four -- struggled last year to get enough to eat.
At a time when rising poverty, widespread unemployment and other effects of the recession have been well documented, the report released Monday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture provides the government's first detailed portrait of the toll that the faltering economy has taken on Americans' access to food
Source:
Washington Post

Newly Poor Swell Lines at Food Banks
By Julie Bosman
February 19, 2009
"(...)
Demand at food banks across the country increased by 30 percent in 2008 from the previous year, according to a survey by Feeding America [formerly America's Second Harvest], which distributes more than two billion pounds of food every year. And instead of their usual drop in customers after the holidays, many pantries in upscale suburbs this year are seeing the opposite.
Source:
The New York Times

America’s Second Harvest has changed its name to Feeding America.

America's Second Harvest Changes Name to Feeding America
Nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief charity changes its name to better engage the public in the fight against hunger
Chicago
September 5, 2008
Effective immediately, America’s Second Harvest—The Nation’s Food Bank Network, an organization of more than 200 food banks that provide food and grocery products to food pantries, soup kitchen and other emergency food agencies across the country, will become Feeding America. The primary objective of the branding change is to more fully engage the public in the fight against hunger.

Feeding America
This new name best conveys our mission—providing food to Americans living with hunger—and will be supported through expansive public outreach campaigns that will raise awareness of domestic hunger and our work.

24 April 2008 - CRINMAIL 977- Special Edition on Food
* Introduction: What do soaring food prices mean for children?
* The Right to Food - and what a rights-based approach means
* Publications and factsheets
* News stories
* Organisation websites
**Other news**
**Quiz special on the Right to Food**
Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

U.S. Mayors examine causes of hunger, homelessness (small PDF file - 2 pages)
News release
December 17, 2007
Washington, D.C. – The U.S. Conference of Mayors and Sodexho, Inc. released today the results of its 2007 Hunger and Homelessness Survey at a press conference at the Conference of Mayors Headquarters in Washington, D.C. For more than 21 years, the Conference of Mayors has documented the magnitude of the issues of hunger and homelessness in our nation’s cities. This report provides an analysis of the scale of the problem in twenty-three of America’s major cities (listed below) and the efforts these cities are making to address the issue.
Source:
The U.S. Conference of Mayors
Sodexho USA

Complete report:

2007 U.S. Hunger and Homelessness Report (PDF file - 983K, 72 pages)
December 2007

One in Eight U.S. Households with Infants is Food Insecure
New Report Links Food Insecurity to Maternal Depression,
Poor Parenting, and Overweight Toddlers

Press Release
July 12, 2007
Washington, DC – One in eight U.S. households with infants (12.5 percent) reports being “food insecure”, according to a new analysis by Child Trends. “Food insecure” is defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to be “limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods."
- the brief also links food insecurity with maternal depression, poor parenting, and-paradoxically-overweight toddlers.

Related Research Briefing based on the report:

Food Insecurity and Overweight among Infants and
Toddlers: New Insights into a Troubling Linkage
(PDF file - 178K, 6 pages)
By Jacinta Bronte-Tinkew, Ph.D., Martha Zaslow, Ph.D., Randolph Cappsa , Ph.D., and Allison Horowitz, B.A.
July 2007
"(...) This Research Brief is based on a forthcoming paper in the Journal of Nutrition titled “Food Insecurity Works Through Depression, Parenting and Infant Feeding to Influence Overweight and Health in Toddlers,” co-authored by the same group as the research briefing."

Source:
Child Trends
Founded in 1979, Child Trends is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research center serving those dedicated to creating better lives for children and youth.

Related link from Child Trends:

Child Trends DataBank
"...the one-stop-shop for the latest national trends and research on over 100 key indicators of child and youth well-being, with new indicators added each month."
HINT: the best way to see the content in this databank is by clicking the "You may also search by: (Subgroup / Age / Alphabetically)" links immediately under the photos on the Child Trends home page.


From the
United Nations
Food and Agriculture Organization:

Call for better food systems to fight hunger and malnutrition:
World Food Day observed in 150 countries
http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/202826/icode/

16 October 2013
News Article
Rome --- Better food systems are required in order to defeat hunger and malnutrition around the globe was the key message coming from the observance of World Food Day at FAO headquarters. (...) This year's observance takes place under the shadow of new hunger figures that show a total of 842 million people are chronically undernourished.

World Food Day
http://www.fao.org/getinvolved/worldfoodday/en/
16 October 2013
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations marks World Food Day each year on 16 October, the day on which the Organization was founded in 1945.
The focus of World Food Day in 2013 will be “Sustainable Food Systems for Food Security and Nutrition.”
- includes links to the following 2013 resources:
* Poster
* Issues paper (see the link below)
* Photo gallery
* Video feature
* Video spot
* Video Message of the Director-General
* Audio
* Director-General's Op-Ed
* FAO headquarters events
* FAO headquarters Ceremony
* High-level seminar
* Photography

Issues Paper:
Healthy People Depend on Healthy Food Systems (PDF - 404K, 8 pages)
http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/templates/getinvolved/images/WFD_issues_paper_2013_web_EN.pdf

Source:
United Nations
Food and Agriculture Organization

http://www.fao.org/home/en/

World Food Programme
http://www.wfp.org/
WFP is the food aid arm of the United Nations system. Food aid is one of the many instruments that can help to promote food security, which is defined as access of all people at all times to the food needed for an active and healthy life.

------------------------------------------------------------------

World Food Day Canada - October 16

Canadians want action on food in Throne Speech on World Food day
http://foodsecurecanada.org/resources-news/news-media/press-releases/canadians-want-action-food-throne-speech-world-food-day
Montreal
15 October 2013
Food Secure Canada (FSC) is calling on Stephen Harper and all other federal party leaders to mark World Food Day tomorrow by speaking up about Canada’s broken food system and what can be done to fix it.

Source:
Food Secure Canada
http://foodsecurecanada.org/
Food Secure Canada is a national membership-based organization concerned with zero hunger, safe and healthy food and sustainable food systems.

---

British Columbia

October 16, 2013
Second Annual Welfare Food Challenge: Hungry for a Welfare Raise
http://welfarefoodchallenge.org/
The Welfare Food Challenge will start on Wednesday, October 16, World Food Day. We are inviting British Columbians to eat only what they can purchase based on what welfare recipients receive for one week (October 16 to October 22). Welfare Food Challenge participants will be expected to live on only the food they can purchase with $26 dollars.

October 2012:
First Annual Welfare Food Challenge:
Comments and observations by participants
at the end of the First Welfare Food Challenge

http://welfarefoodchallenge.org/2012/10/24/welfare-food-challenge-ends/

---

From the
BC Office of the

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

My welfare food challenge: Day 1
http://www.policynote.ca/my-welfare-food-challenge-day-1/
October 16, 2013
By Seth Klein, Director of the BC Office of CCPA
I’ve had a very fortunate and privileged life, and so I figured it was high time I tried to experience a little bit of what life on welfare is actually like, even if only symbolically; to see first-hand just how hard it is to eat a reasonable diet on the amount of money someone on basic social assistance in BC receives.
- includes a breakdown of the welfare cheque payable to, and the living costs of, a single able-bodied person, to show how the figure of $26 is left over for food
- also includes a detailed account of how Seth spent his $26 as frugally as possible, and he includes photos of his week's groceries.

Watch http://www.policynote.ca/ for regular updates from Seth during his week of living on a food budget of $26.
[Spoiler : "Day 2, and I've already broken the rules."]

Source:
BC Office
[ http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc ]
of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
[ http://www.policyalternatives.ca/ ]

Source of the
Welfare Food Challenge:
Raise the Rates
http://raisetherates.org/
Raise the Rates is a coalition of community groups and organizations concerned with the level of poverty and homelessness in British Columbia.

---

Also from
Raise the Rates:

"About a month ago a coalition of some of BC’s leading antipoverty, food, health and social policy organizations invited the CBC to host a day of discussion around the theme of a BC ‘Right to Food Day’ to coincide with this year’s World Food Day. Unfortunately the CBC declined this invitation to be part of a public discussion."

Raise the Rates Letter to the CBC (small PDF file):
http://raisetherates.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/lettertocbc.pdf
August 29,2013

Reply from the CBC (small PDF file)
http://raisetherates.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/cbcreply.pdf
September 13, 2013

-----

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

Hunger Relief Portal - Relief Organizations and Hunger Statistics
This site is a portal consisting of a listing of organizations involved in the elimination of hunger.
Articles on hunger and poverty are also presented, along with statistics on world hunger.

United Nations World Food Program
Interactive Hunger Map

New CDF Report: More Than 13 Million Children Face Food Insecurity -- U.S.
Press Release
June 2 2005
"According to the most recent figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 13.3 million American children were food insecure in 2003; of these, 420,000 lived in households where someone had to go hungry.
Overall, 36.3 million Americans experienced food insecurity in 2003, 1.4 million more than in 2002, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture."

Complete report:

Food Insecurity 2005 (PDF file - 122K, 6 pages)

Source:
Children's Defense Fund

Hunger, homelessness on rise
December 15, 2004
"Hunger and homelessness continue to rise nationwide with requests for emergency food assistance increasing in 97 percent of the cities surveyed including Nashville, according to the Sodexho USA Hunger and Homelessness Survey. The U.S. Conference of Mayors released the 27-city survey in Washington, D.C., Tuesday. An average of 20 percent of the requests for food assistance have gone unmet and 78 percent of the surveyed cities reported a 7 percent increase in requests for shelter by homeless families."
Source:
Nashville City Paper Online

Hunger and Homelessness Survey: A Status Report
on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities
(PDF file - 810K, 133 pages)
December 2004
"To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in America’s cities during 2004, The U.S. Conference of Mayors surveyed 27 major cities whose mayors were members of its Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness. The survey sought information and estimates from each city on 1) the demand for emergency food assistance and emergency shelter and the capacity of local agencies to meet that demand; 2) the causes of hunger and homelessness and the demographics of the populations experiencing these problems; 3) exemplary programs or efforts in the cities to respond to hunger and homelessness; 4) the availability of affordable housing for low income people; and 5) the outlook or the future and the impact of the economy on hunger and homelessness."

Press Release (PDF file - 58K, 3 pages)
December 12, 2004

Source:
U.S. Conference of Mayors

And, from the "Every-Cloud-Has-A-Silver-Lining" crowd:

Survey: Good news in fight against hunger, homelessness
December 15, 2004
"Washington - Requests for emergency food and shelter increased in many large U.S. cities this year, but not by as much as in recent years, according to a survey released Tuesday. Requests for food rose by 14 percent, while appeals for shelter increased by 6 percent, said the annual report by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, based on surveys of 27 large cities. The numbers have risen every year since the conference began the survey 20 years ago. However, the rate of increase for food requests was the lowest since 1998. The rate of increase for shelter requests was less than half what it was in 2003, and the lowest since 1997.
Source:
The Plain Dealer

orld Hunger on the Rise
December 12, 2004
"As many of us head into a holiday season filled with good things to eat, the number of hungry people in the world remains high eight years after a United Nations pledge to halve world hunger. According to the U.N. Food and Agricultural Agency (FAO), which released its annual Hunger Report Wednesday, more than 5 million children die from hunger each year -- one every five seconds. The number of people who do not get enough to eat has increased to 852 million -- up 18 million from the 1990s, causing tremendous suffering and costing developing nations billions of dollars in lost productivity and national income."
Source:
PBS Newshour Extra



The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2004
"The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2004 reports on progress and setbacks in efforts to reach the goal set by the World Food Summit (WFS) in 1996 - to halve the number of chronically hungry people in the world by the year 2015.
Download Full Report (PDF file - 582K, 42 pages)
December 2004
Download Flyer (PDF file - 105K, 2 pages)

- incl.: Towards the World Food Summit target: confronting the crippling costs of hunger - Counting the hungry: latest estimates - The human costs of hunger: millions of lives destroyed by death and disability - The economic costs of hunger: billions in lost productivity, earnings and consumption - Measuring hunger: improving estimates to target more effective action - Hunger hotspots - Globalization, urbanization and changing food systems in developing countries - The impact of changing food systems on small farmers in developing countries - The changing profile of hunger and malnutrition - Acting to combat hunger - Factoring the resilience of food systems and communities into the response to protracted crises - Education for rural people and food security - Rice and food security - The way ahead: scaling up action to scale down hunger - Tables

Source:
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Recent Trends in Food Stamp Participation among Poor Families with Children
Discussion Paper
June 2004
"Food stamp caseloads increased dramatically between October 2002 and October 2003. Our results show that families recently on welfare were substantially more likely to participate in the Food Stamp program in 2002 than in 1997 or 1999. In contrast, participation rates for families with no cash welfare experience, the largest share of poor families with children, remained quite low throughout the period. The new program rules and procedures did not affect their participation. The low current incomes and economic hardship of nonparticipating families indicate the food stamps would benefit these families substantially. States could encourage more families to take advantage of food stamps by strengthening public outreach and simplifying their programs."

Complete report (PDF file - 100K, 38 pages)

Source:
Assessing the New Federalism
[ The Urban Institute ]

Highlights of the Child Nutrition and
Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children Reauthorization Act of 2004

July 8, 2004
"On Wednesday, June 30, 2004, President Bush signed the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 into law (Public Law 108-265). The Act expands the availability of nutritious meals and snacks to more children in school, in outside school hours programs, and in child care; and improves the quality of food in schools."

Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act Section-by-Section from the Congressional Research Service (PDF file - 373K, 53 pages)
July 16, 2004

Federal Food Programs in the U.S
- incl. links to info about : Food Stamp Program - National School Lunch Program - School Breakfast Program - Summer Food Service Program for Children - Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants & Children - Child and Adult Care Food Program - The Emergency Food Assistance Program - Community Food and Nutrition Program - Resources to assist afterschool and summer programs in using the child nutrition programs
- also incl. State Profiles (Choose a state to view a profile of the Federal Food Programs in the state)and a National Profile.

Source:
Current News & Analyses
[ Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) ]

Related Links:

Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act
Bill Summary
Updated June 24, 2004
"The federal government invests more than $16 billion annually in child nutrition programs under the Child Nutrition Act, Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act, and related programs. On June 24, 2004, the House overwhelmingly approved the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act, a House-Senate consensus forged to strengthen these programs and improve their effectiveness for America’s most vulnerable children. “This is the most far-reaching child nutrition bill in a generation,” said Barry Sackin of the American School Food Service Association (ASFSA) in a recent interview with Education Daily."
Source:
Committee on Education and the Workforce
(U.S. House of Representatives)

Google.ca News Search Results : "Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act"
Google.ca Web Search Results : "Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act"
Source:
Google.ca

Modernization of Food Stamp Program Almost Complete - U.S.
June 25, 2004

Food Stamp Program Goes Electronic
Food-Bank Comment Causes Furor
NPR: Commentary: Food Stamps and Medicare

USDA: Food Stamp Program
The WIC Program: Background, Trends, and Issues

A Guide to Food Stamp Program Outreach

"Started in 1939, the food stamp program administered by the United States Department of Agriculture is one of the entitlement programs designated to provide a safety net for Americans. The program enjoys some of the greatest bipartisan support and continues to be immensely successful. Earlier this week, the Department of Agriculture announced that the paper stamps which have been issued under the program for over six decades will be completely phased out later this month and replaced by a plastic card that operates in the same fashion as a bank debit card. As part of this transformation of the program, the Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman has commented that the Agriculture Department will be asking for suggestions for a new name for the food stamp program, a move that may also reduce some of the stigma that has been associated with this extremely valuable initiative in the past. Currently only six counties in California and the U.S. territory of Guam still use the paper food stamps. The usually staid Department of Agriculture has also been in the news as of late due to a comment made by a senior official in that government office who noted in an interview that people who eat at food banks are "taking the easy way out." Several elected officials from the state of Ohio took great exception to his comment, remarking in a letter sent to his office that "You have displayed a disparaging attitude toward the victims of hunger and an astonishing lack of awareness of what is happening beyond the Beltway." [KMG]

The first link leads to a news piece from the Washington Post that discusses the modernization of the delivery system for food stamps in detail. The second link will take visitors to a news brief from MSNBC that provides a summary of the debate surrounding the recent comment made by a senior official at the Department of Agriculture regarding the use of food banks. The third link leads to a 3-minute audio feature from NPR on the continuing popularity of food stamp programs across the United States, reported by the venerable Daniel Schorr. The fourth link leads to the official United States Department of Agriculture website about the food stamp program, complete with eligibility details and research reports on the effectiveness of the program. The fifth link leads to an October 2002 report on the continued success of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (known colloquially as WIC), which "safeguards the health of low-income women, infants, and children up to age 5 who are at nutrition risk." The last and final link leads to a site that provides some fine information on the various food stamp benefit program outreach activities that are intended to provide information on eligibility and benefits, with the primary goal of increasing the participation rate amongst those eligible parties."
Review by The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2003

Characteristics of Food Stamp Households: Fiscal Year 2002
December 2003
Source:
Mathematica Policy Research

From the U.S. Conference of Mayors:

U.S. Conference of Mayors - Sodexho Hunger and Homelessness Survey 2003
Hunger, Homelessness Still On the Rise in Major U.S. Cities; 25-City Survey Finds Unemployment, Lack of Affordable Housing Account for Increased Needs
Press Release
December 18, 2003
"Washington, DC -- Hunger and homelessness continued to rise in major American cities over the last year, according to the new U.S. Conference of Mayors-Sodexho Hunger and Homelessness Survey, released today at the Conference of Mayors Headquarters. As the overall economy remained weak, requests for emergency food assistance increased by an average of 17 percent over the past year, and requests for emergency shelter assistance increased by an average of 13 percent in the 25 cities surveyed."

Hunger and Homelessness Survey:
A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities
A 25-City Survey
(PDF file - 802K, 121 pages)
December 2003

Sources:
U.S. Conference of Mayors
Sodexho USA "the leading provider of food and facilities management in the United States"

The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2003
November 2003
- Table of Contents and acknowledgements
- Flyer (PDF file - 91K, 4 pages)
- Complete report (PDF file - 369K, 40 pages)
- News Release (November 25, 2003)
Source:
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Created in 1945, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has a mandate "to raise levels of nutrition and standards of living, to improve agricultural productivity, and to better the condition of rural populations.(...) FAO has 183 member countries plus one member organization, the European Community. Since its inception, FAO has worked to alleviate poverty and hunger by promoting agricultural development, improved nutrition and the pursuit of food security - defined as the access of all people at all times to the food they need for an active and healthy life."

Food Stamp Participation Jumps in August 2003 to Almost 22.4 Million Persons;
Is Almost 5.5 Million Persons Higher Than in July 2000

Curent News and Analysis
November 7, 2003
- includes Food Stamp Program Participation Data in August 2003 compared with last month, last year and five years ago; also includes links to almost a dozen related online resources.
Source:
Food Research and Action Center
Related Link:
FRAC News Digest - "...highlights what's new on hunger, nutrition and poverty issues at FRAC, at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, around the network of national, state and local anti-poverty and anti-hunger organizations, and in the media."
News Digest Archives - links to almost 100 newsletters back to January 2002, each containing links to further resources

Food Stamp Program [ Food and Nutrition Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture ]
"The Food Stamp Program serves as the first line of defense against hunger. It enables low-income families to buy nutritious food with coupons and Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) cards."
- incl. info for : Applicants & Recipients - Retailers - Governments - Researchers - Public Advocacy Groups

Household Food Security in the United States, 2002
October 2003
Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Report
"Eighty-nine percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year 2002, meaning that they had access, at all times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households were food insecure at least some time during that year. The prevalence of food insecurity rose from 10.7 percent in 2001 to 11.1 percent in 2002, and the prevalence of food insecurity with hunger rose from 3.3 percent to 3.5 percent. This report is based on data from the December 2002 food security survey."
Summary of Study Findings (PDF file - 73K, 2 pages)
Table of contents + links to all chapters and appendices
Complete report (PDF file - 421K, 58 pages)
Source:
Economic Research Service
[ U.S. Department of Agriculture ]

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) (Washington-Based)
"The mission of the International Food Policy Research Institute is to identify and analyze policies for sustainably meeting the food needs of the developing world. Research at IFPRI concentrates on economic growth and poverty alleviation in low-income countries, improvement of the well-being of poor people, and sound management of the natural resource base that supports agriculture."
- focus on Central and South America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia

Global Food Crises
Monitoring and Assessing Impact to Inform Policy Responses
Food Policy Report No. 19
By Todd Benson et al.
September 2008
Executive Summary
Complete report (PDF - 658K 52 pages)

[ earlier food policy reports ]
[ all IFPRI Publications ]

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
FPRI seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI is one of 15 centers supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, an alliance of 64 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations.

Related IFPRI links:

Blog World Hunger http://www.ifpriblog.org
More newshttp://www.ifpri.org
IFPRI on Food Prices http://www.ifpri.org/themes/foodprices/foodprices.asp
IFPRI publications online catalog http://ifpri.catalog.cgiar.org/pubsearch.htm
IFPRI articles in external sources http://www.ifpri.org/pubs/articles/articles.asp
Stay current with IFPRI's Feed http://feeds.feedburner.com/Ifpriupdate

To subscribe to the IFPRI mailing list to receive alerts about their latest releases,
go to http://www.ifpri.org/new/NEWatIFPRI.asp

NEWatIFPRI
"NEWatIFPRI is an e-mail list that updates subscribers with the latest news, publications, and research results important to global food policy issues. IFPRI's mission is to identify and analyze strategies and policies for meeting food needs of the developing world on a sustainable basis, with particular emphasis on low-income countries and on the poorer groups in those countries."
Click on the link above to subscribe - you'll receive one or two issues per month by e-mail.

Global Action for Food Security
March 2007
By Joachim von Braun and Michiel Keyzer
The Centre for World Food Studies at Vrije University in the Netherlands and the International Food Policy Research Institute have recently increased their collaborative activities. Both centers are working on a study of China's agricultural transition. Recently the directors of the two institutes joined forces to discuss global action for food security.

Global Action for Food Security is based on a presentation and discussion by the two authors on global mechanisms to reduce hunger, given at an expert meeting in Amsterdam on September 27, 2006 in celebration of World Food Day and dialogues thereafter.

Source:
Centre for World Food Studies at Vrije University in the Netherlands and
the International Food Policy Research Institute

2006 Global Hunger Index
October 16, 2006
Released for World Food Day (October 16), IFPRI's Global Hunger Index reveals hunger hotspots, shows which regions have improved over time, and demonstrates the links between hunger and war, HIV/AIDS, and gross national income.

Complete report:

2006 Global hunger Index:
A Basis for Cross-Country Comparisons
(PDF file - 570K, 6 pages)

blog world hunger
Blog world hunger is an open global food and nutrition security diary that aims to help the effort to identify and analyze alternative national and international strategies and policies for meeting world food needs in ways that conserve the natural resource base. It is facilitated by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Globalization, Trade and WTO - 70 links to online international resources on the subject of food security and globalization

2020 Vision
A 2020 Vision for Food, Agriculture, and the Environment is an international initiative of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) to identify solutions for meeting future world food needs while reducing poverty and protecting the environment.

World Water and Food to 2025: Dealing with Scarcity
November 5, 2002
Washington, D.C.
"Current water policies threaten global water and food security. This book describes future water situations and how we can avert a crisis
."
Click on the above link to read more about this book, to examine the table of contents and download highlights, individual chapters or the complete report (see below) in PDF format, or you can also order a hard-copy version of the book.

Complete report (PDF file - 2.5MB, 338 pages)

Sustainable Food Security for All by 2020 — Proceedings of an International Conference
September 4–6, 2001 • Bonn, Germany
"IFPRI's 2020 Vision held a major international conference on food security last year in Bonn, Germany. More than 900 people from the public and private sectors and civil society came together for three days to discuss goals, solutions, and the actions necessary to end hunger in the next two decades. These proceedings compile the presentations made by more than 70 speakers, summaries of the discussions that followed, results of polls taken during the conference, and other highlights."
- From this page, you can download (as separate files) the entire proceedings, the table of contents or the foreword.
Publications Released for the 2020 Conference - links to over two dozen reports on food security prepared for or as a result of the Bonn conference.

Reaching Sustainable Food Security for All by 2020
"New Powerpoint tool for teachers, researchers, practitioners, and others working on global food security: 34 slides on IFPRI's action plan for ending hunger by 2020. The action plan reflects IFPRI's best judgment and the advice of more than 900 public, civil society, and private leaders."

DOWNLOAD the Powerpoint presentation (250K) : "A slideshow presentation resulting from the 2020 Bonn conference on achieving global food security."
Also available in the following formats:
HTML
PDF (276K)

Reaching Sustainable Food Security for All by 2020: Getting the Priorities and Responsibilities Right
May 2002
Full Report (PDF file - 1.1MB, 36 pages)
Highlights (PDF file - 630K, 14 pages)
"An action plan resulting from the 2020 Bonn conference on achieving global food security. Reflects IFPRI's best judgment and the advice of more than 900 public, civil society, and private leaders on the actions needed to end hunger by 2020."

THE INFO FINDER - A global link to research on agriculture, hunger, poverty, and the environment.
This convenient new search engine allows you to easily find digital information from the websites of all 16 Future Harvest Centers, the CGIAR, and FAO, which collaboratively developed this research tool.

Food Research and Action Center (U.S)
"The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) is a leading national organization working to improve public policies to eradicate hunger and undernutrition in the United States. Founded in 1970 as a public interest law firm, FRAC is a nonprofit and nonpartisan research and public policy center that serves as the hub of an anti-hunger network of thousands of individuals and agencies across the country."

Federal Food Programs in the U.S
- incl. links to info about : Food Stamp Program - National School Lunch Program - School Breakfast Program - Summer Food Service Program for Children - Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants & Children - Child and Adult Care Food Program - The Emergency Food Assistance Program - Community Food and Nutrition Program - Resources to assist afterschool and summer programs in using the child nutrition programs
- also incl. State Profiles (Choose a state to view a profile of the Federal Food Programs in the state)and a National Profile.

United States:
The Food Assistance Landscape, March 2005
Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Report
"Expenditures for USDA's 15 food assistance programs totaled $46 billion from October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004, marking the second consecutive year in which spending exceeded the previous record high. The fiscal 2004 spending level represented a 10-percent increase from the previous fiscal year, the fourth consecutive year in which total food assistance expenditures increased. Five programs—the Food Stamp Program, the National School Lunch Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the School Breakfast Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program—accounted for 94 percent of USDA's total expenditures for food assistance."

Complete report:

The Food Assistance Landscape, March 2005 (PDF file - 247K, 6 pages)

Related Links:

Food & Nutrition Assistance Programs
Food Security in the United States (ERS Briefing Room)

Source:
Economic Research Service (ERS)
[ U.S. Department of Agriculture ]

Federal Nutrition Programs Making Record
Difference for Families, Children and Elderly
Press Release
February 23, 2005
"FRAC Finds National and State Performance Gaps Remain;
Warns Budget Cut Proposals Could Add to Hunger"

Complete report:

State of the States: 2005
A Profile of Food and Nutrition Programs Across the Nation
(PDF file - 469K, 86 pages)
February 2005
"Millions of American families are struggling with low and stagnant wages, rising energy, housing and child care costs, and shrinking employer-based health coverage. The growth in the use of nutrition programs is helping desperate families cope with the erosion of other private and public supports - - but they can only help so much. The programs can’t wholly replace lagging wages and benefits. And the amounts of assistance which the nutrition programs provide often are not adequate. Food stamps, for example, provide benefits at a level that can not deliver adequate nutrition throughout the month to a typical low-income family."

Source:
Food Research and Action Center
"The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) is a leading national organization working to improve public policies to eradicate hunger and undernutrition in the United States. Founded in 1970 as a public interest law firm, FRAC is a nonprofit and nonpartisan research and public policy center that serves as the hub of an anti-hunger network of thousands of individuals and agencies across the country."

From the U.S. Conference of Mayors:

Hunger, Homelessness On the Rise in Major U.S. Cities
Mayors' 25-City Survey Finds High Housing Costs, Weak Economy Increase Need

2002 Hunger/Homelessness Report Released
Press Release
December 18, 2002
"
As housing costs continued to rise faster than incomes and the national economy remained weak, requests for emergency food assistance increased an average of 19 percent over the past year, according to a 25-city survey released today by the U.S. Conference of Mayors. The survey also found that requests for emergency shelter assistance grew an average of 19 percent in the 18 cities that reported an increase, the steepest rise in a decade."
Full
Report (PDF file - 1MB, 141 pages)

Mayors Call to Action (PDF file - 17K, 2 pages)
Other Sources of Information - PDF file - 18K, 1 page)
Supporting studies and reports on hunger and homelessness from six organizations, from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture to the National Coalition for the Homeless
Sample:
Household Food Security in the United States, 2001 (U.S. Department of Agriculture)
Released November 2002
"The number of food-insecure households increased 9.4% from 10.5 million in 1999 to 11.5 million in 2001."

Related Links:

17th Annual Survey of Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities
December 12, 2001

Press Release
Full Report (PDF file - 400K, 137 pages)
...or click on the Press Release link above and select from the following files : Summary - Hunger - Homelessness - Housing - Outlook
16th Annual Survey on Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities (December 14, 2000)



World Food Summit - Five Years Later (Rome, 10-13 June 2002)
- incl. links to : Daily Journal - From the podium* - Documents - Summit news - Related events - Focus on the issues - Audio/video - Photo gallery - Practical information - Related links - In the headlines - Media contacts
*From the podium - in this section of the World Food Summit site, you'll find a complete list of speeches by representatives of most participating countries - over 200 links, including...
His Excellency Lyle Vanclief (Minister for Agriculture and Agri-Food, Canada)

Related Link:

World Food Summit - Rome, November 1996
- incl. links to : Why the summit? - Opening Interventions by participants - Documents - Parallel Events - Conclusion - World Food Summit Newsletter

Future Harvest (International)
"Future Harvest is a global initiative, incorporated in June 1998 as a charitable and educational organization to advance debate and catalyze action for a world with less poverty, a healthier human family, and a better environment. In 2001, Future Harvest UK was established in the United Kingdom. Future Harvest was created by 16 food and environmental research centers, known as the Future Harvest Centers, located around the world. These centers are supported by 58 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations known as the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)."
Site Map - links to everything on the site on one page
- incl. the five pillars of the Future Harvest organization : Peace - Growth - Earth - Health - People
Related Links :

Future Harvest Centers - "international food and environmental research centers located throughout the world that are working to increase food security, reduce poverty, and protect the environment in the developing countries."
Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)

Economic Perspectives - May 2002
Food Security and Safety
Source : U.S. Department of State
Office of International Information Programs (IIP)
(formerly the Information Bureau of the United States Information Agency)

Electronic Journals of the U.S. Department of State

Working Papers - Cornell Food and Nutrition Policy Program
Links to dozens of downloadable working papers on food, nutrition, poverty, health, etc - all international (no Canadian content)
Source : Cornell Food and Nutrition Policy Program at Cornell UniversityHunger in America 2001
"This report presents the results of a study conducted in 2001 for America's Second Harvest (A2H), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 32,000 clients served by the A2H network, as well as completed questionnaires from nearly 24,000 A2H agencies."
November 11, 2001
Complete Report (PDF file - 618K, 289 pages)

Report of the 27th Session of the Committee on World Food Security
Rome, 28 May - 1 June 2001

List of Documents from the 27th Session - links to 16 documents

Food Insecurity and Public Assistance (U.S.)
Working Paper
George J. Borjas
May 2001
This paper examines the extent to which welfare programs reduce the probability that vulnerable household are food insecure, where food insecurity occurs when the household experiences food deprivation because of financial resource constraints.
(The above link takes you to the Working Paper abstract)
Complete Paper (PDF file - 150K, 54 pages)
Source : Joint Center for Poverty Research (JCPR)

Nutrition Assistance Programs (U.S.)
- incl. links to : The Food Stamp Program - Child Nutrition - Team Nutrition - Women, Infants and Children Program / Farmers' Market - Food Distribution
Source : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services

From the The U.S Conference of Mayors (USCM) :

National Call to Action

Press Release
February 27, 2002
"Citizens from every state in the nation join America's Second Harvest to issue urgent call to action for more food for the hungry Recession, job loss send thousands more to food-relief agencies and supplies can't keep pace with demand."

A National Call to Action - links to : The Facts (Increased Need, The Impact of 9/11, National Statistics) - Press Materials (Media Advisory, Press Release, E-Bibliography, CEO Biography) - What Can Be Done (What can I do?, Volunteer, Make a Donation, Spread the Word, Know the Issues

Hunger and homelessness up sharply in major U.S. cities
Conference of Mayors’ 27-City Survey Finds Weak U.S. Economy Means More People in Need
Press Release
December 12, 2001
On this page, you'll find links to the complete report, a report summary and individual sections on hunger, homelessness and housing, as well as a section entitled Outlook

17th Annual Conference Survey of Hunger, Homelessness (USCM)
December 17, 2001
Article (includes report highlights)
"To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in America's cities during 2001 The U.S. Conference of Mayors surveyed 27 major cities whose mayors were members of its Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness. The survey sought information and estimates from each city on
1) the demand for emergency food assistance and emergency shelter and the capacity of local agencies to meet that demand;
2) the causes of hunger and homelessness and the demographics of the populations experiencing these problems;
3) exemplary programs or efforts in the cities to respond to hunger and homelessness;
4) the availability of affordable housing for low income people; and
5) the outlook for the future and the impact of the economy on hunger and homelessness."

16th Annual Survey on Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities

Press Release
December 14, 2000
Mayors' 16th Annual Survey on "Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities" Finds Increased Levels of Hunger, Increased Capacity to Meet Demand; Affordable Housing Cited as Primary Factor in Largest Emergency Shelter Demand in a Decade
- includes an overview of the key findings of the report on hunger and homelessness and a link to the complete report in PDF format (289K, 125 pages)
Source : U.S. Conference of Mayors - Representing U.S.A. CitiesSurvey Shows Demand for Emergency Food and Shelter on the Rise in America's Cities
December 16, 1999
"WASHINGTON, DC -- A survey of 26 cities released today by the (and available at www.usmayors.org) shows hunger and homelessness grows unabated, despite an expanding national economy. Among two key finding of the "1999 Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities", demand for emergency food related assistance during 1999 grew at the highest level since 1992, and demand for emergency housing related assistance grew at the highest level since 1994."
World Hunger Year (WHY)
WHY is an American not-for-profit registered organization that advances long-term solutions to hunger and poverty. It does so by supporting community-based organizations that empower individuals and build self-reliance, i.e., offering job training, education and after school programs; increasing access to housing and healthcare; providing microcredit and entrepreneurial opportunities; teaching people to grow their own food; and assisting small farmers. WHY connects these organizations to funders, media and legislators.

THE STATE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 2000
Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations
Rome (2000)
Incredible resource - contains excellent historical information as well as current info on a wide range of issues related to food and agriculture, e.g., Microcredit - the world food crisis - social issues - food security - and much, much more
- Go to the FAO website

Bread for the World (U.S.)
Bread for the World is a nationwide Christian citizens movement seeking justice for the world's hungry people by  lobbying our nation's decision makers.
Check the site map - lots here to examine.
See Issues and Actions
- Links to Other Anti-Hunger and Poverty Organizations
and more...

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations - Food for All
Since its creation in October 1945, FAO has worked to alleviate poverty and hunger by promoting agricultural development, improved nutrition and the pursuit of food security - the access of all people at all times to the food they need for an active and healthy life. The Organization offers direct development assistance, collects, analyses and disseminates information, provides policy and planning advice to governments and acts as an international forum for debate on food and agriculture issues.
 Special Programme for Food Security
Towards Sustainable Food Security

Community Food Security Coalition
The CFSC is a California-based non-profit membership-based national coalition of over 600 organizations and individuals that focus on food and agriculture issues. Our mission is to bring about lasting social change by promoting community-based solutions to hunger, poor nutrition, and the globalization of the food system.

Eldis Food Security Guide (UK)
Incl. links to food security country-profiles (Africa - Asia - Latin America) International organisations - Famine Early Warning Systems - Situation reports - Statistics - Research Centres - Discussion lists - Bibliographical sources - HungerWeb

U.N. World Food Programme - The food aid organization of the United Nations

Food First
Founded in 1975, the Institute for Food and Development Policy -- better known as Food First -- is a member-supported, nonprofit 'peoples' think tank  and education-for-action center. Our work highlights root causes and value-based solutions to hunger and poverty around the world, with  a commitment to establishing food as a fundamental human right.

Food for the Hungry is an international organization that exists to fulfill a God-given mandate to help people overcome both physical and spiritual hungers (Isaiah 58). Our efforts include integrated, child-focused development and relief programs in more than 25 countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

State by State Guide to key statistics on hunger, poverty and federal nutrition programs

Cities Feeding People
- This site provides information about the program initiative on urban agriculture (UA) at Canada's International Development Research Centre.
IDRC supports applied, multidisciplinary research on food security and urban policy issues in the South.
 
United Nations World Food Programme
WFP is the frontline United Nations organisation fighting to eradicate world hunger -- whether it is the hunger that suddenly afflicts people fleeing ethnic conflict in Rwanda or Bosnia or the chronic hunger that affects the hungry poor in countries such as Bangladesh or India. WFP became operational in 1963 and is now the world's largest international food aid organisation.
-  About WPF
- Newsroom

Food Bank Central (Massachusetts)
Northwest Harvest (Washington State)
World Health Organization
World Hunger Year (New York)
EarthSave Canada
Food Not Bombs
The Digger Archives
World Hunger Year

 

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