Canadian Social Research Links

Employment and Social Development Canada

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Emploi et Développement social Canada

Updated March 25, 2015
Page révisée le 25 mars 2015


[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]

March 8, 2015

New from the
House of Commons Public Accounts (PACP) Committee:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/committeebusiness/CommitteeHome.aspx?Cmte=PACP&Parl=38&Ses=1

Document: Departmental Action Plans and Progress Reports
http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=6272639&Language=e&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2



The Federal Government section of Canad
ian Social Research Links comprises several separate pages of links : 
- Federal Government Links - sites of general interest (to social researchers), e.g., government information or research sites; also includes links to directories of federal programs and services for specific target groups like youth and seniors 
- Canada's Economic Action Plan - including links to federal government annual reports and analysis/critique of federal budgets since 2009 from various sources.
- Federal Departments and Agencies (three pages) - links to the websites of almost two dozen federal departments and agencies involved with social programs (includes links to selected content on each of those sites):
*** Page 1 - Agriculture and Agri-Food to Environment
*** Page 2 - Finance
*** Page 3 - Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs

- Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) - info about Old Age Security, the Canada Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and other social programs - and where I worked...
- Health Links - Canada/International - info about Health Canada and related stuff from the U.S. and elsewhere in the world
- Employment Insurance in Canada - selected reports and other related links

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Looking for a job or employment assistance?
Jump directly to the
Preparing for and finding jobs in Canada section of the page you're now reading.

Labour Market Agreements --- UPDATED JANUARY 30, 2015


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April 27, 2014
From Health and Welfare Canada to Employment and Social Development Canada:
What's in a Name?

Timeline (back to 1944) of changes in the name of the federal department
responsible for Old Age Security and the Canada Pension Plan and more.

[This link takes you further down on the page you're now reading.]


A review of 2014 at Employment and Social Development Canada
http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=916879&tp=1&_ga=1.50104038.172836795.1417086551
December 23, 2014– Gatineau, Quebec
“Our Government remains focused on what matters to Canadians: creating jobs, economic growth and long-term prosperity for all Canadians. Our Jobs Agenda will help fix the paradox of too many people without jobs and too many jobs without people,” said Minister Jason Kenney.

Source:
Employment and Social Development Canada
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/

NEW from
Service Canada:

Quarterly report of Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security
monthly amounts and related figures - January to March 2015

HTML version : http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/services/pensions/infocard/janmar15.shtml
PDF version (81KB, 2 pages) : http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/services/pensions/janmar15.pdf

Table of Contents:
*
Canada Pension Plan and Quebec Pension Plan Amounts
* Disability and Survivor Amounts
* Calculation of CPP Maximum Monthly Amounts For New Benefits
* Old Age Security
* OAS forecasted expenditures, 2014-15 (in millions)
* Other CPP/QPP figures
* CPP/QPP forecasted expenditures, 2014-15 (millions)

Earlier editions of this report (back to January - March 2013):
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/services/pensions/infocard/index.shtml

Source:
Service Canada

http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/

Related links:

Canada Pension Plan Retirement Pension
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/services/pensions/cpp/retirement/index.shtml

Old Age Security Pension
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/services/pensions/oas/pension/index.shtml

---

From
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC):
[ http://www.esdc.gc.ca/ ]

Old Age Security (OAS)
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/en/pension/oas/index.page

Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/en/pension/cpp/index.page

Source:
ESDC Retirement Pensions and Benefits
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/retirement/index.shtml

Action for Seniors (PDF - 2.3MB, 28 pages)
http://www.seniors.gc.ca/build/theme-sc-ac/pdf/action_report_for_seniors.pdf
September 10, 2014

This report is a comprehensive information resource highlighting federal programs and services that can be accessed by seniors, their families, and caregivers ranging from help to combat elder abuse to government support such as ensuring seniors' financial security.
* Implement changes to income security programs to reflect the modern reality of how Canadians choose to live, work and retire
* Introduce new, and support ongoing programs that help seniors continue to be active members of their communities, through paid or volunteer work
* Support initiatives that help seniors remain in their homes as long as possible
* Invest in research and programs that support and promote good health while aging
* Undertake activities to raise awareness of elder abuse and help prevent it

Source:
Seniors.gc.ca
http://www.seniors.gc.ca/

Action for Seniors is an initiative of
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/

Found in the September 17 issue of SPARmonitor
(see the next link below)

---

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

Seven reasons why disabled Canadians are losing CPP benefits
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/seven-reasons-why-disabled-canadians-are-losing-cpp-benefits/article19630200/
By Michael Prince
July 16, 2014
There are serious problems at the Social Security Tribunal and the Canada Pension Plan Disability Program, especially for people trying to appeal decisions on their ineligibility for this disability pension benefit.
(...)
The seven problems are as follows:
* First, about 60 per cent of initial applications for CPP disability benefits are refused.
* Second, the rate of successful appeals against initial rulings on CPP disability benefits has been declining over the last decade, to just 43 per cent in 2013-14.
* Third, there is a “backlog” of more than 7,000 appeals on denials of CPP disability benefits to be heard by the Social Security Tribunal, a body established in 2013 to streamline the previous system.
* Fourth, working Canadians with disabilities who apply for CPP benefits have lost certain legal rights and had other rights confined.
* Fifth, in the Social Security Tribunal system, every application to the Tribunal is heard before a single member, whereas under the previous system every application for an appeal was heard by a three member panel which usually contained a medical specialist and a lawyer along with a lay person.
* Sixth, under the previous system new evidence could be introduced by a claimant at the second level of appeal, while under the Social Security Tribunal no new evidence or testimony can be presented before the Tribunal’s Appeal Division, following a decision by the Tribunal’s General Division.
* Seventh, the federal government’s stated aim is to move to more electronic technologies for handling CPP disability cases, but nothing in the legislation or the regulations for the Social Security Tribunal requires that teleconferences or videoconferences be accessible to people with a range of impairments or health conditions.

The consequences of these seven problems are extremely distressing: diminished rights of working Canadians with disabilities; compromised rules of natural justice; lost expertise in decision making and an under-resourced Tribunal.

41 comments about this article
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/seven-reasons-why-disabled-canadians-are-losing-cpp-benefits/article19630200/comments/

[ Michael J. Prince is the Lansdowne Professor of Social Policy at the University of Victoria, and has written extensively on disability policy. ]

Source:
The Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/



Looking for job-related resources?

Jump directly to the Preparing for and finding jobs in Canada section of the page you're now reading:
- includes links to the Employment and Social Development Canada Labour program, the Job Bank and 19 non-governmental job-finding and job-preparation websites.




On July 15, 2013, Prime Minister Harper announced changes to the federal Ministry.

-------------------------------------------

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is now called
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

The Honourable Jason Kenney is now
Minister of Employment and Social Development.

Sources:
Prime Minister's website
CBC ]

------------------------------------------

April 27, 2014
The page you're reading now is a work in progress : ESDC will gradually revise all of its old URLs,
and the page you're now reading will evolve accordingly, as time permits.


Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) - Home Page
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) is the department of the Government of Canada responsible for developing, managing and delivering social programs and services. We deliver some $87 billion in programs and services and have approximately 24,000 employees, approximately 19,000 of whom work under Service Canada. Source:
About Us

- includes links to the following themes : *Funding * Jobs and Training * Retirement Pensions * Disability * Seniors * Child and Family * Communities.
[NOTE : See "Overview of ESDC site content/programs" below the yellow box for more detail on each of these themes.]
- Each of the theme links in the main site menu will open a drop-down box with further choices.

COMMENT by Gilles:
If you're using a device with a small screen or if you have your computer set to a larger resolution
, the theme links don't appear across the top of your browser. Instead, you'll notice a tiny icon consisting of three stacked parallel lines about one centimetre in length in the top right corner of your browser window. This tiny icon is a pop-up / drop-down "Site menu" containing the same seven themes and, when clicked individually, more sub-themes. I recommend using the wider resolution if possible, so that the themes appear on the page itself, not a drop-down menu, which is a pain in the keester.

---

Ministers and Officials

ESDC Branches (incl. Income Security and Social Development Branch, "home" of Old Age Security, the Canada Pension Plan and the Office of Disability Issues, among other issues)
NOTE : This link offers a list of branches but no links or further descriptions or other content.


Employment and Social Development
2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities

HTML version
PDF version (1.1MB)
The Report on Plans and Priorities provides (RPP) an overview of the Departmental priorities, planned work to achieve these priorities, planned spending, Full Time Equivalents, and performance targets. The RPP supplements the information contained in Part II of the Main Estimates.

Part II - Main Estimates:
Employment and Social Development

http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/me-bpd/20142015/me-bpd02-eng.asp#toc2-50
NOTE: This is a humongous document that is curiously *not* available as a PDF file.
If you go to the table of contents page of the 2014-15 Main Estimates here:
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/me-bpd/20142015/me-bpdtb-eng.asp
...then scroll down to ESDC and click, it will take almost 30 seconds for the correct page to appear.
BUT --- It's worth the wait!
Recommended reading.

Overview of ESDC site content/programs:

NOTE : Some of the links below are from Service Canada.
That's because ESDC is responsible for program administration and Service Canada is responsible for providing information on how the programs operate.
[ ESDC links contain "esdc.gc.ca" in their URL. ]


Retirement Pensions and Benefits

General info and how to apply for benefits:
* Canada Pension Plan retirement pension
* Old Age Security pension
--- Guaranteed Income Supplement
--- Allowance
--- Allowance for the survivor
- also incl. Acts and Regulations - Success Stories - International Benefits - Disability Benefits

----------------------------------------------------------

Old Age Security
- includes links to the following:
* The Old Age Security (OAS) pension
* The Guaranteed Income Supplement
* The Allowance (formerly Spouse's Allowance)
* The Allowance for the Survivor

----------------------------------------------------------

Canada Pension Plan
- includes links to the following:
* Retirement pension
* Post-retirement benefit
* Disability benefits
* Survivor benefits
* Pension sharing
* Credit splitting for divorced or separated couples

NOTE : Québec administers its own public pension plan, the Régie des rentes

----------------------------------------------------------

Reports about Public Pensions
- includes links to CPP Annual Reports for four years and to six reports on public pensions, several of which are dead links and most of which are past their stale date.

----------------------------------------------------------

Statistics related to the Old Age Security Program and the Canada Pension Plan

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Labour - ESDC's Labour Program
Standards and Equity - Health and Safety - Labour Relations - Resources

Jobs and Training
* Education, Training and Skills Development
* Jobs, Employment and the Labour Market
* Workplace Rights and Responsibilities

Labour Publications and Reports

----------------------------------------------------------

Funding Programs
Learn about the funding opportunities (grants and contributions) that are offered by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), the Labour Program and Service Canada by browsing programs accepting applications or funding by topic.

Sample Funding Program:
New Horizons for Seniors


Disability

Content of this page:

* Apply for Disability Benefits
--- CPP Disability
--- Veterans Disability Pension
--- Student Loans and Grants
* Popular Pages
--- Disability Savings Plan
--- CPP Disability Benefits
--- Enabling Accessibility Fund
* Support for Individuals and Families
--- Disability Savings Plan
--- Disability Benefits
* Funding Programs and Community Initiatives
--- Enabling Accessibility
--- Funding for Social Development
--- Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities
--- Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities
* Disability Resources
--- Accessibility Resource Centre
--- Acts and Regulations
--- Consultations
--- Success Stories
* Grant and Bond Issuers

----------------------------------------------------------

Child and Family
Content of this page:
* Apply for Benefits
--- Child Tax Benefit
--- Child Disability Benefit
--- CPP Children’s Benefit
--- Maternity and Parental Benefits
* Child Care
* Early Childhood
* Intercountry Adoption
* Social Development: Project Funding

Related Information:

Income Assistance for Families and Children

Saving for your Child’s Education

Facts about Child and Family in Canada

CanLearn

----------------------------------------------------------

Communities
To help citizens, communities, the not-for-profit sector and other stakeholders move forward with their own solutions to social and economic challenges affecting vulnerable populations in Canada, Employment and Skills Development Canada undertakes policy development, research, knowledge mobilization and partnership development activities.

Communities include : Homelessness - Official Language Minority Communities - Voluntary Sector

ESDC Publications and Reports
The department produces independent and objective research studies in support of its policy development work. It also produces several types of reports that act as on-going management tools to assist the department in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of its activities and to get better results.

Reports and Publications by Topic:

* Disability: Accessibility Resource Centre
* Education Savings and Student Loans
* Employment Insurance
* Labour Market Information
* Public Pensions (Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security)
* Seniors and Aging Society

Departmental Reports
* Access to Information and Privacy
* Audit Reports
* Consultation and Engagement
* Departmental Performance Report
* Evaluation Reports
* Main Estimates
* Management Accountability Framework
* Official Languages
* Program Activity Architecture (PAA)
* Quarterly Financial Reports
* Report on Plans and Priorities
* Sustainable Development Strategy

COMMENT : Surely the web team at ESDC could have presented the above reports a bit more efficiently from a user's point of view.
Anyone who wants to check out what's new at the departmental level must click each the above 19 links to see everything.
Why not have a one-click list of publications?? Or a What's New page for the whole Dept.??

Selected reports from
Employment and Development Canada:


Click the links in this box to jump directly to the following specific content further down on this page:

Evaluation of the Labour Market Agreements : Final Report (March 31, 2013)

From Health and Welfare Canada to
Employment and Social Development Canada

Timeline of changes in the name of the federal department responsible for Old Age Security and the Canada Pension Plan and more

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008
Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces (25 yrs of Canadian social program statistics)

---
Preparing for and finding jobs in Canada
Labour Market Information
- incl. the federal Job Bank + private job-finding and job-preparation websites

The National Shelter Study 2005-2009 (PDF - 300K, 34 pages):
http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Homelessness%20Partnering%20Secretariat%202013%20Segaert_0.pdf
By Aaron Segaert (Homelessness Partnering Secretariat)
2012 (
Posted April 2013)
The National Shelter Study is the first national analysis using consistent shelter data collected over an extended period of time to establish a baseline count and description of the characteristics of the homeless population in Canada. This study uses information gathered from emergency homeless shelters using the Homeless Individuals and Families Information System (HIFIS) and emergency homeless shelters in the City of Toronto.

Table of Contents:
* About HIFIS
* Methods
* A National Portrait of Homelessness
* Quick facts
* Demographic Trends
* Quick facts
* Conclusion

NOTE:
At the time of the study, there were nearly 400 emergency shelters with over 15,400 beds across Canada.

---

Related links:

National Homelessness Information System (NHIS)
http://hifis.hrsdc.gc.ca/index-eng.shtml
The National Homelessness Information System (NHIS) is a federal data development initiative designed to collect and analyze baseline data on the use of shelters in Canada. NHIS supports the implementation and deployment of the Homeless Individuals and Families Information System (HIFIS) software, HIFIS training at the community level, and projects related to community shelter data coordination.
---
More about HIFIS:
http://hifis.hrsdc.gc.ca/depliant-brochure/index-eng.shtml

Source:
Homelessness Strategy
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/communities/homelessness/index.shtml

The Homelessness Strategy is part of
Employment and Development Canada:

http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml

Social Policy Reports (Archive)
http://goo.gl/dKaX8
Click the link above for the following :
* Five editions of a report on social assistance caseloads.
* A Canada Fit for Children - April 2004
* Future directions To Address Disability Issues for the Government of Canada: Working Together for Full Citizenship - January 1999
* OECD - Early Childhood Education and Care Policy: Canada Country Note - October 2004
* OECD Thematic Review of Early Childhood Education and Care Canadian Background Report - October 2004
* Social Assistance in Canada in January 1994 (1996) - Over 40 pages of information on Canadian social assistance programs as they operated in 1994.
* Earlier editions of Social Security Statistics Canada and Provinces
* Child Welfare in Canada 2000 - January 2000
* Child and Family Services Bulletins (1995-2000)
* Reports on Foster Care in Canada
* Child and Family Statistics 1992-2001
* Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2004
* Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2005
* Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2006
* Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2007
* Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008
* Conferences and Consultations:
New Century, New Risks: Challenges for Social Development in Canada
* more...

Persons with Disabilities

Report released on helping Canadians with disabilities find jobs
http://news.gc.ca/web/article-eng.do?m=%2Findex&nid=715349
January 16, 2013
News Release
The Government of Canada has partnered with Canadian business leaders to identify successes and best practices in the employment of people with disabilities, as well as the barriers faced by employers in employing people with disabilities. Today, the Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development, and the Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, announced the release of Rethinking disAbility in the Private Sector, the report of the Panel on Labour Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities.

Report of the Panel on Labour
Market Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities:

Rethinking disAbility in the Private Sector
2013
HTML version:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability/consultations/rethinking_disabilities.shtml

PDF version (1.74MB, 28 pages):
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability/consultations/rethinking_disabilities.pdf

Table of Contents:
* The challenge
* Executive Summary
* Employers speak
* Understanding the business case
* Making it work for you
* Concluding thoughts
* Selected resources
* Organizations consulted

* Child Disability Benefit (from the Canada Revenue Agency)

* Persons with Disabilities Online
"Persons with Disabilities Online is an Internet site where persons with disabilities, their family, their caregivers, and others with an interest in disabilities can access a broad range of information concerning disabilities."
This is the Government of Canada portal to hundreds of links to federal government programs and services for people with disabilities.
- incl. links in the following areas : Accessibility - Education - Employment - Financial Support - Health - Housing & Residential Services - Personal Supports - Rights - Reports, Publications, Fact Sheets - Disability related government offices - Tax Programs - Accessible transportation & regulations


Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008 (PDF - 608K, 141 pages) :
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf
Produced by the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Directors of Income Support
This report includes a description of, and statistics related to, the welfare system in each province and territory, information about federal-provincial-territorial jurisdictional and funding issues, a bit of historical info on the Canada Assistance Plan and the Canada Health and Social Transfer, etc.

"In recognition of the growing public demand for comprehensive information on provincial and territorial social assistance programs and caseloads, the Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008 is the fifth annual joint publication by federal, provincial and territorial governments. The report provides a general overview of social assistance in Canada, as well as a description of income support-related/social assistance programs in each jurisdiction. This report does not include social assistance rates as this information is currently available to the public on most provincial and territorial government Web sites."
(Excerpt from Chapter 1 - Summary)

---

NOTE: Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008 is online, but not on the HRSDC website. The above links point to a copy of the report that was archived by the Internet Archive.

Thanks for nothing, HRSDC.

The Internet Archive also contains the earlier versions of this statistical report:

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2004 http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/publications/reports/sp-626-09-05e/page00.shtml

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2005
http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/publications/reports/sd10-3-2004e/page00.shtml

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2006
http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/social_policy/fpt/page00.shtml

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2007
http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/social_policy/sasr_2007/page00.shtml

NOTE: Chapter Two of the report is a seven-page descriptive overview of social assistance in Canada in 2008, comprising a (very) brief history of federal social assistance since 1966 and general information about how welfare works in Canadian provinces and territories (including the treatment of federal child benefits under welfare programs, welfare eligibility conditions and administrative rules, etc.). Other chapters of the report provide, for each province and territory, information on eligibility (including asset and income exemption levels) and benefits (but no actual benefit levels), as well as an impressive number of statistical tables, graphs and charts providing numbers of cases and beneficiaries (time series statistics going back as far as the mid-1990s, depending on the jurisdiction), profile information (age/education/sex of household head, cases by reason for assistance) and even (for most jurisdictions) the percentage of households reporting income.

Source:
Social Policy
[ Human Resources and Skills Development Canada ]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

When Working is not enough to Escape Poverty:
An Analysis of Canada's Working Poor

By Dominique Fleury and Myriam Fortin
Policy Research Group
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
August 2006
NOTE: the link above takes you to the title page, where you'll find links to two related publications (released in 2001 and 2002) from the same authors : What Does it mean to be Poor and Working? (2002) and The Other Face of Working Poverty (2001), as well as a link to the table of contents(see the next link below) and a link to the next page in the file.

Table of Contents:
* Title Page * Acknowledgments * Executive Summary * Introduction * Chapter 1: Literature Review on Working Poverty * Chapter 2: Who Are the Working Poor? * Chapter 3: A Descriptive Profile of Working Poor Canadians for 2001 * Chapter 4: Determinants of Poverty Among Workers * Chapter 5: Greater Family Work Effort as a Means of Escaping Working Poverty * Chapter 6: Should Self-Employed and Salaried Working Poor Canadians be Treated Differently? * Chapter 7: Impact of Increasing Hourly Wages on the Earnings of Salaried Workers * Chapter 8: The Situation of Working Poor Canadians Over the Longer Term * Summary and Policy Considerations * Appendix A: Data * Appendix B: Logistic Regressions: Technical Details * Appendix C: Logistic Regressions: Methodological Details * Appendix D: Robustness of the Results to Definitional Changes * Appendix E: Earning Potential of Working Families * Appendix F: Limitations and Mechanics of Simulations Conducted to Assess the Impact on (Working) Poverty of Increasing the Minimum Wage * Bibliography

PDF version of this report (1.2MB, 174 pages)

En français :

Lorsque travailler ne suffit pas afin d'échapper à la pauvreté: une
analyse de la pauvreté chez les travailleurs au Canada
Page couverture
Table des matières
Format PDF
(1,4Mo, 206 pages)

Links to two more recent papers by the same authors:
(NOTE: these two texts are available from the Policy Research Initiative)

What Does it mean to be Poor and Working?
• This paper discusses the spending patterns and living conditions of working poor families in 2002, using data from the Survey of Household Spending.

The Other Face of Working Poverty
• This paper looks at low-income Canadians who were active in the labour market in 2001 according to the number of hours that they worked, using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics.

----------------------------------



Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces
1978-79 to 2002-03

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/20061209234003/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page00.shtml
OR
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page00.shtml
OR:
http://goo.gl/B5rgvQ

NOTE: Since January 2012, this report is no longer available on the website of Human Resources and Skills Development (HRSDC) or its successor, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). This report and many others were moved to the web archive collection at Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

[By Gilles, March 1, 2014]

-------------------------------------------

This report is a goldmine of statistical information (beneficiary data and expenditure data) on current and defunct Canadian federal social programs, and even some on provincial/territorial programs.

This report offers 25 years of longitudinal data on costs and numbers of beneficiaries for most programs - over 100 tables - covering a large number of programs --- here's a partial list:
- Child Tax Benefit, Family Allowances, the Child Tax Credit, Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement/Spouse's Allowance ("The Allowance"), Federal Training and Employment Programs, Federal Goods and Services Tax Credit, the Canada/Quebec Pension Plans, War Veterans' and Civilian War Allowances, Veterans' and Civilians' Disability Pensions, Unemployment/Employment Insurance, the Canada Assistance Plan, Workers' Compensation, Youth Allowances, Social Assistance and Social Services for Registered Indians --- and more...

---------------------------

NOTE : All links below are functional.
Click any link and you'll find the desired content on the website of Archive.org

Preface (short blurb only)
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page01.shtml

List of Tables
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page02.shtml
Read the Introductory notes at the top of the page and in Appendix A:
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page03.shtml
of this report for all methodological notes.
"...Tables in this report have been organized into two parts. Part I presents three Overview Tables which illustrate the trends in social security expenditures by all levels of government for Canada. Part II comprises Component Tables which provide data on beneficiaries and expenditures for individual programs."

Overview Tables:
Table 1:
Total Social Security Expenditures in Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table1a.shtml

Table 2:
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table2.shtml
Social Security Expenditures by Welfare Program and Total Health and Education Expenditures, Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03

Table 3
Expenditure Analyses of Social Security Programs, Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table3.shtml

A number of older tables were removed from this edition of the Social Security Statistics report, including some tables with info on Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances and Unemployed Assistance.
Check older editions of this report for those older stats:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090219214655/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/statistics/index.shtml

Many of the tables are historical and likely of little interest except to historians and CAP-o-philes --- they offer historical caseload and expenditure statistics on each of the CAP cost-sharing components (General Assistance - Homes for Special Care for Children and Adults - Child Welfare - Health Care - Other Welfare Services and Work Activity).

Scroll down the list of tables
[ http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page02.shtml ]
... to find a particular program, then click on its name to access the HTML version of the table (the HTML page includes links to the PDF and Excel versions of the table).

You'll find many key stats tables and some interesting analyses here - only a few of which appear below
- includes links to over two dozen tables (Tables 352-911) with info on federal contributions under the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) and the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) to the cost of provincial and territorial welfare programs.
NOTE: for more info about CAP, the CHST and the Canada Social Transfer (CST, which replaced the CHST in April 2004), see the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

A few sample tables:

Table 360
Total Federal-Provincial Cost-Shared Program Expenditures, 1978-79 to 1999-2000
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab360.shtml
NOTE: Table 360 traces the evolution/devolution of transfers under the Canada Assistance Plan (in dollars) from 1976 to 1999. No new claims were paid out under CAP after the Canada Health and Social Transfer came into effect in April 1996; amounts shown as CAP expenditures for the fiscal years after 1995-96 are final settlements with each jurisdiction for all outstanding commitments by the federal government.

Table 361
Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) - Number of Beneficiaries of General Assistance (including dependants), as of March 31, 1979 to 1996

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab361.shtml
- This is a key table for research on welfare programs - welfare dependency statistics by jurisdiction over the years. These are the final, definitive numbers.

Table 362
Total Federal-Provincial Cost-Shared Expenditures for General Assistance, by Province/Territory, 1978-79 to 1995-96

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab362.shtml
- this table should be of special interest for welfare historians and number-crunchers - it shows exactly when Canadian government spending on welfare (by the federal and provincial/territorial governments) started looking a little fuzzier. When the feds imposed the cap on CAP (max. 5% annual increase in total CAP payments) in Ontario, Alberta and BC in the early 1990s, those three provinces stopped reporting how much of their CAP dollars were going to welfare (vs. other CAP components covered under the same federal contribution). Table 362 shows that as of 1991-92, the federal contribution to those three provinces for General Assistance appears as "n/a" - so it's been impossible to produce a national figure since then. Unless, of course, one wanders over into the minefield of provincial government welfare statistics, where welfare programs (and related expenditures) have undergone a major transformation. If you *do* want to check out welfare stats for each Canadian jurisdiction, your best starting point is the Key Welfare Links Page of this website - http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm - which includes links to welfare stats in each province and territory where they're available.

Table 434
Total Federal Payments under CAP, 1978-79 to 1999-2000

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab434.shtml
[The note under table 360 also applies to this table. ]

Table 435
Number of Beneficiaries (including dependants) of Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance, as of March 31, 1997 to 2003
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab435.shtml

Table 438
Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance Program Expenditures, 1980-81 to 2002-03
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab438.shtml

Table 526
Provincial and Territorial Children's Benefits and Earned Income Supplements, Expenditures for Fiscal years 1978-79 to 2002-03
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab526.shtml

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml
Dept. name changed to Employment and Social Development Canada

Archive source:
Archive.org
https://archive.org/

Official Source:
Library and Archives Canada
http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/


January 27, 2012
Brickbats and Kudos:

Brickbats to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada!

During the 1990s, five separate editions of Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces - a valuable statistical report for social researchers of every stripe - were posted to the website of the Department that is currently (01/2012) known as Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). Each edition contains 25 years of stats on Canadian social programs, and each edition adds a few years' stats but it also drops the oldest stats. For the most complete set of statistics - covering fiscal years 1970-71 to 2002-2003 - researchers had to download both the oldest edition (1970-71 to 1994-95) and the most recent (1978-79 to 2002-2003). In late 2011, HRSDC did a cleanup of its website, which included deleting not one or two but all five editions of Social Security Statistics, along with a few other historical gems. Evidently, there was no historian among the group that decided to remove this report from the site.
Boooooo.

Kudos to the Government of Canada Web Archive!

The Government of Canada Web Archive
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/index-e.html
Since the Fall of 2007, Library and Archives Canada has been harvesting the web domain of the Federal Government of Canada (starting in December 2005). Client access to the content of the Government of Canada Web Archive is provided through searching by keyword, by department name, and by URL. The archive currently contains over 170 million digital objects and more than 7 terabytes of data.
Source:
Library and Archives Canada

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html
Comment (by Gilles):
The Government of Canada Web Archive is a handy tool to track down website content that's been deleted from the Internet, but only for federal government site content and only back to December 2005. It was relatively simple for me to find an old version of the HRSDC website and to drill down to the Social Policy reports, including five complete editions of Social Security Statistics covering the period from 1970-71 to 2002-2003.

Social Policy Reports (this link is from the Govt. of Canada Web Archive)
http://goo.gl/5MLk0
This is how the Social Policy Reports page looked before it was "cleaned up" in December 2011.
It includes functional links to the full text of five editions of Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces and many other historical treasures that no longer appear on the HRSDC reports page.

See also:

Publications Canada
http://publications.gc.ca/
The federal government's Depository Services Program (DSP) and Publications websites have been integrated into a single searchable, browseable database of federal government publications. The website of the Depository Services Program was officially decommissioned on December 8, 2011.

NOTE:
If you're searching for "older" (pre-December 2005) deleted website content o
r for any content that's not from a federal govt. site, try the Wayback Machine (Internet Archive):
http://www.archive.org/web/web.php
Copy and paste a URL into the search box on the Wayback Machine home page and click "Take Me Back".
The Results page consists of a calendar where you can retrieve earlier versions of that page by clicking on any date that's in a blue circle.

 



Labour Market and Job Information :
Preparing for and finding jobs in Canada

[Keep scrolling down for non-govt. job websites]

From Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC):

Summer Jobs 2015 / Emplois d’été Canada
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/epb/yi/yep/programs/scpp.shtml
December 3, 2014
Canada Summer Jobs provides funding to not-for-profit organizations, public-sector employers and small businesses with 50 or fewer employees to create summer job opportunities for young people aged 15 to 30 years who are full-time students intending to return to their studies in the next school year.

The period to apply for Canada Summer Jobs 2015 will be from December 1, 2014 to January 30, 2015.

For information on Canada Summer Jobs please visit the website:
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/epb/yi/yep/programs/scpp.shtml

Canada Summer Jobs 2015 - Local Priorities by Province
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/epb/yi/yep/programs/csj/
We will assess applications on a constituency-by-constituency basis to ensure that proposals meet the assessment criteria and reflect local priorities. Select the constituency based on where the job activities will take place.
To find the local priorities for your constituency, click on your province or territory.

Source:
Service Canada
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/

ESDC Labour Program
- includes links to:
* Standards and Equity : Federal Construction Contracts - Wage Earner Protection Program - Minimum Wage Database - Equality and Inclusion
* Health and Safety : Workplace Safety - Health and Safety Committees - Prevention - Workers' Compensation - Compliance Policy
* Labour Relations : Collective Bargaining - Dispute Prevention - Arbitration Appointments - International Affairs - Provincial / Territorial Affairs
* Resources : Collective Bargaining Information - Negotech - Labour Funding Program - Acts & Regulations - Interpretations, Policies and Guidelines - Operations Program Directives - News - Videos - Publications and Reports - Provincial/ Territorial Ministries of Labour

Labour Program
Publications and Reports

Employment Standards - Equality in the Workplace
Health and Safety
Labour Relations
Workers' Compensation

Job Bank
Job Bank is the Government of Canada's leading source for jobs and labour market information. It offers users free occupational and career information such as job opportunities, educational requirements, main duties, wage rates and salaries, current employment trends, and outlooks.
- includes links to:
* Job Search : Job Search - More Search Options - Job Alerts - Top Advertised Jobs - Job Seeker Accounts - Job Search Safety Tips - How Do I Get A Job?
* Explore careers : By Occupation - By Education Program - By Wages - By Outlook - By Skills & Knowledge
* Employers : Post a Job - Employer Resources
* Job Market Trends : Stay informed about trends in employment, the economy and news by province/territory.

Services for Unemployed Youth
- from the Government of Canada
(Youth.gc.ca)

Jobs and Training
* Education, Training and Skills Development
* Jobs, Employment and the Labour Market
* Workplace Rights and Responsibilities

---

Ontario Helps Over 25,000 Young People Through the Youth Employment Fund:
Fund Provides Young People with Valuable Work Experience
http://news.ontario.ca/tcu/en/2015/01/ontario-helps-over-25000-young-people-through-the-youth-employment-fund.html
News Release
January 27, 2015
Ontario's Youth Employment Fund [ http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/eng/employmentontario/youthfund/ ] has exceeded its initial goal by helping more than 25,000 young people access job opportunities, develop skills and gain valuable work experience.

The Youth Employment Fund provides up to $7,800 to support each young worker, including up to $6,800 for wages and training, and up to $1,000 for other costs like tools and transportation to work.

As part of Ontario's Youth Jobs Strategy [ http://www.ontario.ca/jobs-and-employment/making-impact-youth-jobs-strategy ] , the fund helps employers offer four- to six-month job placements for youth aged 15-29 who are looking for work, particularly those facing multiple barriers to employment. Since its launch in September 2013, the program has helped 26,582 youth. Eighty five per cent of youth who have participated in the program have either been retained or gone on to further employment elsewhere.

Source:
Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities
http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/

Related links:

Search for Youth Jobs Programs
https://www.ontario.ca/business-and-economy/youth-jobs-programs

Employment Ontario
http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/eng/employmentontario/

Ontario Employment programs for people under 30
http://www.ontario.ca/jobs-and-employment/employment-programs-people-under-30
If you are under the age of 30, we have programs and tools to help you build skills, start a business, or find work.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Miscellaneous non-governmental job links:

JobCareer
JobCareer is a job search engine. In one simple search, JobCareer gives job seekers access to over 500,000 jobs sourced from thousands of company recruitment pages and job board sites, saving the trouble of having to visit each site individually
.

Jobs.ca - Canada's job community
Jobs.ca is a unique website; we aggregate the latest job listings directly from corporate job sites and we also have our own database of brand new jobs sent to us from companies across Canada. With hundreds of pages of free, unique job-seeker oriented content (with more added daily) and a fully interactive, user-friendly site, we are well positioned to be "Canada's job community".

Workopolis - Canada's Biggest Jobsite

Indeed.ca
Indeed is a search engine for jobs - with a radically different approach to job search. In one simple search, Indeed gives job seekers free access to millions of employment opportunities from thousands of websites. Indeed.ca includes all the job listings from major job boards, newspapers, associations and company career pages - and we continue to add new sites every day.

Monster.ca

WowJobs.ca
One click, all jobs.
* More about WowJobs:
http://goo.gl/DbsNww

Version française du site:
http://emplois.wowjobs.ca/

Careerjet.ca
Careerjet is an employment search engine.
In just one search access 37,929,131 jobs published on 25,003 websites in the world.
* 496,072 jobs published in Canada!

SocialWorkJobs.ca
SocialWorkJobs.ca is dedicated to providing professionals with a career site tool to solve staffing needs and to assist candidates seeking new opportunities in the Social Work sector.

jobboom (bilingual)
Jobboom is a leader in online recruiting that specializes in the Canadian job market. We feature thousands of job postings every day and provide employment news and career management advice.

AllStarJobs Canada
Your Online Source For Finding A Job In Canada

BilingualLink.Com - Linking candidates and employers in the bilingual marketBilingual Link is the first innovative online service that offers superior human resources solutions promoting bilingual opportunities in jobs, career, training, business and services.

canjobs.com - Your Canadian Employment Search network

Canada WorkInfoNet

Jobs in agriculture, horticulture, livestock, horses, etc.
A careers site for those involved in the field of agriculture.
Agricultural positions from around the world.
Source:
Farmers' Marketplace

Job-Applications.ca --- Search & Apply Online
Find Free Job Applications for the Job You Want & Get Hired Now
An employment resource designed to help Canadian job seekers find work, Job-Applications.ca offers a number of job tips and career-related articles. Large companies need to hire new workers across Canada, and Job-Applications.ca has the inside scoop on Canadian hiring trends and available jobs.

Job-Applications.com - #1 Online Job Application Form Resource Site
Job-Applications.com provides direct access to job applications for over 1,000 of the world’s largest employers. Find Printable Applications, Apply Online for Full-time Employment, Part-time Vacancies, Seasonal or Holiday Work Now! Whether you are a recent graduate from college, a student looking for a part-time job or vacancy, are a mom returning to work, someone rebounding from a recent layoff, a teen-ager looking for summer employment, or just looking to switch careers, you can find or download printable employment applications or find your next employer by completing a job application online through job-applications.com now

JobApplicationDB.com is the largest direct job application site.
We help candidates apply directly to over 1200 companies across 60+ industries and sectors..

eApplicants.com - We'll Help You Find Employment Online
Today’s job market is intense, competitive, and downright ruthless in some cases. Knowing a company’s culture, their history, and how to properly apply are just a few of the resources we offer..

Recently posted
on the Parliamentary Website:
[ http://www.parl.gc.ca/ ]

January 28, 2015
The House of Commons Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA)

[ http://www.parl.gc.ca/CommitteeBusiness/CommitteeHome.aspx?Cmte=HUMA&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2 ]
... has the honour to present its NINTH REPORT.
Pursuant to its mandate under Standing Order 108(2), the Committee has studied the renewal of the Labour Market Development Agreements (LMDA) and has agreed to report the following:

Report: Renewal of the Labour Market Development Agreements - LMDA (PDF - 523KB, 98 pages)
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/412/HUMA/Reports/RP6839662/412_HUMA_Rpt09_PDF/412_HUMA_Rpt09-e.pdf
January 2015
["
The HTML version of this report will be available soon."]

Contact: cmteweb@parl.gc.ca

Source:
House of Commons Standing Committee on Human Resources,
Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA)
[ http://www.parl.gc.ca/CommitteeBusiness/CommitteeHome.aspx?Cmte=HUMA&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2 ]

List of House of Commons Committees:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/CommitteeBusiness/CommitteeList.aspx

---------------------------------

Related links from
Employment and Social Development Canada
:
[ http://www.esdc.gc.ca/ ]

Labour Market Development Agreements
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/training_agreements/lmda//index.shtml
To help unemployed Canadians quickly find and return to work and to develop a skilled labour force that meets current and emerging needs of employers, the Government of Canada has entered into agreements (also called Labour Market Development Agreements) with provinces and territories.
Through these agreements, Government of Canada funding enables provinces and territories to design, deliver and manage skills and employment programs for unemployed Canadians, particularly for those who are eligible for Employment Insurance (EI) benefits.

Labour market development agreements are complemented by labour market agreements [ http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/training_agreements/lma/index.shtml ] , which provide funding for provincial and territorial labour market programs and services, particularly for low-skilled workers and unemployed persons who are not eligible for EI benefits.

Evaluation of the Labour Market Agreements:
Final Report
(MS Word file - 164K, 50 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/Final_LMA_Evaluation_Report_March_31_2013.docx
March 31, 2013
In 2008, the Government of Canada entered into bilateral Labour Market Agreements (LMAs) with all Provinces and Territories (P/Ts) in Canada to provide funding to support a new set of clients not supported under existing Labour Market Development Agreements (LMDAs). Under the LMAs, Canada provides support for provincial and territorial labour market programs and services that focus on skills development for unemployed individuals ineligible for Employment Insurance (EI) and employed individuals who are low-skilled. LMA funds were committed for six years - April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2014
[Source : Executive summary]
-
Disclaimer (by Gilles):
I'm posting the above link and uploading the file to my own web server at the request of a Canadian Social Research Newsletter subscriber who acquired an advance electronic copy of the report shortly after it was finalized. The report still hasn't made it to the HRSDC website, and there was some frustration expressed re. the government's foot-dragging in posting the report.
Eventually, the report will be posted on the HRSDC website, I'm sure.
(like "the cheque's in the mail"..)
In the meantime, this version should appeal to social researchers interested in labour issues and especially LMAs.

---

Table of contents:

Executive Summary
The Labour Market Agreements
Summary of Findings

Management Response
1. Introduction
1.1 The Labour Market Agreements
1.2 Evaluation of the Labour Market Agreements
1.3 Key Evaluation Strengths and Weaknesses

2. Evaluation Findings
2.1 Program Relevance
2.2 Outcomes Achievement
2.3 Efficiency and Economy
2.4 Strategic Training and Transition Fund

3. Conclusions

Excerpts from the key evaluation findings and conclusions:
* Related to program relevance, the evaluation found:
--- A strong and continuing need existed for the LMAs.
--- The flexibility afforded by the LMAs allowed Provinces and Territories to respond to existing and emerging needs.
--- LMA objectives and priorities are aligned with F/P/T Government priorities.

Source:
Evaluation Directorate
Strategic Policy and Research Branch
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml
[NOTE : On July 15, 2013, the name of the Department changed to Employment and Social Development Canada.]


From Statistics Canada:

StatCan Tables by subject: Labour
- includes links to hundreds of StatCan statistical reports on the following topics under Labour:
* Commuting to work
* Employment and unemployment
* Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
* Hours of work and work arrangements
* Industries
* Non-wage benefits
* Occupations
* Unionization and industrial relations
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

February 11, 2010
Guide to the Labour Force Survey
The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.
[ Click "View" for the table of contents to the latest (2010) issue and "Chronological index" for earlier issues of this report. ]

Labour Force Survey Products and Services
This catalogue briefly describes all Labour Force Survey products offered on a monthly, annual and occasional basis. It includes products, uses, general release dates, formats available and prices, as well as special request services and Internet services. It also introduces any changes to products.
[ Click "View" for the table of contents to the latest (2010) issue and "Chronological index" for earlier issues of this report. ]

Canadian Economic Observer - February 2010
Table of contents:
1. Sections [*see below]
2. Tables
3. Charts
4. Appendices
5. User information
6. Related products
__________________

* Sections:
1. Current economic conditions
2. Economic events
3. Feature article
4. Recent feature articles
5. National accounts
6. Labour markets
7. Prices
8. International trade
9. Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources)
10. Services (trade, transportation, travel and communications)
11. Financial markets
12. Provincial

* Youth Employment Strategy Programs
"The Youth Employment Strategy (YES) is the Government of Canada's commitment to help young people, particularly those facing barriers to employment, get the information and gain the skills, work experience and abilities they need to make a successful transition to the workplace."

* Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreements
* Sector Councils
* Canada Education Savings Grant
* Canada Student Loans Program

May 2007 Report of the Auditor General of Canada [dead link]
Chapter 2. Federal Loans and Grants for Post-Secondary Education—Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation
Source:
Office of the Auditor General of Canada

The Government of Canada tables Canada Education Savings Act, creating the Canada Learning Bond
News Release
October 8, 2004
"OTTAWA, ONTARIO—The Honourable Joe Volpe, Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development, tabled legislation in the House of Commons today to create the Canada Education Savings Act. The savings programs contained in the Act will help low- and middle-income families to begin saving for their children’s post-secondary education."
- incl. a backgrounder with more detailed info
Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Related Links:

Canada Education Savings Grant (HRSDC)
"The Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) program underscores government recognition that post secondary education is a national priority, and that learning through full and part-time study, and in a variety of settings, such as, universities, community colleges, vocational and technical institutes, and CEGEPs is vital in providing all Canadian children with an equal opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the challenges of an evolving workforce and a changing economy."

Returns to college education: evidence from the 1990, 1995, and 2000 National Graduates Survey
September 2006
Using data from the National Graduates Survey ant the Census, this research paper examines earnings of recent college graduates by field of study as well as estimates the internal rates of return to college education.
Table of Contents:
* Title Page * Executive Summary * Introduction * Literature Review * Data * Profile of College Graduates * An Overview of Earnings Trends * Earnings by Field of Study * College vs. University Earnings * Conclusions * References
* Appendix Tables

Returns to University Level Education: Variations Within Disciplines, Occupations and Employment Sectors
September 2006
Using data from the National Graduates Survey ant the Census, this research paper examines earnings of recent college graduates by field of study as well as estimates the internal rates of return to college education.
Table of Contents:
* Title Page * Abstract * Introduction * Data * Methodology * Results * Comparison to Previous Literature * Summary and Policy Implications * References

---

Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
Addressing homelessness is a challenge in all regions across Canada. The Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) is a community-based program that relies on communities to determine their own needs and to develop appropriate projects.
The HPS works to prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada through:
* investments in transitional and supportive housing through a housing-first approach;
* support to community-based efforts to prevent and reduce homelessness;
* partnerships between the federal government, provinces, and territories; and
* collaboration with other federal departments and agencies.

---

Call for Proposals:
Research on Immigration, Housing and Homelessness

The Metropolis Project of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, and the Homelessness Partnering Secretariat of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada are very happy to announce the launching of a joint Call for Proposals for research that examines the intersection of Immigration, Housing and Homelessness. Up to $275,000 will be delivered by the Homelessness Partnering Secretariat for successful projects. We are seeking a better understanding of housing outcomes as a key indicator of newcomer integration. This is a priority area of both the Metropolis Project and the Homelessness Partnering Secretariat.
[Click the link above to download the Call for Proposals, the application form, and the budget notes in French and English from the Metropolis Project web site.]

NOTA:
Cet Appel de propositions
est également disponible en français.

The call for proposals ended May 5, 2010 .

Related links:

* The Metropolis Project
* Citizenship and Immigration Canada
* Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
* Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

-----------------------------------------------------------

Miscellaneous

------------------------------------------------------------------

Policy Briefings : Social Issues (PDF file - 230K, 6 pages)
November 24, 2003
Content:
- interview with Human Resources Development Canada Minister Jane Stewart ("Speed up childcare funds, says HRDC Minister Stewart; $935-million national childcare program needs ‘faster investment funding’)
- Justice system contributes to new confidence: Minister Cauchon
- Paul Martin, architect of social inequality? Yes, says MP Davies (NDP MP for Vancouver)
Liberal B.C. government will cut people off welfare on April 1, 2004

- Canadian taxpayers deserve fair and honest EI program (by Brian Pallister, Alliance Party)
- Social policy in the 21st Century : Parliament has a responsibility to protect our children through legislation (by Larry Spencer, former Alliance Party critic for family issues)
- Canada’s aging population: Time for a plan of action (by Elsie Wayne, Conservative Party)
- Renewal of the human sciences : The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council will help government, business and public institutions break through current barriers.
Source:
The Hill Times - "Canada's Politics and Government Newsweekly"

Remarks by The Honourable Jane Stewart, Minister of Human Resources Development Canada,
on The 'Why', 'How' and 'What' of Social Policy Development in Canada at The Empire Club
Toronto
March 27 , 2003
This speech provides an overview of the mandate, themes, programs and clientele of Jane Stewart's Department, including : HRDC budget (Seventy billion dollars) - Canadian pension programs - the marriage of social and economic policy - a children's agenda for Canada - sustainability - social research and development - parental benefits - Canadians with disabilities, Aboriginal people, new immigrants - lifelong learning, active/passive balance in the development of good social policy - partnerships - responsiveness - early learning and childcare - child poverty - National Children's Agenda - National Child Benefit (including a reference to the NCBS clawback) - pulling down the welfare wall - and much more...
Source : Social Development Canada
[NOTE: At the time Jane Stewart was Minister, the Department was called Human Resources Development Canada.]

Government of Canada Response to
"Listening to Canadians: A First View of the Future of the Canada Pension Plan Disability Program"

The Fifth Report of the Standing Committee on Human Resource Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
November 2003
Complete report (HTML)

Related Links:

Listening to Canadians: A First View of the Future of the Canada Pension Plan Disability Program
June 2003


April 27, 2014
From Health and Welfare Canada to Employment and Social Development Canada:
What's in a Name?

Timeline of changes in the name of the federal department
responsible for Old Age Security and the Canada Pension Plan and more

1944
Health and Welfare Canada (HWC)

When I started working in the federal government back in the mid-1970s, it was with Health and Welfare Canada (HWC), the department that was responsible for Old Age Security, the Canada Pension Plan, Unemployment Insurance, the Canada Assistance Plan and much more. The department name dated back to 1944.

1993
Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC)

After the 1993 federal election, the Department was split into its two main components --- the health component became a separate new Department, while the welfare side of HWC was transferred to the existing Employment and Immigration Canada (along with the Labour program) and everything was renamed Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC).
[ FACTOID : Word is that the new dept was initially going to be called Human Resources and Labour until someone figured out that the short-form dept name would be HRL Canada (or "Hurl Canada") - Yikes! back to the drawing board they went. And the rest is history... ]

2003
Social Development Canada (SDC) + Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Ten years later, in December 2003, when Paul Martin took office as Prime Minister of Canada, HRDC was split into two new departments: Social Development Canada (SDC) and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC).

2006
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

In February 2006, the new Conservative Government of Stephen Harper (I mean Canada's New Government) reunited SDC and HRSDC under the umbrella of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC).

2008
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

In 2008, the Conservatives fortified their minority grip on Parliament, and Canada's New Prime Minister started erasing the "Social" even from the federal government glossary, starting with the name of the Department responsible for the administration of Old Age Security, the Canada Pension Plan and other federal social programs. I guess Old Age Security and the CPP are now considered "human resources" programs in this Brave New World. Online researchers always dread these reorganizations, because websites are invariably turned upside down and inside out when ministerial mandates change.

2013
Employment and Social Development Canada

On July 15, 2013, Prime Minister Harper announced changes to the federal Ministry.

For more info on the new Ministry, see the following:
[ http://pm.gc.ca/eng/media.asp?id=5575 ]
[ http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/07/14/pol-cabinet-shuffle-main-monday.html ]

The Honourable Jason Kenney is now Minister of Employment and Social Development,
and the Department is now called Employment and Social Development Canada
[ http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml ]

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