Canadian Social Research Links

Children, Families and Youth
- National Government Links -

[kids]
Updated June 13, 2017
Page révisée le 13 juin 2017
Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Les enfants, les familles et les jeunes
- Sites nationaux gouvernementaux -


Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


Jump directly to this content further down on this page:

Canada Child Tax Benefit Guideline Table, July 2014 to June 2015
(From the Canada Revenue Agency)

Youth Unemployment in Canada : Challenges and Potential Solutions (Report of the Standing Committee on Finance)
[Adopted by the Committee on June 5, 2014; Presented to the House on June 12, 2014]
James Rajotte, Chair
June 2014

Statistics Canada reports/studies
National Child Benefit (NCB) Annual Progress Report, 2007
Federal support for children investments over time (2000-2007)

Centres of Excellence for Children’s Well-Being
National Child Benefit Supplement Clawback Misconception
Understanding the Early Years
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth

Related Canadian Social Research Links pages:

-
Children, Families and Youth - Canadian NGO Links
- Children, Families and Youth - International Links
- Children's Rights Links page - incl. Canada’s National Plan of Action for Children, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the work of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (Special Session on the Rights of the Child), and related sites
- Early Learning and Child Care in Canada - Canadian NGO Links
- Early Learning and Child Care in Canada - Canadian Govt. Links
- Unofficial Social Union / National Child Benefit Links Page (national)
- Unofficial Provincial/Territorial Social Union / National Child Benefit Links Page
See these related outside sites also...
- The (official) Social Union website
- The (official) National Child Benefit website

IMPORTANT NOTE:
Regarding provincial and territorial Child and Family Services (child protection, adoption, foster care, youth at risk, etc.)
[this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading]


Key links for information about
government services for children and youth:

[All of the links in the list below will take you to another website.]

Child and Family - from Employment and Social Development Canada
Canada's Universal Child Care Plan - "Provides Choice, Support and Spaces."
Canada Child Tax Benefit from the Canada Revenue Agency
Child Disability Benefit from the Canada Revenue Agency
Children' Services - from Service Canada
Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development
Historical content:
Income Security for Children: A Supplementary Paper

(from the 1994 federal Social Security Review)
National Children's Agenda
Early Childhood Development and Early Learning and Child Care

Youth Canada

 

 

 

 

 

NEW

The introduction and evolution of child benefits in Canada
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2017/04/27/introduction-evolution-child-benefits-canada/
April 27, 2017
By Allan Moscovitch and Nick Falvo
Child benefits have significant potential to reduce homelessness and the need for emergency shelter beds by putting more money into the hands of low-income parents. They also can (and do) reduce child poverty, though not always as much as governments claim. And because they do not carry the same stigma as other forms of poverty-reduction initiatives (such as social assistance and social housing), they’re also popular among voters—certainly more popular than social assistance benefits for adults. Many elected officials are therefore more eager to create and enhance child benefits than they are to spend on other forms of poverty-reduction. Since they were first established child benefits in Canada have changed significantly in their intention, their recipients, and their method of delivery.

Here’s an eight-step guide to that evolution.
Click a number in the column below to access more info on

1. Legislated in 1944, Canada’s first federal Family Allowance made its first tax free payments in 1945 to all women with children under the age of 16 who attended school.
2. The Family Allowance was the first major benefit program in Canada extended to Indigenous peoples—but it was also used to assimilate them.
3. The first major federal government changes to the Family Allowance occurred in 1974.
4. In 1992, the federal government eliminated the Family Allowance altogether.
5. In 1997, under the terms of the Social Union Framework Agreement between the federal government and the provinces, the federal government created the National Child Benefit Initiative.
6. The Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB)—which looked remarkably like the Family Allowance that had been canceled 14 years earlier—was introduced by the Harper Conservatives.
7. The 2016 federal budget—the first under a Justin Trudeau government—contained important provisions for child benefits.
8. There are other tax expenditures for children.

About the authors:
Allan Moscovitch is Professor Emeritus of Social Work at Carleton University. Nick Falvo is Director of Research and Data at the Calgary Homeless Foundation.

Source:
Behind the Numbers
http://behindthenumbers.ca/
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates. Behind the Numbers delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect Canadians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more.

Family benefits from www.canada.ca :

The federal government offers the following services and information:
* Employment Insurance (EI)
--- EI maternity and parental benefits
---
EI benefits for Parents of Critically Ill Children
---
EI compassionate care benefits
*
Canada Child Benefit
*
Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children
*
Child Disability Benefit
*
Following a death
*
Goods and services tax/Harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit
*
Victim services and funding
*
Having a baby
*
Survivor's Pension
* more (click the link below)...

Source:
Family Benefits

https://www.canada.ca/en/services/benefits/family.html

From the
Department of Finance Canada:
[ http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp ]

Canada Child Benefit

Government Introduces Legislation Advancing Plan to Support the Middle Class and Those Working Hard to Join It
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n16/16-140-eng.asp
October 25, 2016
The Government of Canada knows that a strong middle class means hard-working Canadians can look forward to a good standard of living throughout their lives and a better future for their children. With Budget 2016, the Government of Canada introduced a bold plan that puts people first and delivers the help middle class Canadians need to prosper and grow the Canadian economy.
(...)
Included in Budget Implementation Act, 2016, No. 2 is a measure that will ensure the new Canada Child Benefit (CCB) grows in line with inflation as of July 1, 2020 so that its real value is not eroded over the long term. Since July, nine out of ten Canadian families are receiving more than under the previous system of child benefits, and hundreds of thousands of children are being lifted out of poverty. The CCB is simpler, tax-free, better targeted and more generous than previous child benefits. The CCB will help parents with the high costs of raising their kids, whether this be for such things as buying healthy food or preparing their kids for winter.

Related Products:

Government Introduces Plan to Grow Canada’s Middle Class
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n16/16-054-eng.asp
April 20, 2016

Budget 2016: Growing the Middle Class
http://www.budget.gc.ca/2016/docs/plan/toc-tdm-en.html
March 22, 2016

---

From the
Canada Revenue Agency:
[ http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/menu-eng.html ]

Canada Child Benefit
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/ccb/menu-eng.html
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/t4114/t4114-e.html#cctb
The Canada child benefit (CCB) is a tax-free monthly payment made to eligible families to help them with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. The CCB might include the child disability benefit and any related provincial and territorial programs. (...)
Benefits are paid over a 12-month period from July of one year to June of the next year. Benefit payments are recalculated every July based on information from a taxpayers' income tax and benefit return from the previous year.

Effective July 1, 2016, the Canada child benefit (CCB) replaced the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB), the national child benefit supplement (NCBS), and the universal child care benefit (UCCB).
Source :
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/cctb/bfrppl-eng.html

Related provincial
and territorial programs:
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/t4114/t4114-e.html#P257_18104
- includes links to info about the following provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs
*** Alberta child benefit
*** Alberta family employment tax credit
*** BC early childhood tax benefit
*** BC family bonus
*** New Brunswick child tax benefit
*** Newfoundland and Labrador child benefit
*** Northwest Territories child benefit
*** Nova Scotia child benefit
*** Nunavut child benefit
*** Ontario child benefit
*** Yukon child benefit

Thanks to Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre
[ http://incomesecurity.org/ ]
in Toronto for the following links.

Canada Child Benefit - updated July 30, 2016

Why I’m glad my Canada Child Benefit has been cut
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/janet-butlermcphee/canada-child-benefit_b_11199404.html

Three cheers for the new Canada Child Benefit
http://news.nationalpost.com/full-comment/michelle-hauser-three-cheers-for-the-new-canada-child-benefit

Parents sound off on the CCB – some happy, some distraught: http://globalnews.ca/news/2841472/canada-child-benefit-parents-sound-off/
BBC coverage of CCB: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36849613

Child benefit buoys consumer confidence as worries mount
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-25/trudeau-child-benefits-buoy-consumer-confidence-as-worries-mount

--------------------------------------------------------------

Canada Child Benefit - updated July 24, 2016

Canada Child Benefit cheques hit mailboxes and bank accounts this past week.

Trudeau vows CCB will meet poverty reduction targets
http://www.torontosun.com/2016/07/20/trudeau-vows-ne1w-child-benefit-will-meet-poverty-reduction-targets

CCB is a win for most families
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/household-finances/new-canada-child-benefit-is-a-win-for-most-families/article31017291/

But many Indigenous children on reserves will miss out on child benefit due to tax filing requirement
https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/07/20/indigenous-children-on-reserves-miss-out-on-child-benefit.html

Half of aboriginal families on reserve could miss out under CCB
http://www.lfpress.com/2016/07/19/new-child-benefit-targets-poverty-in-short-term-and-long-term-minister-says

Five things to know about the new CCB
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-child-benefit-july-rollout-1.3668698

Everything you need to know about the new CCB
http://globalnews.ca/news/2833949/canada-child-benefit-everything-you-need-to-know/

CCB to lift 46,000 Albertan kids out of poverty
http://www.edmontonsun.com/2016/07/20/revamped-child-benefit-program-will-lift-46000-albertan-kids-out-of-poverty-federal-politicians-say

Edmonton families “grateful”
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/edmonton-families-grateful-for-new-child-benefit-payments-1.3687836

CCB a boon to struggling families in Waterloo region
http://www.therecord.com/news-story/6778255-new-child-benefit-a-boon-to-struggling-families-in-waterloo-region/

A province-by-province look at the effects of the CCB
http://www.metronews.ca/news/canada/2016/07/19/a-look-by-province-at-the-anti-poverty-effects-of-the-new-child-benefit.html

Here’s hoping new CCB will boost RESPs
http://www.1huffingtonpost.ca/bruce-sellery/canada-child-benefit_b_11117844.html

Worth Repeating: Study shows low income-families spend child benefits on basic needs, education and health – and spend less on alcohol and tobacco http://martinprosperity.org/content/how-do-families-who-receive-the-cctb-and-ncb-spend-the-money/

Three positive steps toward ending poverty in Canada – CCB, GIS top-up and ACB
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2016/07/20/3-positive-steps-toward-ending-poverty-in-canada/

---

Related links:

New Canada Child Benefit rolls out with a more subtle pitch
A year ago, Tory cabinet ministers were hunting for 'missing' families. Any they found get new Liberal benefit
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-child-benefit-uccb-missing-families-1.3669113
By Janyce McGregor
July 11, 2016

---

Five things to know about the new Canada Child Benefit
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-child-benefit-july-rollout-1.3668698
Is your family among the 90 per cent the Liberals say will be better off on July 20? You're about to find out.
By Janyce McGregor
July 11, 2016

1. How much will families receive?
2.
Is this benefit retroactive?
3.
What's been cut?
4. How can I make the most of it?
5.
What about Canada Post disruptions?

--------------------------------------------------

On Family Day, Minister Oliver Celebrates Tax Cuts for
Canadian Families by Highlighting Tax Cuts and Benefits for Families
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n15/15-015-eng.asp
News Release
February 16, 2015
Families across Canada are celebrating Family Day, Louis Riel Day, Heritage Day and Islander Day today, and to mark the holiday, Finance Minister Joe Oliver is celebrating the Harper Government’s latest action to cut taxes for every family with children.

Announced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper last October, these measures include:

* an increase to the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) to $160 per month from $100 per month for children under the age of 6, effective as of January 1, 2015;
* an expansion of the UCCB to include a new benefit of $60 per month for children aged 6 through 17, effective as of January 1, 2015;
* a $1,000 increase to the Child Care Expense Deduction maximum dollar limits, effective as of the 2015 taxation year; and
* the Family Tax Cut, a new federal non-refundable tax credit, which would provide up to $2,000 in tax relief to couples with children under the age of 18, effective as of the 2014 taxation year.

On average, these measures will put about $1,140 per year back into the pockets of every family with children.

Source:
Finance Canada

http://www.fin.gc.ca/

---
By Gilles:
PressProgress
[ http://www.pressprogress.ca/ ], a project of the Broadbent Institute [ http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/ ] reminds us [ http://goo.gl/Od1ptI ] that the "Family Tax Cut" (originally called income-splitting) was panned (by the late Jim Flaherty, former federal Minister of Finance) because 85% of the Canadian population wouldn't receive a plug nickel from this measure. Harper's tinkering with enhancements to the UCCB are laughable, given that the monthly amount would cover one or two days in a day care centre for most working parents.

NOTE to Finance Canada from the Grammar Police:
Do you even read the titles that you slap on your news releases from time to time?

...as in the above example:
"On Family Day, Minister Oliver Celebrates Tax Cuts for Canadian Families by Highlighting Tax Cuts and Benefits for Families"
So the Minister celebrates tax cuts by highlighting tax cuts?
Sheesh.

---

- Go to the Federal Finance Department Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk3.htm

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From the Canada Revenue Agency:
[ http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/menu-e.html ]

Canada Child Tax Benefit Guideline Table : July 2014 to June 2015
The Government of Canada’s Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) system comprises the CCTB Base Benefit and the NCB Supplement. The CCTB targets low-and middle-income families with children, and the NCB Supplement provides low-income families with child benefits in addition to the CCTB base benefit.

NOTES:
1. If you wish to know more about the CCTB program or the NCB Supplement before proceeding, check:
Child and Family Benefits
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/menu-eng.html
- includes links to information about : * Canada Child Tax Benefit * Universal Child Care Benefit * GST/HST credit * Working Income Tax Benefit * Provincial and territorial programs * Children's special allowances
2. CCTB and Welfare :
Canadian jurisdictions have adopted different approaches in their treatment of the CCTB and provincial-territorial child benefits for welfare rate calculations. For more info, see "Comparing welfare rates for families in different provinces" (near the bottom of this yellow text box)

------------------------------------------------

Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) Guideline Table effective July 2014 - June 2015 (based on 2013 tax year)
This table shows the amount of the Canada Child Tax Benefit that's payable from July 2014 to June 2015 to a household with one, two, three, four and five children with family income ranging from $25,584 to $150,000.
[FACTOID: According to this table, a family with five children and an annual family income of $150,000 (in 2013) is entitled to a monthly CCTB payment of $16.42.]

Monthly NCB Supplement only entitlement - July 2014 - June 2015 (based on 2013 tax year)

Guideline tables for earlier years
- includes links to both of the above tables going back to the 2007-2008 benefit period (2006 tax year)

Related links

Canada Child Benefits, July 2014 to June 2015
(Including related federal, provincial, and territorial programs)

Source:
Canada Child Tax Benefit
[ Child and Family Benefits - includes links to : * Canada Child Tax Benefit * Universal Child Care Benefit * GST/HST credit * Working Income Tax Benefit * Provincial and territorial programs * Children's special allowances ]

Provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs (July 2014 to June 2015)
that are related to the Canada Child Tax Benefit:
* Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit * BC Family Bonus and BC low income climate action tax credit * New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit * Nova Scotia Child Benefit * Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit (and Mother Baby Nutrition Supplement) * Northwest Territories Child Benefit * Nunavut Child Benefit * Ontario Child Benefit * Saskatchewan low-income tax credit (SLITC) * Yukon Child Benefit
[NOTE: Residents of Québec must apply to the
Régie des rentes for the child assistance payment.]

Source:
Canada Revenue Agency

---

More information about the
National Child Benefit Supplement

Source:
2006 National Child Benefit Progress Report
[ National Child Benefit website ]

Also from the NCB website:

The Government of Canada's
Contribution to the National Child Benefit Initiative

Comparing welfare rates for families in different provinces?
Be careful..

Because Canadian jurisdictions have adopted different approaches in their treatment of the CCTB and provincial-territorial child benefits for welfare rate calculations, it's becoming exceptionally difficult to compare welfare rates across provinces and territories for families with children. For more detailed information on child benefit clawbacks and pass-ons, see Approaches to Replacing Social Assistance Benefits for Children from the 2006 National child Benefit Progress Report.


Youth Unemployment in Canada : Challenges and Potential Solutions
Report of the Standing Committee on Finance

[Adopted by the Committee on June 5, 2014; Presented to the House on June 12, 2014]
James Rajotte, Chair
June 2014
41st Parliament, Second Session
(84 pages)

Table of Contents
http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=6658485&Language=e&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2&File=9
CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER TWO: YOUTH AS STUDENTS
A. The statistical context
B. Federal supports
C. Witnesses’ views on the challenges faced by post-secondary students
D. Witnesses’ views on the solutions for post-secondary students
E. Witnesses’ views on the challenges faced by apprentices and other types of interns
F. Witnesses’ views on the solutions for apprentices and other types of interns
G. Witnesses’ views on the challenges faced by disadvantaged youth
H. Witnesses’ views on the solutions for disadvantaged youth
CHAPTER THREE: YOUTH AS POTENTIAL OR CURRENT EMPLOYEES
A. The statistical context
B. Federal supports
C. Witnesses’ views on the challenges faced by unemployed youth
D. Witnesses’ views on solutions for unemployed youth
E. Witnesses’ views on the challenges faced by employed youth
F. Witnesses’ views on solutions for employed youth
G. Witnesses’ views on the employment challenges faced by particular groups of youth
H. Witnesses’ views on solutions for the employment challenges faced by particular groups of youth
CHAPTER FOUR: YOUTH AS ENTREPRENEURS
A. The statistical context
B. Federal supports
C. Witnesses’ views on the challenges faced by youth entrepreneurs
D. Witnesses’ views on the solutions for youth entrepreneurs
CHAPTER FIVE: RECOMMENDATIONS
CHAPTER SIX: CONCLUSION

PDF version of the complete report (896K, 86 pages)
http://www.parl.gc.ca/content/hoc/Committee/412/FINA/Reports/RP6658485/finarp06/finarp06-e.pdf

Version française (HTML):
http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=6658485&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2&File=9&Language=F

Presentations to the Committee by individuals and groups
http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=6480660&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2
Links to over two dozen submissions from unions, non-governmental organizations and individuals

Source:
Standing Committee on Finance (FINA)

http://www.parl.gc.ca/committeebusiness/CommitteeHome.aspx?Cmte=FINA&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2

More FINA reports and government responses
http://www.parl.gc.ca/CommitteeBusiness/ReportsResponses.aspx?Cmte=FINA&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=2

FINA is part of the Parliament of Canada website:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/

 


Federal support for children investments over time

- includes a brief program description of, and some financial information about, the following federal programs:
* The Universal Child Care Plan (2006-2007), including the Universal Child Care Benefit and increased support for child care spaces
* The Early learning and Child Care Initiative (2005)
* Early Learning and Child Care Framework Agreement (2003)
* Support for First Nations and Aboriginal Children
* Provincial and Territorial Allocation of Funds
* Early Childhood Development Agreement (2000)
Source:
Department of Finance Canada
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp



Golden Oldie:

Income Security for Children: A Supplementary Paper
Government of Canada
1994

This 25-page paper is part of a series of Supplementary Papers that were released late in 1994 and early in 1995 to provide Canadians with more detailed information about the Canadian income security system and the options outlined in the Discussion Paper Improving Social Security in Canada, which was released in October 1994. This paper is an important historical resource for the study of the National Child Benefit and the federal child support initiative. It offers a 1993-94 snapshot of child poverty in Canada and the federal and provincial programs to assist families with children. It also offers a detailed economist's-eye-view of three different approaches to reform of the benefits available under those programs : (1) enhancing and retargeting child tax benefits; (2) an integrated federal-provincial benefit; and (3) an enhanced Working Income Supplement. Extensive analysis of the impact of many options on families in different income brackets, and of the winners and losers under each of those options...

Federal/National Resources 
Ressources fédérales et nationales

National Child Benefit (site re-launched during 2008 or early 2009 - links changed, content thinned)
The National Child Benefit (NCB) initiative is a partnership among the federal, provincial and territorial governments1 and First Nations that aims to help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty, support parents as they move into the labour market and reduce overlap and duplication of government programs.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Well-Being of Canada’s Young Children: Government of Canada Report 2011
http://www.dpe-agje-ecd-elcc.ca/eng/ecd/well-being/page00.shtml

This report fulfills the Government of Canada’s commitment to report on the well-being of Canada’s young
children. This is the fifth report on young children’s well-being released by the Government of Canada.

Table of Contents:
Preface
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Chapter 2 - Who are Canada’s young children?
Chapter 3 - How healthy are Canada’s young children?
Chapter 4 - How are young children in Canada developing?
Chapter 5 - What do we know about family influences on young children’s development?
Chapter 6 - How are children in middle childhood in Canada developing?
Chapter 7 - Monitoring the Well-Being of Canada’s Young Children
Chapter 8 - What do we know about the well-being of young Aboriginal Children in Canada?
Chapter 9 - What do we know about young children with disabilities in Canada?
Annex A - Technical Notes for Indicators Presented

This report was co-published by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Child Benefit (NCB) Progress Report: 2007
HTML version
- table of contents + links to individual sections of the report
PDF version
(1.3MB, 116 pages)
Table of contents of the report:
Message from Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services
* Executive Summary
* Chapter 1 – The National Child Benefit Supplement
* Chapter 2 – National Child Benefit Programs and Services for Low-income Families with Children
-----------
NOTE: Chapter 2 of the report contains detailed information about the three different approaches used to harmonize/integrate federal and provincial-territorial children's benefits paid to Canadian families. This is compulsory reading for anyone who does welfare rate comparisons for families with children across Canadian provinces and territories.
-----------

* Chapter 3 – The First Nations National Child Benefit Reinvestment Initiative
* Chapter 4 – Monitoring Progress - Societal Level Indicators
* Chapter 5 – Assessing the Direct Impact of the National Child Benefit Initiative
* Chapter 6 – The Way Ahead
* Appendix 1 – Glossary
* Appendix 2 – Provincial, Territorial and First Nations National Child Benefit Reinvestments and Investments
* Appendix 3 – Results of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Analysis
* Appendix 4 – Additional Statistical Information

The NCB Progress Report: 2007 – Pamphlet

News Release:

The ninth National Child Benefit Progress Report
May 14, 2010
Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services are pleased to release to Canadians the ninth report on the progress of the National Child Benefit (NCB). The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2007 shows that the NCB is improving the economic well-being of families with children living in low income.

---------------------------------------------

Earlier reports in this series - for 2004 and 2005 only
GOVERNMENT TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY, MY BUTT.
Since the NCB website was re-launched at some point during 2008 or early 2009, this archive page contains links to annual progress reports for 2004 and 2005 only, compared with the old version of this page, where you could find links to annual reports going back to the first full year (1999) of operation of the NCB, along with news releases, backgrounders and more. It doesn't cost more than a few cents to create a permanent archive of ALL of the NCB progress reports, but when the government arbitrarily decides to dump the older reports, it's nothing less than a slap in the face of government accountability and transparency. There should really be some entity in government (maybe the Auditor-General) who could say "Hey, federal government : deleting historical reports from your websites is not transparent, and it's not accountable!"
Source:
National Child Benefit website

HOWEVER:

Internet Archive to the Rescue!
This page is a functional snapshot (i.e., with working links) of the reports
available in the NCB website in February of 2008

- on this page, you'll find links to all the earlier reports and news releases and backgrounders that were unceremoniously dropped in the re-launch of the NCB website
Source:
This page, which is a functional snapshot (i.e., with working links) of the home page
of the NCB website in February 2008

-
[ How did I do that? - how the Wayback Machine can help you to avoid 404 Fury... ]

See also:

* Child and Family Benefits Page [ Canada Revenue Agency ]

* Welfare Incomes, 2006 and 2007 (PDF - 16.6MB, 157 pages) (from the National Council of Welfare) includes a section that covers the treatment of federal children's benefits under provincial-territorial welfare programs.

Other editions of Welfare incomes:
http://goo.gl/dnp4O
From Publications Canada

See the Unofficial Social Union Links page for more about the NCB and NCB reports
See also the Unofficial Provincial/Territorial Social Union/NCB Links page of this site for over 200 links to information from all provinces and territories about their programs under the NCB initiative.

Brief to the Senate on Urban Child Poverty (2008) (PDF - 187K, 14 pages)
In February 2008, First Call Chair Michael Goldberg presented to the Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology on the topic of urban child poverty. This briefing is an overview of topics including measuring poverty; child poverty rates; and the interaction between market income, social security benefits, taxation and statutory deductions, and income tested social programs.
Source:
First Call: B.C. Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition
First Call is a coalition of individuals and organizations whose purpose is to create greater understanding of and advocacy for legislation, policy, and practice to ensure that all children and youth have the opportunities and resources required to achieve their full potential and to participate in the challenges of creating a better society.

Hope or Heartbreak: Aboriginal Youth and Canada’s Future (PDF - 2MB, 104 pages)
Horizons, Volume 10 Number 1
March 2008
This special issue of Horizons was a joint collaboration between the Government of Canada’s Policy Research Initiative and the Research and Analysis Directorate at Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. This volume is part of one of the PRI's current interdepartmental projects, Investing in Youth: Evidence from Research, Policy and Practice. This special issue presents the latest research and analysis to highlight emerging trends, challenges and opportunities related to the rapidly growing population of Aboriginal youth within an aging and changing Canada.

[ PRI Publications - click on "All Research Projects" to open a drop-down box to select a particular project, or scroll down the page to see all reports, including earlier issues of Horizons. ]

Source:
Policy Research Initiative (Government of Canada)
The Policy Research Initiative conducts research in support of the Government of Canada’s medium term agenda. Its core mandate is to advance research on emerging horizontal issues, and to ensure the effective transfer of acquired knowledge to policy-makers.

The Well-Being of Canada’s Young Children: Government of Canada Report 2006
May 2007 (date on PDF file)
NOTE: Chapter 8 of this report deals with the well-being of Aboriginal children in Canada

Two reports in one:
* Early Childhood Development Activities and Expenditures: Government of Canada Report 2004-2005 and 2005-2006, and
* Early Learning and Child Care Activities and Expenditures: Government of Canada Report 2004-2005 and 2005-2006
June 2007 (date on PDF file)
These reports are co-published by Human Resources and Social Development Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.

From the Department of Finance Canada:

Canada's New Government Establishes
Program Eligibility for the Children's Fitness Tax Credit

News Release
December 19, 2006
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released guidelines on the Children's Fitness Tax Credit, which is scheduled to become effective on January 1, 2007.The Minister confirmed that as recommended by the Expert Panel for the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit, the definition of eligible programs will support children’s participation in all programs that significantly contribute to their fitness. In addition, the Minister indicated that substantial additional support would be provided to children eligible for the disability tax credit to recognize the unique barriers they face in becoming more active.
- includes a backgrounder with more detailed info

Canada's New Government Receives Recommendations
on Savings Measures to Help Children With Severe Disabilities
News Release
December 12, 2006
"(..) Government must better enable parents to set aside funds today to financially support a child with a severe disability, when they are no longer able to provide support."

Complete report:

A New Beginning -
The Report of the Minister of Finance's Expert Panel on Financial Security for Children with Severe Disabilities
December 2006
HTML version
PDF version
(325K, 82 pages)
Table of Contents:
Acknowledgements * Introduction * The Mandate of the Panel * The Composition of the Panel * The Constitutional Constraints * The Fiscal Policy Framework * Plan Concepts * Plan Definitions and Details * Federal-Provincial Issues * Costing the Plan * Future Directions * Recommendations * Appendices (incl. the July 31/06 news release announcing the appointment of a "Panel to Help Children with Severe Disabilities" and the Terms of Reference for the Panel)

Related Link:

Report recommends tax break for parents of disabled children
December 13, 2006
Parents of severely disabled children should be able to set aside up to $200,000 tax free for their care, in the same manner that parents can now create savings plans for the higher education of their children, a panel set up by the federal Finance Minister to investigate the issue has concluded. In a report presented yesterday to Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, the group also calls on Ottawa to provide parents of children with severe disabilities with cash grants of at least $1,000 annually over 20 years, and to double those payments to low-income families.
Source:
The Globe and Mail

Canada’s New Government Receives Report on Children’s Fitness Tax Credit
October 26, 2006
News Release
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today received a report from a panel of health and physical fitness experts recommending which programs of physical activity should qualify for the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit proposed in Budget 2006.
Source:
Canada's New Government (Finance Canada)

Related Link:

Report of the Expert Panel
for the Children's Fitness Tax Credit
HTML version
PDF version
(801K, 49 pages)


The Social Union Website

On this federal-provincial-territorial government site, you'll find general information about the Social Union, including the Framework Agreement, and links to information about a number of federal-provincial-territorial initiatives under the umbrella of the Social Union. The main page contains links to a collection of speeches, papers and news releases about joint initiatives benefiting children and families, notably the NCA and NCB.


Social Union Framework Agreement Third-Year Review Website

[version française]

"The Government of Canada and the Provincial and Territorial Governments Are Reviewing the Agreement that Guides Intergovernmental Cooperation in Areas such as Post-secondary Education, Training, Health and Social Services, as well as Social Assistance"
The Social Union Framework Agreement was signed by the Prime Minister and Canada's Premiers (except for the Premier of Québec) on February 4, 1999. After three years, Canadian governments are jointly undertaking a full review of the Agreement and its implementation to make adjustments to the Framework as required.

Related Links:
SUFA Review Links - incl. links to background SUFA documents and the final report/appendices from the review.
[this link takes you to a section of
the Canadian Social Research Links Unofficial Social Union Links page]

National Children's Agenda (NCA)
Speeches, Papers and News Releases

Note: Check out the Canadian Social Research Links Unofficial Social Union Links page to find information that didn't make it to the official website.  Also, see the Provincial/Territorial Social Union Links page of this site for a large collection of provincial and territorial links to information about reinvestments under the National Child Benefit initiative. For serious social union junkies.

Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services
Release of "Supports and Services for Adults and Children with Disabilities in Canada: An Analysis of Needs and Gaps"

News Release
December 3, 2004

Complete report:

Supports and Services for Adults and Children Aged 5 – 14 with Disabilities in Canada:
An Analysis of Data on Needs and Gaps

Commissioned by Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services*
December 3, 2004
By Gail Fawcett, Coryse Ciceri, Spyridoula Tsoukalas, and Angela Gibson-Kierstead
PDF Version (512K, 89 pages)
HTML version
Table of Contents:
Part One: Supports And Services For Adults With Disabilities In Canada: An Analysis Of Needs And Gaps

- Aids And Devices - Help With Daily Activities - School Supports - Housing Features - Work Supports - Profile Of Unmet Need - Conclusion
Part Two: Disability Supports In Canada For Children With Disabilities Aged 5 - 14: Needs And Gaps
- Aids And Devices - School Supports - Home Supports - Gaps

Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development

Related Link:

Benefits and Services for Persons with Disabilities
[ Social Union website ]
*NOTE: the Social Union website offers more links to information by and about the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services.


National Child Benefit
- A unique partnership of the Government of Canada, Provinces and Territories and First Nations
This joint government website offers information about how the NCB works in each jurisdiction and in First Nations communities.
- incl. links to : What is the National Child Benefit (NCB)? - The Government of Canada's Contribution to the National Child Benefit Initiative - Programs in your jurisdiction - First Nations Reinvestments - Library - NCB Success Stories
The "Programs in your Jurisdiction" link provides information on all NCB initiatives and links to related information on other websites.


National Child Benefit Supplement Clawback Misconception

The Misconception:
"The federal government should take measures to make sure that provinces don't claw back the federal increase in the Canada Child Tax Benefit from families' social assistance benefits."

The Fact: The clawback is actually part of the NCB design, by agreement of the governments of all provinces and territories (except Quebec) and the federal government.
Read the excerpt below from the Second Report on Social Policy Renewal:

Progress Report to Premiers - No. 2 (PDF file - 72K, 18 pages)
July 1997
Excerpt (page 8)
"Federal/provincial/territorial governments have agreed on a joint NCB approach that involves three simultaneous steps.
First, the federal government will increase its benefits for low-income families with children through an increase in the Canada Child Tax Benefit.
Second, provinces and territories will make corresponding decreases in their social assistance payments for families with children while ensuring these families receive at least the same level of income support from governments.
Third, provinces and territories will reinvest these newly-available funds in complementary programs targeted at benefits and services for low income families with children."

News Release:
Social Policy Renewal

August 8, 1997
From the 38th Annual Premiers' Conference

St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, New Brunswick

See also:

"Building a Better Future for Canadian Children" - click on "Social Assistance Adjustments"
National Child Benefit Booklet
September 1997
"As the federal benefit increases, provinces and territories will decrease benefits for social assistance recipients. This decrease will not exceed the amount of the federal increase - the total benefit available to social assistance families will remain at least the same"

Remarks by The Honourable Jane Stewart, Minister of Human Resources Development Canada,
on The 'Why', 'How' and 'What' of Social Policy Development in Canada at The Empire Club
Toronto
March 27 , 2003
This speech provides an overview of the mandate, themes, programs and clientele of Jane Stewart's Department, including : HRDC budget (Seventy billion dollars) - Canadian pension programs - the marriage of social and economic policy - a children's agenda for Canada - sustainability - social research and development - parental benefits - Canadians with disabilities, Aboriginal people, new immigrants - lifelong learning, active/passive balance in the development of good social policy - partnerships - responsiveness - early learning and childcare - child poverty - National Children's Agenda - National Child Benefit (including a reference to the NCBS clawback) - pulling down the welfare wall - and much more...
Source : Social Development Canada
[NOTE: At the time Jane Stewart was Minister, the Department was called Human Resources Development Canada.]

Campaign 2000: Higher child benefits needed to counter persistent poverty
July 8, 2003
"Increased investments in the Canada Child Tax Benefit are needed in order to substantially reduce child poverty, say researchers and advocates following the release of the 2002 National Child Benefit Progress Report."
Source : Canadian Council on Social Development (Campaign 2000 Partner)

 

Early Childhood Development Activities and Expenditures: Government of Canada Report 2001-2002
"...provides information on both new and ongoing federal activities and expenditures on early childhood development, such as a new folic acid awareness campaign and improvements to maternity and parental benefits."
HTML version
PDF version (1.3MB, 108 pages)

The Well-Being of Canada’s Young Children: Government of Canada Report 2002
"...provides an overview of the well-being of Canada’s young children nationally, focusing on such areas as their physical health, safety and security and early development. In addition, the report provides information on the families and communities in which these young children are growing up."
HTML version
PDF version (735K, 58 pages)

Architecture for National Child Care (PDF file - 58K, 21 pages)
November 2002
by Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
"The case for investing in high quality child care is compelling and unequivocal."

Source: Caledon Institute of Social Policy

Related Links:

A National Child Care Strategy: Getting the Architecture Right Now
A Report of the National Liberal Caucus Social Policy Committee with the collaboration of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy
Chair: John Godfrey MP
November 2002

Time to Decide on Child Poverty: Laggard or Leader?
The Competitive Requirement for a Canadian National Child Care* Strategy
A Draft Report of the Social Policy Committee of the National Liberal Caucus
John Godfrey MP, Chair
August 2002

Website of John Godfrey, MP, Don Valley West

National Children's Agenda Caucus Committee

Sub-Committee unanimously calls for overhaul of federal government’s First Nations ECD Programming (June 12, 2002)

Building on Success
"...the Sub-committee heard troubling testimony on the situation of young children living on reserve, across the country. We could not escape the conclusion that First Nations children and families face many challenges, which seem, at times, overpowering and insoluble. We hope the observations and recommendations in this report will contribute to some extent to the vital process of finding solutions. "

Key Federal Government Programs for First Nations Families and Young Children living on Reserves
(Appendix B of Building on Success)

The Government of Canada Announces an Early Childhood Development Initiative for Aboriginal Children
News Release
October 31, 2002
"...a funding allocation of $320 million over the next five years for a strategy to improve and expand Early Childhood Development (ECD) programs and services for First Nations and other Aboriginal children."

Source : Health Canada


NOTE Regarding Child and Family Services:

The scope of federal, provincial and territorial government programs and services for children, families and youth is quite broad. It covers health, social services, child protection, Canadian and international adoptions, foster care, child and family services, counselling, mediation, visiting homemaker services, children's rights, child maintenance, child care, child custody, and much, much more. The "Children, Families and Youth" pages of this site (national govt. - Canadian NGO - international) are my way of organizing links to a very small portion of that information. Canadian Social Research Links has no "Provincial/territorial Government Child and Family Services" page because there are others who do a much better job than I ever could. Follow the link below to THE definitive Canadian collection in the area of child and family services, also known as child protection or child welfare.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare*
http://www.cecw-cepb.ca/

Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal*
http://www.cwrp.ca/

* NOTE: The two links above take you to the same website.
The "Centre" link is to the current location of the site, and
the "Portal"link is to the location of the site once it is liberated
from the shackles of federal government funding in April.

-----------------------------------------------------------

February 25, 2010

News from the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare:

NOTE:
I received this by email but I can't find the same message on the Centre's website, so I'm copying the entire message below.

---

Public Health Agency Funding Ending – Research Portal Focus of Future CECW Work


The Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare (CECW) is pleased to announce that its major communications network, the Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal, will be a primary focus of our future activities (www.cwrp.ca). This portal will showcase the work of Canadian child welfare researchers, provide a wealth of information about child welfare across Canada, and will identify policy and research needs for child welfare in Canada and beyond.

The emphasis on the Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal comes at a time of transition for the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare. The CECW will complete its mandate in March 2010 as part of the Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being, which has been generously funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada
and Health Canada since 2000. The ending of PHAC's funding cycle for the Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being Program will leave a serious gap in Canada's voice to create a national child welfare research agenda and to collaborate closely on policy and practice development. For this reason, the CECW's directors and sponsoring organizations are committed to continuing their collaboration and expanding their networking with partnerships that have developed over that past 10 years. In doing so, we will place particular stress on using our own energies and seeking support from the federal government and elsewhere to further a national research agenda in child welfare for Canada.

We look forward, as individuals and organizations, to continuing our efforts to promote excellence in child welfare research, policy and practice.

Sincerely,

Cheryl Regehr, CECW Executive Director, University of Toronto
Cindy Blackstock, CECW Co-Director, First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada
Claire Chamberland, CECW Co-Director, Université de Montréal
Peter Dudding, CECW Co-Director, Child Welfare League of Canada
Aron Shlonsky, CECW Co-Director, University of Toronto
Nico Trocmé, CECW Scientific Director, McGill University

For more information:
info@cecw-cepb.ca

-----------------------------------------------------------

Personal Endorsement:
Whether you call it the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare or the Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal, this is *the* website to visit for information about child welfare / child protection / child and family services (different names for similar services). Here ,you'll find large collections of resources on these types of programs for each province and territory. The site also includes extensive resources in the areas of : * Child Abuse & Neglect * Intervention & Prevention * Families & Communities * Children & Youth in Care * Aboriginal Child Welfare * Policy & Legislation * Provinces & Territories.

I highly recommend this site, and I think it sucks that neither Public Health Agency of Canada nor Health Canada can find the funds to continue this valuable information service.
My best wishes to all who are involved with the Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal --- and I'll definitely keep referring visitors to their impressive collection of online resources.
Gilles

___________________________________________________________

Here's the original collection of links to the site:
(they'll all be functional until someone pulls the plug on the"old" site)

Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal
[ version française:
Portail canadien de la recherche en protection de l’enfance
]

This website has been designed to be a clearinghouse of information for child welfare professionals, researchers, and the general public. It is searchable by keywords and organized according to major topic areas.
Topics include: * Child Abuse & Neglect * Intervention & Prevention * Families & Communities * Children & Youth in Care * Aboriginal Child Welfare * Policy & Legislation * Provinces & Territories.

The Portal contains a library of Canadian research content as well as an extensive database of child welfare researchers from across Canada.

---

Provincial-territorial child welfare and child protection resources
- includes, for each Canadian jurisdiction, the following links:
* Legislation * Researchers * Publications * Statistics * Links

---

NOTE: the home page of the Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal
is the home page of the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare.
[ More info about the Centre ]

This website is an initiative of the partner organizations of the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare and supported through funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada.
The Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare (CECW) is one of four Centres of Excellence for Children’s Well-Being funded by Public Health Agency Canada.

Statistics Canada

Children and youth
Information on Canada’s infants, children, teens, adolescents, students, and young adults. Topics include child care arrangements, crime, education, health, immigration, labour, low income, risk behaviours and violence.
Subtopics
1. Children and youth (general)
2. Child care
3. Child development and behaviour
4. Crime and justice (youth)
5. Education
6. Health and well-being (youth)
7. Immigrant children and youth
8. Labour market activities
9. Low income families
10. Risk behaviours
11. Violence among children and youth

---

October 18, 2012
Study: Profile of parents in stepfamilies, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121018/dq121018d-eng.htm
In September 2012, data on the family structure and number of children in stepfamilies were released from the 2011 Census of Population, marking the first time information on stepfamilies had been collected in the census. A new report available today examines in more detail the characteristics of parents or stepparents in stepfamilies gathered by the 2011 General Social Survey

Related subjects:

Families, households and housing
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Family types
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40005&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Living arrangements of individuals
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40002&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

---

May 22, 2012
Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120522/dq120522a-eng.htm
According to police-reported data, about 99,000 Canadians were victims of family violence in 2010. Of these, almost 50% were committed by their spouse. An additional 17% were committed by a parent, 14% by an extended family member, 11% by a sibling and 9% by a child, usually a grown child. Unlike other forms of violent crime, the risk of becoming a victim of family violence was more than twice as high for females as for males.

Related subjects:

Children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Violence among children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20009&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crime and justice
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2693&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crimes and offences
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2102&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Family violence
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2696&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Victims and victimization
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=455&lang=eng&type=DAILYART


Centres of Excellence for Children’s Well-Being

Centre of Excellence for Early Child Development - University of Montreal
Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescents with Special Needs - Lakehead University

The Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth-Centred Prairie Communities - Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare
- University of Toronto
Centre of Excellence for Youth Engagement
- Students Commission (national youth advocacy group)

Expert Advisory Committee on children announced
News Release
November 23, 2001
OTTAWA -- Ethel Blondin-Andrew, Secretary of State for Children and Youth, today announced on behalf of Health Minister Allan Rock, the creation of a National Expert Advisory
Committee on the Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being. Ms. Blondin Andrew made the announcement at a national conference in Ottawa featuring the work of the five Centres of Excellence. Over 400 experts, including researchers, policymakers, and professionals in health, education, child care and social services are attending the conference.
Members of the National Expert Advisory Committee
Source : Health Canada

Government of Canada announces five centres of excellence for children's well-being
News Release
October 5, 2000
Read this Health Canada news release for information about all five centres

Effective Programs for Early Child Development: Linking Research to Policy and Practice
XXXV Banff international conference on behavioural science

March 16-19, 2003
Banff, Alberta
"The Banff International Conference on Behavioural Science and the Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development co-hosted this conference presenting the best international research on early childhood programs."
- incl. links to the program, workshops descriptions and individual presentations organized under the following headings (a total of over 20 files, all PDF format):
Effective prenatal to infancy programs - Effective programs for preschool children - Effective comprehensive programs.


Division of Childhood and Adolescence - part of the Public Health Agency of Canada
- incl. links to : Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being - Aboriginal Head Start.Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities - Community Action Program for Children (CAPC) - Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program CPNP) - CAPC/CPNP National Projects Fund - National Fetal Alcohol Syndrome / Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE) Initiative


National Clearinghouse on Family Violence
(Public Health Agency of Canada)

The National Clearinghouse on Family Violence is a national resource centre for professionals, front-line workers, researchers and community groups seeking information about violence within the family and looking for new resources being used to address it. This is a large site of information on child abuse, violence against women, and abuse of seniors.. You'll find fact sheets, a newsletter, special reports and studies and much more. 

Family Violence Initiative (FVI)

Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities

Centres of Excellence
The Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being conduct research on key child health issues, develop policy advice based on solid evidence and disseminate information to a broad audience

Aboriginal Head Start
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities is a Public Health Agency of Canada and Health Canada-funded early childhood development program for First Nations, Inuit and Métis children and their families.

Community Action Program for Children (CAPC)
CAPC provides long term funding to community coalitions to deliver programs that address the health and development of children (0-6 years) who are living in conditions of risk. It recognizes that communities have the ability to identify and respond to the needs of children and places a strong emphasis on partnerships and community capacity building.

Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program.Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP)
CPNP is a comprehensive community-based program designed to meet the needs of pregnant women facing difficult life circumstances that threaten their health and the development of their babies.

CAPC/CPNP National Projects Fund
The CAPC/CPNP National Projects Fund (NPF) provides financial assistance to initiatives supporting the objectives of CAPC/CPNP projects and has direct relationships with projects across Canada. The NPF is designed to support time-limited projects sponsored by voluntary, non-profit, non-governmental organizations, which will be national in scope and result in the strengthening of CAPC/CPNP projects.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
The goal of the national Fetal Alcohol Syndrome / Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE) Initiative is to develop a broad-based collaborative effort to prevent FAS/FAE and improve the quality of life of all people affected by FAS/FAE.

Selected reports:

Young people in Canada: their health and well-being
October 2004
Summary (PDF file - 1.1MB, 8 pages)
Summary - HTML file
Full Document (PDF file - 2.8MB, 156 pages)
"
The Health Behaviour of School-Aged Children (HBSC) Study is a cross-national study supported by the World health Organization. In Canada, the HBSC surveys have been funded by Health Canada. Young people in Canada: their health and well-being, a 136-page report, presents the findings from the three surveys conducted in Canada since 1989-90.




Knowledge and Research (formerly the Applied Research Branch)
[ Social Development Canada ]

Poverty, Social Capital, Parenting and Child Outcomes in Canada
Final Report
March 2002 (posted to the Applied Research Branch website October 24, 2003)
The experience of long-term poverty affects many child outcomes, in part through a family stress process in which poverty is considered to be one of the major factors causing family dysfunction, depression among caregivers and inadequate parenting. (...) This study reports the construction of measures related to social capital (Collective Efficacy and Social Support) at the neighbourhood, rather than the individual level, and the use of these along with a battery of census characteristics and other explanatory variables in the prediction of outcomes for longitudinal children aged 4 to 15 in the National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth.
Click the above link for an abstract of the study; click below to read the study
Complete paper (HTML)
Complete paper (PDF) (1.3MB, 74 pages)
This study is based on statistical modeling, of special interest to economists and others who speak/understand economese. Even if you're not well-versed on "metric partial regression coefficients" (straight from the report), you might find some interesting tidbits in the
literature review on families, poverty and child outcomes, with a particular focus on three distinct themes that are relevant to child outcomes: the effect of long-term poverty, the Family Stress Model, and the role of neighbourhood social capital.

Poverty and Child Well-Being in Canada and the United States:
Does it Matter How We Measure Poverty?
Final Report
September 2000
Posted to the Applied Research website August 2003
"(...) In this paper we examine the possibility that conclusions about the association between poverty and children's well-being may be sensitive to choices made about how to measure 'poverty.' In particular, we focus upon the influence of data set chosen, sample selected and poverty line used. Throughout, the analysis is conducted for children in both Canada and the
United States, both to emphasize that these issues are not unique to the Canadian situation and to point out the influence of measurement choices upon our understanding of Canada/US comparisons of children's poverty and/or well-being. The principal data sets used are the Survey of Consumer Finance and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth for Canada and the Current Population Survey and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth — Mother/Child Supplement for the United States."
Complete paper (HTML)
Complete paper (PDF) (727K, 37 pages)



Surveys

Three major surveys of children and youth were sponsored by the former Applied Research Branch of Human Resources Development Canada:
- National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth
- Youth in Transition Survey
- Understanding the Early Years.

Social Development Canada: Understanding the Early Years
2005 Call for Proposals - Application Guide

February 17, 2005
- this call for proposals closed on April 11, 2005
"In the mid-1990s, government policy officials worked with experts to develop a research program in early childhood development. This work led to the development, creation, and launch of pilot projects known as “Understanding the Early Years.” Documentation (such as conference materials and research reports) on the developmental work behind the UEY pilot projects is available on the Social Development Canada website (http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca, go to “Children,” then “Understanding the Early Years,” then “UEY Pilot Program”)"

Understanding the Early Years (UEY) "is a federal government initiative that provides communities with information on the 'readiness to learn' of their children, the family and community factors that influence child development, and the local resources available to support young children and their families. This neighbourhood-specific information is used by communities to design and implement focused policies, programs and investments that enable their young children to thrive in the early years. UEY is currently underway in 12 pilot communities across Canada. Building on the success of the UEY pilot program and its positive impact on the capacity of communities to support early childhood development, the Spring 2004 federal budget committed the Government of Canada to extend UEY to up to 100 communities across Canada over the next seven years. (bolding added)

A Brief History of UEY - quite brief, actually...

UEY Pilot Project Reports
- links to Early Childhood Development Reports for several provinces --- UEY Phase I (2001-2002) and Phase II (2002-2003)

Source:
Understanding the Early Years - Pilot Projects
[ Social Development Canada - Renamed Human Resources and Social Development Canada]

Related Link:

Understanding the Early Years:
An Update of Early Childhood Development Results in Four Canadian Communities

July 2005 (Posted to the Internet January 2007)
HTML Table of Contents - links to HTML files for each chapter in the report
HTML Executive Summary
PDF version
- (169K, 52 pages)
This report highlights some of the key findings from data collected from four diverse UEY pilot communities: Prince Albert, Saskatchewan; Winnipeg, Manitoba; Prince Edward Island; and Southwest Newfoundland. The findings address how kindergarten children are doing in each community and family and community factors which influence young children’s development.
The author of the report, J. Douglas Willms, is the University of New Brunswick’s Canada Research Chair in Human Development and the director of the Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy at the University of New Brunswick.
Source:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Government of Canada announces funding for six new Understanding the Early Years (UEY) communities in British Columbia
News Release
October 12, 2005

Government of Canada announces funding for Understanding the Early Years North Shore in British Columbia
News Release
October 12, 2005

Related Links:
Understanding the Early Years (UEY)
- UEY Pilot Projects


Youthfluence.com
The  Institute On Governance (IOG) is continuing its development of Youthfluence.com – a dynamic web site designed to encourage civic literacy and participation among Canadian youth. Supported by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, the project team is currently seeking additional funding partners to build exciting content and support the Youth Board governing the site. Youthfluence.com will have its official launch early in 2001. View the prototype at http://www.youthfluence.com
- Go to the Institute On Governance website

Report on Public Consultations on The National Children's Agenda Released
Press Release
Provincial/Territorial Council on Social Policy Renewal
June 21, 2000

What Canadians are Telling Us about the National Children’s Agenda
Provincial/Territorial Council on Social Policy Renewal
June 21, 2000

Public Dialogue on the National Children's Agenda
Developing a Shared Vision
Provincial/Territorial Council on Social Policy Renewal
June 2000

The National Children’s Agenda: Health Canada's contribution
Budget 2000 Information
February 28, 2000


Exchanges Canada
"Exchanges Canada is a Government of Canada initiative that creates opportunities for young Canadians to connect with one another and experience the diversity of Canadian communities, languages and cultures. Exchanges Canada also provides access to information on all sorts of exchange programs and activities available in Canada and abroad."

Second National Study Shows Fewer Aboriginal Youth In Custody
November 22, 2004
"OTTAWA – The Department of Justice, with the support of the provinces and territories, today released the second One Day Snapshot of Aboriginal Youth in Custodyacross Canada . The report documents the number of Aboriginal youth in custody on a single day - June 4, 2003 - and is a follow up to the first Snapshot done in 2000. The 2003 Snapshot shows a 36% reduction in the number of Aboriginal youth in custody from three years earlier: down from 1,128 in 2000 to 720 in 2003."
Backgrounder

Complete report:

A One-Day Snapshot of Aboriginal Youth in Custody Across Canada : Phase II
February 2004
HTML version
- table of contents, links to each section (all in HTML)
PDF version (4.8MB, 45 pages)

Source:
Department of Justice

Youth Employment Strategy (Government of Canada)
Canada's Youth Employment Strategy helps young people get the skills, knowledge and work experience they need for a successful career.


Department of Justice Child Support Page
"On May 1, 1997 new laws respecting child support came into force, including Federal Child Support Guidelines and additional federal enforcement measures to help the provinces and territories ensure that family support obligations are respected."
- incl. links to : About federal child support laws in Canada - Ten things you need to know - Eight steps to calculating child support - Laws and regulations - Provincial and territorial Enforcement programs - Links to provincial and territorial child support programs, custody and access information and the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency - Publications - Latest news - Federal-Provincial-Territorial Consultations on Custody, Access and Child Support in Canada

Child Support Enforcement - incl. links to : Overview of the Canadian system of support enforcement - Family Orders and Agreements Enforcement Assistance - Glossary of Canadian reciprocal and support enforcement terms - Interjurisdictional and international support enforcement - Interjurisdictional support orders (ISO) legislation and reciprocity arrangements - Provincial and territorial information on interjurisdictional and international support order enforcement (ISO).

Minister of Justice Releases Report to Parliament on the Federal Child Support Guidelines
News Release
April 29, 2002

Report to Parliament on Federal Child Support Guidelines (Backgrounder)
April 2002

Children Come First: A Report to Parliament on the Provisions and Operation of the Federal Child Support Guidelines
Complete Report - links to PDF and HTML versions of the report

 

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E-MAIL: gilseg@rogers.com