Canadian Social Research Links

Children, Families and Youth  
International Links

[kids]

Updated October 31, 2014
Page révisée le 31 octobre 2014

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Les enfants, les familles et les jeunes  
Ressources internationales


[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]

Related Canadian Social Research Links pages:
- Early Learning and Child Care in Canada - Canadian NGO Links
- Early Learning and Child Care in Canada - Canadian Govt. Links
- Children, Families and Youth - Canadian Government Links
-
Children, Families and Youth - Canadian NGO Links
- Children's Rights Links page - incl. Canada’s National Plan of Action for Children, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the work of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (Special Session on the Rights of the Child), and related sites
- Unofficial Social Union Links Page (national)
- Unofficial Provincial/Territorial Social Union Links Page
See these related outside sites also...
- The (official) Social Union website
- The National Child Benefit website

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External site:

POVERTY DISPATCH - U.S.
(this link takes you to the current issue of the Dispatch)
- from the Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin
- dozens of
links to full-text articles in the U.S. media (mostly daily newspapers) on poverty, health, welfare reform, education, hunger, etc.
- includes a link to older issues back to 2006 of the Dispatch and a search feature.

 

 



Child Welfare Information Gateway - U.S.
Formerly the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information and the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse, Child Welfare Information Gateway provides access to information and resources to help protect children and strengthen families. A service of the Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Child Welfare Information Gateway connects professionals and concerned citizens to timely, essential information and resources targeted to the safety, permanency, and well-being of children and families.

Source:
Children's Bureau
[ Administration for Children and Families ]
[ U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ]

 
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The State of the World’s Children 2016: A fair chance for every child
http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_91711.html

-----------------------

International (includes Canada)

September 2014

UNICEF :
Innocenti Report Card 12
Children in the Developed World

Children of the Recession : The impact of
the economic crisis on child well-being in rich countries
(PDF - 1.8MB, 52 pages)
http://www.unicef.ca/sites/default/files/imce_uploads/images/reports/unicef_report_card_12_children_of_the_recession.pdf
September 2014
The data and observations in this Innocenti Report Card reveal a strong and multifaceted relationship between the impact of the Great Recession on national economies and a decline in children’s well-being since 2008. Children are suffering most, and will bear the consequences longest, in countries where the recession has hit hardest.

Source:
UNICEF
http://www.unicef.org/
UNICEF is the driving force that helps build a world where the rights of every child are realized. We have the global authority to influence decision-makers, and the variety of partners at grassroots level to turn the most innovative ideas into reality.
(...)
In the case of the Great Recession and its impact on children, conventional wisdom has it that the suffering was inevitable, spread equally among social groups and alleviated by the macroeconomic recovery. This report suggests otherwise.

See also:

UNICEF Canada
http://www.unicef.ca/

Related links from Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre:

Coverage – mostly negative – of the federal government’s income splitting plan:

CBC: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/harper-s-income-splitting-will-make-rich-canadians-with-babies-richer-1.2818997
CBC: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/income-splitting-what-it-is-and-who-benefits-1.2818396
Globe: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/income-splitting-wont-help-parents-who-really-need-a-tax-break/article21382476/
Globe: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/household-finances/the-truth-about-income-splitting-we-take-what-we-can-get/article21394065/
Star editorial: http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2014/10/30/harpers_income_splitting_lite_is_still_a_bad_idea_editorial.html
Maclean’s: http://www.macleans.ca/economy/economicanalysis/harpers-income-splitting-program-isnt-great-policy-or-good-politics/
Regg Cohn: Plan would short-change Ontarians: http://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2014/10/29/stephen_harpers_incomesplitting_plan_would_shortchange_ontarians_cohn.html
Broadbent Institute analysis: http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/costly-and-unfair-stephen-harpers-income-splitting-scheme
Is the NDP’s $15 / day childcare plan Canada’s hottest new political pledge?
http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/behind-numbers/2014/10/15-day-child-care-canadas-hottest-new-political-pledge

United Kingdom

No more baby steps: A strategy for revolutionising childcare
http://www.ippr.org/publications/no-more-baby-steps-a-strategy-for-revolutionising-childcare
By Dalia Ben-Galim
29 June 2014
In this report, we set out plans for how the UK can move towards a universal, high-quality and affordable system of childcare and early-years provision, complemented by reforms to parental leave and rights to flexible employment.

Source:
Institute for Public Policy Research
http://www.ippr.org/
IPPR, the Institute for Public Policy Research, is the UK's leading progressive thinktank

UNICEF Report: U.S. Ranks 34th Out of 35 In Childhood Poverty
http://iacknowledge.net/unicef-report-u-s-ranks-34th-out-of-35-in-childhood-poverty/
February 15, 2014
A sobering report released by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) found that out of the top 35 developed nations in the world, the United States comes 2nd to last in childhood poverty [NOTE: Canada is ninth from the bottom]. While many of the Scandinavian and Western European countries (i.e. countries with a robust social safety net) have very low rates of childhood poverty, America only just narrowly beat Romania for the worst. Poverty is a reality for at least 22 percent of American children (and considerably higher by other estimates).

Child well-being in rich countries:
A comparative overview
Innocenti Report Card 11
(PDF - 3.4MB, 60 pages)
http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/rc11_eng.pdf

PART ONE presents a league table of child well-being in 29 of the world’s advanced economies.
PART TWO looks at what children say about their own well-being (including a league table of children’s life satisfaction).
PART THREE examines changes in child well-being in advanced economies over the first decade of the 2000s, looking at each country’s progress in
educational achievement, teenage birth rates, childhood obesity levels, the prevalence of bullying, and the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs.

Source:
UNICEF
http://www.unicef-irc.org/

From UNICEF:

April 24, 2013
The State of the World’s Children 2013: Children with Disabilities
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2013/
Each year, UNICEF’s flagship publication, The State of the World's Children, closely examines a key issue affecting children. The State of the Word’s Children website includes digital versions of report component such as supporting data, statistics and stories in addition to online only features.
---

The 2013 edition of The State of the World’s Children is dedicated to the situation of children with disabilities. The report examines the barriers – from inaccessible buildings to dismissive attitudes, from invisibility in official statistics to vicious discrimination – that deprive children with disabilities of their rights and keep them from participating fully in society. It also lays out some of the key elements of inclusive societies that respect and protect the rights of children with disabilities, adequately support them and their families, and nurture their abilities – so that they may take advantage of opportunities to flourish and make their contribution to the world.

---

Complete report (PDF - 4.1MB, 164 pages):
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2013/files/SWCR2013_ENG_Lo_res_24_Apr_2013.pdf
Version française:
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2013/files/FRENCH_SOWC2013_Lo_res.pdf

Executive Summary (PDF - 1.8MB, 28 pages)
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2013/files/SOWC2013_Exec_Summary_ENG_Lo_Res_24_Apr_2013.pdf
Excerpt:
In many countries, responses to the situation of children with disabilities are largely limited to institutionalization, abandonment or neglect. These responses are the problem, and they are rooted in negative or paternalistic assumptions of incapacity, dependency and difference that are perpetuated by ignorance. What is needed is a commitment to these children’s rights and their futures, giving priority to the most disadvantaged – as a matter of equity and for the benefit of all.

Statistics
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2013/statistics.html
- incl. links to 14 tables of economic and social statistics for the countries and territories of the world, with particular reference to children’s well-being.

Customized statistical tables
http://www.unicef.org/statistics/index_24183.html
The statistical tool includes economic and social data from 195 countries and territories, with particular reference to children’s well-being. Users can choose their countries and indicators to build tables on the fly, or download the numbers into an Excel spreadsheet. These statistics are derived from UNICEF’s flagship publication, The State of the World’s Children.

Previous editions of The State of the World's Children
http://www.unicef.org/sowc/index.html

Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

http://www.unicef.org/
UNICEF is on the ground in over 150 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

Related link:

UNICEF Canada
http://www.unicef.ca/
Since 1955, UNICEF Canada has grown into a recognized national symbol for the world’s children and the most visible United Nations presence across the country. UNICEF Canada’s mandate is to raise funds in support of UNICEF’s work for children in more than 150 countries and territories and build awareness among Canadians about the issues facing the world’s children.

July 15, 2013
2012 UNICEF Annual Report

UNICEF celebrates a year of important firsts in 2012
http://www.unicef.org/policyanalysis/index_69815.html
By Chris Niles, UNICEF correspondent
News Release
New York
15 July 2013
UNICEF’s 2012 annual report celebrates a year of successes for children amidst a challenging climate. The report recognizes an important year of ‘firsts’ – from one year polio-free in India to important new global partnerships that tackled such issues as preventable child deaths and affordable medicines. As the deadline for the Millennium Development Goals approaches, UNICEF has seen important gains in preventing child mortality, lower levels of child poverty, increased immunization coverage and more girls in school. However, too many children continue to struggle. 2012 was a year of extra effort to reach them.

Download the reports:

UNICEF Annual Report : 2012 (PDF - 1.2MB, 52 pages)
http://www.unicef.org/publications/files/UNICEF-AnnualReport2012_8July2013.pdf
Released July 8, 2013

Summary of the 2012 Annual Report (PDF - 812K, 5 pages)
http://www.unicef.org/publications/files/UNICEF_Annual_Report_2012_SUMMARY_ENG_2July2013.pdf

Report on Regular Resources 2012 (PDF - 5.4MB, 52 pages)
http://www.unicef.org/publications/files/RR_REPORT_2012_FINAL_14June2013.pdf

2012 Supply Annual Report
http://www.unicef.org/supply/index_report.html

---

Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

http://www.unicef.org/

[United States]

New from the
Annie E. Casey Foundation:

Child Poverty Still on the Rise, but Outlook for Children
Better in Education and Health, KIDS COUNT report finds
(PDF - 232K, 3 pages)
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/~/media/159/USA2013DataBookNewsRelease.pdf
Gradual economic recovery presents national opportunity to refocus on investments in early childhood development
June 24, 2013
News Release
BALTIMORE — As the nation’s economy recovers, America’s children are showing some signs of improvement despite an ever-growing poverty rate, according to new data in the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT® Data Book.
(...)
Children continue to progress in the areas of education and health. From roughly 2005 to 2011, the teen birth rate dropped by 15 percent to a historic low. (...) The percentage of children without health insurance decreased by 30 percent. Although the economic well-being of the nation’s children improved slightly from 2010
to 2011, the negative impact of the recession remains evident. (...) In particular, younger children are disproportionately affected by the lingering effects of the recession: The poverty rate among children younger than 3 is 26 percent; among 3- to 5-year-olds, it is 25 percent — higher than the national average for all kids.

Source:
2013 Kids Count
National and State News Releases
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications/databook/StateNewsReleases/2013

--------

2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book
National and state-by-state data on key indicators of child well-being
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications/databook/2013
- main page for this book, includes links to (1) download or order the book, (2) media resources, (3) state rankings & interactive wheel, and (4) custom data reports.

The complete book:

2013 Kids Count Data Book : State Trends in Child Well-Being (PDF - 7MB, 56 pages)
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/files/2013KIDSCOUNTDataBook.pdf

Contents:
Foreword
Kids Count Data Center
Overall Child well-being
Economic well-being
Education
Health
Family and Community
Conclusion
Appendices:
--- About the Index
--- Definitions and Data Sources
--- Primary Contacts for State Kids Count Projects
--- About the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Kids Count

- Indicators include:
* Demographics * Economic Well-Being * Education * Family & Community * Health * Safety & Risky Behaviors

U.S. national and state profiles
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications/databook/StateProfileSheets/2013

Kids Count Data Center
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/

Source:
Annie E. Casey Foundation

http://www.aecf.org/
The Annie E. Casey Foundation creates a brighter future for the nation’s children by developing solutions to strengthen families, build paths to economic opportunity and transform struggling communities into safer and healthier places to live, work and grow.

---

Related media coverage:

June 24, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/06/24/
2013 Kids Count Data Book
Click the link above to access all 14 articles whose headlines appear below:
--- Kids Count: Parents finding themselves increasingly without jobs, Associated Press
--- Children living in poverty longer, putting their futures at risk, Washington Post
--- As economy improves, so do lives of children in state, study says, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
--- ‘Good news and bad news’ in Iowa Kids Count report, Des Moines Register
--- Kids Count report: Michigan ranks last in Great Lakes states for child well-being, Mlive.com
--- Kentucky, Indiana children slide economically in Kids Count report, Louisville Courier-Journal
--- Arizona still lags in child welfare, Arizona Republic
--- Are New Mexico kids all right? Report says no, Santa Fe New Mexican
--- Utah’s slipping when it comes to well-being of children, report shows, Deseret News
--- More Colorado children living in poverty, Denver Post
--- California ranks low in child well-being; Northeast tops, Los Angeles Times
--- Oregon children fare poorly in economic well-being, national report says, The Oregonian
--- Report: Economic well-being of kids in Washington still down, 2013, Seattle Times

Source:
Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

Child Well-being in Rich Countries: A comparative overview
Innocenti Report Card 11

April 2013

NOTE: This report card and related documents are also available:
- in French : [ http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/687 ]
- in Italian : [ http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/688 ]
- in Spanish : [ http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/689 ]

Child well-being - progress in danger? (PDF - 196K, 3 pages)
http://www.unicef-irc.org/files/documents/d-3832-Child-well-being---progre.pdf
News release
10 April 2013
[This release is also available in French and in Spanish : See http://www.unicef-irc.org/article/951/ ]
FLORENCE/BRUSSELS/DUBLIN – A timely study on child well-being in rich countries, launched today by UNICEF’s Office of Research, finds that the Netherlands and four Nordic countries – Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden – again sit at the top of a child well-being table; whilst four southern European countries – Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain – are placed in the bottom half of the table.

This report card ranks 29 developed countries according to the overall well-being of their children.
This report includes Canada ---- Number 17 on the list (Netherlands is Number 1).

The complete report card:

Child Well-being in Rich Countries: A comparative overview
Innocenti Report Card 11
(PDF - 3.4MB, 60 pages)
http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/rc11_eng.pdf
By Peter
Adamson
April 2013
The Report Card series is designed to monitor and compare the performance of economically advanced countries in securing the rights of their children.

Part 1 of the Report Card presents a league table of child well-being in 29 of the world's advanced economies.

Part 2 looks at what children say about their own well-being (including a league table of children’s life satisfaction).

Part 3 examines changes in child well-being in advanced economies over the first decade of the 2000s, looking at each country’s progress in educational achievement, teenage birth rates, childhood obesity levels, the prevalence of bullying, and the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs.

----------------------------------------------------

Related documents
http://www.unicef-irc.org/article/951/
- includes links to Report Card 11 key findings (in French, English and Spanish), an interactive Report Card 11 map and key messages (English only) and the above news release in French and Spanish.

Earlier reports in this series:
http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/series/16

Source:
Office of Research
(a.k.a. Innocenti Research Centre
)
http://www.unicef-irc.org/
The Office of Research is part of
UNICEF

http://www.unicef.org
UNICEF works in more than 190 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

The Canadian Context, from
UNICEF Canada:

Child Well-Being in Rich Countries : A comparative overview
Report Card 11 : Canadian Companion
(PDF - 2.9MB, 17 pages)
http://goo.gl/thdXv
(...) The story of Canada in Report Card 11 is one of a country stuck in the middle. Canada has a middle rank in the League Table of Child Well-being, and this position has not budged since we last measured it a decade ago. In some aspects of child well-being Canada shines, and it lags at the bottom in others – just like the pattern in many other countries.

Canada : A nation stuck in the middle
http://www.unicef.ca/en/discover/article/child-well-being-in-rich-countries-a-comparative-overview
In the overall well-being of our children, Canada ranks in a middle position at 17 of 29 nations.
Canada also achieves a middle-level ranking in its scores for:
- Material Well-being (15 out of 29)
- Education (14 out of 29)
- Behaviours and Risks (16 out of 29)
- Housing and Environment (11 out of 29)
Most concerning is that in Health and Safety, Canada ranks as low as 27 of the 29 industrialized countries.

Key points for Canada (PDF - 112K, 1 page)
http://www.unicef.ca/sites/default/files/imce_uploads/TAKE%20ACTION/ADVOCATE/DOCS/unicef_rc_11_key_points_0.pdf

Source:
UNICEF Canada

http://www.unicef.ca/

February 12, 2013
Remarks by the President in the State of the Union Address
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/02/12/remarks-president-state-union-address
[ Selected excerpts on early childhood education ]
(...)
Study after study shows that the sooner a child begins learning, the better he or she does down the road. But today, fewer than 3 in 10 four year-olds are enrolled in a high-quality preschool program. Most middle-class parents can’t afford a few hundred bucks a week for a private preschool. And for poor kids who need help the most, this lack of access to preschool education can shadow them for the rest of their lives. So tonight, I propose working with states to make high-quality preschool available to every single child in America. That's something we should be able to do. Every dollar we invest in high-quality early childhood education can save more than seven dollars later on -- by boosting graduation rates, reducing teen pregnancy, even reducing violent crime.
(...)

Source:
The White House

http://www.whitehouse.gov/

Federal Spending on Kids Slips for First Time in Three Decades
http://www.urban.org/publications/901513.html
July 19, 2012
Press Release
Federal spending on children declined in 2011 for the first time since the early 1980s, the Urban Institute’s sixth annual “Kids’ Share” study estimates. The children’s slice of the federal budget and gross domestic product also shrank. The decline in spending on kids will continue in the fiscal year that ends September 30, as the economic stimulus funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) are nearly exhausted. Assuming no changes in federal policies or law, the children’s share of federal program outlays and of GDP will drop through at least 2022, the Urban Institute researchers forecast.

Complete report:

Kids' Share 2012: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children through 20110 (PDF - 5.6MB, 56 pages) (dead link)
http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412600-Kids-Share-2012.pdf
By Julia Isaacs et al.
2012
This sixth annual Kids’ Share report examines federal expenditures on children in 2011, when the temporary boost in federal funding to address the recession was dwindling, yet states and families were still struggling to recover from the recession. This report provides in-depth analysis of dozens of federal programs and tax provisions that allocate resources to children and places these expenditures in the broader context of the overall federal budget.

Some key findings:

* Federal outlays on children fell by $2 billion, from $378 billion in 2010 to $376 billion in 2011 which is the first time spending on children has fallen since the early 1980s
* While the federal government spent less on children, total federal spending increased, from $3.52 to $3.60 trillion
* Ten programs and tax provisions account for three-quarters (75 percent) of the $445 billion in expenditures on children
* Federal spending on education was $5 billion lower in 2011 than in 2010, a drop equivalent to the total decline in outlays and tax expenditures.

Source:
Urban Institute
http://www.urban.org/

New Report Shows Progress in Child Education and Health Despite Economic Declines
http://www.aecf.org/Newsroom/NewsReleases/HTML/2012Releases/2012KIDSCOUNTDataBook.aspx
July 25, 2012
News Release
BALTIMORE — The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s latest KIDS COUNT® Data Book shows both promising progress and discouraging setbacks for the nation’s children: While their academic achievement and health improved in most states, their economic well-being continued to decline.
Over the period of roughly 2005 to 2011, the improvements in children’s health and education include a 20 percent decrease in the number of kids without health insurance; a 16 percent drop in the child and teen death rate; an 11 percent reduction in the rate of high school students not graduating in four years; and an 8 percent reduction in the proportion of eighth-graders scoring less than proficient in math.
- includes highlights from the report.

KIDS COUNT 2012 Data Book
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/DataBook/2012/Default.aspx
- Download or order the book
- Media resources
- State rankings & interactive wheel
- Create custom data reports

Full report (PDF - 60 pages)
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/DataBook/2012/OnlineBooks/KIDSCOUNT2012DataBookFullReport.pdf

Data Book U.S. and state profiles
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/DataBook/2012/StateProfileSheets.aspx

Definitions and Sources (PDF - 3 pages)
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/DataBook/2012/OnlineBooks/2012KidsCountDataBookDefinitionsSources.pdf

Earlier editions of KIDSCOUNT
http://www.aecf.org/SearchResults.aspx?keywords=kids%20count&source=topsearch

Source:
KIDSCOUNT

http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx
KIDS COUNT, a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, is a national and state-by-state effort to track the well-being of children in the United States.

Annie E. Casey Foundation
http://www.aecf.org/
The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a private national philanthropy that creates better futures for the nation’s children by strengthening families, building economic opportunities and transforming neighborhoods into safer and healthier places to live, work and grow.

---

Selected media coverage of the release of the
KIDSCOUNT 2012 Databook
- from Poverty Dispatch (University of Wisconsin)

July 27, 2012 (12 articles about KIDSCOUNT 2012)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/27/

July 26, 2012 (16 articles about KIDSCOUNT 2012)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/26/

July 25, 2012 (2 articles about KIDSCOUNT 2012)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/25/

Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Research Synthesis Briefs:

What Can CCDF Learn from the Research on Children's Health and Safety in Child Care? March 2012 (PDF - 346K)
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/other_resrch/tanf_ccdf/reports/synthesis_brief.pdf

---

A Summary of Research on How CCDF Policies Affect Providers, March 2012 (PDF - 277K)
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/other_resrch/tanf_ccdf/reports/policies_providers.pdf

---

Client-Friendly Strategies: What Can CCDF Learn from Research on Other Systems? December 2011 (PDF - 248K]
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/other_resrch/tanf_ccdf/reports/ccdf_learn.pdf

---

Source:
TANF and CCDF Research Synthesis Project

http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/research/project/tanf-and-ccdf-research-synthesis-0
The purpose of the TANF and CCDF Research Synthesis Project was to inform research planning and support evidence-based decision making related to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) programs.

[ The TANF and CCDF Research Synthesis Project was an initiative of the Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation (OPRE) - http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/index.html ]
--- More OPRE Welfare & Employment Research links - http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/project/welfareProjects.jsp
[ OPRE is part of the Administration for Children & Families (ACF) - http://www.acf.hhs.gov/index.html ]
[ ACF is part of Health and Human Services - http://www.hhs.gov/ ]

UK Child poverty figures drop, but remain above 2 million
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/jun/14/child-poverty-above-2-million
June 14, 2012
By Randeep Ramesh
• 18% of children live in households earning £251 or less a week
• Number rises to 3.6 million when housing costs included
• Campaigners warn of future rises as government cuts kick in
• Separate figures show leap in homelessness

The number of children living below the poverty line in the UK has fallen slightly, but the figure remains stubbornly above 2 million, official figures show. Eighteen percent of children are living in households in the UK with incomes of less than 60% of the median average in 2010-11, equating to 2.3 million children, according to figures released by the Department for Work and Pensions on Thursday. When housing costs are taken into account, this share rises to 27%, or 3.6 million children. The figures show 300,000 fewer children are living in poverty than a year ago, or 200,000 fewer after housing costs are taken into account.
Source:
The Guardian (UK)

http://www.guardian.co.uk

---

The complete report:

Child Poverty in the UK: The report on the 2010 target (PDF - 608K, 29 pages)
http://goo.gl/7T8VL
June 2012
As required by section 1(1) of the Child Poverty Act 2010, the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions has laid a report on whether or not the previous Government’s target to halve child poverty by 2010 was met.
The target to halve child poverty by 2010 was not met. The number of children living in relative income poverty in 2010/11 was reduced to 2.3 million. This is 600,000 short of the number required to meet the target.

Sources:
Department for Work and Pensions

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/

Department for Education
http://www.education.gov.uk/

---

UK Child Poverty: Percentage of children living in poverty drops as
[Work and Pensions Secretary] Iain Duncan Smith changes definition
http://www.egovmonitor.com/node/51176
June 15, 2012
Income should not be the only determinant for child poverty, the Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith has said. The Minister argued that just by ensuring a family’s income is over an artificial threshold will not take the family out of poverty.

"By this narrow measure, if you have a family who sit one pound below the poverty line, you can do a magical thing," Mr Duncan Smith said. "Give them one pound more, say through increased benefit payments, and you can apparently change everything – you are said to have pulled them out of poverty. Yet moving someone from one pound below the poverty line to one pound above it might be enough to hit a target."

According to latest official figures, 18% of children currently live in households who earn 60% less than the median income in the UK - about 2.3 million children. However, if housing costs are included in the figures then, the number of children living in poverty increases to 27% or 3.6 million children.

This means the coalition government has failed to keep the Labour pledge it had promised to keep. UK has not been able to halve the child poverty numbers, as pledged by Tony Blair, by 2010-11.

Source:
eGovmonitor
http://www.egovmonitor.com/

---

Child poverty: where next?
http://www.ippr.org/?p=801&option=com_wordpress&Itemid=17
13 June 2012
By Nick Pearce
Thursday morning sees the annual publication of the child poverty statistics. This year’s set of statistics is especially important because it covers the year 2010/11, so it enables us to come to a final judgment on the Labour government’s record on child poverty.
In advance of the statistics, battle has been properly joined on whether Labour’s child poverty targets, enshrined in the Child Poverty Act 2010 [ http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/9/contents ] , were the right ones, and in particular, whether measuring poor households’ incomes, relative to median incomes, is the best way of thinking about poverty or not. The Centre for Social Justice [ http://www.centreforsocialjustice.org.uk/ ]has become the latest in a long line of conservative thinktanks to criticise the child poverty targets and Labour’s approach to meeting them; meanwhile the Child Poverty Action Group [ http://www.cpag.org.uk/ ] and a number of commentators have issued their detailed rejoinders.
(...)
Following substantial rises in spending under Labour, we now commit a relatively high share of our national income on families with children. However, while this was aimed at reducing child poverty in a cost-efficient manner, the graph below suggests that – paradoxically – we are not doing as well as other countries at translating this into low child poverty.
This disparity is partly explained byBritain’s relatively high levels of income inequality, single parent households, low pay and worklessness, but it also reinforces the need for a more strategic approach to supporting families with children – especially given the fiscal constraints. That means a stronger focus on childcare, the under-5s and working families – and a recognition that the struggle to eradicate child poverty will not be achieved overnight.

Source:
Nick Pearce is the Director of IPPR.
He blogs on things that matter to our public life, from the heart of progressive thinking in Britain.

Institute for Public Policy Research (IRPP)
http://www.ippr.org/
The Institute for Public Policy Research, is the UK’s leading progressive thinktank. We produce rigorous research and innovative policy ideas for a fair, democratic and sustainable world.

NEW from UNICEF:

The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World
February 29
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/index.php
Almost half the world’s children now live in urban areas; the report calls for greater emphasis on identifying and meeting their needs.

Complete report:

The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World (PDF - 4MB, 156 pages)
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/pdfs/SOWC-2012-Main-Report_EN_21Dec2011.pdf

Updates and corrections to the report up to Feb. 29, 2012 (small PDF file, 2 pages):
http://goo.gl/Kx6EX

Executive summary (PDF - 1.1MB, 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/J5Dx3
Key recommendations:
Increasing numbers of children are growing up in urban areas. they must be afforded the amenities
and opportunities they need to realize their rights and potential.
Urgent action must be taken to:

1. Better understand the scale and nature of poverty and exclusion affecting children in urban areas.
2. Identify and remove the barriers to inclusion.
3. Ensure that urban planning, infrastructure development, service delivery and broader efforts to reduce poverty and inequality meet the particular needs and priorities of children.
4. Promote partnership between all levels of government and the urban poor – especially children and young people.
5. Pool the resources and energies of international, national, municipal and community actors in support of efforts to ensure that marginalized and impoverished children enjoy their full rights.
These actions are not goals but means to an end: fairer, more nurturing cities and societies for all people – starting with children.

Statistical tables for 2011
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/statistics.php

Figures
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/figures.php

Panels
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/panels.php

Press materials
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/press.php

Children in an Increasingly Urban World : Infographic (PDF - 124K, 1 page)
http://goo.gl/STbhr

Previous editions of The State of the World's Children
http://www.unicef.org/sowc/index.html

Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

UNICEF is on the ground in over 150 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

Related link:

UNICEF Canada
Since 1955, UNICEF Canada has grown into a recognized national symbol for the world’s children and the most visible United Nations presence across the country. UNICEF Canada’s mandate is to raise funds in support of UNICEF’s work for children in more than 150 countries and territories and build awareness among Canadians about the issues facing the world’s children.

Media coverage of the report
from The Scout Report (University of Wisconsin):

The State of the World's Children 2012
The first link below will take visitors a piece from this Tuesday's Guardian which offers commentary on this recently released report. Moving on, the second link will whisk users away to the official report press release from UNICEF's press center. The third link will take interested parties to a post from the Los Angeles Times' World Now blog which includes a short video about the report and its basic findings. The fourth link leads to the entire State of the World's Children Report, along with interviews with experts, infographics, and figures. The fifth link leads to the full text of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1959. The last link leads to the homepage of the UN's Committee on the Rights of the Child. Here visitors can learn about this independent body, their work, and also read their press releases and papers.

Children in urban areas around the world continue to face tremendous challenges
Make children the cornerstone of urban decision-making, urges UNICEF
http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2012/feb/28/unicef-children-central-urban-planning

Cities are failing children, UNICEF warns
http://www.unicef.org/media/media_61839.html

World's slum children in desperate need, UNICEF says
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2012/02/unicef-report-says-worlds-slum-children-in-desperate-need.html

Children in an Urban World: The State of the World's Children 2012
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/

Declaration of the Rights of The Child
http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/humanrights/resources/child.asp

Committee on the Rights of the Child
http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/

In 1959, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child to complement the Declaration of Human Rights approved in 1948. The hope was that this declaration would secure certain basic rights for children across the globe, regardless of nation origin, ethnicity, or other factors. Over the intervening five decades, much progress has been made, but according to a report released by UNICEF this Tuesday, many children in urban areas still face tremendous challenges. Commenting on the report, UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake noted that "Today an increasing number of children living in slums and shantytowns are among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable in the world, deprived of the most basic services and denied the right to thrive." While cities often offer children the advantages of a diverse set of schools, health care and playgrounds, they do not work very well for the majority of those children living in poverty. For example, in some poor neighborhoods, a basic necessity like water can cost 50 times more than in wealthier neighborhoods, where residents are connected directly to water mains. The report is worth reading, and the hope is that it will inspire a broad coalition to tackle some of these challenges head on.

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2012.

http://scout.wisc.edu/

Recession Increases Number of Children Living in Low-Income Families by 7% to 31 Million
7.8 Million Children Lived With at Least One Unemployed Parent in 2010
(PDF - 258K, 3 pages)
News Release
August 17, 2011
Baltimore, Md., Aug. 17, 2011 – According to data released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation in its annual KIDS COUNT® Data Book, over the last decade there has been a significant decline in economic well-being for low income children and families. The official child poverty rate, which is a conservative measure of economic hardship, increased 18 percent between 2000 and 2009, essentially returning to the same level as the early 1990s.

2011 KIDS COUNT Data Book - main page
- scroll down the page for links to:
* Full report (PDF, 9MB, 88 pages)
* Data Book national and state profiles
* Summary of findings
(PDF - 1.4MB, 28 pages)
* Definitions and sources for 10 key indicators
* National and State News Releases
* National Fact Sheet
(PDF - 271K, 4 pages)
* View Media Webinar
* [Essay] America’s Children, America’s Challenge:
Promoting Opportunity for the Next Generation
(PDF - 2.7MB, 24 pages) --- this essay "... explores how kids and families are faring in the wake of the recession and why it’s important to help children reach their full potential and become part of a robust economy and society."

NOTE : At the bottom of the 2011 data book home page, you can create custom data reports on the following:
*
Overall Rank * Data for Your State * Compare Data Across States * Indicator Briefs * Campaign Partners * Auxiliary Tables

[ Earlier editions of the data book ]

Source:
Annie E. Casey Foundation
The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a private charitable organization, dedicated to helping build better futures for disadvantaged children in the United States. It was established in 1948 by Jim Casey, one of the founders of UPS, and his siblings, who named the Foundation in honor of their mother. The primary mission of the Foundation is to foster public policies, human-service reforms, and community supports that more effectively meet the needs of today’s vulnerable children and families.

Recent report from
The Children's Defense Fund (CDF):

The State of America's Children® 2011 Report
CDF’s new report The State of America's Children 2011 finds children have fallen further behind in many of the leading indicators over the past year as the country slowly climbs out of the recession. This is a comprehensive compilation and analysis of the most recent and reliable national and state-by-state data on population, poverty, family structure, family income, health, nutrition, early childhood development, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence.

Click the link above and then scroll down the next page
to a collection of links organized under the following headings:

* Child Population * Child Poverty * Family Structure * Family Income * Child Health * Child Hunger and Nutrition * Early Childhood * Education * Child Welfare * Juvenile Justice * Gun Violence

Download the complete report (PDF - 3.5MB, 206 pages)

How much do you know about the state of America's children?
Take this short quiz.

U.S. State Data on Children

--------------------

Related article
in the Huffington Post:

The State of America's Children 2011
By Marian Wright Edelman (President, Children's Defense Fund)
Posted July 15, 2011
The Children’s Defense Fund has just released a new report, The State of America’s Children® 2011, which paints a disturbing portrait of child needs across our country. With rampant unemployment, housing foreclosures, homelessness, hunger, and massive looming federal and state budget cuts, children’s well-being is in great jeopardy. One in five children is poor and children are our nation’s poorest age group. Child poverty increased almost 10 percent between 2008 and 2009, the largest single year increase since data were first collected. Fifteen and a half million children are adrift in a sea of poverty, and every 32 seconds another child is born poor. As our country struggles to climb out of the recession millions of our children are falling further behind
Source of this article:
Huffington Post

Children's Defense Fund
The Children's Defense Fund is a non-profit child advocacy organization that has worked relentlessly for over 35 years to ensure a level playing field for all children. We champion policies and programs that lift children out of poverty; protect them from abuse and neglect; and ensure their access to health care, quality education and a moral and spiritual foundation.

[U.S.]
Kids’ Share 2011: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children through 2010

July 25, 2011
By Julia B. Isaacs et al.
This fifth annual Kids’ Share report marks a milestone in the analysis of federal expenditures on children because available data now span 50 years, from 1960 to 2010. During the past half-century, the size and composition of expenditures on children has changed considerably. Back in 1960, the largest federal contributions to families due to the presence of children came from the dependent exemption, Social Security, and education. Fifty years later, the dependent exemption has much less relative value, and Medicaid, the earned income tax credit, and the child tax credit have become the three largest federal expenditures on children.

Complete report (PDF - 2MB, 44 pages)
(...) Only once in the past 50 years has spending on children declined as much as it is projected to decline in the next five years. Unless priorities shift, children are not expected to benefit from any of the projected growth in outlaysover the next decade. The future for children’s spending is particularly difficult to predict this year, given
current policy debates about federal spending and revenues .
[Excerpt from the conclusion, p. 30]

Data Appendix (PDF - 1.2MB, 73 pages)
- includes an overview of the three-step methodology for estimating federal expenditures in each year. First, we define spending on children and identify programs with children’s spending. Second, we describe the process of collecting expenditure data for the more than 100 programs and tax provisions included in our report, as well as the sources for these data. Third, we explain how we calculate the share of these expenditures that go to children. In addition, we explain the data and assumptions used to generate projections, briefly describe the sources for our state and local estimates, and specify the ways in which our methodology has changed from previous Kids’ Share reports. In the second section of this document, we present a summary table of expenditures in 2010 detailing the programs included in our analysis, estimated expenditures, and the share of the expenditure going to children.

Source:
Brookings Institution
and
Urban Institute

July 8, 2011
America's Children : Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2011
- main page of the report, includes the following table of contents:
* Introduction
* Demographic Background
* Family and Social Environment
* Economic Circumstances
* Health Care
* Physical Environment and Safety
* Behavior
* Education
* Health
* Special Feature: Adoption
* America's Children at a Glance
* Forum Agencies
* List of Tables
* List of Figures
* Data Source Descriptions
* Printer-friendly PDF version of 2011

Federal report shows drop in adolescent birth rate
Annual statistics compilation notes increases in 8th grade drug use, child poverty
Press Release
July 8, 2011
The adolescent birth rate declined for the second consecutive year, preterm births declined for the third consecutive year, adolescent injury deaths declined, and fewer 12th graders binge drank, according to the federal government's annual statistical report on the well-being of the nation's children and youth. However, a higher proportion of 8th graders used illicit drugs, more children were likely to live in poverty, and fewer children were likely to live with at least one parent working year round, full time, according to the report, America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being 2011. The report was compiled by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, a working group of 22 federal agencies that collect, analyze, and convey data on issues related to children and families. The report uses the most recently available major federal statistics on children and youth to measure family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health.

Source:
Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
The Forum is a working group of Federal agencies that collect, analyze, and report data on issues related to children and families. The Forum has partners from 22 Federal agencies as well as partners in private research organizations. America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being is the Forum's signature annual report.


Key Resource for U.S. State Information on Low-Income Benefit Programs!

Key Low-Income Benefit Programs - by state
Updated June 29, 2011
HTML version
PDF version (329K, 42 pages)
[TIP: PDF files are better in some respects, but in this case, the content of the HTML link is periodically updated; the PDF isn't.
If you choose to download the PDF, be sure to save the link to the HTML version and check it from time to time to ensure that you have the latest information.]

- incl. links to information in each U.S. state (total of 400+ links) about the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs:
* SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as Food Stamps)
* Medicaid
* SCHIP
(Children’s Health Insurance Program)
* TANF
(Temporary Assistance for Needy Families)
* child care.

"There is significant variation between what online information is provided across states. Some provide a simple description of each program on their agencies websites. Others offer additional information, such as application forms, eligibility screening tools, and policy and procedure manuals used by state agency caseworkers. A few states allow individuals to apply for certain types of benefits online."

Recommended resource!!
This collection of links offers direct access to information (FOR EACH STATE] about the five programs mentioned above under the following headings:
* Policy Manuals and Materials
* Descriptive Program and Eligibility Information
* Applications for Assistance
* Benefit Screener/Calculator and Online Applications
* Program Data

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)

Report Card 9 - The Children Left Behind
Rich countries letting poorest children fall, says new report
(PDF - 280, 3 pages)
News Release
3 December 2010
Florence-Helsinki-Geneva
A landmark report by the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre has found that children in many wealthy European nations and the United States suffer greater inequality than children in numerous industrialized nations. Report Card 9: The Children Left Behind ranks, for the first time, 24 OECD countries (including Canada) in terms of equality in health, education and material well-being for their children. The report looks at a particular aspect of disparity – bottom-end inequality – and asks how far behind are rich nations allowing their most disadvantaged children to fall.

Innocenti Report Card 9: The Children Left Behind - main product page
- includes links to the news release and the report itself, along with press materials, an opinion piece, some videos and more. I've copied some of those links here; click the main product page link to see the rest.

The report:

The Children Left Behind:
A league table of inequality in child
well-being in the world’s rich countries
(PDF - 1.5MB, 40 pages)

Key Findings (PDF - 278K, 5 pages)

[ Earlier Innocenti report cards ]

Source:
Innocenti Research Centre
The UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre in Florence, Italy, was established in 1988 to strengthen the research capability of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and to support its advocacy for children worldwide.
[ UNICEF ]

----------------------------------

From UNICEF Canada:

The Children Left Behind : The Canadian perspective
* How does Canada measure up?
Overall, Canada is in the middle of the group of wealthy nations in terms of equality in child well-being, similar to less affluent countries like Poland and Portugal
* A closer look at Canada's children
A large gap leads not only to squandered individual lives but also to poorer average levels of well being for all children. The heaviest costs of falling behind are paid by the child.
* What Canada should do
Among the practical and affordable steps Canada can take now that would make a real and lasting difference for children, UNICEF Canada recommends the establishment of a National Children’s Commissioner to ensure the best interests of children are considered in policy decisions that affect them, and services and policies affecting children are coordinated across government so all Canadian children have equitable access to and benefit from them.

Sign the petition now and say our children matter
- demand a National Children's Commissioner

Source:
UNICEF Canada

Related media link:

Canada's poorest children fall behind
By Norma Greenaway
December 3, 2010
Compared to other rich countries, Canada has a mediocre record of keeping the wellbeing of its poorest children from falling behind their better off counterparts, says a UNICEF report being released today. Canada placed 17th among 24 industrialized countries in terms of the material well-being enjoyed by its poorest children, ninth in terms of their health and third in education, according to the report.
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

World Forum 2010 - International Forum for Child Welfare (IFCW)
November 8-11, New York City
International delegates and child welfare experts will gather at the IBM Learning Center in Palisades, New York this November 8 to 11 for WorldForum 2010, the 21st annual summit of the International Forum for Child Welfare (IFCW). This year’s theme, A World Fit for Children: Advancing the Global Movement, sets the stage for 500 delegates from 40 nations to take stock of current successes and obstacles; to share cutting edge research, innovative solutions, and best practices; and to plan for future action.

* Agenda

* Speaker Biographies
---
Estela Barnes de Carlotto - President of Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo, Argentina
--- Lilliam Barrios-Paoli - Commissioner of the New York City Department for the Aging
--- Dr. Susan Lynn Bissell, PhD - Associate Director, Chief, Child Protection, Programmes UNICEF
--- Gladys Carrión, Esq., Commissioner of the New York State Office of Children & Family Services
--- Djibril Diallo, PhD - Senior Advisor to the Executive Director, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS
--- Priscilla Star Diaz - one of the stars of the hit series The Electric Company on PBS Kids Go
--- Gord Mackintosh - Minister of Family Services and Consumer Affairs, Manitoba
--- Stephen W. Nicholas, MD, Founder and Director, Columbia University International Family AIDS Program, professor of pediatrics and public health
--- Cheryl Perera - Founder and President of OneChild
--- Victoria Rowell - New York Times Bestselling Author, Actress and Humanitarian
--- Bryan Samuels - US Dept. of Health and Human Services-Commissioner, Administration on Children, Youth and Families
---
Marta Santos Pais - Special Representative of the UN, Secretary-General on Violence against Children

Examining Food Insecurity
Among Children in the United States

August 2010

Excerpt
from the full report:

Fourteen million children live in poor families (that is, families with income below the federal poverty level, which is $22,050 a year for a family of four in 2009). There is a wide body of research documenting the importance of family income for children’s health and well-being. Yet, research suggests that families with income twice the poverty threshold experience as many material hardships as poor families, such as food insecurity, inadequate housing, and insufficient health care. These findings are alarming and underscore the degree to which income-based measures of impoverishment mask experiences with material deprivation that are widespread and transcend the standard thresholds that define poverty.
- includes an 18-point food insecurity checklist
[e.g., In the last 12 months, did you lose weight because there wasn’t enough money for food? (Yes/No)]

Complete report:

Who Are America’s Poor Children?
Examining Food Insecurity Among Children in the United States
(PDF - 859K. 16 pages)
By Vanessa R. Wight, Kalyani Thampi, and Jodie Briggs

Publication Date: August 2010
The focus of this report is on one type of material hardship – food insecurity – highlighting an important, but sometimes overlooked, dimension of impoverishment.

Also by the same
authors, same release date:

Basic Facts About Food Insecurity
Among Children in the United States, 2008
(PDF - 1.1MB, 8 pages)
Authors: Vanessa R. Wight and Kalyani Thampi
Publication Date: August 2010
This report is part of the National Center for Children in Poverty’s Who Are America’s Poor Children series. Estimates, unless otherwise noted, were prepared by Vanessa R. Wight and are based on the U.S. Current Population Survey, Food Security Supplement, December 2008. The food security supplement measures food security status at the household level.

Source:
National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP)
The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) is the nation’s leading public policy center dedicated to promoting the economic security, health, and well-being of America’s low-income families and children.

Related NCCP links:

Low-income Children in the United States
National and State Trend Data, 1998-2008
(PDF - 930K, 60 pages)
By Michelle Chau
November 2009
After nearly a decade of decline, the number of children living in low-income families has increased significantly since 2000. This data book provides national and 50-state trend data on the characteristics of low-income children over the past decade: parental education, parental employment, marital status, family structure, race and ethnicity, age distribution, parental nativity, home ownership, residential mobility, type of residential area, and region of residence.

The most current year of data can also be accessed at www.nccp.org—see NCCP’s 50-State Demographic Profiles or build custom tables using NCCP’s 50-State Demographics Wizard. For a discussion of these data and selected policy implications, see NCCP’s fact sheets on low-income children, which are updated annually.

More NCCP resources on the topic of poverty

Ten Important Questions About Child Poverty and Family Economic Hardship

NCCP Fact Sheets

Marriage and Family Resources
Links to 50 online resources - mostly American, but definitely relevant for Canadian social researchers - on marriage and family life.
The list covers a wide range of topics and philosophies from the right-wing Heritage Foundation to Marriage Equality USA (same-sex marriage).

Sample resources:
* Abstinence & Marriage Education Partnership: Offers training, education, and research on abstinence for teenagers and parents to lead to healthy marriages.
* ChildCare.gov: Comprehensive resource covering: health, nutrition, safety, and development of children.
* Children's Defense Fund: Working to prevent poverty, neglect, and abuse among children and families.
* Council on Contemporary Families: Examine the cultural, social, and legal aspects of modern families; with fact sheets on same sex marriage, single fathers, and marriages among older adults.
* AdoptUsKids: Connecting families with children needing to be adopted or placed in foster care across the United States.
* Australian Institute of Family Studies: Publications and research dedicated to family wellbeing in Australia.
* Center for Disease Control and Prevention: The National Survey of Family Growth section, offers recent information on family life covering everything from pregnancy, marriage, and contraceptive use.
* Family Research Council: Focuses on the sanctity of the institute of marriage and family from a Christian worldview.
* Grandparenting: Showcases the importance of grandparents to the family structure and guidance for grandparents raising grandchildren.
* Marriage Equality USA: Organization devoted to promoting and advocating the benefits of civil marriage for same sex couples.
* National Domestic Violence Hotline: A resource for families looking to escape or prevent abuse.
* National Fatherhood Initiative: Equipping fathers with the skills needed to be involved in their children's lives.
* National Network for Child Care: This extensive list of research based articles and resources covers information on child development, special needs children, and finding caregivers.
* National Stepfamily Resource Center: Provides education, research, facts, and tips for dealing with blended families.

A picture of Australia's children 2009
Published 17 June 2009
This report delivers the latest information on how, as a nation, we are faring according to key indicators of child health, development and wellbeing. Death rates among children have fallen dramatically, and most children are physically active and meet minimum standards for reading and numeracy. But it is not all good news. Rates of severe disability and diabetes are on the rise. Too many children are overweight or obese, or are at risk of homelessness, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fare worse on most key indicators.
Source:
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

Early childhood education and care : Key lessons from research for policy makers, (PDF - 549K, 72 pages)
June 2009
This report is a review of the international evidence about the social benefits of early childhood education and care (ECEC). It provides an analytic overview of the various rationales that drive the development of ECEC services. It summarizes existing knowledge from research and highlights policy lessons and measures that are shown to contribute to successful ECEC policy development and implementation.
- incl. references to Canada & U.S.
Source:
Nesse network (Network of Experts in Social Sciences of Education and Training)
[ European Commission - Brussels ]

"Child poverty rates in Canada in 2005 were at the higher end of the OECD,
with 15% of children living in poor households versus an OECD average of 12.4%.
"

New from the
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD):

Spend early on children, says OECD
News Release
1 September 2009
Governments should invest more money on children in the first six years of their lives to reduce social inequality and help all children, especially the most vulnerable, have happier lives, according to the OECD’s first-ever report on child well-being in its 30 member countries. Doing Better for Children shows that average public spending by OECD countries up to age six accounts for only a quarter of all child spending. But a better balance of spending between the “Dora the Explorer” years of early childhood and the teenage “Facebook” years would help improve the health, education and well-being of all children in the long term, according to the report.

Doing Better for Children
This link takes you to the main page of this OECD report.
I don't generally promote books for sale, but this report is worth spotlighting because it contains a lot of free resources, such as the complete content of two chapters and links to complementary info and sources, along with highlights for 12 countries (including Canada). Check it out - you may find that it's worth the $29 (E-book) or $42 (paper copy).

Table of Contents (PDF - 104K, 4 pages)

Comparative Child Well-being across the OECD (PDF - 1.1MB, 43 pages)
Chapter Two presents a child well-being framework and compares outcome indicators for children in OECD countries across six dimensions: material well-being; housing and environment; education; health; risk behaviours; and quality of school life.

Doing Better for Children: The Way Forward (PDF - 206K, 29 pages)
Chapter 7 offers a range of policy recommendations for improving child well-being.

Doing Better for Children
Country Highlights : Canada
(PDF - 117K, 1 page)
2009
"Canada receives solid marks in “Doing Better for Children”, the OECD’s first report on the well-being of children. But there are areas which may need policy attention to improve the lives of Canadian children, including reducing child poverty and youth risk-taking, and ensuring timely immunisations. (...) Child poverty rates in Canada in 2005 were at the higher end of the OECD, with 15% of children living in poor households versus an OECD average of 12.4%." [Bolding added]

OECD links to child well-being research related websites
- incl. dozens of links to : International Organisations - European Organisations - NGOs and International Research Projects - Government & Ministries - Statistical Offices - Universities

Related link:

High spending fails to improve child welfare, says OECD report
UK's levels of teenage pregnancy, drunkenness and unemployment are among highest out of 30 countries
1 September 2009
Source:
The Guardian (U.K)

America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009
America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009 continues a series of annual reports to the Nation on conditions affecting children in the United States. Three demographic background measures and 40 selected indicators describe the population of children and depict child well-being in the areas of family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. This year's report has a special feature on children with special health care needs.
[ Highlights ]
Source:
America's Children Reports
[ Childstats.gov - the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (working group of Federal agencies that collect, analyze, and report data on issues related to children and families. The Forum has partners from 22 Federal agencies as well as partners in private research organizations) ]

Related link:

Child Poverty Rising, Report Says
July 11, 2009
A growing number of American children are living in poverty and with unemployed parents, and are facing the threat of hunger, according to a federal report released yesterday.
According to the report, America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 18 percent of all children 17 and younger were living in poverty in 2007, up from 17 percent in 2006. The percentage of children with at least one parent working full time was 77 percent in 2007, down from 78 percent in 2006. Those living in households where parents described children as being hungry, having skipped a meal or having gone without eating for an entire day increased from 0.6 percent in 2006 to 0.9 percent in 2007, the report said.
Source:
Washington Post

UNICEF Canada Report on Aboriginal Children’s Health Shows Disparities
Between Aboriginal Children and National Averages a Major Children’s Right Challenge
Health of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Children Well Below National Averages (dead link)
News Release
June 24, 2009
Toronto - UNICEF Canada is marking the 20th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child with the release today of a report called Aboriginal Children’s Health: Leaving No Child Behind- the Canadian Supplement to State of the World’s Children 2009. UNICEF Canada partnered with the National Collaborating Centre on Aboriginal Health to produce the report, which examines the health of Aboriginal children in Canada through the perspectives of national experts and analysis of existing data. The report concludes that health disparities between First Nations, Inuit and Métis children relative to national averages is one of the most significant children’s rights challenges facing our nation.

Aboriginal Children’s Health: Leaving No Child Behind:
The Canadian Supplement to State of the World’s Children 2009
* Complete report (PDF - 6.6MB, 61 pages) (dead link)
* Summary (PDF - 379K, 4 pages)(dead link)
* Highlights (HTML)

[ Other UNICEF Canada Publications ]

Source:
UNICEF Canada
Since 1955, UNICEF Canada has grown into a recognized national symbol for the world’s children and the most visible United Nations presence across the country. UNICEF Canada’s mandate is to raise funds in support of UNICEF’s work for children in more than 150 countries and territories and build awareness among Canadians about the issues facing the world’s children.

---

Related link from UNICEF:

The State of the World’s Children, 2009:
Maternal and Newborn Health

January 2009
"The State of the World's Children 2009 examines critical issues in maternal and newborn health, underscoring the need to establish a comprehensive continuum of care for mothers, newborns and children. The report outlines the latest paradigms in health programming and policies for mothers and newborns, and explores policies, programmes and partnerships aimed at improving maternal and neonatal health. Africa and Asia are a key focus for this report, which complements the previous year's issue on child survival."

[ Previous editions of The State of the World's Children reports - back to 1996]

Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
UNICEF is on the ground in over 150 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

Related link:

Aboriginal children's health below national averages: UNICEF
By Amy Minsky, Canwest News Service
The infant mortality rate across Canadian First Nations reserves is up to seven times higher than among the general population, according to a report released Wednesday from UNICEF Canada. And between 2002 and 2006, the tuberculosis rate among the Inuit was 90 times higher than in the non-Aboriginal population in Canada, the study said. The report's authors said this disparity is a symptom of a larger problem — not all Canadian children are treated equally when it comes to health care.
Source:
Canada.com

International Day of Families, 15 May 2009
Theme: "Mothers and Families: Challenges in a Changing World"

Message of the Secretary General (PDF 19K, 1 page)
15 May 2009

Source:
United Nations Programme on the Family
The United Nations Programme on the Family is the focal point within the United Nations system on matters related to family.

--------------------------------------------

Just released [11 Dec 08] by the
UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre
:

The child care transition: A league table of
early childhood education and care in economically advanced countries

[including Canada]
Innocenti Report Card #8
By Peter Adamson drawing on research by John Bennett
Publication date 11 Dec 08

* The child care transition 1(report) - (PDF - 602K, 40 pages)(dead link)
* The child care transition (summary) (dead link)
* Canada's status at a glance
"(...) Canada invests about 0.2 per cent GDP in early child care and education (for 0-6 years) according to the OECD Canada Review (2006). Investing in quality services available to all children who need them would cost about 1 per cent of GDP."

Background information:
* Early childhood services in the OECD countries
* Benchmarks for early childhood services in OECD countries

Related resources:
* Press releases - UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre (incl. summary, other press material, background papers, etc.)

--------------------------------------------

Response from UNICEF Canada:

UNICEF Canada calls for measurable standards,
guidelines, appropriate funding for child care, and solutions by 2009

UNICEF Canada press release
Publication date 11 Dec 08

--------------------------------------------

Opposition parties respond to UNICEF report card
*
New Democrat Olivia Chow to send UNICEF card to Harper to highlight report of Canada missing the mark in childcare. 11 Dec 08
* UN report shows Conservatives’ failed childcare strategy: Canada ranks last among OECD countries. Liberal Party of Canada, 11 Dec 08
Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
CRRU focuses on research and policy resources in the context of a high quality system of early childhood education and child care in Canada
NOTE: the links above are from the CRRU website, the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre website and the UNICEF CAnada website

--------------------------------------------

From CTV.ca :

Canada tied for last in UNICEF child care ranking
December 11 2008
Canada is tied for last place in a UNICEF ranking of the early child-care services offered by 25 developed countries. Canada failed to meet nine out of 10 of the proposed benchmarks UNICEF used to rank the countries. The 10 proposed benchmarks included parental leave of one year at 50 per cent or more of salary, a national plan with priority for the disadvantaged, and child poverty rates of less than 10 per cent.

Child Development Index
December 2008
Save the Children UK has just launched a ground-breaking publication - The Child Development Index. This is the first-ever global index comparing countries' performance on child well-being. It uses child-specific indicators in health, education and nutrition to rank countries in every region of the world. It is a vital tool for policy-making and development analysis worldwide.

The Child Development Index:
Holding governments to account for children’s wellbeing
(PDF - 227K, 30 pages)
December 2008
"(...) we are highlighting three areas that warrant much more sustained attention and decisive action on the part of national governments, the international donor community, development
NGOs, and the private sector : child malnutrition, equitable development and women’s education and empowerment."
- Canada is third-best of 137 countries, after Japan and Spain.

Source:
Save the Children UK
We’re the world’s independent children’s rights organisation. We’re outraged that millions of children are still denied proper healthcare, food, education and protection and we’re determined to change this. Save the Children UK is a member of the International Save the Children Alliance, transforming children’s lives in more than 100 countries.

What's new from the Canadian Council on Social Development:

New report says NAFTA ignores economic well-being of our kids ( PDF - 74K, 2 pages)
Media Release
September 17, 2008

The Economic Well-being of Children
in Canada, the United States and Mexico
(PDF - 1.2MB, 59 pages)
- examines a range of different measures to determine the economic security of children living in Canada, the United States and Mexico.

Source:
Growing Up in North America series

Related links:

Children in North America Project website
The Children in North America Project aims to highlight the conditions and well-being of children and youth in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Through a series of indicator reports, the project hopes to build a better understanding of how our children are faring and the opportunities and challenges they face looking to the future.

Partners in the project:

Canadian Council on Social Development
The Annie E. Casey Foundation (U.S.)
Population Reference Bureau (U.S.)
Red por los Derechos de la Infancia (Mexico)

The Economics of Early Childhood Policy (U.S.)
http://rand.org/pubs/occasional_papers/OP227/
[ News Release - May 12, 2008 ]
What, pray tell, might the so-called "dismal science" of economics have to say about public investment in early childhood programs? Quite a bit, as it turns out. This report from the RAND Corporation takes an economic perspective on such investments, and its intent is to provide policymakers with a primer about "how economic analysis can help set agendas for early childhood policy and identify the economics benefits of targeting certain groups for help." Released in May 2008, the 48-page report draws on concepts including human capital theory and monetary "payoffs" from investments in early childhood programs. The report is divided into four chapters, including "Human Capital Theory" and "Implications for Early Childhood Policy". It's quite a compelling read, and it will be of interest to a broad range of persons working in fields such as early childhood development, economics, and public policy.
Review by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2008.

Related links:

RAND Corporation - home page
* Child Policy - related research and reports

RAND Corporation - from Wikipedia

The State of the World's Children 2008
News Release
[GENEVA, 22 January 2008] – Strategies that can help reduce the number of children who die before their fifth birthday were highlighted today, at the launch of UNICEF’s flagship report - The State of the World’s Children 2008: Child Survival – in Geneva. While recent data show a fall in the rate of under-five mortality, the State of the World’s Children Report 2008 goes beyond the numbers to suggest actions and initiatives that should lead to further progress.

Complete report:

State of the World's Children 2008 (PDF file - 4.3MB, 164 pages)

Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

Center for Law and Social Policy
The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) is a national nonprofit that works to improve the lives of low-income people. CLASP’s mission is to improve the economic security, educational and workforce prospects, and family stability of low-income parents, children, and youth and to secure equal justice for all.

New from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development:

Starting Strong Network website launched - January 4, 2008
Starting Strong Network website reports on network initiatives to develop effective and efficient policies for early childhood care and education.

Starting Strong Network
The Network has received a mandate from the OECD Education Policy Committee to assist member countries to develop effective and efficient policies for early childhood care and education.
[ Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - OECD ]
Related links:
OECD Early Childhood Education and Care Home Page

Starting Strong curricula and pedagogies in early childhood education and care: Five curriculum outlines
Report by OECD of four well-known ECEC curricula including Experiential Education by Professor Ferre Laevers.

Improved childcare policies needed to achieve better work/life balance, says OECD
News Release
November 29, 2007
Getting family-friendly policies right will help reduce poverty, promote child development, enhance equity between men and women and stem the fall in birth-rates, according to a new OECD report. Babies and Bosses, Reconciling Work and Family Life compares the different approaches that the 30 OECD countries take to help parents balance their work and family commitments.

Babies and Bosses - Reconciling Work and Family Life:
A Synthesis of Findings for OECD Countries

Babies and Bosses (Vol. 4): Canada, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom
Finding a suitable work/family life balance is a challenge that all parents face. Many parents and children in Canada, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom are happy with their existing work and care outcomes. However, many others feel seriously constrained in one way or another, and their personal well-being suffers as a consequence.

Key Outcomes of Canada compared to OECD average

Selected Tables and Charts (Excel format) from Babies and Bosses (Vol. 4): Canada, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom

--------------

This book is part of the Babies and Bosses series, consisting of comparative studies of work and family reconciliation policies.
To get a more comprehensive picture of reconciliation policies, you can consult the first three volumes:
- Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands (volume 1) , which was published in 2002
- Austria, Ireland and Japan (volume 2), which was published in 2003
- New Zealand, Portugal and Switzerland (volume 3), which was released in 2004

--------------

Main OECD Social Policy Activities in 2006-2007
- click the link above for info about the activities listed below (incl. links to many key documents), or click a link below
* Family Policies (employment-oriented)
* Making Work Pay (ongoing)
* Policies to support and integrate the disabled of working age
* Pension system monitoring (ongoing) (dead link)
* Development of social indicators
* Income Distribution and Poverty

Source:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Most Low-Income Parents Are Employed
By Ayana Douglas-Hall and Michelle Chau
Fact sheet
November 2007
HTML version
PDF version
(132K, 3 pages)
Despite low levels of unemployment,1 average household income has declined since 2000.2 The number of children living in low-income families has continued to rise. Programs that provide supports for low-income, working parents can increase income and child well-being. The majority of children in low-income families have parents who are employed full-time and year-round.

Source:
National Center for Children in Poverty

Investing in Our Children: The U.S. Can Learn From the U.K.
By Jane Waldfogel
July 30, 2007
The former and newly installed British prime ministers, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, are longstanding Labour Party rivals, yet they were able to unite in what history may one day view as their most important domestic achievement—a commitment to end child poverty in the United Kingdom.
(...)
Although most of the focus in the United Kingdom is on relative poverty, the government also tracks its progress using an absolute poverty line, similar to the one the United States uses. On this measure, the United Kingdom has reduced poverty by a stunning 50 percent since the start of its anti-poverty campaign—reducing the numbers of children in absolute poverty before housing costs from 3.4 million in 1999 to 1.6 million in 2006. From a U.S. vantage point, this is a remarkable achievement.
Source:
Center for American Progress

Noteworthy:

A Comparison of Child Benefit Packages in 22 Countries
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http://www.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd5/rrep174.asp
October 2002
-
tax allowances, cash benefits, exemptions from charges, subsidies and services in kind, which assist parents with the costs of raising children.
- an investigation of variations in the structure and level of this package in 22 countries as at July 2001.
- includes Canada...
-Nine PDF files include the complete report (in two files), plus the table of contents, appendices, references, a list of other reports and a summary of the child benefit package for each of the 22 countries.
Source:
U.K. Department for Work and Pensions

-------------------------------------------

Ditto:

Federal Expenditures on Children: 1960-1997 - U.S.
April 2001
"This paper provides the most comprehensive examination ever made of trends in federal spending, including tax subsidies, on children. (...) Some 66 federal programs are classified within eight major budget categories: tax credits and exemptions (including the Earned Income Tax Credit and the dependent exemption), income security (including Aid to Families with Dependent Children), nutrition (including Food Stamps), health (including Medicaid), education, housing, social services, and training.1 Children are defined as individuals 18 years of age or younger." [Source: Executive Summary]
HTML version - includes the executive summary
PDF version (243K, 25 pages)
Source:
The Urban Institute

 

State policies Ignore Research on Healthy Child Development:
Leading National Organization Releases Report on Policies for Young Children
(PDF file - 45K, 2 pages)
News Release
May 16, 2007
NEW YORK– In advance of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s summit on early childhood development, the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), has released a new report, State Early Childhood Polices: Improving the Odds. The study finds unevenness and deficiencies across the 50 states in policies that affect the well-being and development of young children.

State Early Childhood Policies
Helene Stebbins and Jane Knitzer
June 2007
Executive Summary - HTML
Complete report (PDF file - 852K, 27 pages)
National Profile (PDF file - 418K, 6 pages)
Full Set of State Profiles (PDF file - 852K, 27 pages)
State Early Childhood Policy Profiles - HTML

Source:
National Center for Children in Poverty

State of the World's Mothers 2007:
Saving the Lives of Children Under 5

A Mothers Day Report Card: The Best And Worst Countries to Be a Mother
Sweden tops list, Niger ranks last, United States ranks 26th, tied with Hungary
May 8, 2007— Save the Children, a U.S.-based independent global humanitarian organization, today released its eighth annual Mothers’ Index that ranks the best — and worst — places to be a mother and a child and compares the well-being of mothers and children in 140 countries, more than in any previous year.

Egypt Makes the Most Progress and Iraq the Least In Reducing Child Deaths, Report Finds
Millions of Children Still Dying Each Year Despite Availability of Proven, Low-Cost Interventions that Could Save Their Lives

Special Features from the Report

Download the complete report (PDF file - 2MB, 70 pages)
[Canada? Number 15.]

State of the World's Mothers Reports
Every year, the State of the World's Mothers report reminds us of the inextricable link between the well-being of mothers and that of their children. Seventy-five years of on-the-ground experience has demonstrated that when mothers have health care, education and economic opportunity, both they and their children have the best chance to survive and thrive. Each year a different issue that impacts mothers and their children is highlighted.
- incl. links to annual reports for 2007 back to 2000

Source:
Save the Children
"Save the Children is the leading independent organization creating lasting change in the lives of children in need in the United States and around the world."

AFDC/TANF State and Local Estimates (5.3MB, 54 pages)
- program information and welfare statistics going back to the 1960s...
Source:
Appendix A, Table TANF13,
Indicators of Welfare Dependence Annual Report to Congress 2006
By the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Federal Resources for Children Challenged
by Automatic Growth in Adult Entitlement Programs

News Release
WASHINGTON, D.C., March 15, 2007 -- Caught between ever-rising expenditures on adult health care and retirement programs and their own programs that often lack automatic growth, children will see their shares of federal domestic spending and the gross national product decline by double digits over the next decade, according to a report released today by the nonpartisan Urban Institute.

Kids’ Share 2007: How Children Fare in the Federal Budget
- trends in federal spending on children from 1960 to 2017, looking across over 100 major federal programs, including tax credits and exemptions.

Source:
The Urban Institute

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre (IRC) works to strengthen the capacity of UNICEF and its cooperating institutions to respond to the evolving needs of children and to develop a new global ethic for children. It promotes the effective implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, in both developing and industrialized countries, thereby reaffirming the universality of children’s rights and of UNICEF’s mandate. [ About IRC ]

Canada ranked 12th out of 21 rich nations for child welfare
February 14, 2007
A new United Nations study suggests Canada lags behind other industrialized nations when it comes to child welfare.
Child Poverty in Perspective: An Overview of Child Development in Rich Countries, the seventh report from UNICEF's Innocenti Research Centre, ranks Canada 12th overall for child well-being among 21 developed countries.
Source:
CBC.CA



Child Welfare Information Gateway - U.S.
Formerly the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information and the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse, Child Welfare Information Gateway provides access to information and resources to help protect children and strengthen families. A service of the Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Child Welfare Information Gateway connects professionals and concerned citizens to timely, essential information and resources targeted to the safety, permanency, and well-being of children and families.

Source:
Children's Bureau
[ Administration for Children and Families ]
[ U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ]


The State of the World’s Children 2007
December 2006
The State of the World’s Children 2007 examines the discrimination and disempowerment women face throughout their lives – and outlines what must be done to eliminate gender discrimination and empower women and girls.
- incl. links to all related material --- news release, full report, profiles, statistics, youth centre, Gender and the life cycle (multimedia feature), and more...

Empower Women to Help Children
Gender Equality Produces a ‘Double Dividend’ that Benefits Both Women and Children, UNICEF Reports
Press Release
11 December 2006
NEW YORK/GENEVA, 11 December 2006 – Eliminating gender discrimination and empowering women will have a profound and positive impact on the survival and well-being of children, according to a new UNICEF report issued on UNICEF’s 60th anniversary. Gender equality produces the “double dividend” of benefiting both women and children and is pivotal to the health and development of families, communities and nations, according to The State of the World’s Children 2007.

Executive Summary (PDF file - 697K, 44 pages)
Full report (PDF file - 1.8MB, 160 pages)
Download the report by chapter (HTML table of contents + links to individual PDF files)
Chapters: A call for equality * Equality in the household * Equality in employment * Equality in politics and government * Reaping the double dividend of gender equality
View previous issues of this report - annual, back to 1996
[ Previous (2006) report - this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading. ]

Source:
UNICEF

What's New - Selected content from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

5-Jan-07

FROM CRADLE TO CAREER: CONNECTING AMERICAN EDUCATION FROM BIRTH TO ADULTHOOD
11th annual Quality Counts publication from the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center (US) “begins to track state efforts to create seamless education systems from early childhood to the world of work.”
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=94494

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: PATHWAYS TO QUALITY AND EQUITY FOR ALL CHILDREN
Report from Australian Council for Educational Research finds provision of child care services in Australia to be “insufficient, fragmented, under funded and inconsistent.”
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=94493

PREPARING CULTURALLY COMPETENT EARLY CHILDHOOD TEACHERS
Briefing note from FPG Child Development Institute (US) summarizes the study “Diversity competencies within early childhood teacher preparation: Innovative practices and future directions."
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=94492

Childcare funding too low – developer [NZ]
The Marlborough Express, 27 Dec 0
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=94488

Importance of early childhood education [US]
Paper of Montgomery County, 26 Dec 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=94491

No guarantee of free childhood education hours [NZ]
Sunday Star Times, 17 Dec 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=94489

Keep scrolling down this page to see more content from CRRU.

What's New from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP):

Child Care and Early Education State-by-State Data - U.S.
November 16, 2006
This set of state-by-state data includes new analysis of 2005 child care spending from Child Care Development Block Grant and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funds and of 2005 Head Start Program Information Report data, along with data (published in March 2006) on states’ use of community-based child care to provide pre-kindergarten.

Child Care Assistance in 2005: State Cuts Continue (PDF file - 78K, 9 pages)
November 1, 2006
State spending on child care assistance declined in 2005 for the second consecutive year. Twenty-two states made cuts to their child care programs, as the number of children living in low-income families that received help from these programs continued to decline. Many families turn to child care assistance programs to get help paying for the child care they need in order to work and to succeed. This policy brief provides an overview of national expenditure data for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funds directed towards child care. 9 pages.

Investing in Children: Public Commitment
in Twenty-one Industrialized Countries, 1980-2001

(PDF file - 635K, 25 pages)(PDF file - 635K, 25 pages)
By Shirley Gatenio Gabel and Sheila B. Kamerman
[includes Canada]
Using time series and survey data, this article explores public commitment to children and their families from 1980 through 2001 in 21 industrialized countries. Despite the shrinking child population in all countries and the slowed growth of the welfare state in most, the authors find that spending on children and families has increased in most countries. The authors conclude that the instruments and goals of the family benefit and service package have changed over time and that future public spending on children is increasingly likely to go toward helping families balance their responsibilities as workers and parents and toward enhancing the development of young children.
Source:
Institute for Child and Family Policy (ICFP) at Columbia University (New York)
[Found in: Social Service Review (June 2006), The University of Chicago.]

What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

Strong foundations: Early childhood care and education
27 Oct 06
- UNESCO's 2007 Education for All Global Monitoring Report.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92590

Spending on childcare ranked low [AU]
25 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92626

The building blocks of a global empire [AU]
20 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92625

More from CRRU - keep scrolling down this page for more CRRU anayses and links

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
"The Forum, is a working group of Federal agencies that collect, analyze, and report data on issues related to children and families. The Forum has partners from 20 Federal agencies as well as partners in private research organizations."

Ending child poverty
"
On 6 July 2006, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) published a report (What will it take to end child poverty? Firing on all cylinders) (PDF file - 1MB, 72 pages) which explores the changes needed for the government to achieve its ambitious target of ending child poverty by 2020. It reviews the character of child poverty in Britain today, and shows that not ending child poverty has high costs for our society, both moral and material. It reviews a wide range of measures for cutting child poverty. Taking into consideration the effect and costs of existing policies, as well as new measures which might be needed to meet targets, a modelling exercise tests the contribution that certain of the measures reviewed can make to reducing child poverty.

This publication draws together the findings of a programme of research funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation focusing on child poverty in the UK. The aim of the programme was to produce costed policy options for ending UK child poverty by 2020. A team of researchers from universities and other research organisations examined issues which impact on child poverty - from the tax and benefit system, through to childcare and mental health - as well as the lessons to be learned from other countries.

Working papers and reports on the diverse issues affecting child poverty were published online during June 2006.
Details of the programme are at www.jrf.org.uk/child-poverty

Complete report:

What will it take to end child poverty? Firing on all cylinders) (PDF file - 1MB, 72 pages)

Source:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF)

Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is selected recent content from the notifier.

16-Jun-06

ABC LEARNING CENTRES: A CASE STUDY OF AUSTRALIA'S LARGEST CHILD CARE CORPORATION
by Rush, Emma & Downie, Christian
Report from The Australia Institute investigates quality issues at ABC Learning Centres, as reported through surveys and interviews with ABC staff.

>> It's the mother of all myths [GB]
by Sarler, Carol / London Times, 15 Jun 06

>> Preschool empire flawed by its carers [AU]
by Horin, Adele / Sydney Morning Herald, 12 Jun 06

>> Wild goose chase turns child care into a game of hide and seek [AU]
by Alexander, Harriet / Sydney Morning Herald, 8 Jun 06

More CRRU content (further down on the page you're now reading)

First-of-its-Kind Report Examines Child Well-Being in Canada, United States and Mexico:
Economic and Social Integration Have Profound Effect On 120 Million Children in North America
(PDF file - 36K, 2 pages)
Press Release - May 2, 2006
WASHINGTON, D.C. – A new report that examines the state of child well-being in North America – Growing Up in North America: Child Well-Being in Canada, the United States & Mexico – reveals that gains in human development across the continent have not kept pace with the last decade’s dramatic advances in technology, trade, and investment. In this first-of-its-kind report issued today, the three project partners – the Canadian Council on Social Development, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and Red por los Derechos de la Infancia en México – call for attention to child well-being against a backdrop of economic and social change in North America.

Growing Up in North America:
Child Well-being in Canada, the United States and Mexico
May 2006
- includes links to:
* Complete report (PDF file - 1MB, 50 pages)
* Executive Summary (PDF file - 92K, 2 pages)
* Fact Sheet (PDF file - 35K, 2 pages)
* Press Release: Economic and Social Integration Have Profound Effect On 120 Million Children in North America (see above)
* From canada.com (May 1): Well-being of children may be overlooked as Canada, U.S., Mexico grow closer
* CCSD Op Ed [March 2006]: Message to Harper, Bush and Fox: Shortsighted to ignore 120 million kids
* Grandir en Amérique du Nord [French] (PDF file - 1.2MB., 56 pages)
* Creciendo en América del Norte [Spanish] (PDF)
* Children in North America Project website

Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development

Project partners:

Annie E. Casey Foundation
Since 1948, the Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF) has worked to build better futures for disadvantaged children and their families in the United States. The primary mission of the Foundation is to foster public policies, human service reforms, and community supports that more effectively meet the needs of today's vulnerable children and families.

Red por los Derechos de la Infancia en México (site available only in Spanish

World Forum 2006 - Future Directions in Child Care
November 19 – 22, 2006 in Vancouver, BC
This international conference will explore and share knowledge, information, data and on promising practices and innovative approaches to prevention and response to child abuse and neglect.

What's New in International child care - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is international content from a recent issue of the notifier; you can find Canadian content from CRRU on the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page of this site : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

Care for every child
Jen Ross/Toronto Star, 27 May 06

Breaking the piggy bank: Parents and the high price of child care
Report from the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (US) “finds that parents across the United States are struggling to meet the high cost of child care.”

Family-friendly Finland
by Korpela, Salla
Story from Virtual Finland introduces the Tuurala family from Helsinki and illustrates how they benefit from the Finnish government’s full system of support for families with children.

>> Reconstructing teacher education to prepare qualified preschool teachers: Lessons from New Jersey
by Lobman, Carrie; Ryan, Sharon & McLaughlin, Jill
Article from Early Childhood Research and Practice (US) reports on New Jersey’s efforts to improve their system of preschool teacher certification.

>> Germany embraces the family: Calls for free child care and tax breaks for parents [DE]
National Post, 21 Jan 06

>> Chile’s new leader to stay the course [CL]
Globe and Mail, 17 Jan 06

>> New Liberia leader hails children [LR]
BBC News, 18 Jan 06

>> Child care ‘shambles’ under the spotlight [AU]
Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 16 Jan 06

Also from CRRU:

What's New? - Links to Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - links to theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications - links to briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

More CRRU content (this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading)

Children out of sight, out of mind, out of reach
Abused and Neglected, Millions of Children Have Become Virtually Invisible
Press release
LONDON, 14 December 2005
"Hundreds of millions of children are suffering from severe exploitation and discrimination and have become virtually invisible to the world, UNICEF said today in a major report that explores the causes of exclusion and the abuses children experience."

The State of the World’s Children 2006: Excluded and Invisible
December 2005
- incl. links to the full report and stats, plus : Executive summary * Customized statistical tables * Audio interviews with UNICEF experts * Additional real life stories * Photo essay: Excluded and Invisible * The State of the World's Children movie * Press Release * Key Arguments * Fast Facts * Video News Package * State of the World's Children for young people * Lucy and the World of Invisible Children * Understanding the Millennium Development Goals

Complete report (PDF file - 3.1MB, 156 pages)

Child Care Assistance in 2004: States Have Fewer Funds for Child Care (PDF file - 39K, 3 pages)
December 1, 2005
by Hannah Matthews and Danielle Ewen
"State spending on child care assistance declined in 2004 for the first time since the passage of welfare reform in 1996. Child care assistance helps low-income families find and retain the jobs they need to support their families. This policy brief, which examines national expenditure data for the Child Care and Development Block Grant and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), finds that 30 states made cuts to their child care programs and fewer families received the child care help they needed to work and succeed."

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
The Center for Law and Social Policy is a national, nonprofit public policy organization founded in 1968 that conducts research, policy analysis, technical assistance, and advocacy on issues related to economic security for low-income families with children.

Symposium on Early Child Development - A Priority For Sustained Economic Growth & Equity
September 27-30, 2005
World Bank – Washington, DC
"The Symposium brought together 150 participants from about 30 countries from the Latin and Central America and the Caribbean, East Asia Pacific, the Middle East and North Africa, Eastern and Central Asia, and Sub Saharan Africa, with the largest representation coming from LAC. (...) The symposium objectives were to: (i) Continue to build awareness of ECD as an important investment that nations can make to inform policymakers about the returns on ECD; (2) Highlight progress in the implementation of policy and program responses; (3) Identify and explore alternative mechanisms to finance effective early child development interventions that reach the beneficiaries, and (4) Learn from existing evaluations so that in the future, better-designed evaluations will respond to questions posed by policy makers and project managers to continue funding ECD."
- includes a detailed agenda and links to other symposium materials (audio/video presentations, speeches, etc.)

The three links below are to Canadian presentations made at the symposium.
Clicking a link downloads a video file and a Powerpoint presentation in each case.
If the video doesn't work, it's likely because you're trying to access the file from behind an office or university network that has a high level of security, or else the network admin just doesn't like people watching videos on company time. Try watching the video from home if that's the case...

Science of ECD: Biological Embeddings of ECD
Video and Powerpoint presentation, approx. 46 min.
by Fraser Mustard (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research)

Measuring ECD Longitudinal Research in Canada
Video and Powerpoint presentation, approx. 19 min
by Jane Bertrand (Council for Early Child Development and Parenting, Canada)
- incl. info about the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth

Investment in Early Childhood Development : The Economic Argument
Video and Powerpoint presentation, approx. 19 min
by Charles Coffey (Executive VP, Royal Bank of Canada)
[
Text version of this presentation - from the RBC Financial Group website]

Source:
Early Child Development (ECD)
"This site is a knowledge source designed to assist policy makers, program managers, and practitioners in their efforts to promote the healthy growth and integral development of young children."
[ The World Bank ]

Child Care and Early Education Research Connections
"A new database Child Care and Early Education Research Connections (http://www.childcareresearch.org/ ) has been launched. It is is a web-based, interactive database of research documents and public use data sets for conducting secondary analyses on topics related to early care and education. Research Connections highlights current research; develops and disseminates materials designed to improve child care policy research; provides technical assistance to researchers and policy makers; synthesizes findings into policy research briefs; and facilitates collaboration in the field."

"Child Care and Early Education Research Connections promotes high quality research in child care and early education and the use of that research in policy making. Our vision is that children are well cared for and have rich learning experiences, and their families are supported and able to work. Through this Web site, we offer research and data resources for researchers, policy makers, practitioners, and others. Research Connections is a partnership among the National Center for Children in Poverty at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research at the Institute for Social Research, the University of Michigan; and the Child Care Bureau, Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services."
Source:
About this Site

Related Links:

National Center for Children in Poverty - NCCP (Washington)
Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research at the Institute for Social Research (University of Michigan)
The Child Care Bureau (U.S. Administration for Children and Families)

America's Children: Key National Indicators of Children's Well-Being 2005
July 2005
"...America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, is an annual indicators report that details the status of children and families in the United States. The report presents the latest available data on 25 indicators related to economic security, health, behavior and social environment, and education and on 9 background measures related to population and family characteristics. These indicators represent important aspects of children's lives. In addition, each year the report includes special features that present measures that are either not regularly available, merit special attention, or provide additional detail regarding a specific topic."

Highlights of the report

Source:
Childstats.gov
"This web site offers easy access to statistics and reports on children and families, including: population and family characteristics, economic security, health, behavior and social environment, and education."

What's New in International child care - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is international content from recent issues of the notifier.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NEW POSTINGS AVAILABLE ON THE
CHILDCARE RESOURCE AND RESEARCH UNIT’S WEBSITE
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

19-Aug-05

>> In our own backyards: Local and state strategies to improve the quality of family child care
by Katie Hamm, Barbara Gault & Avis Jones-De Weever
Report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (US) proposes policy changes to combat low earnings and lack of training opportunities among family child care providers.

>> In focus: Work-life balance
by various authors
Current issue of the Ivey Business Journal (U.S.) features nine articles dedicated to work and family issues, including an article on the changing role of fathers.

29-July-05

>> Research debunks myth of self-reliant nuclear family [US]
EurekAlert! 28 Jul 05
Despite the long-cherished belief that the nuclear family is independent and self-sustaining, most families with working parents depend on a network of care to manage work and family demands, according to research by Brandeis University sociologist Karen Hansen.

>> The social economy: Finding a way between the market and the state
by Neamtam, Nancy
Article by Nancy Neamtam for Policy Options describes the social economy as “a manifestation of positive and active citizenship that governments need to recognize and support”.

>> Head Start impact study: First year findings
by Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla & Lopez, Michael
Study by the U.S government tracks the influence of Head Start on 3- and 4-year old children across cognitive, social-emotional, and health domains.

>> Mothers encouraged to stay out of work [AU]
Sydney Morning Herald, 21 Jul 05
Australian mothers have one of the lowest employment rates in the developed world, encouraged to stay at home through welfare payments and community expectations, says an international expert.

>> Fathers to have child care leave [KR]
Korea Times, 22 Jun 05
Working fathers in Korea will soon be allowed to have paid leave to care their young one as part of government efforts to help turn around the declining birthrate.

Also from CRRU:

What's New? - Links to Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - links to theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications - links to briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

Earlier Issues of CRRU's notifier - this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading

Launch of World Development Indicators 2005 Report
World Bank Report Urges Faster Progress In Reducing Child Deaths, Primary School Enrollments – Particularly Among Girls
Press Release
April 17, 2005
"WASHINGTON—Five years after the Millennium Declaration, many countries have made progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), but many more lag behind. Faster progress is needed in reducing maternal and child deaths, boosting primary school enrolments, and removing obstacles to greater numbers of girls going to school, according to the World Bank’s latest World Development Indicators (WDI) 2005."

World Development Indicators 2005
"The 2005 WDI includes more than 800 indicators in 83 tables organized in 6 sections: World View, People, Environment, Economy, States and Markets, and Global Links. Data are shown for 152 economies with populations of more than 1 million and 14 country groups, plus selected indicators for 56 other smaller economies. Indicators are shown for the most recent year or period for which data are available and, in most tables, for an earlier year or period (usually 1990 in this edition)."
- incl. links to the full text online, the press release, time series database access, and more

Source:
The World Bank Group

 

2005 Index of Child Well-Being shows mixed picture for America's children:
huge declines in crime, violence and risky behavior amid increasing poverty and worsening health
New Index Report Finds Virtually No Improvement In Reading
And Math Test Scores Since 1975; Obesity Epidemic Continues To Worsen
Press Release
March 30, 2005
"Washington, D.C. – Dramatic declines in rates of violence and risky behaviors such as teen births, smoking, and alcohol and illegal drug use during the past 10 years have contributed substantially to modest and slow progress in the overall well-being of America’s children, according to the 2005 Index of Child Well-Being (CWI), released today by the Foundation for Child Development (FCD)."

Complete report:

2005 Report
Index of Child Well-Being (CWI), 1975- 2003 with Projections for 2004
(PDF file - 79K, 17 pages)
"The 2005 CWI report presents a mixed picture of child well-being. Substantial and dramatic improvements in safety and risky behavior among young people, especially since 1993, contrast with declines in health and economic well-being and a 30-year flat line in education.

Source:
Foundation for Child Development
"Connecting Research with Policy to Promote Social Change since 1900"
- incl. links to:
Press Release * Fact Sheet * Policy Brief * Fast Facts

Google.ca News Search Results : "2005 Index of Child Well-Being"


Earlier Earlier Issues of CRRU's notifier

15-July-05

>> Assessing the quality of early years learning environments - U.S.
by Walsh, Glenda & Gardner, John
Article from Early Childhood Research and Practice describes a means of evaluating early years classrooms from the perspective of the child's experience.

>> Effects of welfare and employment policies on young children: New findings on policy experiments conducted in the early 1990s - U.S.
by Morris, Pamela A.; Gennetian, Lisa A. & Duncan, Greg J.
Paper from Society for Research in Child Development (U.S.) analyses findings on the effects of welfare policies on children, including the increased use of centre-based child care arrangements.

>> Timing of poverty in childhood critical to later outcomes [US]
Society for Research in Child Development, 14 Jul 05
It is well known that children who live in poverty have more trouble in school and more problems socially than other children. Now investigators funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Development (US) find that while children who live in chronic poverty from birth through age 9 score lowest on tests of school readiness and social competence, poverty at any time during early childhood is detrimental.

>> Dig deep to make Sure Start just as brilliant as it can be [GB]
Guardian, 13 Jul 05
The British government has tried to create a universal child care network without providing anything like the money needed. Its decision to fund this network through credits instead of biting the bullet and subsidising nurseries needs an urgent review.

8-July 2005

>> Women’s empowerment: Measuring the global gender gap
By Lopez-Claros, Augusto & Zahidi, Saadia
Study from the World Economic Forum measures the extent to which women have achieved equality; includes information on child care availability and cost and the impact of maternity laws.

>> Family values, Santorum-style [US]
World Net Daily, 8 Jul 05
What do Republicans mean when they appropriate the term "family values"? Well, now we know. It's all spelled out by Republican Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania. In his scary new book, "It Takes A Family: Conservatism and the Common Good" – due in book stores July 24 – Santorum speaks out against diversity, public schools, college education and working women.

>> Loan scheme on offer for child care [AU]
Sydney Morning Herald, 6 Jul 05
Australia's biggest chain of private child care centres, ABC Learning, is offering finance to help parents meet rising fees. While the first 14 months are interest-free, child care industry representatives are worried parents may run up debts.

30-June-05

>> Government of Australia 2004 census of child care services
by Government of Australia. Department of Family and Community Services
Report from Australia’s Department of Family and Community Services finds child care fees increasing and growth in for-profit care outstripping growth in not-for-profit care.

>> All together now: State experiences in using community-based child care to provide pre-kindergarten
by Rachel Schumacher, Danielle Ewen, Katherine Hart & Joan Lomardi
Report from the Center for Law and Social Policy (US) proposes that some states’ plans to provide pre-K in both centres and schools may help break barriers between education and care.

>> Child care fees soar - if you can find it [AU]
Sydney Morning Herald, 30 Jun 05
The cost of child care in Australia is increasing at five times the rate of inflation. While the number of places is growing, demand still outstrips supply, particularly in inner-city areas where parents routinely wait for two or three years before finding a place.

>> Dressed to oppress [AU]
Daily Telegraph (Australia), 30 Jun 05
Child care giant ABC Learning is making staff buy their own uniforms while pocketing a cool $40 million in profit. Carers, some of whom earn as little as $420-a-week after tax, are having to shell out more than half that for pants and shirts featuring the ABC logo.

Quality time thrills Nordic dads [DK]
BBC News, 28 Jun 05
Paternity leave schemes in Denmark and Iceland are among the most generous in the world - and are proving to benefit society, experts say.

24-June-05

>> Presentations from Plan-It Quality: Environments in early learning and child care linking research to policy and practice
Presentations by Bengt-Erik Andersson, Thelma Harms, Margaret Tresch Owen and Gillian Doherty “address the issue of quality in all aspects of a child's environment”.

>> How Swede it is: Learning from Sweden's perspective on children [SE]
Today’s Parent, 15 Jun 05
"In Sweden, child care (preschool, they call it) seems more about providing a good experience for kids rather than a good future outcome. I think we could learn and borrow much more from Sweden."

>> Building blocks of an empire [AU]
Courier-Mail, 20 Jun 05
Australia’s biggest corporate child care group ABC Learning Centres has had sand kicked in its face in recent weeks. In contrast to its advertisements of smiling children it has faced images of angry parents and unionists. But the
Brisbane-based company has stuck by its guns and analysts are seeing profitable times ahead.

>> Schools call on more men to be child carers [GB]
Guardian, 19 Jun 05
The British government plans a fivefold increase in the number of male child care workers. National advertising campaigns tailored to men and male-only training courses will be used to recruit the extra staff.

20-May-05

>> Prekindergarteners left behind: Expulsion rates in State prekindergarten systems
by Gilliam, Walter S.
Study from the Foundation for Child Development (US) finds that expulsion rates are 3.2 times higher in pre-K than K-12. Rates are highest in faith-affiliated and for-profit centres.

>> Growing up in Australia: The longitudinal study of Australian children - 2004 annual report
by Government of Australia. Australian Institute of Family Studies
Report from the Australian Institute of Family Studies aims to further understanding of early childhood development and inform social policy debate.

>> OECD Thematic Review of ECEC: Austrian background report
by Kromer, Ingrid; Phoser, Alena & Zuba, Rheinhard
Background report from the Austrian government provides comprehensive and critical descriptions of ECEC policies and organization, as part of the OECD’s Thematic Review.

>>‘Bébé boom’ will put France ahead of UK and Germany [FR]
Independent, 13 May 05
According to demographic calculations by the French government, a booming birth rate will push the population of France to 75 million by the year 2050. Two children or more are the norm for French couples. France spends more than any other EU country - 4.5 per cent of GDP - on policies that promote child care and assist families.

13-May-05

>> Pre-school in transition: A national evaluation of the Swedish pre-school
Report from the Swedish National Agency for Education is the first evaluation of Swedish preschool since the 1998 reforms and introduction of a national preschool curriculum.

>> Who’s teaching our youngest students? Teacher education and training, experience, compensation and benefits, and assistant teachers
Report from the National Institute for Early Education’s National Prekindergarten Study (US) finds seven out of ten teachers in state-funded prekindergartens earn salaries in the low-income category.

>> Gender-based analysis: Building blocks for success
Report of the Standing Committee on Status of Women discusses GBA as a tool to ensure that "federal government programs and policies do not maintain or exacerbate any equality gap".

>> Caring more for children in child care [AU] (dead link)
The Age, 13 May 05
The Australian government's policy of paying child care subsidies to parents rather than direct subsidies to community child care centres has seen a huge rise in privately run facilities and concerns that the quality of care is being sacrificed in those centres that exist to make a profit.

06-May-05

>> Minister meets parents over child care [AU]
The Age, 12 Apr 05
Federal Community Services Minister Kay Patterson has told a Melbourne mother not to be "so emotional" about Australia's shortage of child care places.

22-April-05

>> OECD Thematic Review of Early Childhood Education and Care: France reports
Background report and country note from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development discuss ECEC policy in France.

>> Care Architecture project
Ongoing research project by the Danish National Institute for Social Research is a cross-national comparison of care packages in eight European countries.

SEIU to represent daycare workers [US-IL]
Associated Press, 20 Apr 05
The Service Employees International Union declared victory Thursday in an election to decide if it would represent 49,000 Illinois state-subsidized child care workers.

Child care industry proves big business [US]
Boston Globe, 19 Apr 05
Early childhood education in the U.S is big business. That's one of the conclusions in a report released yesterday by the MIT Workplace Center and the Family Initiative of Legal Momentum, a nonprofit child care advocacy group.

Filipino MPs demand inquiry in Canada on 'modern-day slaves' [PH]
Asian Pacific Post, 7 Apr 05
Six MPs from the Philippines House of Representatives are seeking an inquiry into alleged abuses committed against Filipina caregivers in Canada.

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

Early childhood education and care policy in the Federal Republic of Germany
by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
OECD Thematic Review of ECEC country note discusses key policy issues in Germany.

Parents in care concern [AU]
Herald Sun, 21 Jan 05
Thirteen thousand babies in Victoria, Australia will miss out on a child care place as desperate parents try signing-up before conceiving. Victoria's child care shortage has reached crisis proportions, with the majority of children on waiting lists never likely to get a place.

Child Friendly Cities Website (dead link)
"The UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre (IRC) in Florence, Italy focuses part of its activities on research to promote the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child at the sub-national level. This work includes the development of a global knowledge base on Child Friendly Cities (CFC) - an approach that is demonstrating a potential for promoting the rights of the child at municipal level in both developing and industrialised countries. A Child Friendly City is a local system of good governance committed to fulfilling children's rights."
- incl. links to Child Friendly Cities around the world

Related Link:

UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

New Report Commemorates Child Trends' 25th Anniversary - U.S.(dead link)
"Child Trends recently published a special report to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the organization's founding. 25 Years of Research in the Service of America's Children takes a broad view of Child Trends' work over the years and described how this work has expanded knowledge about child well-being. The report also features representative comments from a cross-section of people about the value of Child Trends' research and research products."

25 Years of Research in the Service of America's Children (PDF file - 409K, 28 pages) (dead link)
December 2004
"A Special 25th Anniversary Report"
- incl. links to : Introduction - In the Beginning - Today at a Glance - Surveys and Indicators - Research Areas - Communications - Looking Ahead - Afterword - Child Trend Publications

Source:
December 15/04 Child Trends Newsletter
Child Trends

What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is the international content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

>>Women’s work supports, job retention, and job mobility:
Child care and employer-provided health insurance help women stay on jobs
December 2004
by Sunhwa Lee
Report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (US) examines the career paths of low-income mothers; finds that mothers with stable child care arrangements stay on the job longer.

>>The High/Scope Perry Preschool Project through age 40 (dead link)
December 2004
by Lawrence J. Schweinhart
Latest report from the Perry Preschool project shows that the children who attended the program four decades ago continue to be more law-abiding, earn higher incomes, and have more stable home lives than children who were not enrolled in the program.

>> Corporatised child care to face scrutiny [AU]
The Age, 5 Dec 04
Child care centres could face spot checks and have their performance graded as part of a tougher approach to regulating Australia's increasingly corporate child care industry.

The State of the World's Children 2005: Childhood Under Threat
Childhood Is A Brutal Experience For Half of World's Children, UNICEF Says –Crucial Years Destroyed by Poverty, Conflict and AIDS
Press Release
December 9, 2004
London
"Despite the near universal embrace of standards for protecting childhood, a new UNICEF report shows that more than half the world's children are suffering extreme deprivations from poverty, war and HIV/AIDS, conditions that are effectively denying children a childhood and holding back the development of nations. Launching her 10th annual report on The State of the World's Children, UNICEF Executive Director Carol Bellamy said more than 1 billion children are denied the healthy and protected upbringing promised by 1989's Convention on the Rights of the Child – the world's most widely adopted human rights treaty. The report stresses that the failure by governments to live up to the Convention's standards causes permanent damage to children and in turn blocks progress toward human rights and economic advancement. 'Too many governments are making informed, deliberate choices that actually hurt childhood', Bellamy said in launching the report at the London School of Economics. 'Poverty doesn't come from nowhere; war doesn't emerge from nothing; AIDS doesn't spread by choice of its own. These are our choices.'"

Complete report - download the entire report in one PDF file, or download the chapters, maps and tables separately
Chapter titles:
Chapter 1. Childhood under threat
Chapter 2. Children living in poverty
Chapter 3. Children caught up in conflict
Chapter 4. Children orphaned or made vulnerable by AIDS
Chapter 5. Advancing childhood, advancing humanity

Source:
UNICEF

The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE)project:Final report - U.K.
Final report of a longitudinal study from the University of London finds that "pre-school experience enhances all-round development in children".

>> No need for new child care centre, court told [AU]
Advertiser 1 Dec 04
Child care giant ABC Learning Centres is trying to disprove the economic theory that market competition improved services, a court has heard.

>> Study backs Labour childcare strategy [GB]
Guardian, 26 Nov 04
The largest ever survey of pre-school education in Britain comes just ahead of children’s minister Margaret Hodge’s release of a national childcare strategy which is expected to become a centrepiece of Labour's election strategy. It will call for a national network of children's centres providing education and health services for the under-fives.

>> Child care firm is part of merger worth $1 billion [US]
Statesman Journal, 10 Nov 04
Privately held Knowledge Learning Corp. said that it will acquire Portland-based KinderCare in a deal worth $1 billion. The deal would combine two of the largest child-care-center operators in the U.S.

To view all of CRRU’s links visit: http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU

Recent Trends in Food Stamp Participation among Poor Families with Children - U.S.
Discussion Paper
June 2004
"Food stamp caseloads increased dramatically between October 2002 and October 2003. Our results show that families recently on welfare were substantially more likely to participate in the Food Stamp program in 2002 than in 1997 or 1999. In contrast, participation rates for families with no cash welfare experience, the largest share of poor families with children, remained quite low throughout the period. The new program rules and procedures did not affect their participation. The low current incomes and economic hardship of nonparticipating families indicate the food stamps would benefit these families substantially. States could encourage more families to take advantage of food stamps by strengthening public outreach and simplifying their programs."

Complete report (PDF file - 100K, 38 pages)

Source:
Assessing the New Federalism
[ The Urban Institute ]


International Report on Early Childhood Education and Care in Canada (dead link)
News Release
October 25, 2004
"OTTAWA, ONTARIO – Together with the governments of British Columbia , Saskatchewan , Manitoba , and Prince Edward Island , the Government of Canada welcomes the release of an important report on early childhood education and care in Canada . The Early Childhood Education and Care Policy: Canada Country Note was prepared by an international review team of early childhood education experts appointed by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) as part of the second round of the OECD’s Thematic Review of Early Childhood Education and Care Policy. The report presents observations and recommendations on a range of programs and services including kindergarten, pre-kindergarten, child care, and family services."
Source:
Social Development Canada

Complete Report:

Early Childhood Education and Care Policy
Canada Country Note

October 2004
PDF version (965K, 97 pages)
Source:
OECD Directorate for Education

OECD Early Childhood Education and Care Home Page
- OECD reviews of national early childhood policies and organisation in 18 countries: Australia, Belgium (two communities), Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States. Two countries remain to be reviewed in 2004: Austria and Germany.
- incl. links to : Update and Coming Events - History and Context of the Reviews - Documents from the OECD Thematic Review - Thematic Workshops and Documents - Background Reports - Country Notes - Country Profiles - Contacts -
Useful Links

Source:
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

Related Links:

OECD Thematic Review of ECEC: Canada Reports
October 2004
"This policy analysis within an international framework is perhaps the most important that Canada has had in early learning and child care. The OECD Country Note and the Background Report on Canada were released today by Social Development Canada. The content and sprit of this work is likely to inform and shape how the federal election commitment to early learning and child care is actualized. For the release of this report, CRRU has prepared an ISSUE file that provides resources related to this landmark study.
The ISSUE file consists of:
- an overview of the OECD Thematic Review of ECEC
- links to the Country Note and Canada’s Background Report
- highlights from the Country Note recommendations
- other important reports from the Thematic Review of ECEC and related readings
- relevant news articles
- responses to the Canada reports"
Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

Canada's child care is failing, OECD says (dead link)
October 25, 2004
By Margaret Philp
"(...) The review of Canada, one of 20 nations whose early-learning policies have come under OECD scrutiny, paints a picture of a child-care system adrift, with no overarching vision. It is underfunded, with pitiful staff salaries and subsidies inequitably doled out to a small number of the poorest families. The premises of child-care centres are often shabby, workers are poorly trained and frequently quit. Many centres catering to aboriginal families are low-quality with "tokenistic concessions to indigenous language." And waiting lists are long, with more than half of Canadian children stuck in unregulated care."
Source:
Globe and Mail

Canada's child-care system languishing: OECD (dead link)
25 Oct 2004
"OTTAWA - A new OECD reports calls Canada's child-care system a patchwork of dismal programs that offers basic babysitting but not much more. The Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development reviewed 20 countries. It said Canada's system was chronically under-funded and found subsidies inequitably distributed to a small number of the poorest families. As part of the report, four European investigators toured dozens of programs in Prince Edward Island, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia, the only four provinces that agreed to be in the review. The report is to be released Monday."
Source:
CBC.ca

Report finds tightening child care crunch for low-income families - U.S.
Associated Press
September 14, 2004
"WASHINGTON – States are charging low-income parents more for child care, putting more kids on waiting lists and paying providers less, tightening a national child care crunch, a study released Tuesday concludes. The study, by the National Women's Law Center, blames tight state budgets and stagnant federal funding. The group and many independent experts say child care is essential for poor and low-income parents, particularly single mothers, to find and keep work."
Source:
San Diego Union-Tribune

Child Care Assistance Policies 2001-2004: Families Struggling
to Move Forward, States Going Backward
(227K, 17 pages) (dead link)
September 2004
By Karen Schulman, Senior Policy Fellow, and
Helen Blank, Director of Leadership and Public Policy
Source:
National Women's Law Center

Down Under is on top in early childhood programs
New Zealand's investment in its young children puts Canada to shame, says HILLEL GOELMAN
By HILLEL GOELMAN
September 6, 2004
"The new federal government has promised to introduce legislation to launch an early child care and development system in Canada. This is good news. Research consistently shows that early child care and development programs for young children result in higher levels of school readiness and better academic performance. The government's promise is also long overdue: Every jurisdiction in Canada except Quebec lags far behind most other developed countries in this area."
Source:
The Globe and Mail

Effects of Recent Fiscal Policies on Today's Children and Future Generations - U.S.
July 1, 2004
Author(s): William G. Gale, Laurence J. Kotlikoff
"This paper examines the direct and indirect effects of one set of policies—the tax cuts and the Medicare spending increases that have been proposed and enacted since January 2001—on the long-term economic prospects of today's and tomorrow's youth. These proposals were not typically discussed in terms of their impact on children, other than a few vague claims to being 'pro-family.' Nevertheless, these recent fiscal policies will significantly and adversely affect both future generations as a whole and a substantial majority of children in the current and each subsequent generation."
NOTE: the above link is to the front section (the first two pages) of this 16-page report; you have to click the PDF file to read the whole report.

Complete report (PDF file - 568K, 16 pages)

Source:
The Urban Institute

America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2004 (dead link)
July 2004
"Since 1997, the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics has published America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, a report that includes detailed information on a set of key indicators of child well-being. To make better use of its resources, the Forum has decided to alternate publishing the more detailed report with a new condensed version—America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being—that highlights selected indicators. Thus, this July, the Forum is publishing the Brief; in July 2005 the Forum will publish the more detailed report, returning to the Brief in July 2006. Detailed data tables for all background measures and indicators are available, as well as a press release."
- incl. Population and Family Characteristics - Economic Security - Health - Behavior and Social Environment - Education
Source:
Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics

Related Link:

U.S. children doing better but poverty rate increases
July 16, 2004
The Associated Press
"WASHINGTON - The family life, education and health of America''s children are generally improving, though child poverty has risen for the first time in a decade, according to the government''s broadest measure of children''s well-being. Today''s report by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics finds that children are doing better. The teenage birth rate is down, young people are less likely to be involved in violent crimes and the death rate for this group has declined. Still, children are more likely to be overweight than they were before and child poverty has inched up after several years of decline, according to the report, which draws together findings from many federal agencies."
Source:
Salt Lake Tribune

A fair share of welfare : Public spending on children in England (PDF file - 1.3MB, 83 pages)
May 2004
Source:
Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) - London

A Canada Fit for Children : Canada’s plan of action in response to the
May 2002 United Nations Special Session on Children
Released May 10, 2004
See the Canadian Social Research Links Children's Rights page for links to this report and other information about Canada’s National Plan of Action for Children, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the work of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (Special Session on the Rights of the Child).

Child poverty in the UK
Second Report of Session 2003-04, Volume I
April 2004
Selected report highlights:
"... Child poverty is still a major problem: 3.6 million children live in poverty.
... The Government’s target of reducing child poverty by a quarter by 2004 is likely to be met.
... Meeting subsequent targets (reduction of child poverty to a half by 2010 and eradicating it by 2020) will be much more challenging since the achievement of those targets will involve helping those who are most disadvantaged.
... Accessible and affordable childcare available to all by 2010 should be the government’s goal."
Complete report:
PDF version - 1.1MB, 144 pages
HTML version

Related Links:

Work and Pensions - First Report
January 2004
HTML version
PDF version - 137K, 17 pages)

Work and Pensions Committee: Reports and Publications - links to dozens of Work and Pensions Committee reports from 1997 to date

Source:
Work and Pensions Committee (dead link)
"The Work and Pensions Select Committee is appointed by the House of Commons to 'examine the expenditure, administration and policy of the Department for Work and Pensions and its associated public bodies.'"
[ House of Commons ]
London

Low-Income Children in the United States (2004) (dead link)
May 2004
"37% of America's children - more than 26 million - live in low-income families. After a decade of decline, the rate of children living in low-income families is rising again. Our latest fact sheet is updated from 2003 and includes trends and new statistics."
Source:
Economic Security
[ National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) ]
(Columbia University, New York)

Also from NCCP:

Child Care and Early Education - "A Comprehensive Resource for Researchers and Policy Makers" - U.S.
National Center for Children in Poverty Launches NEW Child Care and Early Education Web Site
April 2004
"Designed for researchers and policymakers. Built on a relational database:
* searchable research collection
* data sets for secondary analysis
* specially designed syntheses
* 50-state policy data tool."

Financing ECEC services in OECD countries (dead link)
January 2003
Posted to the CRRU website March 25, 2004
Paper prepared for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Thematic workshop in Rotterdam (01/03) makes the case for public investment in Early Childhood Education CEC.
- incl. an excerpt from website description and the link to the complete report

Complete report (PDF file - 500K, 96 pages)

Source:
Child Care Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
[part of the Centre for Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto]

Related Links:

Early Childhood Education and Care Home Page
[ Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development ]

Poverty: Measures and Targets (PDF file - 355K, 81 pages) - United Kingdom (dead link)
March 4, 2004
Research Paper 04/23
"There are many difficulties inherent in defining and measuring poverty. This paper looks at these, and the Government’s approach to monitoring poverty, together with a range of ‘low income’ poverty statistics. The Government has set itself a target of reducing child poverty by a quarter by 2004. This paper follows progress towards the target, and considers whether it is likely to be met. This target is a first step towards the ‘eradication’ of child poverty by 2020. A consultation process has recently led to a new measurement of child poverty that will be used to monitor progress towards future targets."
- Part I discusses poverty, social exclusion and some alternative approaches to poverty measurement
- Part II explains Households Below Average Income (HBAI) methodology and terms
- Part III presents selected HBAI statistics (including trends over time)
- Part IV presents international comparisons of low income poverty [incl. Canada], based on EU and OECD sources.
- Part V looks at the Government's progress in reaching its 2004/05 child poverty target
- Part VI summarises the consultation exercise started in April 2002 [ by the Department for Work and Pensions ] on a new child poverty measure to be used to judge whether the Government’s future targets for halving child poverty by 2010, and eradicating it by 2020, are met.

Source:
The United Kingdom Parliament

Related Links

Measuring child poverty consultation, Final report (PDF file - 166K, 27 pages) - United Kingdom
December 2003

Opportunity for All - series of annual reports (starting in 1999) with detailed information about the U.K. Government strategy against poverty and social exclusion
The first report set out "evidence-based strategy for tackling poverty and social exclusion. The report also established indicators of progress to audit the effectiveness of this strategy."
Here's a link to the current report:
Opportunity for All: Fifth Annual Report 2003

Work and Pensions - Written Evidence

Written Evidence ordered by the House of Commons to be printed 14 January 2004.
- incl. links to over 35 submissions providing comprehensive, detailed information on child poverty and poverty measurement in the United kingdom from over 35 individuals and organizations. Presenters include the Association of London Government, the Citizen's Income Trust, Save the Children, the End Child Poverty Campaign, the Northern Ireland Anti Poverty Network, CARE, the Disability Alliance, the Institute of Fiscal Studies, the Child Poverty Action Group, the Department for Work and Pensions, Daycare Trust and many more.
Recommended reading!

Related Links:
- Go to the Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Measures page

Child Poverty in English-Speaking Countries (PDF file - 235K, 38 pages)
June 2003
Micklewright, John
Innocenti Working Paper No. 94
[ Word version in .zip file - 82K ] - requires both a zip utility (e.g., WinZip) and Microsoft Word
"The paper considers child poverty in rich English-speaking countries - U.S.A., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the U.K. and Ireland. It is sometimes assumed that these countries stand out from other OECD countries for their levels of child poverty. The paper looks at the policies they have adopted to address the problem. 'Poverty' is interpreted broadly and hence the available cross-national evidence on edicational disadvantage and teenage births is considered alongside that on low household income. Discussion of policy initiatives ranges across a number of areas of government activity."
Source:
UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre
- Florence

Child, Family, & Community Indicators Book
[Dated August 2002, posted to the Child Trends website Dec. 12, 2003]
"The California Children & Families Commission contracted for evaluation activities to support their outcome-based accountability system (called results-based accountability or RBA) to track progress in the areas of maternal and child health, child development, family functioning, and systems change. Child Trends helped produce the 550-page Child, Family, & Community Indicators Book to inform decisions about outcomes, performance measures, and other factors to include in the statewide evaluation."
Source:
Child Trends

Complete book online:
Child, Family, & Community Indicators Book
(PDF file - 3.7MB, 550 pages) (dead link)

Related Links:
California Children & Families Commission

For more links to poverty measures and indicators, go to the Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Measures page.

Child Poverty: A Review (PDF file - 503K, 81 pages) - Australia (dead link)
Commonwealth Department of Family and Community Services
November 2003
This review of child poverty measurement in Australia is written from an economist's perspective, and it contains some valuable information about how Australia defines child poverty,
the policy concerns, the measurement of child poverty, the causes of child poverty and policy strategies that can be used to combat it.
- includes some international comparisons of child poverty measures and actual numbers (including Canada).
Source:
Social Policy Research Centre
The SPRC conducts research and fosters discussion on all aspects of social policy in Australia
[ University of New South Wales ]
Sydney, Australia

A Study of TANF Non-Entrants (PDF file - 634K, 131 pages)
Robert A. Moffitt et al.
Working Paper 03-03
November 2003
Current American welfare reform research efforts tend to focus on families who have left welfare (“leavers”) and those who have remained on the rolls (“stayers”).
This study looks at non-entrants, a group that includes "...families who have never thought about applying for TANF [Temporary Assistance for Needy Families] and are self-sufficient without welfare, but also families who have thought about applying but have not for some reason, and families who have applied and have not come onto the welfare rolls either because they were rejected, diverted, or withdrew from the application process."

Source:

Welfare, Children and Families : A Three City Study
"This research project is an intensive study in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio to better understand the effects of welfare reform on the well-being of children and families and to follow these families as welfare reform evolves. We will investigate the strategies used to respond to reform, in terms of employment, schooling or other forms of training, residential mobility, and fertility. We will also examine the effects of these strategies on children's lives, with an emphasis on their health and development as well as their need for, and use of, social services."
- incl. longitudinal surveys, embedded development studies, and contextual, comparative ethnographic studies.

Three City Study Publications - links to over two dozen related working papers and studies back to June 1998

Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre(U.K.)
"The Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre is a collaborative venture between Save the Children and the Chronic Poverty Research Centre (CPRC) with partners in China, India, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia and the UK. It aims to: * Deepen understanding of the main causes of childhood poverty and poverty cycles, and increase knowledge of effective strategies to tackle it in different contexts * Inform effective policy to end childhood poverty, ensuring that research findings are widely communicated to policy makers, practitioners and advocates * Raise the profile of childhood poverty issues and increase the urgency of tackling them through anti-poverty policy and action. * Work globally to tackle chronic and childhood poverty in transition and other countries."

Children and Poverty: some questions answered(PDF file - 127K, 4 pages)
April 2003
"This short paper explores the meaning of childhood poverty through examining its causes and identifying groups vulnerable to extreme poverty. This accessible paper demystifies terms and definitions and also highlights the importance of specific policy measures to adequately address the devastating effects of poverty suffered by children and young people."

Beat Poverty(Save the Children's on-going campaign to tackle the causes of poverty)

Child Poverty Action Group(U.K.) - fighting the injustice of poverty

America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being 2003
Complete Report (links to the HTML and PDF versions of the 2003 report and to earlier years)
July 18, 2003
"Teen Birth Rate Down, Exposure To Secondhand Smoke Drops, Kids More Likely To Be Overweight."
Source:Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics


States cutting welfare reform programs;
Upcoming Federal Welfare Law Could Force Additional Cuts

June 4, 2003
"Many states are making significant cuts in their welfare and child care programs, a new Center study finds, including programs to help families move from welfare to work. Even deeper cuts could be in store if the legislation Congress is crafting to renew the 1996 welfare law imposes new requirements on states but does not provide the new money needed to help meet these requirements."
- Highlights page, incl. links to the press release and the complete report
Source :Center on Budget and Policy Priorities(U.S.)

States are cutting TANF and child care programs:
Supports for low-income working families and welfare-to-work programs are particularly hard hit
(dead link)
by by Sharon Parrott and Nina Wu
June 3, 2003
"More than 35 states have made cuts in programs funded with TANF and child care block grant funds, and most of these cuts are in programs that promote the goals of welfare reform."
- Highlights page, incl. links to the press release and the complete report
Source :Center on Budget and Policy Priorities(U.S.)

CHILD CARE (U.S.)
Recent State Policy Changes Affecting the Availability of Assistance for Low-Income Families
(PDF file - 364K, 47 pages)
Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Subcommittee on Human Resources, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives
May 2003
"Since January 2001, two-thirds of the states made key changes that affect the availability of child care assistance while the other one-third maintained their policies. Of the 35 states that made key changes:
• 23 made changes tending to decrease the availability of assistance,
• 9 made changes tending to increase the availability of assistance, and
• 3 made a mix of changes."
Source :General Accounting Office

Do Public Expenditures Improve Child Outcomes in the US?: A Comparison Across Fifty States(PDF file - 542K, 39 pages)
March 2003
"Written by Kristen Harknett and her colleagues at Princeton University's Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, this working paper examines the effects of public expenditures on child outcomes across the United States. The outcomes analyzed in the paper include child health and mortality, standardized test scores, child poverty, and adolescent behavior. Building on recent scholarship, the researchers estimate public expenditures on children across more than thirty social programs and tax credits in 1996. The second section of the paper reviews prior research in the field, while the third section describes their data and methods. The authors conclude that "the returns on investments in children are both broad and impressive." The tables referenced within the paper are attached to the conclusion of the document for those interested in taking a look at their definitions and data."
Source :Princeton Center for Research on Child Wellbeing
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report- Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2001
April 25, 2003


U.K. Department for Work and Pensions
(DWP)
"The Department is responsible for delivering support and advice through a modern network of services to people of working age, employers, pensioners, families and children and disabled people. Our key aims are to help our customers become financially independent and help reduce child poverty."


Measuring child poverty: a consultation document(PDF file - 146K, 36 pages) (DWP)
April 2002
"In March 1999, the Prime Minister announced the Government’s commitment to eradicate child poverty within a generation. As we move towards this goal we want to be sure that we are measuring poverty in a way that helps to target effective policies and enables the Government to be held to account for progress."



Two links found in the February 2003 issue of the monthly Disability Research Digest (Society for Manitobans with Disabilities):

National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
"NCWD/Youth is your source for information about employment and youth with disabilities. Our partners - experts in disability, education, employment, and workforce development - strive to ensure you will be provided with the highest quality, most relevant information available."

National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
"NICHCY is the national information center that provides information on disabilities and disability-related issues. Anyone can use our services - families, educators, administrators, journalists, students. Our special focus is children and youth (birth to age 22)."


ChildStats.gov
-"The official Web site of the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics"
"This web site offers easy access to federal and state statistics and reports on children and their families, including: population and family characteristics, economic security, health, behavior and social environment,and education. Reports of the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics include America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, the annual Federal monitoring report on the status of the Nation's children, and Nurturing Fatherhood."

America's Children: Key National Indicators of Child Well-Being, 2002
July 2002
"America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2002, developed by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, is the sixth annual synthesis of information on the status of the Nation's most valuable resource, our children. This report presents 24 key indicators of the well-being of children. These indicators are monitored through official Federal statistics covering children's economic security, health, behavior and social environment, and education."
[For previous editions (back to 1997), scroll to the bottom of the 2002 repor

International Forum for Child Welfare(IFCW)
"The International Forum for Child Welfare (IFCW) is an international nongovernmental organization (INGO) established (1989) in the Canton of Geneva, Switzerland. Its members are national organizations and professional associates that provide direct or indirect service to children worldwide. The IFCW is in consultative status to the United Nations."


The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study
(U.S.) (dead link)
April 2002

"The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, also called "The Survey of New Parents," follows a birth cohort of (mostly) unwed parents and their children over a four-year period. The study is designed to provide new information on the capabilities and relationships of unwed parents, as well as the effects of policies on family formation and child wellbeing. The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study is a joint effort by Princeton University's Center for Research on Child Wellbeing and Columbia University's Social Indicators Survey Center."
Public Use Data- (Click on "Data" at the top of the Fragile Families home page)
(Free registration)
"Currently, registered users can download Fragile Families baseline data for both mothers and fathers in the 20-city sample. We expect to release 12-month follow-up data in the spring of 2003 and 30-month data in the fall of 2004. Baseline interviews for the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study were conducted in 75 hospitals in 20 cities across the United States."
Related Links:
Princeton University Center for Research on Child Wellbeing(CRCW) (dead link)
"CRCW conducts research on children's health, education, income, and family structure. (...) Our goal is to promote basic research on children's wellbeing and to link research to public policy."

Columbia University Social Indicators Survey Center(SIS Center)
The SIS Center conducts research on inequality and survey methodology. Our mission is to provide unique data sources for the analysis of social problems, to provide teaching resources for Columbia University students, and to provide useful knowledge to social service administrators, planners, and policy makers in New York City and elsewhere.

Connect for Kids- "Guidance for Grownups"(U.S.)
"An alternative news source on the Web, Connect for Kids provides solutions-oriented coverage of critical issues for children and families.

2002: What's Ahead for Families?
May 30, 2002
"Several of the key pieces of federal legislation that weave the safety net for low-wage families—the welfare-to-work Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grants, Food Stamps, the Child Care Development Block Grant and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act —will be up for reauthorization in 2002. At the same time, the federal government will be facing severe budget constraints and most states will be making hard decisions affecting their education and social services budgets that serve vulnerable families.Add to this a hot election year..."

Global Movement for Children
"The Global Movement for Children (GMC) is a world-wide movement of organisations, individuals and children. It unites efforts to build a world fit for children."
- incl. links to : Home | Register | Take action | Publications | Information | Past Campaigns | About Us | Contact Us

The Condition of Education, 2002(U.S.)
June 2002
"The 2002 edition of the Condition of Education report has recently been released by the US Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Produced annually, the report highlights significant educational developments and progress made within the past year. This year’s report is available in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) and contains 44 indicators in six main areas: enrollment trends and student characteristics; student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; student effort and rates of progress among different population groups; the quality of elementary and secondary education; the context of post-secondary education; and societal support for learning. Additionally, this report also provides analysis on the environment, climate, student outcomes at private schools, and the enrollment and persistence of nontraditional undergraduates. For anyone interested in education and its future, the report can be viewed in its entirety or by individual sections."
Reviewed byThe Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2001
Related Links:
National Center for Education Statistics
U.S. Department of Education

No Child Left Behind(U.S. federal law to improve student achievement)
"On Jan. 8, 2002, President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). This new law represents his education reform plan and contains the most sweeping changes to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) since it was enacted in 1965. "

January Is Poverty in America Awareness Month: New Media Campaign Spotlights 12 Million Poor Children in U.S.
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops
Press Release
January 2, 2002
"The Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD) today launched a new national awareness campaign emphasizing the tragic reality that one out of every six children in the United States lives in poverty, according to the most recent U.S. census figures. (...) Although poverty rates declined slightly from 1999 to 2000, more than 31 million people in the United States are poor and youth under 18 years of age still experience the highest incidence of poverty. The child poverty rate is actually higher than it was in 1979 and the U.S. ranks higher in this category than most industrialized nations."

PovertyUSA(CCHD) - America's Forgotten State
"For more than 31 million Americans, every day is a bitter struggle to survive with the least. They are America's poor, left behind on the road to prosperity. The Catholic Campaign for Human Development has created this site to raise awareness about poverty and help close the borders of this forgotten state."
- Go to theCatholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD)website

Source :United States Conference of Catholic Bishops


"A Decade of Transition" - Launch of the MONEE REPORT no. 8
(PDF file - 25K) (dead link)
Press Release - November 29, 2001
"Child poverty is widespread in the Commonwealth of Independent States, and Central and Eastern Europe, despite growing economies throughout the region. Rising numbers of children are ending up in institutions or being put up for adoption as families strain to cope, according to a UNICEF report, the first comprehensive review of the social side of a decade of transition."
This Report focuses on the410 million people who live in the 27 countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). It looks at trends in their well-being between 1989 and 1999: a decade of transition that closed their countries’ prolonged experiment with communism and that opened new perspectives to development. Examines household incomes, health, education and children in public care, in each case analysing the changes in outcomes during the 1990s and the policies affecting these outcomes.
Executive Summary(PDF file - 57K)
Report Index- (dead link)
Source :UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

Related Link:

The UNICEF Regional Monitoring Project (MONEE)(PDF file - 19K) (dead link)
MONEE is"a UNICEF project to monitor the impact on children of the tremendous social and economic transition taking place in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. (...) The MONEE Project provides a unique source of information on the social impact of the transition years. It has made a major contribution to the international debate on the directions of public policy, drawing attention to emerging issues for children, women and families across the region and keeping the interests of children on the agenda."

Harnessing Globalisation for Children : A Report to UNICEF
July 2002
Fifteen PDF files, including overviews of changes in child well-being from 1980 to 2000 and proposals for a number of policy and program options to harness globalisation for children over the next two decades.
Introduction
(PDF file - 15K, 3 pages)
- covers a wide range of topics, including :
Changes in child wellbeing in the era of globalisation: main global trends - Child Mortality Differentials by Income Group - Source of Child Poverty Changes during the Globalisation Era - Financial Globalisation and Child Wellbeing - Globalisation and Child Labour -Liberalisation, Poverty-led Growth and Child Rights: Ecuador over 1980-2000 -Liberalisation of Utilities and Children’s Right to Basic Services: Some Evidence from Latin America - New Approaches to Harnessing Technological Progress for Children - In the best Interest of the Child: International Regulation of Transnational Corporations Widening Women’s Choices: The Case for Childcare in the Era of Globalisation - more...

Child Poverty Across Industrialized Nations(1999) - (PDF File, 468K - 90 pages) (dead link)
UNICEF International Child Development Centre
- Estimates of patterns of child income poverty in 25 nations -including Canada -using data from theLuxembourg Income Study
Released in 1999, but most statistical tables and charts date back to 1995 and 1996.
Incl. The Measurement of Child Poverty - Income, Consumption and Saving - The Poverty Threshold and Counting Methods - Child Income Poverty Across Nations - Three Measures of Child Poverty - and much more.

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
The NICHD is a component of theNational Institutes of Health(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services).
NICHD research on fertility, pregnancy, growth, development, and medical rehabilitation strives to ensure that every child is born healthy and wanted and grows up free from disease and disability.

Children's Defense Fund
"For over 30 years, CDF has struggled to make sure no child in the United States gets left behind. (...) Since 1973,CDF has worked toward, and made great progress in, reducing the numbers of neglected, sick, uneducated, and poor children in the United States. CDF's research, public education campaigns, budget and policy advocacy, and coalition building have contributed to millions of children gaining immunizations; health care; child care; Head Start; a right to education; adoptions; a chance to escape poverty; and protections in our child welfare, mental health, and juvenile justice systems. More than 400 CDF publications have educated millions about child conditions and what can be done individually and collectively to change things."

America's Promise-The Alliance for Youth (dead link)
That's what America's Promise is all about - pulling together the might of America's companies, public service groups and children's service providers; their talents and their resources, to strengthen kids. Not just their minds and bodies, but their character as well. And it's working. It will work even better if you and your group join in. It's time to get involved. Join us. "- General Colin L. Powell, USA (Ret)

Publications (dead link)
- incl. * The Promise Letter * State of Our Nation's Youth * Report to the Nation * President’s Summit Declaration * Strategy Series Library * Annual Report * Connecting Communities with Colleges & Universities * Becoming a College or University of Promise * Faith in the Five Guide * Schools of Promise brochure * Creating Communities of Promise * The Power of Five


Mystifying Data: Can America's Promise Get Away with It?

July 1999
FromEnergize, Inc.- "especially for leaders of volunteers" 



World Bank Early Child Development website
"This site is a knowledge source designed to assist policy makers, program managers, and practitioners in their efforts to promote the healthy growth and integral development of young children. This website expands on the content of the previous version of the ECD website. You will find that the content has been restructured, consolidated, and updated to include new information. The chapter on selected publications provides a list of the Bank's ECD publications and toolkits. The chapter on news & events features the World Bank sponsored events as well as external conferences and workshops."

United Kingdom:
The benefits of parenting: government financial support for families with children since 1975(PDF file - 548K, 74 pages) (dead link)
November 2002
"The introduction of the child tax credit in April 2003 will be the largest reform to the way the government supports families with children since child benefit replaced family allowance in the 1970s. But how have successive governments used the tax and benefit system to support families with children? This Commentary quantifies the changes in the level and distribution of financial support for children (called child-contingent support™ in this publication) between 1975 and 2003."
Source:Institute for Fiscal Studies(London)

Also from the Institute for Fiscal Studies:

A survey of the UK tax system(PDF file; 485K, 31 pages) (dead link)
Updated November 2001
"This paper describes the main components of the current UK tax system, the revenue raised from different taxes, and discusses how the tax system has changed over the last twenty years."

A survey of the UK benefit system(PDF file - 1250K, 57 pages) (dead link)
Updated October 2002
"This paper describes all the main benefits in the UK system, giving details of rates and allowances, as well as numbers and types of claimants and levels of expenditure."

Pueblito is a registered Canadian charity committed to the well being of children in Latin America. For over 25 years we have struggled to confront the effects of poverty and to promote the care and healthy development of children. By working hand in hand with partner organizations in Latin America, we are able to share know-how, training and resources with communities in a way that is cost effective and efficient.

Canadian Action Plan Sets New Course in Child Protection in the Developing World (dead link)
News Release
June 18, 2001
International Cooperation Minister Maria Minna today released Canada's Child Protection Action Plan, a document that sets the course for Canadian aid programming for the most marginalized children in developing countries. The document, prepared by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) after extensive consultation with civil society partners, places special emphasis on war-affected children and child labour.

Canada's Child Protection Action Plan (dead link)
- CIDA's Action Plan on Child Protection

Promoting the rights of children who need special protection measures
June 2001
Incl. links to :
- The challenges facing children (poverty, exploitation, abuse, and discrimination, examples of child-protection challenges in different regions
-The response of the international community (Canada - CIDA)
- The rights-based approach
- A new direction for CIDA in child protection
- Implementing the new direction
- Conclusion

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Bullying Resources
(U.K. website)



UKChildcare
(dead link)
The information contained within this site is geared primarily towards a Canadian audience with an interest in improving the quality of child care in our country. British models of policy, practice, and training are outlined in an attempt to help you with your research endeavors. If we may further assist you in any way, please feel free to contact us. Funds for the development of the website were provided by Child Care Visions, Social Development Partnership Program, Human Resources Development Canada to Dr. M. Kaye Kerr, Psychology, University of Winnipeg. The site is hosted and resides at the University of Winnipeg.
- Excellent resource --- incl. Policy and Legislation - Education and Training - Resources - Recommended Reading - Practices - Current Research - Organizations - Glossary

International Reform Monitor(from the Bertelsmann Foundation - Europe) 
This Bertelsmann Foundation website gives a wide range of well-selected information on social policy (health care, pensions provision, family policy, state welfare), labour market policy and industrial relations in15 OECD countries: Australia, Austria,Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States of America. 

International Reform Monitor Brochures
The three links below are PDF files with some excellent information on recent developments and trends ininternational social policy- labour market policy - industrial relations 
Issue 3 - October 2000(66 pages - 446K, Canadian content: the CPP Pension Fund, Parental Leave, the Canada Child Tax Benefit increase)  
Issue 1 - 1999(43 pages, 492K, Canadian content: New child benefit) 

The Bertelsmann Foundation(Europe) 
Working on more than 180 projects (as of December 2000) in the fields of Economics, State and Public Administration, Media, Politics, Public Libraries, Medicine and Health Service, Philanthropy and Foundations, Culture and Universities, the Bertelsmann Foundation wants to help solve current social problems. 
- See the Bertelsmann Foundationsitemapfor an overview of what you'll find on this large site. 

The Kindergarten Year: Findings from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99-- [PDF file, 61 pages, 227K]
Released on the first of this month by the National Center for Education Statistics, "this report attempts to answer two basic sets of questions about children's knowledge and skill acquisition during the kindergarten year." The report presents and analyzes data on improvements in math and reading skills for children pre- and post-kindergarten in specific cognitive skills such as letter recognition, understanding the letter-sound relationship, and sight-word recognition (in reading) and "counting beyond 10, recognizing the sequence in basic patterns, and comparing the relative size (dimensional relationship) of objects" (in mathematics). The report is presented in .pdf format and features a hypertext table of contents.
 [Reviewed by theScout Report for Social Sciences]U.S.
Census Bureau Children's Page
Census Bureau Child Care Statistics
Child Care Bureau
Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC)
Head Start Bureau
National Institute on Early Childhood Development and Education

 


The Child Abuse Prevention Network
The Child Abuse Prevention Network is the InternetNerve Center for professionals in the field of child abuse and neglect. Child maltreatment, physical abuse, psychological maltreatment, neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional abuse and neglect are our key areas of concern. We provide unique and powerful tools for all workers to support the identification, investigation, treatment, adjudication, and prevention of child abuse and neglect.

Children's House in Cyberspace(from the Child Abuse Prevention Network)
"Children's House is a cooperative initiative by AIFS, CIDEF, Children's Rights Centre, Childwatch, Consultative Group, CRIN, Family Life Development Center, IIN, NOSEB, Radda Barnen, ISCA, UNICEF, UNESCO, World Bank and WHO."
Children's House is an international meeting place for the exchange of information that serves the well being of children. The site is designed as floors of a house - including the Early Childhood Floor, the Child Health Floor, the Child Research Floor, the  NGO Floor, the Children's Rights Floor, the Education Floor, the Information Resources Floor, the News Floor, the Conferences Floor and the Training Floor. Each floor is dedicated to a childhood domain and maintained by a different international children's organization.
On theChildren's House Committeepage, you'll find a list of moderators for each floor including e-mail addresses and the website addresses of their organizations (11 in all).
Excellent resources - for example, theInformation Floorincludes links to information in the following areas : Advocacy and Policy - Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention - Child Health and Child Poverty - Children and Cities - Children and War - Children's Rights - Early Childhood - Homeless Children and Street Kids - Youth and Adolescents - Journals with Relevance to Children - Internet Resources for Children. And don't forget to check out theChild Rights Floorfor a series of links to web sites containing substantive information on child rights issues.


Benton Foundation
-"... working to realize the social benefits made possible by the public interest use of communications"
Washington, D.C.


American Public Human Services Association
(formerly the American Public Welfare Association)


Research Forum on Children, Families and the New Federalism
(U.S. site hosted by the National Center for Children in Poverty)
- the Research Forum database includes 41 reviewed and 28 unreviewed research
projects dealing with issues of welfare reform in the U.S. and its effects.
- includes theCanadian Self-Sufficiency Projectpage (a welfare research and demonstration project in New Brunswick and British Columbia)
- plenty of information and links to studies -

Urban Institute- (U.S. site) - incl. reports on children's well-being

Assessing the New Federalism- Multi-year research project to analyze the devolution of responsibility for social programs from the federal government to the states, focusing primarily on health care, income security, job training, and social services



Related Canadian Social Research Links pages:
- Early Learning and Child Care in Canada - Canadian NGO Links
- Early Learning and Child Care in Canada - Canadian Govt. Links
- Children, Families and Youth - Canadian Government Links
-
Children, Families and Youth - Canadian NGO Links
- Children's Rights Links page - incl. Canada’s National Plan of Action for Children, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the work of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (Special Session on the Rights of the Child), and related sites
- Unofficial Social Union Links Page (national)
- Unofficial Provincial/Territorial Social Union Links Page
See these related outside sites also...
- The (official) Social Union website
- The National Child Benefit website


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