Canadian Social Research Links

Campaign 2000 Child Poverty Report Cards

November 28, 2015
Le 28 novembre 2015


[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]

Campaign 2000 report cards:
Click a year to jump directly to links for that year, further down on the page you're now reading
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010


From the
Broadbent Blog:

How the Conservatives have failed on child poverty
http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/how-conservatives-have-failed-child-poverty
November 29, 2014
By Andrew Jackson
Twenty-five years ago, the House of Commons unanimously passed Ed Broadbent's resolution to abolish child poverty by the year 2000. We are far from that goal.
(...)
If we use the low income measure, the child poverty rate increased from 15.8% in 1989 to 19.2% in 2012, according to data provided to Campaign 2000 by Statistics Canada. Poverty measured in these relative terms significantly affects the life chances of children.
(...)
If we are to seriously address the continuing problem of child poverty, the federal government must show real leadership, and the needs of low income families must be given priority.

Source:
The Broadbent Blog

http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/

Broadbent Institute
http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/


2015 Child Poverty Reports

November 2015

Campaign 2000 report for 2015 shows 1.3 million Canadian children are living in poverty:
http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/national-report-states-1-in-5-canadian-children-live-in-poverty-1.2672856

Child poverty rates in PEI take a jump
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/child-poverty-rates-pei-jump-1.3335964

Child poverty still rising in Cape Breton
http://www.capebretonpost.com/-News/Local/2015-11-24/article-4354446/Child-poverty-still-rising-in-Cape-Breton/1

Child and family poverty in Manitoba “a chronic nightmare”
http://www.cbc.ca/-news/canada/manitoba/child-family-poverty-manitoba-1.3332545

One in five kids in BC lives in poverty
http://www.vancouversun.com/business/-five+kids+lives+poverty+report/11540821/story.html?__lsa=4dd4-566d

More on BC poverty rates, by region
https://www.kelownanow.com/-watercooler/news/news/Provincial/15/11/25/B_C_s_Child_Poverty_Among_the_Worst_in_Canada/

Too many children in Atlantic Canada still struggling
http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/-national-report-states-1-in-5-canadian-children-live-in-poverty-1.2672856

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NOTA : La version française suit l'anglais ci-dessous.

From Campaign 2000:
[ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ]

Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Let’s End Child Poverty for Good.
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
November 24, 2015
The 2015 report card, entitled Let’s Do This: Let’s End Child Poverty for Good outlines the once in a generation opportunity before Canada to eradicate child and family poverty. With the federal government committed to collaboratively developing a national poverty reduction strategy, Canada must seize the opportunity to finally end the child poverty crisis for good.

The complete report card:

LET’S DO THIS – LET’S END CHILD POVERTY FOR GOOD:
Campaign 2000 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada, 2015
(PDF 1.2MB, 20 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NationalReportCardEn2015.pdf

English media release (PDF):
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/MediaReleaseEnNov24_2015.pdf

Infographic
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/Infograph2015.png

Mapping Child Poverty: A Reality in Every Federal Riding
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/releases/ChildPovertyBackgrounderOctober%208_15.pdf
On the eve of the 2015 federal election, Campaign 2000: End Child and Family Poverty in Canada has mapped the prevalence of child poverty on a riding by riding basis. This is the first time that child poverty rates have been mapped by riding from coast to coast to coast. PDF and interactive versions of the maps are available from Campaign 2000.

---

Related link:

High hopes for federal action to end child poverty
Canada finally has a government ready to tackle child poverty. Activists want to make sure Ottawa gets it right.

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/11/24/high-hopes-for-federal-action-to-end-child-poverty.html
November 24, 2015
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Canadians have elected a government that appears ready to tackle child poverty with a list of progressive measures, including a new national benefit that could lift 315,000 children out of poverty, say advocates who have been urging federal action for a generation.

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

--------------------------------------------------------------

Version française:

FAISONS-LE! METTONS FIN UNE FOIS POUR TOUTES À
LA PAUVRETÉ DES ENFANTS:
Rapport 2015 de Campagne 2000 sur la
pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada
(fichier PDF - 1,3Mo, 20 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NationalReportCard2015FR.pdf

Communiqué:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/MediaReleaseFRNov24_2015.pdf

--------------------------------------------------------------

Provincial reports:

The Campaign 2000 website [ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ] features report cards from provincial partners in Nova Scotia, Manitoba and British Columbia, aas well as media releases from those provinces, and an infographic featuring key findings and recommendations. Report Cards from our other provincial partners, including Ontario, will be released in early 2016.

British Columbia 2015 Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 59 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/2015-BC-Child-Poverty-Report-Card-FirstCall-Web-2015-11.pdf

Manitoba Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2015 (PDF - 10 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/Manitoba2015RepCard.pdf

Nova Scotia 2015 Report Card: End it Now (PDF - 28 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NovaScoatia2015RepCard.pdf

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/

2014 Child Poverty Reports

Campaign 2000 report card on child poverty
November 24, 2014

Child Poverty 25 Years Later : Campaign 2000 report cards
On November 24 (2014), Campaign 2000 released its annual collection of report cards on child poverty in Canada.
The release includes report cards on child poverty for Canada as a whole and individual reports from participating provinces : British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. Below, you'll find links to each of the report cards along with related links.

Campaign 2000 report card on child poverty : Marking 25 Years since Canada’s House of Commons’ Unanimous Resolution to End Child Poverty in Canada
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
November 24, 2014
Campaign 2000 released its new Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada on Monday, November 24th in Toronto. This year marks 25 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada and five years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

The complete national report:

Child Poverty 25 Years Later : We Can Fix This
2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 744KB, 12 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014EN.pdf
.
[ Version française :
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014FR.pdf ]
.
More than two decades after food banks emerged as a community response to hunger and poverty, they have become an expected source of support for many low-income families. With insufficient improvements to income supports across the country and with the collapse of many decent jobs, too many families cannot afford to provide the basic food necessities. When the help of family and friends has been exhausted, they often have no other option than food banks. Most recent statistics confirm that more than 841,000 people use food banks each month. Almost half of those are families with children. Of those families, almost 50% are led by two parents. Children represent more than one in three (37%) of those users in Canada.
(Source: Report, page10)

Child Poverty 25 Years Later: Action Long Overdue (small PDF file, 2 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/PressReleaseRC2014EN.pdf
Media Release
With over 310,000 Canadian children using food banks each month, growing income inequality and rising childcare and tuition costs, we can’t afford to delay any longer. We need real progress, for real people, now.

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada network of 120 national, provincial and community partner organizations committed to working to end child and family poverty.

---

From CBC.ca:
http://www.cbc.ca/

Child poverty persists 25 years after Canada promised to end it
http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/episode/2014/11/24/canadas-broken-promise-on-child-poverty-25-years-later/
November 24, 2014
Twenty-five years ago today, MPs of all political parties voted unanimously in the House of Commons to bring an end to child poverty by the start of a new millennium. Four Prime Ministers later, child poverty has persisted. Today we hear from Ed Broadbent, the man behind the motion and from some people who know all too well about the persistence of poverty.

To listen to the 22-minute podcast, click the link above and then click "Listen" (just below the photo).

Panelists:
Ed Broadbent
, Chair of the Broadbent Institute, an independent, non-partisan organization working for progressive change through the promotion of democracy.
Mike McKenzie is the national Aboriginal youth representative for the National Association of Friendship Centres. He is from Skeetchestn First Nations in B.C.
Rachelle Bloomfield is a youth outreach worker with the YMCA of Greater Toronto.
Vitta Morales is a high school student. He was in our Fredericton studio.

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada network of 120 national, provincial and community partner organizations committed to working to end child and family poverty.

---

From CBC.ca:
http://www.cbc.ca/

Child poverty persists 25 years after Canada promised to end it
http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/episode/2014/11/24/canadas-broken-promise-on-child-poverty-25-years-later/
November 24, 2014
Twenty-five years ago today, MPs of all political parties voted unanimously in the House of Commons to bring an end to child poverty by the start of a new millennium. Four Prime Ministers later, child poverty has persisted. Today we hear from Ed Broadbent, the man behind the motion and from some people who know all too well about the persistence of poverty.

To listen to the 22-minute podcast, click the link above and then click "Listen" (just below the photo).

Panelists:
Ed Broadbent, Chair of the Broadbent Institute, an independent, non-partisan organization working for progressive change through the promotion of democracy.
Mike McKenzie is the national Aboriginal youth representative for the National Association of Friendship Centres. He is from Skeetchestn First Nations in B.C.
Rachelle Bloomfield is a youth outreach worker with the YMCA of Greater Toronto.
Vitta Morales is a high school student. He was in our Fredericton studio.

Provincial reports
-------------------------

British Columbia

British Columbia : 2014 Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 4.8MB, 43 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/BCRC2014.pdf
November 24, 2014
First Call has been tracking child and family poverty rates in BC for nearly two decades. Our first provincial report card containing data for 1994 showed that one in five (over 170,000) BC children were poor. It is profoundly disappointing that 18 years later the data still shows that one in five (169,420) BC children are poor.
(Source : Report, page 4)

Source:
First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition
http://www.firstcallbc.org/

First Call Coalition's 2014 BC Child Poverty Report Card
http://still1in5.ca/
- incl. links to (1) the report card, (2) specific actions you can take to convince the BC Government to act on the recommendations of this report, and (c) First Call’s Media Release about the Report Card and what other people are saying about the report card findings.

---

Related links

From TheTyee.ca :
http://thetyee.ca/

Child Poverty Report Card: BC Shows Improvement
http://thetyee.ca/News/2014/11/24/BC-Poverty-Report-Card/
By Katie Hyslop
November 24, 2014
British Columbia has the fifth highest child poverty rate in Canada, according to the 2014 Child Poverty Report Card released today by First Call B.C. Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition. It's an improvement from a year earlier when B.C.'s rates were the highest in the country. But hold the celebration. Although Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick surpass B.C. in child poverty, First Call, a child advocacy group, says B.C.'s decrease is likely due to a change in data availability.

NOTE : Click the link above, then scroll partway down the next page for links to the following related articles:
* Warning: Child Poverty Is Hazardous to Our Health
* Not one of our kids is disposable, yet we keep them brain-damagingly poor.
* No Easy Numbers for Single Mom Poverty
* BC figures show sharp fall in their median income. But variable data hides the real story.
* BC ties Manitoba for highest child poverty
* Read more: Rights + Justice, BC Politics

---

From CBC.ca
http://www.cbc.ca/

Child poverty on rise in B.C., says First Call coalition report card
First Call coalition finds roughly 1 in 5 - or 169,240 - children were living in poverty in B.C. in 2012
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/child-poverty-on-rise-in-b-c-says-first-call-coalition-report-card-1.2847293
November 24, 2014

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

Alberta

No Change : After 25 years of promises,
it’s time to eliminate child poverty
(PDF - 3.3MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/ABRC2014.pdf
Co-authored by John Kolkman and Manuel Escoto of the Edmonton
Social Planning Council (ESPC), and Bill Moore-Kilgannon of Public Interest Alberta (PIA).
November 2014
On September 15, 2014, the Honourable Jim Prentice was sworn into office as Alberta’s 16th Premier. Prentice replaced Alison Redford who had committed during the April 2012 provincial election campaign to ending child poverty in five years and reducing poverty overall. During the leadership campaign, work on the provincial poverty reduction strategy slowed down. The previous commitment to finalize a strategy this year has fallen by the wayside. The strategy will not be released until Spring 2015.
(Source : Report intro)

Sources:
Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC)
https://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/

Public Interest Alberta (PIA)
http://pialberta.org/

From PIA:

No Change - 143,200 Children Live in Poverty in Alberta:
New Report Challenges Government to Fulfill Promise to End Child Poverty
http://pialberta.org/content/no-change-143200-children-live-poverty-alberta
November 24, 2014
(...)
The report shows that despite Alberta’s strong economy, Alberta’s income inequality has increased faster than the national average, with the top 1% of earners seeing real income gains of over 60% since 1982 while the bottom half of income earners only saw a tiny gain of 3.4%.

From CBC.ca:

Alberta's child poverty rate remains almost unchanged 25 years later, says report
Public Interest Alberta says cuts to programs that help people out of poverty a factor
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/alberta-s-child-poverty-rate-remains-almost-unchanged-25-years-later-says-report-1.2848502
November 24, 2014

Saskatchewan

Campaign 2000 Releases 2014 Report Cards on Child Poverty in Canada:
Findings and Recommendations Echo Poverty Costs Saskatchewan Report
(small PDF file, 2 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/Sask-Upstream2014_Release.pdf
Press Release
November 24, 2014

Poverty Costs Saskatchewan:
A New Approach to Prosperity for All
(PDF - 6.8MB, 54 pages)
http://vibrantcanada.ca/files/povertycostssaskatchewan_povertycosts_2014_s.pdf
October 2014
By Charles Plante and Keisha Sharp

Source:
Vibrant Communities Canada

http://vibrantcanada.ca/

Poverty Costs
http://www.povertycosts.ca/
Poverty Costs is a campaign to raise awareness about the economic cost of poverty and give Saskatchewan people an opportunity to voice their support for a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy.

---

One in four Sask. kids live in poverty, study finds
http://www.leaderpost.com/business/four+Sask+kids+live+poverty+study+finds/10411113/story.html
By Evan Radford
November 25, 2014

Regina Leader Post
http://www.leaderpost.com/

Manitoba

25 years and Children are no better off:
Manitoba Child and Family Poverty
Report Card 2014
(PDF - 480KB, 8 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/MBRC2014.pdf
Canada is now far overdue on its pledge to eliminate child poverty. Not only did Canada fail to meet the target, many believe that as a country we’ve fallen back. One in five children in Canada and 40% of Indigenous children living off-reserve live in poverty. In Winnipeg, food banks provide nourishment for about 20,000 children a month.

Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

http://www.spcw.mb.ca/

---

NDP record on child poverty is poor
http://www.winnipegsun.com/2014/11/24/ndp-record-on-child-poverty-is-poor

---

From CBC.ca:

Manitoba's child poverty rate 2nd-highest in Canada: report
Almost 3 in 10 children live in poverty, says Social Planning Council of Winnipeg report

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-s-child-poverty-rate-2nd-highest-in-canada-report-1.2847331
November 24, 2014

Ontario

Child Poverty, 25 Years Later : We Can Fix This
2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 482KB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/ONRC2014EN.pdf
.
Version française:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/ONRC2014FR.pdf
.
November 2014
In November 2014, the unanimous, federal all-party resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000 turns 25. An entire generation has lived in the shadow of this 1989 commitment, now fourteen years overdue. Over 1.3 million children in Canada and over 550,000 in Ontario live in poverty today. Even as Canada’s economy has more than doubled in size, child and family poverty is worse in 2014 than it was in 1989 at both the national and the provincial level.
(Source : Report intro)

Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/Ontario/

---

Ontario falling behind its own poverty reduction goals
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2014/11/24/ontario_falling_behind_its_own_poverty_reduction_goals.html
November 24, 2014
Campaign 2000’s annual report card shows province not meeting goal it set in 2008 to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent over five years.

Nova Scotia

A Generation of Broken Promises:
The 2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia
(PDF - 641KB, 26 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/NSRC2014.pdf
By Lesley Frank
November 2014
Despite both the federal and provincial government’s initiatives, the child poverty rate in Nova Scotia has marginally increased each year since 2009. Clearly piecemeal increases and marginal tax adjustments have not been robust enough to address inadequate welfare incomes that are thousands of dollars below poverty thresholds. Instead, the limited commitment to family policy to support parents in the workforce, rising housing and food prices, and increases in low-waged precarious employment remain in the way of child poverty eradication.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives | Nova Scotia Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/nova-scotia

---

One-third of Cape Breton kids living in poverty, report says
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1252960-one-third-of-cape-breton-kids-living-in-poverty-report-says
November 24, 2014
About 32.6 per cent of children in Cape Breton live in poverty, compared with 22.2 per cent in Nova Scotia and 19 per cent across the country.

Source:
The Chronicle Herald
http://thechronicleherald.ca/

New Brunswick

A quarter of a century and not much change:
2014 New Brunswick Child Poverty Report Card
(PDF - 7.5MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/NBRC2014.pdf
November 24, 2014
In 1989, when the resolution was passed, 1,066,150 children (15.8%) in Canada lived in poverty. In 2012, both the number and percentage of children living in poverty had increased – to 1,340,530 (19.2%). The child poverty rate in New Brunswick has increased from 19.8% in 1989 to 21.0% in 2012—more than 29,000 children live in poverty in our province.
(Source: Report, page 3)

Source:
Human Development Council
http://www.sjhdc.ca/
The Human Development Council identifies and addresses social issues in Greater Saint John through research, information, coordination and networking
.

Prince Edward Island

Lingering Too Long, At What Cost? (PDF - 240KB, 4 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/PEIReport2014.pdf
This report is a first attempt to develop a Child Poverty Report Card for P.E.I. It is being done in cooperation with Campaign 2000. A more comprehensive report card will follow in cooperation with authors in Nova Scotia.
(...)
It is almost unimaginable that federal and provincial governments would allow poverty to increase at such a rate in Canada. Whatever happened to the Common Good the principle that is supposed to be at the heart of all good government? Whatever happened to the many UN Conventions signed by Canada and the Provinces?
(Source: Excerpts from the report)

---

More Islanders living in poverty now than in 1989
http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/News/Local/2014-11-24/article-3949823/More-Islanders-living-in-poverty-now-than-in-1989/1
By Mitch MacDonald
November 24, 2014
A new report showing the level of poverty in Prince Edward Island is “extremely disappointing,” says a well-known social activist and author of the report. Mary Boyd, of the MacKillop Centre for Social Justice, said the report shows that poverty rate for P.E.I. now stands at 17.5 per cent.

2013 Child Poverty Reports

2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty- November 26, 2013
(From Campaign 2000)

Campaign 2000 and Its Regional Partners Release
New 2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
November 26, 2013
Campaign 2000’s annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada was released on Tuesday, November 26th in Ottawa. This year marks 24 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada by 2000 and four years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

National report card:

The 2013 national report card, entitled Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to take leadership. It presents the latest statistics on child and family poverty and makes recommendations for all political parties. Federal party leaders have been invited to respond to the report card.

Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication:
2013 Report card on Child and Familkiuy Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 3MB, 22 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000NATIONALREPORTCARDNOV26.pdf
[ Version française:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013NationalReportCardNov26French.pdf ]

---

Media release on the national Campaign 2000 Report Card
* English (small PDF file) - http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/2013Campaign2000PressReleaseNov26.pdf
* Français (fichier PDF de petite taille) - http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/2013Campaign2000PressReleaseNov26French.pdf

---

Campaign 2000 national child poverty report card for 2012
November 21, 2012
- this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading
NOTE : For links to reports for selected provinces, go to the Campaign 2000 home page [ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ] and select a jurisdiction.

----------------------------------

Provincial report cards:

On the same day as the national report card was released, several of Campaign 2000 regional partner organizations released their provincial report cards on child and family poverty as well, including:
* Vancouver, BC
* Edmonton, Alberta
* Calgary, Alberta
* Toronto, Ontario
* Saint John, New Brunswick
* Halifax, Nova Scotia

---

British Columbia

BC Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013 (PDF - 3.4MB, 32 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/provincial/BritishColumbia/2013First_Call_Report_Card.pdf
By Adrienne Montani
November 2013
BC had a child poverty rate of 18.6 per cent — the worst rate of any province in Canada, using the before-tax low income cut-offs of Statistics Canada as the measure of poverty.

Source:
First Call: BC Child and
Youth Advocacy Coalition

http://firstcallbc.org

---

Alberta

From Words to Action : Alberta Can Afford a Real Poverty Reduction Strategy
Alberta Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013
(PDF - 1.5MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/otherreports/Alberta%20reportcard%20From%20Words%20to%20Actions%20Report%202013%20FINAL.pdf
By John Kolkman (Edmonton Social Planning Council) and Bill Moore-Kilgannon (Public Interest Alberta)
November 2013
In April 2012, Premier Alison Redford promised Albertans that if her government was re-elected, they would commit to a 5-year plan to end child poverty and a 10-
year plan to reduce poverty overall. This breakthrough occurred due to the hard work of many concerned organizations and individuals advocating for a provincial poverty reduction strategy.
(...)
The next year will be critical in determining whether the Social Policy Framework and Children First Act end up being simply statement of good intentions, or include specific policy changes to make Alberta a leader in eliminating child and family poverty.

Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council

http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/
Public Interest Alberta
http://pialberta.org/

-

Ontario

Beyond Austerity : Investing in Ontario's Future
Ontario Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013
(PDF - 5.6MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/Ontario/reportcards/2013%20FULL%20ON%20Campaign%202000%20Report%20Card%20-Nov26.pdf
By Anita Khanna with Laurel Rothman & Nicole Forget
November 2013
Ontario must chart a new path; austerity has been harmful to marginalized Ontarians struggling to move beyond poverty. Now, low income children and families need the province to move beyond words into action by making investments in poverty reduction that will help to achieve social justice and equity. Prior to austerity in 2012, such investments led to declining levels of child and family poverty in Ontario.
Source:
Family Service Toronto

http://www.familyservicetoronto.org/
Family Service Toronto (FST) helps people face a wide variety of life challenges. For almost 100 years, we have been assisting families and individuals through counselling, community development, advocacy and public education programs.

---

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013
1989-2011
(PDF - 638K, 26 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Nova%20Scotia%20Office/2013/11/2013_NS_Child_Poverty_Report_Card.pdf
By Dr. Lesley Frank
November 2013
(...) Another concern with producing this report card is the erosion of data quality. Year after year, there is less and less to report, particularly for small provinces like Nova Scotia. Reporting the child poverty rates is still possible with available statistics; however statistics for sub-populations which we know experience higher rates of child poverty are increasingly non-existent due to reduced sampling. Changes made by the federal government to the long form census will further erode our ability to track child poverty.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives | Nova Scotia

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/nova-scotia

---

New Brunswick

Where’s the Data?
2013 New Brunswick Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013
(PDF - 4.1MB, 18 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/provincial/New%20Brunswick/2013ChildPovertyReportCard.pdf
By Randy Hatfield
November 2013
It has always been a challenge to report child poverty rates in New Brunswick. Our small population means that sampling techniques used by Statistics Canada result in rates that often are not statistically reliable. Over the years we have used the poverty measure – whether the Low Income Cut O? (LICO) before or after tax, the Market Basket Measure (MBM) or the Low Income Measure (LIM) - which o?ers the most dependable number. Last year, for example, we reported the LIM; the year before it was LICO.

This year we are unable to offer any number.
All of the poverty measures available from Statistics Canada’s Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics for New Brunswick are accompanied by an “E”, which is the lowest grade, and indicates a warning to “use with caution”.
[Bolding and red text are from the original.]

Our ability to relay reliable data was further eroded with the 2011 switch from a mandatory long form census questionnaire to a voluntary National Household Survey (NHS).

Source:
Human Development Council
http://sjhdc.ca/

---

Join us and take e-action to send a message to our Prime Minister and all the federal party leaders today.
Click here to send a letter : http://www.makepovertyhistory.ca/act/where-s-our-federal-poverty-eradication-plan

---

Related online resource:

A history of inaction (PDF infographic [English and French] - 19.7MB, 2 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000INFOGRAPHIC_FULL%20COLOUR.pdf
- incl. timelines and potential outcomes
[HUMONGOUS FILE ALERT!]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of more than 120 national, provincial and community organizations committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada, over 70 of which are from Ontario.

2012 Child Poverty Reports

2012 Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada : Campaign 2000

Government of Canada Missing in Action on child poverty: Report (PDF - 196K, 1 page)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/2012ReportCardPressRelease.pdf
November 21, 2012
News Release
TORONTO – More Canadian children live in poverty today than in 1989 and the federal government is missing in action, says Laurel Rothman, National Coordinator for Campaign 2000. Twenty-three years after the House of Commons unanimously voted to work together to eliminate child poverty the crisis is worse. Today, one in seven Canadian children live in poverty – one in four in First Nation’s communities – a reality that threatens our country’s future through higher healthcare costs, lost productivity and limited opportunities.

The 2012 report, entitled Needed: A Federal Action Plan to Eradicate Child and Family Poverty in Canada calls on the Federal Government to take a lead role in child and family poverty reduction. Policy recommendations are offered to all political parties to redress the persistence of child and family poverty in Canada.

Complete national report:

Needed: A Federal Action Plan to Eradicate Child and Family Poverty in Canada
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/C2000ReportCardNov2012.pdf
November 2012
[ Version française : http://www.campaign2000.ca/2012ReportCardFr.pdf ]
Without a national anti-poverty strategy, child and family poverty in Canada will continue to grow, compromising the success of future generations and threatening Canada’s economic stability. Today, there are poverty reduction strategies in seven of the ten provinces and even in some municipalities. When it comes to eradicating child poverty, the Federal government is currently an absentee partner. A coordinated federal action plan that sets significant goals for poverty eradication, dedicates adequate financial and human resources and mandates reporting of progress is vital for Canada’s future. It is also long overdue.

Table of Contents:
* INTRODUCTION
* RECOMMENDATIONS
Factsheet #1 Child Poverty Worse Now Than in 1989
Factsheet #2 Child Poverty Is Also A Provincial Issue
Factsheet #3 Improving Incomes for Families with Children
Factsheet # 4 Making Work Work for Workers
Factsheet #5 The Life Cycle: Seniors’ Poverty Rising
Factsheet #6 Child Poverty among Marginalized Groups & in Major Cities
Factsheet #7 Income Inequality: The Growing Gap
Factsheet #8 Aboriginal Children & Families
Factsheet #9 Still Struggling for Better Childcare
Factsheet #10 Stable and Affordable Housing
Factsheet #11 Youth Face An Uncertain Future

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada. Visit the Campaign 2000 website for a complete list of partner organizations.

Related links:

Campaign 2000 urges Ottawa to eliminate child tax credits and use money to fight poverty
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1290644
November 21, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Ottawa should streamline the “hodgepodge” of federal child tax credits and use the money to lift more children out of poverty, says Campaign 2000. On the 23rd anniversary of a unanimous House of Commons pledge to eradicate child poverty by the year 2000, the national coalition is once again calling for a federal plan with goals and timelines to get the job done. With one in seven Canadian children — including one in four in First Nations communities — still living in poverty, this year’s progress report goes after Ottawa’s “inefficient” tax system.

It takes aim at the “misnamed” Universal Child Care Benefit that provides $100-per-month for children under age 6; the “regressive” Child Tax Credit that reduces federal income taxes by about $300; and the Child Fitness Credit, worth a maximum of $75 per child. All three should be eliminated and the resources redirected to boost the National Child Benefit to a maximum of $5,400 a year, up from the current maximum of $3,485, the coalition says.

At $5,400, a single parent with one child who is working full-time at $11 an hour would be able to escape poverty. More broadly, it would cut Canada’s child poverty rate by 15 per cent and lift 174,000 children out of poverty.
(...)
Campaign 2000 also calls on Ottawa to invest in a national child-care system, introduce a national housing strategy, restore and expand eligibility for Employment Insurance, address employment equity for “racialized communities” and improve funding for post-secondary education.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada

Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada

From Campaign 2000:

Canada Told to Stop Failing Its Children (PDF - 187K, 2 pages)
Media Release
November 23, 2011
Toronto –
The 2011 Report Card, Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times, explores child poverty, the conditions it creates, and the issues faced by families living on low-income. The report finds that the number of children living in poverty has only decreased by 20% in 20 years. With 639,000 children still living in poverty, proactive social policies will need to be introduced and implemented immediately if Canada is to avoid an increase in the depth and rate of poverty.

The national report:

Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 2.8MB, 16 pages)
November 2011
All we are asking is to give children a chance. Campaign 2000 is looking for a real commitment from this Parliament to reduce poverty by at least 50% by the year 2020, creating a pathway to eventual eradication. The federal government, in our view, must play a lead role.

[ Version française:
Réexaminer la sécurité des familles en cette période d'insécurité:
Rapport 2011 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada
(fichier PDF - 2,8 Mo., 16 pages)

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada.

------------------------------------------

2011 Provincial Report Cards:

British Columbia:

British Columbia Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 2.4MB, 28 pages)
Novembver 2011
Campaign 2000 calls on all provinces and the federal government to commit themselves to a 50 percent reduction in poverty among all Canadians by 2020. BC supporters of Campaign 2000 hope to see a provincial child poverty rate before taxes of seven percent or less by 2020. We are also calling for the appointment of a BC cabinet minister with the authority and responsibility to ensure that a poverty reduction plan is developed and implemented and that the province is on track for achieving its poverty reduction targets and meeting its timelines. (p. 23)
Source:
First Call: BC Child and
Youth Advocacy Coalition

First Call is a cross-sectoral, non-partisan coalition of provincial and regional organizations, engaged communities and individuals whose aim is to raise public awareness and mobilize communities around the importance of public policy and social investments that support the well-being of children, youth and families.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alberta

In This Together : Ending Poverty in Alberta (PDF - 2.3MB, 16 pages)
November 2011
This report shows that 73,000 Alberta children lived below Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (after-tax) in 2009. This was a 40% increase from the year before. The document also offers solutions to alleviating poverty in Alberta.
(...)
The recession caused a sharp increase in poverty rates for children living in two-parent families (Chart 3). In 2007, only 3.4% of these children lived in poverty. In 2009, this increased to 8.0%. The increase is likely due to low income families with both parents working experiencing job loss, reduction in hours and/or pay cuts.
(Excerpt, p. 2)
Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council
Alberta College of Social Workers
Public Interest Alberta

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Manitoba

2011 Child and Family Poverty Report Card:
The Portrait of Poverty

http://goo.gl/HLCF1s
February 23, 2012
Using 2009 data, the latest available, we see that a portrait of poverty in Manitoba includes:
* 92,650 children in Manitoba living in families under the poverty threshold
* 29,000 children in Manitoba living in families with annual incomes insufficient for meeting basic needs
* 29,563 Manitoban children using food banks each month because their families cannot afford to purchase the necessary food they require
* 59,734 Manitobans accessed Employment and Income Assistance
* The richest 20% of Manitoban families have more total income than the poorest 60% of the population
(Source : Excerpt, p. 4)

Table of contents:
1. Executive Summary
2. Poverty Portrait (current conditions)
--- a. Child poverty in Manitoba
--- b. Child Poverty by Family Type
--- c. Conditions of Inequality
--- d. Inadequate Disposable Income
--- e. Material Deprivation
--- f. Aboriginal Conditions
--- g. Explanations
3. How the Poor Manage
--- a. Family Budgets
--- b. Employment Income Assistance (Provincial Welfare)
--- c. Public and Emergency Shelters
--- d. Food banks
--- e. Health and Healthcare
--- f. Employment Insurance
--- g. Charities and Community
4. Trends and Projections
5. Campaign 2000
--- National Campaign
--- Recommendations
--- Social Planning Council
6. References

Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
The Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (SPC) is a membership-based organization in the voluntary sector committed to providing leadership in social planning and effecting social policy changes.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ontario

Ontario does not have a choice on Poverty Reduction (PDF - 216K, 2 pages)
http://goo.gl/auobG
February 6, 2012
Media Release
Toronto – Ontario cannot afford to have the poverty reduction strategy sit on the margins, warns Ontario Campaign 2000. The economic and social potential of the province is at risk of being further eroded if the austerity agenda is given precedence over the wellbeing of Ontario’s children and their families. The government no longer has a choice in whether or not to concentrate on poverty reduction over other policy areas – poverty reduction must be a necessary part of overall public decision-making. The 2011 report card, Poverty Reduction in an Age of Uncertainty and Change, focuses on child, family and youth poverty and finds that 393,000 children are still living in poverty in Ontario.

The report:

Poverty Reduction in an Age of Uncertainty and Change:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 960K, 13 pages)
http://goo.gl/ZhU4E
Table of contents:
* Key Recommendations
* Measuring Child Poverty
* Ontario Deprivation Index
* Employment Insecurity
* Economic insecurity amongst youth
* An Unequal Society
* Ontario Child Benefit
* Ontario’s Social Assistance
* Mental Health and Child Poverty
* Child Care in Ontario
* Affordable Housing
* Conclusion

Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/Ontario/
Part of
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

New Brunswick

2011 New Brunswick Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 472K, 15 pages)
November 2011
The latest Statistics Canada data, from 2009, shows that 14,000 New Brunswick children (9.9%) are living in families with incomes below the poverty line—a drop since 2008 (12.0%). In November 2009, New Brunswick joined the ranks of provinces that have adopted comprehensive poverty reduction strategies. Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan has set a target of reducing income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50% by the year 2015. These targets and timetables are set out in the Economic and Social Inclusion Act, which received Royal Assent in April 2010.

[ Version française:
Rapport sur la pauvreté des enfants en 2011 (fichier PDF - 495K, 15 pages)]

Source:
Human Development Council
The Human Development Council is a local social planning council that co-ordinates and promotes social development in Greater Saint John.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nova Scotia

2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia: 1989-2009 (PDF - 690K, 11 pages)
November 2011
Clearly, the goal was not achieved; in fact, in 2000 the child poverty rate in Nova Scotia was higher than in 1989, the year the promise was made. Did nine additional years bring us any closer to the goal? While child poverty rates did show a steady decline after 2003, our most recent figures (regardless of the poverty measured used) now show a reversal of this trend. With 14,000 children living below the After-Tax Low-Income Cut Off (LICO-AT) in 2009, progress has stalled and we are far from realizing child poverty eradication.

Source:
Nova Scotia Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Manitoba

Manitoba's Child Poverty Report Card was released September 22, and it is accessible on the website of the NGO which produced the report, the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ontario

The Ontario Child Poverty Report Card will be released in the New Year prior to the provincial budget announcement.

2010 Child Poverty Reports

2010 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada and [selected] provinces
November 24, 2010
Campaign 2000
[NOTA : Le lien vers la version française se trouve à la suite des liens vers l'anglais.]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The National child poverty report for 2010:

2010 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: 1989 – 2010
Reduced Poverty for All
(PDF - 389K, 12 pages)
The 2010 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada, Reduced Poverty = Better Health for All, looks at the nation’s most recent child and family poverty rate compared to 21 years ago, when Parliament unanimously resolved to end child poverty by 2000, and finds that 610,000 children (2008 LICO after-tax) and their families lived in poverty even before the recession hit. The child poverty rate of 9.1 per cent is slightly less than when it was 11.9 per cent in 1989. Lessons from past recessions tell us that poverty will rise before the recovery is complete.
See also:
[ Press release - November 24, 2010 (PDF - 52K, 2 pages) ]

The report card’s key findings show Canada has a long way to go to prevent and reduce poverty:

• One in 10 children still lives in poverty in Canada. It’s worse for children living in First Nations communities: one in four grow up in poverty;
• Employment is not always an assured pathway out of poverty: 1 in 3 low-income children lives in families where at least one parent works full-time year round and almost 400,000 adult full-time workers earn less than $10 per hour.
• Child poverty is persistent across Canada: rates of child and family poverty (LICO before-tax) are in the double digits in all provinces.
• The gap between rich and poor has widened: On average, for every dollar the families in the poorest 10 per cent had, families in the richest 10 per cent had almost 13 times as much ($12.66) in 2008.

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.
[ Campaign 2000 Partners - national AND provincial/territorial organizations, incl. links to their websites ]
[ Links to national child and family poverty report cards for earlier years - back to 2000 ]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Version française:
Rapport 2010 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada: 1989 – 2010
Moins de pauvreté = meilleure santé pour tous et toutes
(PDF - 326Ko., 12 pages) ]

Source:
Campagne 2000
Campagne 2000 est un réseau pancanadien, non partisan et non gouvernemental de plus de cent vingt organismes nationaux, provinciaux, territoriaux et communautaires qui ont pris l’engagement de « promouvoir et d’assurer la mise en œuvre complète de la résolution du 24 novembre 1989 de la Chambre des communes ».
Voir également:
[ Communiqué de presse - 24 novembre - (petit fichier PDF, 2 pages) ]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Media coverage of the
release of the national report:

Number of seniors living in poverty soars nearly 25%
By Joe Friesen
November 24, 2010
The number of seniors living in poverty spiked at the beginning of the financial meltdown, reversing a decades-long trend and threatening one of Canada’s most important social policy successes. The number of seniors living below the low-income cutoff, Statistics Canada’s basic measure of poverty, jumped nearly 25 per cent between 2007 and 2008, to 250,000 from 204,000, according to figures released on Wednesday by Campaign 2000. It’s the largest increase among any group, and as the first cohort of baby boomers turns 65 next year, could place increased pressure on families supporting elderly parents.
[ 79 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

Provincial child poverty reports

British Columbia

BC Campaign 2000 : 2010 Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 2.4MB, 22 pages)
BC Campaign 2000 Recommendations:
Campaign 2000 calls on all provinces and the federal government to commit themselves to a 50 percent reduction in poverty among all canadians by 2020. bc supporters of campaign 2000 hope to see a provincial child poverty rate before taxes of seven percent or less by 2020. We are also calling for the appointment of a bc cabinet minister with the authority and responsibility to ensure that a poverty reduction plan is developed and implemented and that the province is on track for achieving its poverty reduction targets and meeting its timelines.

A Time for Leadership in Fighting Child Poverty (PDF - 2 pages)
Media Release
November 24, 2010
Children need the political leaders of British Columbia to step forward and commit themselves to fighting poverty, BC Campaign 2000 said today in its latest annual report on child poverty. (...) The child poverty rate in British Columbia dropped to 14.5 percent in 2008, according to the latest figures published by Statistics Canada. The number of poor children was 121,000 - or about one of every seven BC children. Alarmingly, the poverty rate for children under age six was 19.6%, or one in five young children.

Source:
First Call : BC Child and youth Advocacy Coalition
First call is a cross-sectoral, non-partisan coalition of provincial and regional organizations, engaged communities and individuals whose aim is to raise public awareness and mobilize communities around the importance of public policy and social investments that support the well-being of children, youth and families.

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction

---

Media coverage of
the release of the BC report:

Putting a face on poverty
By Mark Hume
November 24, 2010
VANCOUVER
(...) The [child poverty] report, with a focus on the provincial situation, was released by First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition. Relying on 2008 Statistics Canada data, the most recently available, it shows one in ten children nationally live in poverty; in B.C. it is one in seven. The rates are the lowest in a decade, but a spike is expected when the 2009 data is released next spring because of the economic crisis that began in the fall of 2008.
[ 178 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

---

1 in 7 B.C. children live in poverty
NOVEMBER 24, 2010
An anti-poverty group says the recession will likely make B.C. child poverty rates worse.
Source:
Toronto Star

Alberta

Time For Action: Working Together To End Poverty In Alberta (PDF - 1.6MB, 16 pages) [dead link]
(...)Work on developing an Alberta poverty strategy has continued throughout 2010. Public Interest Alberta formed a task force to coordinate activities province-wide.
Using the Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness as a model, Alberta should develop its own comprehensive initiative to reduce, eliminate, and prevent poverty.

53,000 Alberta Children Live Below Poverty Line [dead link]
Report Calls on Governments and Others to Work Together to End Poverty
News Release
November 24, 2010
The Edmonton Social Planning Council and Public Interest Alberta released a new report that shows 53,000 Alberta children lived below Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (after-tax) in 2008, and that number is probably higher today due to the effects of the recession on our economy

Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council
The ESPC is an independent, non-profit, charitable organization. Our focus is social research – particularly in the areas of low income and poverty. The ESPC provides leadership within the community by addressing and researching social issues, informing public discussion and influencing social policy.

Public Interest Alberta
Public Interest Alberta is a non-profit, non-partisan, province-wide organization focused on education and advocacy on public interest issues. PIA exists to foster an understanding of the importance of public spaces, services and institutions in Albertans' lives, and to build a network of people and organizations committed to advancing the public interest.

------

Media coverage:

Alberta child poverty a 'hidden' crisis: report [dead link]
53,000 kids affected, perhaps more

By Jana G. Pruden and Amy Minsky
November 25, 2010
Despite a government pledge to end child poverty 20 years ago, a new report says there are 53,000 children living below the poverty line in Alberta -- and possibly more, given downturns in the economy in the past two years, (...)The Alberta report says more than half of the children who live in poverty are from a household in which at least one person works full time year-round.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

Saskatchewan

Child and Family Poverty in Saskatchewan: November 2010 (PDF - 618K, 10 pages)
New data from Statistics Canada for the year 2008 show that Saskatchewan has an overall poverty rate of 12.1%. This represents 115, 000 people — equivalent to more than half the population of Regina — living below the poverty line. Of those, 33,000 are children under the age of 18. In recent years, Saskatchewan’s poverty rate has fallen below the national rate. This trend continues in 2008 with the provincial poverty rate slightly below the national rate of 13.6%, or 4,426,000 people
Source:
Social Policy Research Unit
[ Faculty of Social Work ]
[ University of Regina ]

Manitoba

Manitoba Child Poverty Report Card - 2010
The Challenge for Manitoba’s Provincial Government
(PDF - 2.8MB, 27 pages) [dead link]
Manitoba maintains it s title as the “Child Poverty Capital of Canada. The November 16, 2010 Throne Speech, The Government of Manitoba claimed to have the second lowest child poverty rate in Canada. This rating used the Market Basket Measure, which is not based on a comprehensive concept which takes into account all of the aspects of poverty. The methodology is also suspect because shelter is so undervalued. Using the comprehensive LICO, which considers income in a manner consistent with how Canadians at all levels see their own economic well-being, the picture is very different. Manitoba has the worst poverty rate in the country, almost 3 percent above the Canadian rate and 1.5% above the next worst province. These figures translate into 43,000 children live in poverty or 1.1 times the size of Brandon.
Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
The Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (SPC) is a membership-based organization in the voluntary sector committed to providing leadership in social planning and effecting social policy changes.

Ontario

2010 Report Card on Child & Family Poverty in Ontario
Poverty Reduction: Key to Economic Recovery for Ontario Families
(PDF - 182K, 8 pages)
(...) Despite tight fiscal times the 2009 and 2010 provincial budgets included a number of measures that have benefited low income families, including increases to the minimum wage and the Ontario Child Benefit, stimulus spending on affordable housing, funding tosave child care subsidies, and implementation of full day kindergarten for 4 and 5 year olds. But the poorest 6.5% of Ontario’s population, those who receive social assistance, have seen no increase in welfare benefits in real dollars. In terms of purchasing power, benefits are as low now as in 1967.
Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000

Related link:

Family Service Toronto
Family Service Toronto (FST) helps people face a wide variety of life challenges. For over 90 years, we have been assisting families and individuals through counselling, community development, advocacy and public education programs. Our services are available to everyone who lives or works in Toronto.

---

Child poverty up in Ontario
By Laurie Monsebraaten
November 24, 2010
Queen’s Park needs to step up efforts if it hopes to cut child poverty by 25 per cent by 2013, advocates say
Source:
Toronto Star

New Brunswick

Child Poverty Report Card : New Brunswick (PDF - 980K, 16 pages)
November 2010
Prepared by Kathryn Asher, Researcher with the Human Development Council, a local social planning council that co-ordinates and promotes social development in Greater Saint John.

Source:
Human Development Council - Saint John

Nova Scotia

From the Nova Scotia Office
of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2010 : 1989–2008 (PDF - 816K, 27 pages)
by Lesley Frank
November 24, 2010
This year’s report card examines the period 1989 to 2008, the year for which the most recent data is available. It also reviews changes for a later period (1997 to 2008) to assess the impact of the 1998 National Child Benefit initiative, which is specifically aimed at preventing and reducing child poverty.

News Release:

14,000 children in Nova Scotia still living in poverty is 14,000 too many
November 24, 2010
HALIFAX, NS –Twenty-one years ago (in 1989), the government of Canada promised to end child poverty by the year 2000. In 2000, not only had they not kept the promise - the child poverty rate was even higher. Today, ten years after the goal date, the broken promise remains. This year’s annual report published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives –Nova Scotia and Campaign 2000 reports that 14,000 Nova Scotia children were living in poverty in 2008. Based on the most recent available data (for 2008), the report card shows that there has been some progress made, however.

---------------------------

Earlier related report
from the CCPA Nova Scotia Office:

The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia (PDF - 822K, 34 pages) [dead link]
By Angella MacEwen and Christine Saulnier
October 16, 2010

News Release:

Poverty costs Nova Scotia over $1billion a year
October 16, 2010
HALIFAX- The total economic cost of poverty in Nova Scotia is at least $1.5 to $2.2 billion dollars per year, accounting for between 5% - 7% of Nova Scotia’s GDP in 2008. The portion of the total cost borne by society (the social cost) is at least $500 to $650 million dollars. This corresponds to 6% - 8% of Nova Scotia’s 2007/2008 budget, or around $1,400 to $1,700 for each Nova Scotian household

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - Nova Scotia Office
[ CCPA National Office ]
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.


CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH LINKS HOME PAGE
 PAGE D'ACCUEIL - SITES DE RECHERCHE SOCIALE AU CANADA

SEARCH
FREE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER


To search the complete
Canadian Social Research Links website ,
use the text box below:


To search ONLY the page you are now reading,
use Ctrl + F to open a search window.


SUBSCRIBE TO THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER

Sign up to receive this free weekly newsletter by e-mail or read it online
(including archives back to January 2005).
Each issue includes all links added to this site during the previous week.
(2800+ subscribers in June 2017)

 

Site created and maintained by:
Gilles Séguin (This link takes you to my personal page)
E-MAIL: gilseg@rogers.com