Canadian Social Research Links
Alberta

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada
Alberta

Updated July 31, 2017
Page révisée le 31 juillet 2017

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


Jump directly further down on the page you're now reading:

* Key Welfare Links in AB (scroll down to the grey box below, right column)
* Latest AB Budget
: (March 16, 2017)
* Poverty reduction in AB
* Non-governmental sites in AB

* Minimum wage in Alberta
* Alberta Election 2012 results and coverage
* Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH)


NOTE : All links to content concerning poverty reduction strategies and campaigns are now on a single page. The link below is where you'll find the Alberta content:

Poverty Reduction in Alberta
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm



Canada Social Report

- includes (by province and territory) welfare incomes, poverty reduction strategies, # of welfare cases and beneficiaries, welfare program descriptions and much more!

Recommended resource from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy.

 


Recommended resource:

Edmonton Social Planning Council
Research Links and Resources
:
http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/index.php/resources/research-links
Selected links for each of the following topics:
* Alberta Resource Links
* Canada Resource Link
* Children, Youth, and Families Links
* Edmonton Resource Links
* Education Links
* Food Security Links
* Health & Social Determinants Links
* Housing & Homelessness Links
* Immigrant & Newcomer Links
* Income & Employment Links
* Indicators & Measures Links
* Persons with Disabilities Links
* Poverty & Low Income Links
* Seniors Links
* Social Inclusion Links
* Statistics & Tools Links
Source:
http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/

---

Alberta Diary by David Climenhaga
David is an award-winning journalist, author, post-secondary teacher, poet and trade union communicator who has worked in senior writing and editing positions at the Toronto Globe and Mail and Calgary Herald.




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NEW

Ten Things to Know About Social Assistance in Alberta
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/ten-things-know-social-assistance-alberta/
Posted July 24, 2017
By Nick Falvo, PhD
[Click the link above to access more info on each of the ten things to know]

Ten Things to Know About Social Assistance in Alberta is part two of a two-part blog series on social assistance.
Part one, which looks at social assistance across Canada, can be accessed here:
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/ten-things-know-social-assistance-canada/

Nick Falvo is Director of Research and Data at Calgary Homeless Foundation.

The ten things:

1. It’s always been challenging for households to qualify for—and maintain—social assistance in Alberta.
2. In 1986, the Edmonton Social Planning Council published a controversial document. (The Other Welfare Manual).
3. In the 1990s, rules for social assistance receipt in Alberta became harsher and benefit levels were reduced.
4. Since that time, it’s been even more difficult for people to access social assistance throughout the province.
5. Across Alberta municipalities, it’s possible that there are discrepancies in the way social assistance offices interpret rules and administer benefits.
6. In Alberta, persons experiencing homelessness are not eligible to receive certain forms of social assistance.
7. Earlier this year, the Alberta government streamlined the AISH application process.
8. Even though the cost of rental housing is substantially higher in Calgary than in other Alberta municipalities, social assistance benefit levels are the same across the entire province.
9. When it comes to the percentage of each city’s homeless population receiving social assistance, one factor that may help explain the discrepancy between Calgary and the rest of Alberta may be labour market attachment.
10. Today, the Alberta government is under considerable political pressure to control spending.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
http://calgaryhomeless.com/

DATA THAT MAKES A DIFFERENCE:
The 2nd Annual Canadian Homelessness Data Sharing Initiative
http://datathatmakesadifference.com/
May 18, 2017
School of Public Policy | University of Calgary

What can we learn if we start sharing data across projects?
In May each year, researchers from across Canada gathered in Calgary to discuss the data they were collecting to support various projects related to homelessness. We discovered that our data can and should be shared to support new, better, and more impactful analysis.

Research Blog : Second Annual Canadian Homelessness Data Sharing Initiative
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/second-annual-canadian-homelessness-data-sharing-initiative/
Posted July 4th, 2017
By Nick Falvo, PhD, Director of Research and Data at Calgary Homeless Foundation
On May 18, 2017, the Second Annual Canadian Homelessness Data Sharing Initiative took place in Calgary.
All slide presentations, as well as photos from the event, are available in the event archive:
http://datathatmakesadifference.com/photo-archive/

Detailed program for the 2017 event (speakers and presenters)
http://datathatmakesadifference.com/program/

Data Sharing Initiative (PDF, 12 pages)
http://datathatmakesadifference.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/2017-Data-Sharing-Minutes.pdf

Here are 10 things to know about this year’s event:

1. For the second year in a row, there was strong representation from Canada’s federal government
2. This year’s event had strong Quebec representation.
3. Indigenous perspectives were presented.
4. Several data-sharing advocates actively participated in this year’s event.
5. Difficulties with researchers accessing federal homelessness data were raised.
6. One of the event highlights was a panel discussion on moving towards increased national integration of Homelessness Management Information Systems (HMIS).
7. Important findings were presented from Canada’s recent nationally-coordinated Point in Time Count of homeless persons.
8. One of the event highlights was a “review of the day” by Stephen Metraux
9. Several suggestions were made about a ‘way forward.’
10. This will continue to be an annual event that we expect to be held each year in (or near) Calgary.

---

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation :
http://calgaryhomeless.com
University of Calgary School of Public Policy : http://www.policyschool.ca/

Book review: Understanding spatial media
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/book-review-understanding-spatial-media/
July 5, 2017
Reviewed by Nick Falvo, PhD

Nick Falvo is the Director of Research and Data at Calgary Homeless Foundation

Rob Kitchin, Tracey Lauriault and Matthew Wilson recently co-edited a book titled Understanding Spatial Media. Published by SAGE, this book is about technology, power, people, democracy and geography.

Here are 10 things to know about the book:
[Click the link above to access more info on each of the ten things to know]

1. The book can help us make better decisions pertaining to the acquisition and use of technology and data.
2. This book matters because homelessness is inherently geographical.
3. The book is relevant to Point-in-Time (PiT) Counts of homelessness.
4. Chapter 4, “Digitally Augmented Geographies,” highlights important differences in Internet accessibility globally.
5. Chapter 5, “Locative and Sousveillant Media,” discusses the use of smartphones to capture things on video…including things that weren’t intended to be captured on video.
6. Chapter 7, titled “Urban Dashboards,” discusses a topic that is very relevant to my work at the Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF).
7. Several of the book’s chapters are relevant to research currently being done at CHF.
8. The book touches on many of the same issues discussed at the Canadian Homelessness Data Sharing Initiative.
9. The authors who contributed to this book represent a diverse collection of scholars.
10. This book is geared mostly to other researchers in geography and media studies

Also by Nick Falvo:

Data that makes a Difference:
Second Annual Canadian Homelessness Data Sharing Initiative

Posted July 4, 2017
By Nick Falvo, PhD

On May 18, 2017, the Second Annual Canadian Homelessness Data Sharing Initiative took place in Calgary (all slide presentations, as well as photos from the event, are available here: [ http://datathatmakesadifference.com/photo-archive/ ] . The event was organized by the Calgary Homeless Foundation and the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy, and the participants included: people who build datasets (about persons experiencing homelessness); researchers who use that data; persons with lived experience; and public servants.

Here are 10 things to know about this year’s event:

1. For the second year in a row, there was strong representation from Canada’s federal government.
2. This year’s event had strong Quebec representation.
3. Indigenous perspectives were presented.
4. Several data-sharing advocates actively participated in this year’s event.
5. Difficulties with researchers accessing federal homelessness data were raised.
6. One of the event highlights was a panel discussion on moving towards increased national integration of Homelessness Management Information Systems (HMIS)
7. Important findings were presented from Canada’s recent nationally-coordinated Point in Time Count of homeless persons.
8. One of the event highlights was a “review of the day” by Stephen Metraux
9. Several suggestions were made about a ‘way forward.’
10. This will continue to be an annual event that we expect to be held each year in (or near) Calgary.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
http://calgaryhomeless.com/

Momentum.org [ http://www.momentum.org/ ] has just published two reports on predatory lending in Alberta that is also relevant across the country at this time. Here is the link in case you wish to share:http://www.momentum.org/files/Publications/Fringe%20Financial%20Summary%20Brief.pdf (small PDF file, 2 pages)

Monitoring Program Performance in Calgary’s Homeless-Serving System of Care
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/monitoring-program-performance-calgarys-homeless-serving-system-care/
Posted June 12, 2017
By Nick Falvo, PhD

Nick Falvo is Director of Research and Data at the Calgary Homeless Foundation.

Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) recently unveiled new key performance indicators (KPIs) for programs they fund.[1] These new indicators were developed after nine months of community consultation and have been piloted over the course of the past year. A May 2017 slide presentation on the development of some of these KPIs can be found here, while a seven-page guide for staff in the sector who do data entry can be found here.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
http://calgaryhomeless.com/

Ten things to know about program evaluation and the Calgary Homeless Foundation
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/ten-things-know-program-evaluation-calgary-homeless-foundation/
Posted May 2, 2017
By Nick Falvo, Ph.D.

The Canadian Evaluation Society (CES) [ https://evaluationcanada.ca/ ] recently invited Nick to speak on a panel discussion. He was asked to speak to how his organization, the Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF), views program evaluation.

Here are ten things to know, according to Doctor Nick :

1. Formal program evaluation typically has a logic model.
2. Some program evaluators learn on the job, while others have formal training
3. How ‘arm’s length’ program evaluators should be is often the subject of debate.
4. There are advantages to having program evaluation done externally.
5. There are advantages to having program evaluation done internally.
6. Like many non-profit organizations, the Calgary Homeless Foundation typically (CHF) chooses not to use external program evaluators.
7. CHF uses a logic model for the housing programs that it funds.
8. CHF’s performance indicators are linked to the CHF’s logic model.
9. CHF contracts (for the programs we fund) contain explicit information about our performance indicators
10. Some programs funded by CHF have their own logic models.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
http://calgaryhomeless.com/

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

Alberta Budget 2017 - March 16, 2017
https://www.alberta.ca/budget.aspx
- inncludes links to all budget papers.

Alberta budget 2017-18
http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Tax_Alert_2017_No_07/$FILE/TaxAlert2017No07.pdf
Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci tabled the province's fiscal 2017-18 budget on 16 March 2017.

Thesis by Dr. Maroine Bendaoud: Social Housing in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec
http://calgaryhomeless.com/info/research-blog/thesis-by-dr-maroine-bendaoud-social-housing-in-british-columbia-alberta-and-quebec-by-nick-falvo/
By Nick Falvo
February 1st, 2017
A Discussion with Dr. Maroine Bendaoud in question-and-answer format, two pages (if printed).
Dr. Maroine Bendaoud recently completed his PhD thesis at the University of Montreal. His focus was social housing in British Columbia, Alberta and Quebec during the 1975-2015 period. Now a Postdoctoral Fellow at McMaster University in Hamilton, he recently agreed to answer some questions put to him by Nick Falvo

Author Nick Falvo is Director of Research and Data at the Calgary Homeless Foundation.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation

http://calgaryhomeless.com/

Calgary Homeless Foundation Releases its Research Agenda
http://calgaryhomeless.com/calgary-homeless-foundation-releases-its-research-agenda-by-nick-falvo/
November 10, 2016
By Nick Falvo, PhD
This week, the Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) released its updated (2016) Research Agenda.
Here are 10 things to know:

1. The CHF is a non-governmental organization that disburses funding to Calgary non-profits to deliver housing and programming to persons experiencing homelessness.
2.
Over the years, CHF has partnered on a considerable number of research projects.
3. Since 2009, CHF has published research agendas approximately once every two years.
4. Every two years, CHF also organizes a community research symposium.
5. A major strength of CHF research is its use of data.
6. The main reason CHF is able to use data stems from the fact that we oversee a city-wide database system with information on persons experiencing homelessness.
7. This year, CHF co-organized the First Annual Canadian Homelessness Data Sharing Initiative.
8. CHF likes to partner on research that has an impact on both practice and policy.
9. Some of CHF’s best research involves persons with lived experience with homelessness.
10. CHF research is developing an international reputation.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
http://calgaryhomeless.com/

Calgary Homeless Foundation Research Agenda (small PDF file, 26 pages)
http://calgaryhomeless.com/wp-content/uploads/CHF_ResearchAgenda_2016_11_07.pdf
November 2016

NOTE : Appendices A and B to the Research Agenda contain dozens of links to
CHF publications and blog posts from a variety of authors.


Average Rent Prices for September 2016
with Data Provided for 20 Canadian Cities
- avg. rents for studio/bachelor - 1-2-3bedrooms

New report on rents in various communities across Canada
http://www.rentseeker.ca/blog/index.php/newly-updated-rental-data-shows-average-rents-for-20-canadian-cities/2917
News Release
September 14, 2016
By the RentSeeker Team
Canada’s Leading Real Estate Listing Website and Apartment Finder, published newly updated rental data in what’s become it’s [sic] highly popular Infographic format, which has become a popular resource for renters, landlords, economists, and journalists which shows Average Rent Prices for September 2016 with data provided for 20 Canadian cities. (Click the link above to select an apartment size and one of the 20 Canadian cities below, in no particular order.)

* Toronto : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Toronto.aspx * Lethbridge : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Lethbridge.aspx
   
* Ottawa : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Ottawa.aspx * Hamilton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Hamilton.aspx
   

* Calgary : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Calgary.aspx

* Mississauga : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Mississauga.aspx
   
* Montreal : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Montreal.aspx

Niagara Falls : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Niagara_Falls.aspx

   
* Edmonton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Edmonton.aspx

* Oshawa : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Oshawa.aspx

   

* Vancouver : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Vancouver.aspx

* Burnaby : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Burnaby.aspx

   

* Kingston : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Kingston.aspx

* Brampton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Brampton.aspx

   

* London : http://www.rentseeker.ca/London.aspx

* St. Catharines : http://www.rentseeker.ca/St._Catharines.aspx

   

* Sarnia : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Sarnia.aspx

* Halifax : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Halifax.aspx

   

* Windsor : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Windsor.aspx

 

Source:
RentSeeker.ca
– Canada’s Leading Real Estate Listing Website and Apartment Finder
http://www.rentseeker.ca/


Canada’s National Housing Strategy Consultations:
Our Position on the National Housing Strategy
http://calgaryhomeless.com/canadas-national-housing-strategy-consultations/
By Nick Falvo, Ph.D, Director, Research and Data, Calgary Homeless Foundation
September 7, 2016
Canada’s federal government has begun national consultations on the development of a “national housing strategy.” The government is expected to release a report on November 22, which is also National Housing Day [ http://homelesshub.ca/resource/what-national-housing-day-where-did-it-originate-what-happens-day ]. The consultation web site is called “Let’s Talk Housing.” [ https://www.letstalkhousing.ca/ ] It includes the consultation’s stated vision, principles, themes, intended outcomes and key dates.

NOTE: Recommended reading --- includes at least two dozen links to online resources!
(Click the link above to access the links that are embedded in the text.)

Here are 10 things to know:

1. In Canada, social expenditure by government—measured as a percentage of GDP—is considerably less than the OECD average.
2. Canada has considerably less social housing per capita than most OECD countries.
3. Historically, when Canada’s federal government has led on social housing, provinces and territories have followed with spending of their own.
4. Every year, Canada’s non-profit housing sector as a whole gets less money than the year prior to operate existing units of social housing.
5. It’s become common for senior levels of government to express public support for housing first; sometimes this talk is accompanied by funding support, sometimes it isn’t.
6. Very little rental housing has been built in Canada in the past three decades; this wasn’t the case in prior decades.
7. On a per capita basis, Alberta has approximately half the number of rental housing units as the rest of Canada.
8. Relative to the rest of Canada, Alberta has very few subsidized housing units
9. Any national housing strategy should prioritize the housing needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis persons.
10. The Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) has submitted its own brief as part of the national consultation.

Ten things to know about central agencies in Canada
http://calgaryhomeless.com/ten-things-to-know-about-central-agencies-in-canada/
By Nick Falvo
August 8, 2016
From time to time, voluntary sector leaders—and advocates in general—come up with ideas for new spending and new social programs. When they do this, they often focus too much on influencing elected officials, and too little on influencing senior public servants. What’s more, it’s important that their proposals be supported by good research, in part because exaggerated claims about the benefits of their proposals may hurt them in the end. With all of this in mind, here are 10 things to know about central agencies in Canada.

1. Even after a minister tells you they support your idea, there will often be further government approvals required.
2. For your idea to become a new program, cabinet will need to give “policy authority” and PCO supports this cabinet decision-making process.
3. Once you have policy authority from cabinet, a new program will still need budgetary approval through Finance if it involves new money.
4. Treasury Board, a committee of cabinet, provides implementation authority for proposals and this approval process gets into the details of how the program will be run.
5. There is typically some overlap between what the different central agencies do.
6. At the end of the day, if cabinet really wants a new program or new spending, central agencies won’t stop the initiative.
7. In Ottawa, even the Minister typically has to wait until Budget Day to know if each proposal has been accepted.
8. A key take-away from all of this is that, when voluntary sector organizations advocate for a new program or new spending, they should think about both elected officials and senior public servants.
9. New proposals should be supported by sound research.
10. Exaggerated claims about your proposal will probably burn you in the end. Consider a statement such as: “This proposed program will revolutionize this sector because nothing this great has ever been done before.” That might get you traction in the media and with some elected officials; but always consider the roles of central agencies discussed above. Senior public servants have heard such statements before and will likely scrutinize every aspect of such a claim.

Author Nick Falvo, Ph.D., is Director of Research and Data with the Calgary Homeless Foundation [ http://calgaryhomeless.com ]

New releases from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Using low income and material deprivation to monitor poverty reduction
- July 2016
--- Minimum Wage, Maximum Wager in Alberta - July 2016
--- Using low income and material deprivation to monitor poverty reduction - July 26

Minimum Wage, Maximum Wager in Alberta
Commentary by Sherri Torjman and Ken Battle
July 2016

Abstract
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/Detail/?ID=1102
Alberta, more than any other province in the country, has endured a period of fiscal pain unlike any time in its history. Precipitous drops in oil prices mean lower revenues for both resource companies and government. Rather than hunker down and retreat, the province has boldly proceeded with its promise to bring in a $15 minimum wage. It will increase the minimum wage in three incremental steps in October 2016, 2017 and 2018. At first glance, this announcement may seem wrong-headed in such a tough economic climate. But the province recognized that there is clearly something wrong with the equation in which minimum-wage, full-time work equals desperate poverty. Alberta has made the correct choice: to tip the scales in favour of working-poor households.

Complete commentary (small PDF, 2 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1102ENG.pdf

To see the June Federal and Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitors, visit the Canada Social Report website [ http://www.canadasocialreport.ca/ ] Follow Caledon on Twitter: @CaledonINST

Last week, the Toronto Star carried an opinion piece by
Armine Yalnizyan entitled
Basic income? How about basic services?
https://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2016/07/19/basic-income-how-about-basic-services.html
By Armine Yalnizyan
July 19, 2016
Could a provincial basic income approach federal levels of income support, knowing even $15,000 a year is far below the poverty line for a single person? Basic math shows this is unlikely. Anyone working under 25 hours a week, 52 weeks a year, at the minimum wage ($11.40) is better off not working — not a strong government objective...

Source:
Toronto Star

https://www.thestar.com/

---

Counterpoint:

Basic income is the best public service we could ask for
http://www.basicincomecanada.org/basic_income_is_the_best_public_service_we_could_ask_for
July 22, 2016
By Robin Boadway and Roderick Benns
As basic income policy gets more press as a way to drastically reduce poverty, inevitably there will be those who seek to preserve the status quo approach.
This has served us inadequately for many years and yet there are some believers who remain. These same believers often seek to create false policy choices, as Armine Yalnizyan has done in her recent offering to the Star, ‘Basic income? How about basic services?’

Source:
Basic Income Canada Network

http://www.basicincomecanada.org/

Alberta Child Benefit and enhanced
Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit
(small PDF file, 2 pages)
http://www.alberta.ca/documents/QA.pdf
March 2016
The ACB is a new Government of Alberta program that provides direct financial assistance to lower-income families – helping them make ends meet and support a better quality of life for their children.

Source:
Government of Alberta
http://www.alberta.ca/

Alberta Budget
http://www.alberta.ca/budget.cfm
April 14, 2016
- includes links to all budget documents

Budget highlights - Alberta Govt.
http://www.alberta.ca/budget-highlights.cfm

The Alberta budget will polarize the political system - Calgary - CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/duane-bratt-budget-alberta-1.3537784

-------------------------------------------------

Ten things to know about the 2016-17 Alberta budget
http://calgaryhomeless.com/ten-things-to-know-about-the-2016-17-alberta-budget/
May 3, 2016
By Nick Falvo, PhD

On April 14, the Alberta government tabled its 2016-17 budget: Alberta Jobs Plan.
Here are 10 things to know about it:

1. A new carbon tax (known as a “carbon levy”) was announced.
2. Two-thirds of the revenue generated from the carbon tax will finance climate-related initiatives.
3. A major feature of the budget is the new Alberta Child Benefit.
4. The days of 6% year-over-year growth of health spending may be over.
5. On an annual basis, provincial spending on housing will nearly double.
6. The homelessness sector saw a 2% increase in funding.
7. Many social assistance recipients will see a decrease in the real value of their benefits.
8. Alberta remains the only Canadian province without a sales tax.
9. Alberta’s debt-to-GDP ratio remains the lowest in Canada.
10. More details on the budget will be released over the next several weeks.

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
http://calgaryhomeless.com/

Using Data to End Homelessness in Calgary
http://calgaryhomeless.com/using-data-to-end-homelessness-in-calgary/
April 8, 2016
By Nick Falvo, PhD
On March 9, I spoke on a panel in Professor Susan Phillips’ Policy and Program Evaluation course at Carleton University. This is a required course in Carleton’s Master of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership program, and one of the program’s main themes is that non-profit organizations face strong expectations to demonstrate their effectiveness. Thus, future leaders in the sector will need to be both knowledgeable and competent in this regard.

L’ Utilisation de données dans le programme visant à mettre fin à l’itinérance à Calgary
http://calgaryhomeless.com/l-utilisation-de-donnees-dans-le-programme-visant-a-mettre-fin-a-litinerance-a-calgary/

Par: Nick Falvo, PhD
Le 9 mars, j’ai fait une présentation sur l’itinérance adressée aux étudiants du séminaire d’études supérieures de Madame Susan Phillips à l’Université Carleton. Ceci est un cours obligatoire du programme de Master of Philanthropy and Non-Profit Leadership, et l’un des principaux thèmes du programme est que les organisations à but non lucratif sont confrontées à de fortes attentes pour démontrer leur efficacité. Ainsi, les futurs dirigeants du secteur devront être, à cet égard, à la fois informés et compétents.

Ten Things to Know About Jeannette Waegemakers Schiff’s New Book on Working with Homeless People
http://calgaryhomeless.com/ten-things-to-know-about-jeannette-waegemakers-schiffs-new-book-on-working-with-homeless-people/
February 25, 2016
By: Nick Falvo, PhD

Version française:

Dix choses à savoir à propos d’un nouveau livre écrit par Jeannette Waegemakers Schiff (PDF)
http://calgaryhomeless.com/wp-content/uploads/Falvo_Review-of-Waegemakers-Schiff-Book-FRENCH_22feb2016.pdf

TEN THINGS TO KNOW:

1. The idea for this book was conceived when its author was involved in starting a course for workers in Calgary’s homeless-serving sector.
2. Chapter 3, which focuses on homelessness and health, is very strong.
3.
The book says very important things about ‘burnout prevention.’
4.
You can always count on Jeannette to deliver a thoughtful, historically-grounded consideration of housing first; and in this book, she doesn’t disappoint.
5.
Chapter 5 skillfully distinguishes which level of government handles which area of social policy that’s relevant to homelessness.
6. Not every approach offered in this book will appeal to every worker.
7.
Chapter 7’s discussion of mental health has some solid content, but misses a great opportunity to discuss the need for workers to advocate with clients vis-à-vis psychiatrists.
8.
The book’s treatment of politics and public policy could have been a bit stronger.
9.
I’m disappointed the book doesn’t give more attention to harm reduction.
10.
The book doesn’t talk about unions; I think it should.

Despite the shortcomings identified above, I (Nick) wish to emphasize that this book is a ‘must read.’

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation

http://calgaryhomeless.com/

---

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi vows to take ‘leadership’ on basic income guarantee issue
http://leadersandlegacies.com/2015/05/09/calgary-mayor-naheed-nenshi-vows-to-take-leadership-on-basic-income-guarantee-issue/
May 9, 2015
Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi called for “brave steps” in the fight against inequality and vowed to take leadership on pushing for a basic income guarantee.
Speaking to a National Poverty Reduction Summit in Ottawa on May 7*, Nenshi told a capacity crowd that it’s up to Canada’s mayors to take leadership on important issues, like reducing poverty.
“The frustrating thing is that we know what the answers are.”
Bringing up the idea of a guaranteed annual income (or basic income guarantee) – and noting that this is just an extension of the Child Tax Credit, except that it would be for all Canadians who might drop below the poverty line – he called for courage from politicians to take steps to deal with poverty.
---
*
National Poverty Reduction Summit spotlights inequality
May 11, 2015
http://leadersandlegacies.com/2015/05/11/national-poverty-reduction-summit-spotlights-inequality/

---

Source:
Leaders and Legacies

http://leadersandlegacies.com/
Leaders and Legacies is a social purpose organization and a news site for unique, asset-based articles about Canada’s leaders, particularly those leaders whose enterprises are engaged in improving our nation through an emphasis on healthy communities, policy changes to support a basic income guarantee, education, renewable energy, citizen engagement, and indigenous Canada.

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

Alberta - May 5, 2015
Outcome : NDP majority


YES, they CAN fly!

Elections Alberta
http://www.elections.ab.ca/

Alberta Provincial Election
http://www.electionalmanac.com/ea/alberta/

CBC : Alberta Votes
http://www.cbc.ca/news/elections/alberta-votes

Six election promises from Alberta’s NDP:
Highlights include 2,000 new spaces in long-term care and a $15 minimum wage.
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2015/05/06/6-election-promises-from-albertas-ndp.html


From the
Parkland Institute:

From Gap to Chasm: Alberta's Increasing Income Inequality
http://parklandinstitute.ca/research/summary/from_gap_to_chasm
April 20, 2015
The gap between the rich and the poor in Alberta is the widest in the country, and the disparity between those Albertans at the top of the income ladder and those at the bottom has been growing faster than in any other province, according to the findings of a new fact sheet written by public finance economist Greg Flanagan.

"Alberta is now the most unequal province in Canada, and the gap between those at the top and those at the bottom widened in Alberta over the past 20 years twice as much as the national average," says Flanagan. "Equally worrisome is the fact that because Alberta is the only province without a progressive taxation system, Alberta saw the least improvement in income equality after taxes."

Read the fact sheet:
http://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/parkland-research-pdfs/fromgaptochasm.pdf

Read the media release:
http://parklandinstitute.ca/media/comments/albertas_income_inequality_the_worst_in_canada

Source:
Parkland Institute
[ http://parklandinstitute.ca/ ]

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Social Assistance Summaries 2014 (PDF - 235KB, 49 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1062ENG.pdf
Anne Makhoul, March 2015

The informative Social Assistance Statistical Report [ http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf ], published by the federal and provincial/territorial governments, was last released in 2010 and presented 2008 data. In its place, the Caledon Institute will publish a Social Assistance Summaries series as part of its web-based Canada Social Report, which will be operational in spring 2015. In the interim, this publication offers an advance viewing of 12 of Canada’s 13 provincial and territorial Social Assistance programs. Material from Nunavut was not available in time to be included in this paper.
A summary was prepared for each province and territory with input and feedback from government representatives in every jurisdiction. All reports include program descriptions and data on the number of social assistance cases and recipients dating, in most jurisdictions, from 1997 to 2014. The summaries will be updated annually.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

An update on Payday lenders in Calgary
From Joe Ceci [ Momentum]:
March 16, 2015

Our payday lending policy work saw some success last week at a Committee of Calgary City Council. Committee has asked administration to formulate a bylaw amendment that would ensure a 400 metre separation distance between payday lenders and other fringe financial businesses such as pawn shops, cash for gold, and cheque cashers.

They will also explore business license fee hikes for such businesses (small PDF file):
http://momentum.org/files/Publications/Municipal%20Micro-Lending.pdf

Momentum also received some media coverage most of which is summarized on the Action to End Poverty website: http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/city_of_calgary_committee_calls_for_action_on_payday_loans

Momentum is also calling for reform at the provincial level for payday loans. We released the following policy recommendations brief in February (small PDF file): http://momentum.org/files/Publications/Provincial-Payday-Lending-Strategy.pdf

The Alberta government will be going through a regulatory review in this area later this year.

Source:
Joe Ceci
Manager of Public Policy
Momentum
[ http://www.momentum.org ]
Action to End Poverty in Alberta [ http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org ]

-------------

More about Poverty Reduction in Alberta
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm#ab
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Income Support Program Policy
* Expected to Work/Barriers to Full Employment Policy & Procedures ===> main welfare policy

* Learner Policy and Procedures

Source:
Alberta Works Policy Manual
On this page, you'll find links to:
- Income and Employment Supports Act and Regulation
- Employment and Training Programs (Programs and Services, Accountability, Employment Insurance Initiatives, News and Updates)
- Child Support Services (Child Support Services Policy, News and Updates)
- H
ealth Benefits Programs (General Policy, Health Benefits Card Coverage, Alberta Adult Health Benefit, Alberta Child Health Benefit, Health Benefits Review Committee, News and Updates)

Alberta Works replaced:
* Widows’ Pension - eff. April 2004
* Supports for Independence (Alberta's welfare program) - eff. May 2004
* Skills Development Program living allowances for continuing and new students beginning a training term - eff. August 1, 2004.

Dept. responsible:
Human Services

Related links:


Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH) - income assistance for Albertans with disabilities

AISH provides a maximum monthly living allowance of $1,588 (in Feb. 2015) to assist clients living in the community. The living allowance may be reduced if a client and their cohabiting partner receive non-exempt income, or if a client resides in a Government of Alberta group home.

AISH Policy Manual
AISH provides assistance to adult Albertans with a permanent disability that substantially limits their ability to earn a living. AISH provides a monthly living allowance, a child benefit, health benefits, and personal benefits. Benefits are provided to assist clients with their living needs and with living as independently as possible. In addition to the monthly living allowance, personal benefits help AISH clients with extra monthly or one-time expenses. In determining an individual’s eligibility to receive AISH benefits, consideration is given to the applicant, client and their cohabiting partner’s income and assets.

AISH Program Resources (AISH Tip Sheets, Forms, Legislation, Online Policy Manual and Other Information for Albertans with Disabilities)

NEW


Minimum Wage:

Current and Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates for Adult Workers in Canada
- federal govt. site --- the best resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels
Source : Minimum Wage Database

---

Poverty Reduction in Alberta
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm#ab
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Since May 2010, ALL links to content concerning poverty reduction strategies and campaigns have been moved to the above page from the individual provincial/territorial pages, including government and NGO links.




Hotlinks

The links below will take you directly to the following 
Alberta government and non-governmental web pages:

Alberta Government Home Page
Alberta Ministries
Alberta News

Government Employees Directory

Legislative Assembly
Community and Social ServicesNEW
Alberta Municipal Affairs
Alberta Treasury Board and Finance
Health

Education
Enterprise and Advanced Education
Seniors
Auditor-General

Pembina Institute
Canada West Foundation (CWF)

Alberta Committee of Citizens with Disabilities

The Parkland Institute

Alberta Council on Aging

Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre
Edmonton Social Planning Council


Government of Alberta Programs and Services for:

- Lower-income Earners

- Persons with disabilities

- Seniors

- All groups - incl. Aboriginal Peoples - Caregivers - Children - Immigrants - Job Seekers - Nonprofit/Voluntary Organizations - Parents - Students - Youth - more...

Source:
Government of Alberta Programs and Services


Servicealberta - "one stop. thousands of answers."

 


Alberta Provincial Election Resources

No set date for the next provincial election
Source:
Election Almanac
- complete coverage of federal, provincial and territorial elections in Canada including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

 

 

Key welfare links

Department responsible for welfare
Community and Social ServicesNEW

Name of the welfare program
Income Support - part of Alberta Works

Legislation
Income and Employment Supports Act

- Child and Adult Support Services Regulation
- Disability-Related Employment Supports and Services Regulation
- Income Support, Training and Health Benefits Regulation
<=== main welfare regulations
- Recovery Regulation
- Support Agreement Regulation
- Temporary Employment and Job Creation Programs Regulation
- Training Provider Regulation

Policy Manual
Alberta Works Policy Manual
On this page, you'll find links to:
- Income and Employment Supports Act and Regulation
- Employment and Training Programs (Programs and Services, Accountability, Employment Insurance Initiatives, News and Updates)
- Child Support Services (Child Support Services Policy, News and Updates)
- H
ealth Benefits Programs (General Policy, Health Benefits Card Coverage, Alberta Adult Health Benefit, Alberta Child Health Benefit, Health Benefits Review Committee, News and Updates)

Welfare statistics
See Social Assistance caseload/beneficiary statistics and expenditure information, 1997 to 2014 (further down on the page you're reading presently)

Alberta Income Support Caseload - monthly welfare statistics
Source: Alberta Office of Statistics
Number of People on Welfare, March 1995 to March 2005 (PDF file - 133K, 1 page)
Source: National Council of Welfare

Welfare rates (benefits)
See Schedule 1 (Core Income Support Payments) and Schedule 2 (Continuous Supplementary Benefits) at the end of the Income Supports, Health and Training Benefits Regulation
Historical: see Alberta Supports Low-Income Families Through the National Child Benefit (July 30, 2001) - includes a detailed backgrounder with rate calculation information

Related Links
*Alberta Supports (Seniors - Employment & Training - Persons with Disabilities - Lower Income - Children & Youth - Abuse & Bullying - Homeless - Making Life Decisions)
* Province provides more help to Albertans in need (Oct. 22/08)
* Government increases AISH rates and supports employment (Jan. 31/08)
* Low-Income Review presents a vision for the future (May 22/02)
* Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH)
- AISH Policy Manual

* Alberta welfare reforms a model for other provinces, says C.D. Howe Institute study (PDF file - 668K, 38 pages) - April 1997 Source: C.D. Howe Institute

Latest search results on Google.ca for
"welfare, -child, -animal, Alberta"

- Web search results
- News search results
- Blog search results


For more information about welfare in other Canadian jurisdictions,
see the
Canadian Social Research Links Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page



Alberta Government Home Page

Alberta News

Performance Measurement Publications - The Measuring Up component of the government annual report provides information on the government's progress in meeting social and economic goals published in the previous year's Government Business Plan 
- incl. links to individual ministry business plans

Servicealberta - "one stop. thousands of answers."

Alberta Catalogue of Statutes and Regulations

Legislative Assembly 
Legislative Assembly Proceedings - Bills, Hansard, House records, links to Committees

Alberta Government Departments

Ministry of Human Services
The Ministry of Human Services is part of Premier Redford's strategy to take action on Albertans' priorities.
Human Services is responsible for programs and services related to:
* Children and Youth
*
Employment and Immigration
*
Homeless Supports
*
Alberta Supports <=== including Alberta's Income Support (welfare) program


Super ministry responsible for all Alberta social programs
(dead link)
By Karen Kleiss
May 10, 2012
EDMONTON - Tuesday’s cabinet shuffle marked another major shakeup in the delivery of services for vulnerable Albertans. Human Services has now become a super-ministry responsible for every major social program, including those for unemployed, disabled and homeless Albertans, as well as children in care. A new associate minister in the department will focus specifically on services for people with disabilities. The Seniors ministry has been dismantled, and services for older Albertans will now be provided by the Department of Health, under the auspices of an associate minister. The changes mark another step in Premier Alison Redford’s plan to remake Alberta’s social safety net.

Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

---

New Cabinet team focused on growing Alberta's future
New structure to change the way government does business
http://goo.gl/jRONB
May 8, 2012
News Release
Premier Alison Redford has named a new Cabinet team that will help bring about the change that Albertans recently voted for.
- incl. the List of Cabinet members in order of precedence, government structure and committees, and a summary of changes to government structure resulting from this Cabinet shuffle.

Source:
Government of Alberta
http://alberta.ca/

Alberta Supports
- Seniors - Employment & Training - Persons with Disabilities - Lower Income - Children & Youth - Abuse & Bullying - Homeless - Making Life Decisions
NOTE : This link may not work in your browser, because the URL contains a "+" symbol that apparently converts into something else in some browsers. If the link doesn't work, go to the Alberta Human Services home page [ http://humanservices.alberta.ca/ ] and click the "Alberta Supports" link at the bottom of the list of programs and services.

------------------------

Alberta Human Services is the ministry responsible for welfare in this province.
For links to welfare program information, scroll back up to the grey box on the page you're now reading.

-------------------------

Selected site content:

Social Policy Framework provides roadmap for transformational change
31,000 Albertans build new vision for social policy in Alberta
http://alberta.ca/acn/201302/3373421703E69-E310-8B91-0D86BF0497F467DF.html
News Release
February 28, 2013
Premier Alison Redford was joined by Cabinet members, community and business leaders, and stakeholders to adopt Alberta’s Social Policy Framework, a framework created from the input of over 31,000 Albertans to guide community partners and government in creating the type of province that allows all Albertans to live with dignity, reach their potential and live full and rich lives.

The final report:

Alberta’s Social Policy Framework (PDF - 1MB, 28 pages)
https://docs.google.com/gview?url=http://socialpolicyframework.alberta.ca/files/documents/ahs-nonannotatedfrmwrk-webfinal.pdf&hgd=1&chrome=true
February 2013

For related links, see Poverty Reduction in Alberta
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

---

A Plan for Alberta: Ending Homelessness in 10 Years - 3 Year Progress Report
http://humanservices.alberta.ca/documents/homelessness-3-year-progress-report.pdf
February 2013
In 2009, Alberta became the first province in Canada to commit to ending homelessness. For the next four years, the Alberta Secretariat for Action on Homelessness developed and monitored the implementation of A Plan for Alberta: Ending Homelessness in 10 Years. The Secretariat also provided strategic advice on A Plan for Alberta to Minister Hancock. The 3 Year Secretariat Report shows that Alberta is on the right track to ending homelessness, not to just manage it.

---

Alberta Interagency Council on Homelessness
http://humanservices.alberta.ca/homelessness/16051.html
In January 2013, the Alberta Interagency Council on Homelessness was established. It was created to enhance community input and participation in guiding the future direction of the 10-year plan Homelessness is a complex issue that must be addressed through coordinated action by a broader range of stakeholders than in the past. The Alberta Interagency Council brings together these stakeholders, including leaders of community-based organizations, shelters, other orders of government, and other provincial ministries.

---

Alberta Statistics on Homelessness
http://humanservices.alberta.ca/homelessness/16052.html

Source:
Alberta Secretariat for Action on Homelessness

http://humanservices.alberta.ca/homelessness/14628.html
The Secretariat was established in January 2008 to produce the province’s long-term strategic plan to end homelessness. Accepted by the Government of Alberta in March 2009, A Plan for Alberta: Ending Homelessness in 10 Years represents a fundamental shift in Alberta’s approach to homelessness. Instead of managing homelessness, the Plan offers a roadmap to end homelessness

---

A Plan For Alberta : Ending Homelessness in 10 years (PDF - 1.8MB, 48 pages)
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/documents/PlanForAB_Secretariat_final.pdf
October 2008
Prepared By:
The Alberta Secretariat
For Action On Homelessness
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/Alberta_Secretariat.cfm

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

October 22, 2008
Province provides more help to Albertans in need
Increases to benefits and earning exemptions will help those who need it most
Albertans receiving Alberta Works income support will receive higher monthly benefits beginning November 1. In addition single Albertans who work and qualify for income support assistance will see earning exemptions double from $115 to $230 a month - meaning they can make more money before their benefits are affected. (...) The maximum qualifying income levels for the Alberta Child Health Benefit (ACH) and Alberta Adult Health Benefit (AAHB) also increased allowing families to earn more and remain eligible for the benefit.

More info on Alberta Works / Income Support

Related link:

Albertans on welfare to get payment boost
October 24, 2008
Albertans in 46,500 households receiving welfare payments will get a boost in their monthly payments next week. On Nov. 1, those who receive income support through Alberta Works -- the government's official name for welfare -- will receive an increase after the province approved a rate hike. (...) Earning exemptions will double to $230 from $115 a month, meaning those Albertans can make more money before their benefits are affected. Of the 4,000 Albertans receiving those benefits and working either part-time or full-time, 1,400 will notice the increase to the earnings exemption.
Source:
Calgary Herald

Alberta Works implements debit card program province wide:
Debit cards save government and Albertans with low incomes time and money

February 12, 2007
Edmonton... Starting in summer, 2007, Albertans who receive income support through Alberta Works and who do not have bank accounts will have the option to receive their benefits with a debit card. A successful six-month pilot project showed debit cards to be faster and less expensive to administer than conventional cheques and that Albertans on social assistance overwhelmingly preferred the cards. The program is the first of its kind in Canada.
- includes a backgrounder on the pilot project

April 24, 2006
Alberta Works [welfare] debit card pilot a Canadian first
A new six-month pilot project is using debit cards and direct deposit to deliver Alberta Works benefits, instead of traditional paper cheques. The pilot is the first of its kind in Canada.
Related News Release - April 24 --- includes a detailed backgrounder
Source:
Government of Alberta News Page

More supports help families invest in children's futures - Alberta
News Release
March 15, 2005
Edmonton
"Effective April 1, 2005, changes to Alberta Works will increase the time low-income parents have at home with young children, make it easier for youth to finish high school and help families save for their children's education."
Changes include:
- a parent receiving income support will have one year instead of the current six months to stay home with a child before being required to seek or accept employment
- the requirement to be out of school for one year before receiving training benefits to complete high school is waived.
- a new one-time $100 benefit for Albertans receiving income support to help offset the costs of setting up a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) to participate in Alberta's Centennial Education Savings program (to help cover costs such as the fee for obtaining a birth certificate and the initial deposit required to open an RESP account).
- to better address domestic violence, the existing $1,000 allowance to set up a new household for a person fleeing a violent spouse will now be extended to anyone eligible for income support and who needs help to leave an abusive situation, such as individuals who experience abuse by people other than a spouse.
Source:
Alberta Works
(Human Resources and Employment)

Related link:

Education investment of $500 for each child born in 2005 or later
News Release
February 17, 2004
"Babies born in Alberta in 2005 or later will benefit from a $500 investment by the Alberta government into individual education savings plans. The Alberta Centennial Education Savings Plan Act, which is the first bill introduced in the spring sitting, sets the stage for a new program that will encourage parents to open a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) for their child with a $500 grant from the government."

Alberta Centennial Education Savings (ACES) Plan website
- program info and links to related resources

More families qualify for free health benefits
Alberta Works News Release
September 9, 2004
"Edmonton... More families are now eligible for premium-free health benefits for their children through the Alberta Child Health Benefit because eligibility levels have been increased. 'This benefit has a positive impact on children's health and parents' workforce participation,'said Clint Dunford, Minister of Alberta Human Resources and Employment. 'More than 70,000 children are receiving health services, and increasing the qualifying levels will help us extend coverage to even more.'"

Related Link:

Alberta Child Health Benefit
"The Alberta Child Health Benefit (ACHB) program is part of Alberta’s role in the National Child Benefit – a series of programs designed to address child poverty across Canada. The ACHB is a premium-free health benefit plan that provides basic dental, optical, emergency ambulance, essential diabetic supplies and prescription drug coverage for children living in families with low incomes."

Alberta Works focuses on training people for employment
News Release
March 30, 2004

Supports for Independence is changing : What you need to know about your benefits (PDF file - 100K, 4 pages) (dead link)
Alberta Works Pamphlet
"New Alberta Works Income Support Program starts with May benefits"
NOTE: on page 4 of this pamphlet, you'll find the following under Asset rule changes:
"The following assets will not affect your benefits:
• Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs) for your children,
• Up to $5,000 per adult in the family in a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP), and
• Up to $5,000 equity in vehicles and any amount of equity in a vehicle adapted to accommodate a disability."
[RRSPs and RESPs were formerly subject to lower exemption limits, as they are in many Canadian jurisdictions]
In my view, this is a progressive asset-based welfare policy initiative. Well done!
[ For more info about asset-based social policies in Canada, go to the Canadian Social Research Links Asset-Based Social Policies page ]

Source:
Alberta Human Resources and Employment
Hot Topics - March 30, 2004

New Act strengthens link between income support and training
News Release
December 17, 2003
"Legislation building on Alberta's success at helping people move from income support to the work force will be phased in starting in January 2004. The Income and Employment Supports Act establishes how the government will help families meet their basic needs and help employable people find and keep jobs."
Source:
Alberta Human Resources and Employment


Benchmarks in Alberta's Public Welfare Services:
History Rooted in Benevolence, Harshness, Punitiveness and Stinginess
By Baldwin P. Reichwein, MSW (equiv.), RSW
Research Report prepared for the Alberta College of Social Workers
© December 2002 (Updated February 2003)
Edmonton, AB
History of social assistance in Alberta from from pre-Confederation to date, from the perspective of a social worker with thirty years of experience in the field. Includes a bonus section on implications of the Supreme Court ruling in the Gosselin case (for more on the Gosselin case, see the Canadian Social Research Links Case Law / Court Decisions / Inquests page)
Complete report - PDF version (983K, 53 pages)
Complete report - Word version (189K, 59 pages)
Baldwin Reichwein is an Edmonton-based (retired) social worker with a career background in statutory social programs and services for people with disabilities. Over the past few years, he has conducted historical research. The current research report was prepared for the Alberta College of Social Workers, as background information on public welfare services and complement to the college's advocacy in the interest of Alberta citizens on low income.

Income increases for SFI families with children
Alberta Government News Release
July 18, 2003
"About 12,000 families receiving Supports for Independence (SFI) benefits will have more money for their children due to Alberta's decision not to offset a federal increase under the National Child Benefit (NCB) program. This is the second phase of a two-stage increase for families with children included in Budget 2003."
Related Links:
Budget 2003 targets additional assistance to people most in need (April 8, 2003)
The National Child Benefit in Alberta
Supports for Independence (SFI)

Two new information resources to help low-income Albertans
July 16, 2003
Edmonton... Albertans looking for information on the province's income support programs and the appeals process will now be able to find what they need through a new guide to the Supports for Independence (SFI) [welfare] program and a new Appeals Secretariat Web site.

---------------------------------------------------------

Appeals Secretariat website
"An additional source of information on the right to appeal decisions made on income support programs such as SFI or Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH) is the new Appeals Secretariat Web site, which outlines how the government's appeal process works from beginning to end."

---------------------------------------------------------


Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH) - income assistance for Albertans with disabilities

AISH provides a maximum monthly living allowance of $1,588 to assist clients living in the community. The living allowance may be reduced if a client and their cohabiting partner receive non-exempt income, or if a client resides in a Government of Alberta group home.

AISH Policy Manual
AISH provides assistance to adult Albertans with a permanent disability that substantially limits their ability to earn a living. AISH provides a monthly living allowance, a child benefit, health benefits, and personal benefits. Benefits are provided to assist clients with their living needs and with living as independently as possible. In addition to the monthly living allowance, personal benefits help AISH clients with extra monthly or one-time expenses. In determining an individual’s eligibility to receive AISH benefits, consideration is given to the applicant, client and their cohabiting partner’s income and assets.

AISH Program Tools and Resources (AISH Tip Sheets, Forms, Legislation, Online Policy Manual and Other Information for Albertans with Disabilities)

---------------------------------------------------------

Budget 2003 News Releases:
April 8, 2003
Homeless Shelters integrated with housing programs
Backgrounder: Homeless Shelters and Support Programs

Budget 2003 targets additional assistance to people most in need

Bill 32, Income and Employment Supports Act, will help low-income Albertans
March 20, 2003
"Legislation to integrate income and employment training programs, increase accountability for training service providers, and build on Alberta's success in helping people on income support move into the workforce has been introduced in the Alberta legislature. Bill 32, the Income and Employment Supports Act, will establish a new program and benefit structure that will help people meet their basic needs, such as food, clothing and shelter, and provide additional building blocks of support to respond to people's unique circumstances. That might mean academic upgrading, help to get child support, or longer-term financial assistance for people who are unable to work. Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH) will continue as a separate program.

Working parents leaving SFI keep health benefits
News Release
Oct. 30, 2002
"Effective Nov. 1, parents who find a job and no longer receive financial benefits through the Supports for Independence (SFI) program will be able to keep their health benefits, subject to an annual review based on their net income. To qualify, parents must have dependent children and must be leaving SFI for employment. (...) Offering health benefits to parents who leave SFI for employment is a National Child Benefit (NCB) reinvestment."
Source:
Human Resources and Employment

 

Low-Income Programs Review Website (2001) - Alberta Human Resources and Employment (dead link)
NOTE:
1. this is the program review that led to the development and implementation of Alberta Works.
2. this site is now dead - the above link is to a copy of the page that was saved in 2005 from the Internet Archive - http://www.archive.org

Low-Income Programs Review Reports (Nov. 2001)
* What We Heard (PDF file - 589K, 108 pages)------------ (dead link)
* What We Recommend (PDF file - 436K, 30 pages)----- (dead link)

Low-Income Review presents a vision for the future
Press Release

May 22, 2002

"Social programs will become fairer and more equitable as the government moves to implement the recommendations of the MLA Committee to Review Low-Income Programs. In a presentation to low-income stakeholders in Calgary, Alberta Human Resources and Employment Minister Clint Dunford released the committee's reports and confirmed that their recommendations will set the future direction for income support programs in Alberta."
- incl. (all in the same file) : Backgrounder - Government Response Checklist - Low-Income Fact Sheet

Employability Council calls for action to improve services and raise awareness
April 10, 2002
"Edmonton...An independent advisory committee report suggests new strategies to improve work opportunities for Albertans with disabilities. Breaking Barriers, enhancing employment opportunities for people with disabilities is the final report to government from the Minister's Employability Council (MEC)."

Breaking Barriers - Enhancing Employment Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities
Final Report of the Minister's Employability Council
April 2002
PDF Format (438K, 32 pages) (dead link)
Text (RTF) Format  (dead link)
Audio Format (RealAudio) (dead link)


SFI earnings exemption increase for families
News Release
November 14, 2001
Edmonton - Single parents and families with two working parents on Supports for Independence (SFI) can now earn up to $230/month before their SFI payment is reduced, doubling the previous employment earnings exemption. This is one of four changes to the Social Allowance Regulation designed to further encourage parents receiving SFI benefits to find and keep a job.
- incl. funding under the NCB

Some of Alberta’s low-income programs are being publicly reviewed by a five-member panel of government MLAs.
June 2001
News Release


National Child Benefit (dead link)
- One-page description of the NCB in Alberta - includes a short overview of services available to Albertans under the NCB and links to more information about each of those services...

Alberta Child Health Benefit
"The Alberta Child Health Benefit (ACHB) program is part of Alberta’s role in the National Child Benefit – a series of programs designed to address child poverty across Canada. The ACHB is a premium-free health benefit plan that provides dental, optical, emergency ambulance, essential diabetic supplies and prescription drug coverage for children living in families with low incomes."

Evaluation of the Alberta Child Health Benefit - (dead link)
October 2001
A recent evaluation conducted by Nichols Applied Management (covering the period from January to April 2001) found "the ACHB is having a positive impact on children's health, child poverty, and the workforce participation of low-income parents and that there is a high level of client satisfaction with the program." The evaluation identified the need to increase awareness of the program among low-income Albertans.
Executive Summary (PDF file - 60K, 4 pages) - (dead link)
Final Report (PDF file - 370K, 100 pages) - (dead link)

Alberta Supports Low-Income Families Through the National Child Benefit (July 30, 2001)
- includes a detailed backgrounder with rate calculation information

Alberta families benefit from the National Child Benefit
May 01, 2001
"The news that fewer children are living in poverty and more low-income families are earning money from employment is a very positive sign, says Alberta Human Resources and Employment Minister Clint Dunford..."


Family Maintenance Program - (dead link)
The Family Maintenance program helps single parents and parents of blended families receive financial support from the other parent of their children. It is a mandatory service for all single parents or parents of a blended family who are receiving welfare [Supports for Independence].

---------------------------------------------

Mike Harris in province to launch new initiative benefiting children
NewsRelease
May 20, 2003

Alberta's Promise
"Alberta's Promise is based upon the following five promises:
1. Providing a Healthy Start
2. Safety, Growth and Development
3. Interaction, Mentoring and Inspiration
4. Participation and Volunteering
5. Leadership and Innovation"

Related Link:

America's Promise
"The Five promises:
1. Caring Adults.
2. Safe Places.
3. A Healthy Start.
4.Marketable Skills.
5. Opportunities to Serve."

Government responds to recommendations raised in Children's Forum and Task Force on  Children At Risk
Government of Alberta News Release 
November 24, 2000 

Minister to review U.S. children's programs
July 7, 2000 
Alberta Children's Services Minister Iris Evans will meet with children's services officials in California, July 17-19 to discuss common issues and to review their 
programs and services. Meetings are scheduled with the Children's Defense Fund in Oakland, San Francisco Family and Children's Services, California Children's Services and Children's Medical Services. ....more

Children's Forum
Children's Forum report delivered to government
News Release 
February 9, 2000
Additional $24 million allocated to Children's Services
Children's Services 
Press Release 
November 25, 1999 
"This additional funding will offset costs resulting from the growing demand for services and the increasing complexity of services required."
Terms of Reference Released for Review of Children's Advocate
Press Release - Backgrounder 
October 22, 1999 
Recommendations Presented by Children's Forum Participants
October 6, 1999 
Some Service Gaps Identified by Task Force on Children at Risk
October 5, 1999 
Serious Issues Top Children's Forum Agenda
October 4, 1999 
Forum Highlights Children's Week in Alberta
October 1, 1999 
Alberta Children’s Forum [October 5-6, Edmonton] will set priorities
for improving the lives of children and families
July 6, 1999

 

Alberta Treasury Board and Finance
- incl. links to:
* Our Business * Budget Information * Planning & Accountability* Economy & Statistics * Heritage Fund * Insurance Information * Pensions Information * Taxes & Rebates * Publications & Forms * Ministry * Newsroom

---


From the
Government of Alberta:

Alberta Budget 2015
Supporting jobs, supporting families. The Alberta way.
http://alberta.ca/budget/
October 27, 2015
- includes the budget speech (video), the transcript and the following backgrounders:
* Supporting jobs and the economy
* Supporting families
* A plan to balance
* Economic situation
* Revenue
* Savings
* News

Budget Highlights
http://alberta.ca/budget/highlights.cfm
Excerpt:
Support for children and families
* More support for children in care, helping vulnerable families with new funding for the Family and Community Support Services program
new annual funding of $15 million to support women’s shelters
* Increased support for people with disabilities, child intervention, child care and homeless and outreach supports
* An enhanced Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit (AFETC) to provide lower and middle-income working families with additional support
* A new Alberta Child Benefit to help lower and middle income families make ends meet

Budget Documents - Budget 2015 (October)
http://www.finance.alberta.ca/publications/budget/budget2015-october/index.html

---

Big deficit, bigger debt: Alberta goes on spending spree to spur stalled economy
http://edmontonjournal.com/news/politics/alberta-finance-minister-set-to-table-his-first-provincial-budget-tuesday
By Mariam Ibrahim
October 28, 2015
Alberta will try to spend its way out of an economic downturn with a provincial budget that projects a $6.1-billion deficit, hikes sin taxes and calls for billions in new debt.
Plunging oil prices and declining corporate income tax revenues will take a $7.3-billion bite out of the provincial treasury.

Source:
Edmonton Journal

http://edmontonjournal.com/

---

Alberta budget 2015: Praise and criticism for NDP spending blueprint
Calgary mayor, teachers and students pleased while Wildrose and Liberal parties slam plan

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/alberta-budget-reaction-calgary-political-students-teachers-1.3292158
October 28, 2015

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

Budget 2015 sets a balanced direction for Alberta's future
http://alberta.ca/release.cfm?xID=379486D767B80-E6B6-D13B-D2D8C1E809442C2F
News Release
March 26, 2015
Budget 2015 will invest in the programs and infrastructure Albertans need while holding the line on spending.
Guided by 10 Fiscal Principles and a matching 10-year vision (see both below), Budget 2015 includes five year fiscal and capital plans showing Albertans the long-term approach government is taking. Budget 2015 balances spending restraint with revenue enhancements and will use savings in the Contingency Account to address the province’s fiscal challenge.

Alberta Budget home page
http://finance.alberta.ca/publications/budget/budget2015/index.html
Government is taking action to reduce expenses and create a long-term sustainable fiscal plan.
- main budget page, with links to all budget documents, including (but not limited to) the following:

* Budget 2015 Speech: A balanced direction for Alberta's future
http://alberta.ca/release.cfm?xID=3795878522DC8-90B7-14E0-E1976AFFEC3D773C

* Budget Highlights
http://www.alberta.ca/budget-highlights.cfm

* Alberta's fiscal situation
http://www.alberta.ca/budget-fiscal-situation.cfm

* Ten Fiscal Principles (PDF)
http://finance.alberta.ca/publications/budget/budget2015/fiscal-plan-overview.pdf#page=3

* Ten-year strategic plan (PDF)
http://alberta.ca/albertacode/images/GOA-10-Year-Strategic-Plan-March2015.pdf
The 10-year plan will bring stability to Alberta's public finances and secure a brighter future through the following actions:
* building affordable and efficient public services
* paying off debt and building up savings
* making strategic investments for our environment
* economy
* Society

Read:
Putting things right: A responsible, strategic plan to secure Alberta's future (PDF, 36 pages)
http://www.alberta.ca/albertacode/images/GOA-10-Year-Strategic-Plan-March2015.pdf

------------------------------------------------

Analysis : CBC News
[ http://www.cbc.ca/news]

An economist digs into Alberta’s budget
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/an-economist-digs-into-alberta-s-budget-1.3013676
By Janice Plumstead
March 28, 2015
A combination of tax and fee increases, spending cuts and borrowing will have the budget balanced by 2018. The plan is that after that, we will move to rely less on energy royalties and be able to save again. Whether the government will be able to hold the line on these commitments over time will be the biggest challenge.
[ Janice Plumstead is a senior economist with the Canada West Foundation. ]

Alberta budget delivers tax increases for 1st time in years:
Increases to liquor, fuel and tobacco taxes take effect at 12:01 a.m. Friday
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-budget-delivers-tax-increases-for-1st-time-in-years-1.3010696
March 26, 2015
For the first time in years, Alberta is introducing new taxes and will use that money to keep building infrastructure for the growing province.

Five things you need to know about the Alberta budget
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/alberta-budget-2015-5-things-you-need-to-know-1.3011244
(...) After six years of consecutive deficits, the province is projecting to have a surplus of $248 million this year. But Alberta is expected to return to a deficit budget in 2015 because oil prices have fallen roughly 50 per cent since last summer, causing a $7-billion revenue shortfall next year — which amounts to the entire education budget.

Food for Thought:
If Jim Prentice can roll out his budget, why can't Joe Oliver?
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/if-jim-prentice-can-roll-out-his-budget-why-can-t-joe-oliver-1.3011195

---

Previous Alberta Budget + analysis
http://canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm#atbf
This link will take you to a collection of related links further down on the page you're now reading.

 


Alberta Municipal Affairs
http://municipalaffairs.alberta.ca/

Alberta announces $3.2b plan to end homelessness (dead link)
March 16, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
The Alberta government has today released a dramatic plan to end homelessness in 10 years by committing $1.2 billion in capital investments and $2 billion in operating funding. The plan – based on the “housing first” approach (which provides immediate housing and then offers supports as required) – will lead to the creation of 11,000 new homes by 2012, according to the provincial government. Full details, including funding and implementation lines, will be released in next month’s provincial budget.

---

Related link:

A Plan For Alberta : Ending Homelessness in 10 years (PDF - 1.8MB, 48 pages)
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/documents/PlanForAB_Secretariat_final.pdf
October 2008
Prepared By:
The Alberta Secretariat
For Action On Homelessness
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/Alberta_Secretariat.cfm

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

Alberta Learning

The former ministry of Learning was divided into Alberta Education (for K-12 education) and Alberta Advanced Education (for post-secondary education) effective November 25, 2004.

Education

Advanced Education


Health and Wellness
- incl. links to : Health Care Insurance Plan - Health Information - For Health Professionals - News/Media/Resources - Health Regions - About Us

The Health Care Debate

Premier's Advisory Council on Health

Alberta Liberal Caucus

Minister McLellan and Minister Mar announce $54 million to strengthen primary health care in Alberta
News Release
August 28, 2002
Source : Health Canada
"...the Government of Canada is investing over $54 million in initiatives designed to ensure Albertans have access to high-quality, affordable and sustainable primary health care services."

For related links (incl. the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada) :
- see the Canadian Social Research Links Medicare Debate in Canada Links page


Alberta Community Development

- incl. links to : Protecting Persons in Care - Human Rights, Diversity, and Equality -- Building Strong Communities - Volunteer and Community Development - Youth - Funding and Partnerships - Human Rights Education Funding - Commissions, Boards, Councils and Foundations - and much more...

New disabilities office to provide better coordination, improved access, increased awareness
News Release
February 20, 2004
"Edmonton... The new Office for Disability Issues, announced in this week's throne speech, will allow government to better coordinate policies and programs. As a central place to discuss disability issues, provincial government departments and stakeholders will have the opportunity to collaborate on and strengthen long-term planning to address the needs of Albertans with disabilities."

Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PDD)

Premier's Council on the Status of Persons with Disabilities (dead link)


Alberta Seniors and Community Supports

The Ministry consists of four functional units: Seniors Services, Housing Services, Strategic Planning and Supportive Living, and Strategic Corporate Services. In addition, the Alberta Social Housing Corporation (ASHC), and the Seniors Advisory Council for Alberta are part of the Ministry.

Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH)
- incl. links to: What is AISH? - Am I eligible to receive AISH? - Who receives AISH? - How can I apply for AISH? - Can I work and receive AISH? - Can I appeal decisions about AISH? - Can I receive Alberta Works Income Support benefits while I'm receiving AISH benefits? Where can I get more information about AISH?

AISH clients can earn more while still receiving financial assistance
Employment income exemption increases, effective July

July 21, 2008
Edmonton... Albertans receiving assistance through the Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH) program can now earn more money and still remain eligible for financial assistance. The employment income exemption increase is retroactive to July 1. (...) On July 1, the upper limit of the employment exemption formula increased by $500 to $1,500 per month for single AISH clients and to $2,500 per month for couples and clients with children. Close to 7,000 AISH clients are currently working.

Government increases AISH rates and supports employment
January 31, 2008
Edmonton
AISH benefits will increase for the second time in a year, and interested clients are able to access employment supports.

$1.6 billion in benefits provided to Alberta seniors
Information Bulletin
May 6, 2004
- incl. a list and brief description of Government of Alberta benefits to help seniors maintain their well-being and independence; these benefits total approximately $1.6 billion annually
- incl.
Alberta Seniors Benefit - Health Care Insurance Premium Exemptions - Special Needs Assistance for Seniors program - Dental and Optical Benefits - Alberta Blue Cross Coverage for Seniors - Alberta Aids to Daily Living (AADL)



Queen's Printer 

Alberta Catalogue of Statutes and Regulations


Auditor-General
 

Other Alberta Sites - Autres sites de l'Alberta
(links are added in reverse chronological order, more or less...)

Poverty Costs 2.5: Investing in Albertans
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/vibrant-initiatives/poverty-costs/poverty-costs-25/
January 2015
This report is an updated version of the original Poverty Costs 2.0 report [ PDF - http://goo.gl/jE6wbW ] released June, 2013 by Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary. It is meant to be a blueprint for a provincial poverty reduction strategy following the Government’s announcement to significantly reduce poverty in 10 years and eliminate child poverty in five years.

Poverty Costs 2.5 has 60+ updated policy recommendations, as well as suggested approaches to measure and define poverty in a progressive way, namely through the adoption of a General and Child-specific Deprivation Index. Furthermore, the report recommends a place-based approach when developing a poverty reduction strategy since we know that local communities are best-suited to understand their own needs and assets as well as deliver unique programs and services focused on prevention rather than alleviation.

The initial report written by VCC and AEPA in 2012, Poverty Costs: An Economic Case for a Preventative Poverty Reduction Strategy in Alberta [ PDF - http://goo.gl/nA0Rx ], found that perpetuating poverty resulted in an annual expenditure of $7.1 to 9.5 Billion dollars. This spending is unsustainable and still no plan exists to reduce it. Poverty Costs 2.5, released January 2015 lays out that plan.

---

From Action to End Poverty in Alberta
and Vibrant Communities Calgary:

Poverty Costs 2.5 - Revised Edition
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/uploads/poverty-costs-2.5/
January 2015
The report includes a more comprehensive and consistent use of the StatCan Low Income Measure ("LIM") as the poverty line, updated policy recommendations, updated poverty statistics for Ablerta, and updates on what Alberta municipalities are doing to reduce poverty.

-----------------------

Sources:

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Poverty Reduction in Alberta
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Campaign 2000 Alberta Child Poverty Report for 2014

No Change : After 25 years of promises,
it’s time to eliminate child poverty
(PDF - 3.3MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/ABRC2014.pdf
Co-authored by John Kolkman and Manuel Escoto of the Edmonton
Social Planning Council (ESPC), and Bill Moore-Kilgannon of Public Interest Alberta (PIA).
November 2014
On September 15, 2014, the Honourable Jim Prentice was sworn into office as Alberta’s 16th Premier. Prentice replaced Alison Redford who had committed during the April 2012 provincial election campaign to ending child poverty in five years and reducing poverty overall. During the leadership campaign, work on the provincial poverty reduction strategy slowed down. The previous commitment to finalize a strategy this year has fallen by the wayside. The strategy will not be released until Spring 2015.
(Source : Report intro)

Sources:
Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC)
https://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/

Public Interest Alberta (PIA)
http://pialberta.org/

From PIA:

No Change - 143,200 Children Live in Poverty in Alberta:
New Report Challenges Government to Fulfill Promise to End Child Poverty
http://pialberta.org/content/no-change-143200-children-live-poverty-alberta
November 24, 2014
(...)
The report shows that despite Alberta’s strong economy, Alberta’s income inequality has increased faster than the national average, with the top 1% of earners seeing real income gains of over 60% since 1982 while the bottom half of income earners only saw a tiny gain of 3.4%.

From CBC.ca:

Alberta's child poverty rate remains almost unchanged 25 years later, says report
Public Interest Alberta says cuts to programs that help people out of poverty a factor
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/alberta-s-child-poverty-rate-remains-almost-unchanged-25-years-later-says-report-1.2848502
November 24, 2014

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The complete national child poverty report card:

Child Poverty 25 Years Later : We Can Fix This
2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 744KB, 12 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014EN.pdf
.
[ Version française :
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014FR.pdf ]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada network of 120 national, provincial and community partner organizations committed to working to end child and family poverty.

---

- For similar reports from other participating jurisdictions,
go to the Campaign 2000 Child Poverty Report Card Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/campaign_2000_child_poverty.htm

Topic : Payday lenders

Recent events in Alberta
around social policy and research:
By Joe Ceci

On October 6, Calgary City Council introduced a Notice of Motion on Payday Lending:
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/calgary_city_council_introduces_notice_of_motion_on_payday_lending

The motion passed by 11-2 votes, so now city administration must report back by March with potential amendments to land use and business licensing bylaws that could help limit the prevalence of payday lenders. (Please note – the Notice of Motion linked here is not the final version that council debated. I have included the revised version of the NOM in the attachment for you).

Joe Ceci, MSW RSW, is Manager of Public Policy for Momentum and
Coordinator of Action to End Poverty in Alberta

Related links:

Momentum
http://www.momentum.org/
Momentum is a Community Economic Development organization. Our mission is to partner with people living on low incomes in order to increase prosperity, and inspire the development of local economies with opportunities for all. Our vision is that every person in Calgary can have a sustainable livelihood and contribute to their community.

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
The Inter-City Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) has been researching the impacts of poverty in Alberta for several years. In 2010, member municipalities of ICFSP agreed to play a leadership role in engaging interested stakeholders to promote the need for a comprehensive poverty-reduction plan for Alberta. (...)
The goal of the ICFSP is to create and help implement a comprehensive plan to prevent, reduce and ultimately eliminate poverty in Alberta.

Tougher action sought on 'predatory' payday lenders [dead link]
By Jason Van Rassel
July 14, 2014
With provincial regulations governing payday lenders due to expire in 2016, a Calgary social services agency is urging the government to further restrict what it calls a "predatory" industry.

Source:
Calgary Herald
http://www.calgaryherald.com/

---

From Momentum.org:

The Real Cost of Payday Lending (PDF - 256K, 10 pages)
http://momentum.org/files/Publications/Real-Cost-Payday-Lending.pdf
June 2014
Since the early 1990s payday lending businesses have become increasingly prolific in most parts of Canada, including Calgary. The payday loan
industry claims that they provide a needed service at a reasonable cost and do not target those living on low incomes or push customers for repeat business. Social agencies and advocates working to reduce poverty view payday lenders and other fringe financial businesses as problematic for those looking to exit the cycle of poverty. Payday lenders charge interest rates that, when annualized, top 400% .
(...)
A wide range of options exist that can help solve the cycle of poverty exacerbated by fringe financial businesses, including payday lenders. There is no question that payday lenders perpetuate the cycle of poverty - statistics illustrate this. For every new customer who takes out a loan, the lender gives out loans to repeat customers. 55% of those who take out a payday loan do so to pay for necessities.

Source:
Momentum.org

http://momentum.org/

---

Canadian Payday Loan Association
http://www.cpla-acps.ca/english/home.php
The Canadian Payday Loan Association (CPLA) represents the majority of licensed payday lenders in Canada. CPLA works to ensure payday loan companies hold themselves to a higher standard of responsible service and to help customers make informed financial decisions .

Vital Signs Reports paint a stark picture of youth unemployment across Canada
http://rabble.ca/news/2014/10/vital-signs-reports-paint-stark-picture-youth-unemployment-across-canada
October 8, 2014
By Ella Bedard
Stability is not in the cards for Canadian workers, with young workers particularly affected, according to this year's Vital Signs Reports from the Community Foundations of Canada. The first Vital Signs was produced by the Toronto Community Foundation in 2001. It assembled local research and national data to paint a broad strokes picture of community health. Since its inception the Vitals project has expanded to include a total of 49 Canadian communities big and small, who have produced reports or are acting on findings from previous reports.

Source:
rabble.ca

http://rabble.ca

---

From
VitalSigns:

27 communities across Canada launch quality-of-life reports on October 7
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/blog-387-27-communities-across-canada-launch-quality
(Ottawa, ON) Sept. 30, 2014 – Community foundations in 27 communities across Canada are releasing their Vital Signs 2014 reports on Tuesday, October 7. Vital Signs is an annual community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that provides a comprehensive look at how our communities are faring in key quality-of-life areas.

Local Reports:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/localreports
Here, you'll find links to all of the local reports released on October 7, 2014.
A total of 49 community foundations are involved in the Vital Signs program – either producing a report or acting on the findings of previous reports.
The communities releasing Vital Signs reports in 2014 are:

* British Columbia: Abbotsford, Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve Region, Golden, Nanaimo, Phoenix (Grand Forks), Shuswap, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Surrey, Victoria
* Alberta: Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge and Southwestern Alberta, Southeastern Alberta
* Saskatchewan: Regina
* Manitoba: Winnipeg
* Ontario: Huronia (Simcoe County), Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Peterborough, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor
* Atlantic provinces: Fredericton, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia

Vital Signs
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/home
Vital Signs is a community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada. Each Vital Signs report measures the vitality of its community in key areas, providing the community with critical information that can help set priorities and identify opportunities for action

Community Foundations of Canada
http://www.cfc-fcc.ca/

Societal changes happening in Calgary and Edmonton
from the perspective of two former city councillors:

Joe Ceci of Calgary and Edmonton's Michael Phair each have 15 years of experience in municipal politics. Together they often discuss, debate and trade insights on urban culture, community economic development and municipal governance. Below, you'll find links to recent articles on annexation and taxation, municipal authority, and poverty reduction.

[Joe Ceci is now public policy manager at Momentum [ http://www.momentum.org/ ] , a Calgary community economic development agency.
Michael Phair is currently a part-time educational co-ordinator at the University of Alberta.]

-------------------------------------

Opinion: Protection from recurring cycles of poverty [dead link]
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 4, 2014
(...)
Calgary and Edmonton have reached a place where we must be realistic about poverty reduction, and that means moving beyond the strategic process to full implementation.
Cities don’t have the ability to do this alone. We need the co-operation of all orders of government, with specific focus placed on poverty reduction, universal child care, adoption of a living wage and a guaranteed annual income. Our conversations with others (including those from the private and non-profit sectors as well as governments) must be for the sake of supporting and implementing this kind of lasting structural change.

Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

-------------------------------------

Guaranteed annual income would wipe out poverty [dead link]
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 3, 2014
(...)
It is time to institute a living wage, based on the household budget approach developed by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives [ https://www.policyalternatives.ca/ ]. The calculations show the minimum income an individual or family must have to be able to afford their most basic needs.
(...)
With the average income for our cities hovering near $60,000, a new economic policy for a guaranteed annual income is necessary. A guaranteed annual income would ensure that people in our cities who have no incomes (or minimal ones) are protected from recurring cycles of poverty. The adaptation of a guaranteed annual income, alongside a living wage policy, would generate further opportunities for community economic development in both cities.

Related link:

Calculating the Living Wage: Webinar for local communities
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc/events/calculating-living-wage-webinar-local-communities
Tuesday, September 9th, from 12 PM to 1 PM PDT
The Living Wage for Families Campaign has received more than three dozen requests from communities around BC (and across western Canada) asking how the local living wage can be calculated. To help the living wage movement grow, you are invited to join us for a free one-hour webinar on how the Living Wage for Families calculates the annual living wage, and to learn how you can adopt this methodology to use in your own community (anywhere in Canada).

Source:
BC Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc/

Opinion: Boldly broaching two touchy topics [dead link]
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 2, 2014
Calgary and Edmonton are arguably two of Canada’s most diverse and complex cities. They are a big part of the reason why Alberta currently leads the nation in terms of population and employment growth. With all of these economic, social and structural changes abounding, we got together to analyze our cities’ collective positions on development. We found that two components of city governance are inextricably linked to all this growth: taxation and annexation.

Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

---

Today’s cities should be given greater powers [dead link]
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 2, 2014
Municipal services now extend far beyond roads and sewers. Cities are expected to generate and preserve a rich community experience that enhances urban quality of life. Calgary and Edmonton are in the throes of this challenge, attempting to address the increasing expectations of their citizens. How they go about doing this will inevitably have long-term impacts on the province’s future prosperity and development. Is it worth having a conversation about? We thought so.

Source:
Calgary Herald
http://www.calgaryherald.com/

---

Albertans have bigger priorities than low taxes [dead link]
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 2, 2014

(...)
The annual collection of property taxes in both cities means hundreds of staff assess every piece of property's value and use a formula to levy and collect the tax. It's time to end the entire property tax system. Instead, a portion of that income tax (which is levied by the federal and provincial governments) should be designated to the cities. This is quite simple and would streamline the currently cumbersome tax system.

Source:
Calgary Herald
http://www.calgaryherald.com/

Six charts that show why Alberta is the "most unequal province in Canada"
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/6-charts-show-why-alberta-most-unequal-province-canada
May 21, 2014
If you want to know why "Alberta is now by far the most unequal province in Canada," a report released Wednesday by the Parkland Institute (see the link to the report below)
sums it up.

"Due to exceptional increases in income for the richest 1% of Albertans, while the incomes of the rest of the population have virtually stagnated, Alberta is now the most unequal province in the country," the report concludes. "These changes coincided and are closely associated with the declining strength of unions in the province."

Click the link above for six charts that show what's going on in Alberta, and the relationship between unions and growing inequality.

Source:
PressProgress

http://www.pressprogress.ca/

---

The Parkland Institute report:

On the Job:
Why Unions Matter in Alberta
(PDF - 732K, 58 pages)
http://parklandinstitute.ca/research/summary/on_the_job
By David Campanella, Bob Barnetson and Angella MacEwen

Executive Summary
http://parklandinstitute.ca/research/summary/on_the_job

Media Release
http://parklandinstitute.ca/media/comments/unions_critical_to_well_being_of_all_albertans_new_study
May 21, 2014

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

- Go to the Union Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

New from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Disability in December (PDF - 28K, 3 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1028ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
December 2013

December 3 is the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. There have been many noteworthy achievements in the country in such areas as transportation, communications, technology and equipment. But significant actions are still required, particularly around income security and disability supports.
The Caledon Institute has proposed a new Basic Income for persons with severe disabilities that would replace welfare with an adequate federally delivered benefit. The resulting provincial and territorial savings would be reinvested in a wide range of disability supports. These are the goods and services that enable independent living.
In the absence of major income security reform, Ottawa could still create a fund that would allocate monies to the provinces and territories to encourage investment in a comprehensive system of supports. These goods and services provide essential assistance not just to persons with disabilities but also to the entire population. They are especially crucial in light of Canada's aging population.

---

Laurie Needs Affordable Housing
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1029ENG.pdf
Sherri Torjman and Ken Battle
December 2013

The Caledon Institute will be releasing shortly the Welfare Incomes report. Its calculations make clear that welfare incomes fall below all major comparator measures.
It is becoming increasingly difficult for welfare recipients to make ends meet. Shelter allowances, in particular, have not kept pace with market rents.
Laurie is a Calgary resident who is on the Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped program in Alberta. Her poignant story, which she sent to us, speaks powerfully to the need for affordable housing in Canada. Several policy options are proposed to enhance the ability of renters to pay for housing and to increase the availability of affordable housing.



2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty- November 26
(From Campaign 2000)

Campaign 2000 and Its Regional Partners Release
New 2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
November 26, 2013
Campaign 2000’s annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada was released on Tuesday, November 26th in Ottawa. This year marks 24 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada by 2000 and four years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

National report card:

The 2013 national report card, entitled Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to take leadership. It presents the latest statistics on child and family poverty and makes recommendations for all political parties. Federal party leaders have been invited to respond to the report card.

Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication:
2013 Report card on Child and Familkiuy Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 3MB, 22 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000NATIONALREPORTCARDNOV26.pdf
[ Version française:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013NationalReportCardNov26French.pdf ]

----------------------------------

Provincial report cards:

On the same day as the national report card was released, several of Campaign 2000 regional partner organizations released their provincial report cards on child and family poverty as well, including:
* Vancouver, BC
* Edmonton, Alberta (see link below)
* Calgary, Alberta
* Toronto, Ontario
* Saint John, New Brunswick
* Halifax, Nova Scotia

---

Alberta

From Words to Action : Alberta Can Afford a Real Poverty Reduction Strategy
Alberta Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013
(PDF - 1.5MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/otherreports/Alberta%20reportcard%20From%20Words%20to%20Actions%20Report%202013%20FINAL.pdf
By John Kolkman (Edmonton Social Planning Council) and Bill Moore-Kilgannon (Public Interest Alberta)
November 2013
In April 2012, Premier Alison Redford promised Albertans that if her government was re-elected, they would commit to a 5-year plan to end child poverty and a 10-year plan to reduce poverty overall. This breakthrough occurred due to the hard work of many concerned organizations and individuals advocating for a provincial poverty reduction strategy.
(...)
The next year will be critical in determining whether the Social Policy Framework and Children First Act end up being simply statement of good intentions, or include specific policy changes to make Alberta a leader in eliminating child and family poverty.

Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council

http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/
Public Interest Alberta
http://pialberta.org/

---

NOTE : For links to the reports on child poverty from Vancouver, Toronto, Saint John (NB) and Halifax,
go to : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm#2013_report_card_child_poverty

---

Join us and take e-action to send a message to our Prime Minister and all the federal party leaders today.
Click here to send a letter : http://www.makepovertyhistory.ca/act/where-s-our-federal-poverty-eradication-plan

---

Related online resource:

A history of inaction (PDF infographic [English and French] - 19.7MB, 2 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000INFOGRAPHIC_FULL%20COLOUR.pdf
- incl. timelines and potential outcomes
[HUMONGOUS FILE ALERT!]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of more than 120 national, provincial and community organizations committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada, over 70 of which are from Ontario.

 

2013 Edmonton Vital Signs (PDF - 8.1MB , 6 pages)
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/files/localreports/2013_EdmontonFood_report.pdf
October 2013
2013 Edmonton Vital Signs is the first of an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with the Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how our community is doing on a specific issue; this year we are looking at food security. Community Foundations across Canada are reporting on how their communities are doing and how Canada is doing over all.

The Edmonton Community Foundation (ECF) [ http://www.ecfoundation.org/ ] works with donors to support the causes important to them through gifts now and/or in their wills.

The Edmonton Social Planning Council [ http://edmontonsocialplanning.ca ] is an independent social research and analysis organization which has been operating in Edmonton for over 73 years.

National Vital Signs website:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/

2013 Vital Signs receives media attention nationwide:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/blog-375-vital-signs-receives-media-attention-nationwide
With 25 community foundations across Canada producing reports this year, Vital Signs received media attention from coast to coast.
===> links to 50 articles on the subject of 2013 Vital Signs, organized by province (incl. BC - AB - ON - NS - National - International)

--------------------------------------

NOTE : The Edmonton Vital Signs report is one of over two dozen reports from cities across Canada.
Click the Local reports link below to see the group responsible for producing each report and a link to the report itself:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/localreports

Tracking the Trends 2013: 12th Edition (PDF - 11.8MB [!!BANDWIDTH HOG ALERT!!], 126 pages)
http://www.threesource.ca/documents/October2013/Tracking-the-Trends-2013.pdf
October 2013
Tracking the Trends is the ESPC's flagship publication that offers a comprehensive collection of current and historical demographic and socio-economic data focused on the Edmonton region.
(...)
Data in this publication can apply to either the City of Edmonton, the Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area (CMA), or both. Each table and chart is labeled to specify the geography of the underlying data. In a few instances, national or provincial data is used when Edmonton data is unavailable.
This edition includes data from both the mandatory 2011 Census and the voluntary 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). Other than population, age, and dwelling types, most of the included information is from the NHS and not the Census.

Due to the higher non-response rate in the voluntary NHS compared to the previous mandatory long-form census, data quality may be compromised. Disadvantaged socio-economic groups tend to have lower response rates in voluntary surveys compared to more advantaged groups.
***
NOTE (by Gilles): I added some bolding in the previous paragraph to emphasize the type of disclaimer that more and more StatCan reports are displaying nowadays..
Thanks, Mr. Harper.

Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC)
http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/
[You can order a paper copy of this report ($20 + $3.50 for shipping) by clicking the "Buy Now" button on the home page

COMMENT (by Gilles):
To avoid BANDWIDTH HOG ALERTS, please consider creating two PDF documents from the same file : one for printing and a leaner, lighter version with fewer graphics and plain fonts for people with modest Internet usage plans or slow Internet connections.

Funding Cuts to Alberta’s Post-Secondary Education Sector: There Are Alternatives
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2013/08/07/funding-cuts-to-albertas-pse-sector-there-are-alternatives/
By Nick Falvo
August 7, 2013
It has recently been reported that the University of Alberta wants to “reopen two-year collective agreements” with faculty and staff “to help the university balance its budget…”

This appears to be in direct response to Alberta’s provincial government announcing in its March budget that there would be a “7% cut to operating grants to universities, colleges, and technical institutes.”

This strikes me as a curious turn of events, for several reasons.

- Alberta’s top income tax rate (10%) is the lowest of any Canadian province or territory.
- Alberta’s corporate tax rate (10%) is also among the lowest in Canada.
-There is no provincial sales tax in Alberta (making it the only jurisdiction without a sales tax.)
- Compared to workers in the rest of Canada, Alberta workers have not been earning their fare share of productivity increases.

If Alberta’s provincial government is having trouble balancing its books, why doesn’t it increase taxes?

Source:
progressive Economics Forum
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/

The Dilemma of Housing in Alberta
By Joe Ceci, Coordinator - Action to End Poverty in Alberta
and Mike Brown, Communications Coordinator, Momentum
http://povertyreduction.alberta.ca/Blog/Dilemma_Housing_Alberta
July 15, 2013
The devastating floods in Southern Alberta, the worst in recent memory, have thrown into question the critical need for safe, affordable housing for the tens of thousands of Albertans.
(...)
Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary recently co-published a report entitled Poverty Costs 2.0: Investing in Albertans (June 2013) which notes that housing insecurity is a growing issue in Alberta. The recent flooding has exacerbated this issue and shows an even clearer need for government intervention.

---
Joe Ceci is Coordinator of Action to End Poverty in Alberta.
Mike Brown is Communications Coordinator of Momentum.
---

Source:
Poverty Reduction Blog
http://povertyreduction.alberta.ca/Blog

---

See also:

Poverty Costs 2.0 : Investing in Albertans
A Blueprint for Reducing Poverty in Alberta
(PDF - 2.6MB, 44 pages)

June 2013

---

Sources:
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
Vibrant Communities Calgary is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.

and

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta.

---

Momentum (Calgary)
http://www.momentum.org/
Imagine... every person in Calgary can have a sustainable livelihood and contribute to their community.
Momentum uses a Community Economic Development (CED) approach that offers hope and opportunity to people living in poverty.

----------------------------------------------------

From the
Edmonton Social Planning Council:

Tracking the Trends 2013: 12th Edition (PDF - 11.8MB [!!BANDWIDTH HOG ALERT!!], 126 pages)
http://www.threesource.ca/documents/October2013/Tracking-the-Trends-2013.pdf
October 2013
Tracking the Trends is the ESPC's flagship publication that offers a comprehensive collection of current and historical demographic and socio-economic data focused on the Edmonton region.
(...)
Data in this publication can apply to either the City of Edmonton, the Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area (CMA), or both. Each table and chart is labeled to specify the geography of the underlying data. In a few instances, national or provincial data is used when Edmonton data is unavailable.
This edition includes data from both the mandatory 2011 Census and the voluntary 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). Other than population, age, and dwelling types, most of the included information is from the NHS and not the Census.

Due to the higher non-response rate in the voluntary NHS compared to the previous mandatory long-form census, data quality may be compromised. Disadvantaged socio-economic groups tend to have lower response rates in voluntary surveys compared to more advantaged groups.
***
NOTE (by Gilles): I added some bolding in the previous paragraph to emphasize the type of disclaimer that more and more StatCan reports are displaying nowadays..
Thanks, Mr. Harper.

Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC)
http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/
[You can order a paper copy of this report ($20 + $3.50 for shipping) by clicking the "Buy Now" button on the home page

COMMENT (by Gilles):
To avoid BANDWIDTH HOG ALERTS, please consider creating two PDF documents from the same file : one for printing and a leaner, lighter version with fewer graphics and plain fonts for people with modest Internet usage plans or slow Internet connections.

---

New from Vibrant Communities Calgary
and Action to End Poverty in Alberta:

Poverty Costs 2.0 : Investing in Albertans
A Blueprint for Reducing Poverty in Alberta
(PDF - 2.6MB, 44 pages)
(dead link)
June 2013
(...)
This report provides recommendations for government policy to be implemented at the provincial level. While the first Poverty Costs report made the case that the cost of addressing the symptoms of poverty is much higher than the cost to reduce it, Poverty Costs 2.0: Investing in Albertans makes concrete recommendations to the Provincial Government that will have a significant impact in reducing poverty. In addition to policy recommendations on poverty reduction, this report also provides suggestions on best measures and indicators by which the Government may evaluate progress.
(Excerpt from the report's Conclusion, p.34)

Table of Contents:
Foreword
Section I: A Blueprint for Reducing Poverty in Alberta
Section II: Why is there Poverty in Alberta?
Section III: A Vibrant Action Plan to End Poverty in Alberta
Section IV: Ensuring Alberta Succeeds
Appendices
--- Appendix I: Revenue
--- Appendix II: The Role of Municipal Government in Alberta’s Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy
--- Appendix III: The Canada Social Transfer and the Deconstruction of Pan-Canadian Social Policy (By Donna Wood, PhD)

NOTE : Appendix III is an abridged version of a longer report by Donna Wood.
Here's the link to the complete report by Dr. Wood
(PDF - 732K, 37 pages):
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/uploads/pdfs/Canada_social_transfer_Wood_full.pdf
Recommended reading!

Sources:
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
Vibrant Communities Calgary is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.

and

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta

---

Calgary’s wealth gap called ‘most unequal in the country’
http://parklandinstitute.ca/media/comments/alberta_is_canadas_most_unequal_province/
By Jason Rassel
January 28, 2013
CALGARY - A University of Alberta think-tank has dubbed Calgary the “most unequal city in the country,” saying provincial government policies have helped create an income gap between the wealthiest one per cent and everyone else that is the widest in Canada.
In an analysis of Statistics Canada income-tax data released Monday, the University of Alberta’s Parkland Institute [ http://parklandinstitute.ca/ ] said Calgary’s richest one per cent earned 26 times what people in the bottom 90 per cent did in 2010. The gap has grown in part because Alberta’s personal income-tax policies favour the rich, and our province’s resource royalty regime subsidizes massive salaries paid to oil and gas executives, said the Parkland Institute’s research manager.

Source:
Calgary Herald

http://www.calgaryherald.com/

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

---

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
Email Update - January 2013 (dead link)

An update from the Alberta Inter-City Forum on Social Policy's Action to End Poverty in Alberta.

Poverty Costs 2.0 Back on Track
After some staffing turnover and changes, Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary are back on track to publish the Poverty Costs 2.0 report by the end of March 2013. This report will include pragmatic solutions to end poverty in Alberta rather than maintaining poverty as the current system in Alberta does. The Government of Alberta will be releasing its Social Policy Framework in the spring which will be followed by a provincial poverty reduction strategy later in 2013. Our hope is that the policy recommendations in Poverty Costs 2.0 will help shape the policies the government adopts for the provincial strategy.

Leaders' Gathering Video (duration 7:17)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvxzJA0g7ks
Back in June 2012, AEPA hosted representatives from the eight municipalities working on poverty reduction plans. The video associated with that meeting is something we have meant to put in this e-newsletter for some time.

Source:
Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta

Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
Vibrant Communities Calgary is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary. .

---


Ending Poverty in Alberta
(PDF - 1.7MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/provincial/Alberta/2012ReportCardAB.pdf

November 2012
By John Kolkman and Joseph Ahorro of the Edmonton Social Planning Council [ http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/ ]
and Bill Moore-Kilgannon of Public Interest Alberta [ http://pialberta.org/ ]
This report is also published by the Alberta College of Social Workers [ http://www.acsw.ab.ca/ ]

Poverty Reduction in Alberta
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Related link:

2012 Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada : Campaign 2000

Government of Canada Missing in Action on child poverty: Report (PDF - 196K, 1 page)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/2012ReportCardPressRelease.pdf
News Release
November 21, 2012
TORONTO – More Canadian children live in poverty today than in 1989 and the federal government is missing in action, says Laurel Rothman, National Coordinator for Campaign 2000. Twenty-three years after the House of Commons unanimously voted to work together to eliminate child poverty, the crisis is worse. Today, one in seven Canadian children live in poverty – one in four in First Nation’s communities – a reality that threatens our country’s future through higher healthcare costs, lost productivity and limited opportunities.

The 2012 report, entitled Needed: A Federal Action Plan to Eradicate Child and Family Poverty in Canada calls on the Federal Government to take a lead role in child and family poverty reduction. Policy recommendations are offered to all political parties to redress the persistence of child and family poverty in Canada.

Complete national report:

Needed: A Federal Action Plan to Eradicate Child and Family Poverty in Canada
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/C2000ReportCardNov2012.pdf
November 2012
[ Version française : http://www.campaign2000.ca/2012ReportCardFr.pdf ]
Without a national anti-poverty strategy, child and family poverty in Canada will continue to grow, compromising the success of future generations and threatening Canada’s economic stability. Today, there are poverty reduction strategies in seven of the ten provinces and even in some municipalities. When it comes to eradicating child poverty, the Federal government is currently an absentee partner. A coordinated federal action plan that sets significant goals for poverty eradication, dedicates adequate financial and human resources and mandates reporting of progress is vital for Canada’s future. It is also long overdue.

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada. Visit the Campaign 2000 website for a complete list of partner organizations.

From Parkland Institute and
the Alberta College of Social Workers:

Alberta has the richest rich and the poorest poor in Canada
New report highlights dangers and causes of rapidly growing disparity in the province
http://www.acsw.ab.ca/news/new_social_policy_framework_highlights_disparity_in_alberta
Media Release
November 1, 2012
EDMONTON – A new report released this morning by the U of A’s Parkland Institute and the Alberta College of Social Workers says that despite Alberta’s obvious wealth, inequality and disparity in the province are growing faster than almost anywhere else in the country. The report, titled A social policy framework for Alberta: Fairness and justice for all, comes as the Alberta government continues to consult on what it says will be a comprehensive social policy framework for the province.

Executive Summary
http://parklandinstitute.ca/research/summary/a_social_policy_framework_for_alberta/
(...)
The key elements of the ACSW social policy framework are:
1. Improve quality of life;
2. Ensure dignity and an adequate income for the most vulnerable;
3. Implement progressive revenue reform;
4. Protect workers;
5. Strengthen democracy and good governance;
6. Invest in housing affordability; and
7. Strengthen community services.

Complete report:

A social policy framework for Alberta: Fairness and justice for all (PDF - 620K, 43 pages)
http://www.acsw.ab.ca/pdfs/ab_socialpolicyframework_2012_web.pdf

Source:
Alberta College of Social Workers
http://www.acsw.ab.ca/

Parkland Institute
http://parklandinstitute.ca/
The Parkland Institute is a non-partisan public policy research institute in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta.

Do welfare rules provide a route out of poverty in Alberta? (PDF - 84K, 4 pages)
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/uploads/pdfs/Income_Replacement_J_Stapleton.pdf
By John Stapleton
October 18,2012
John Stapleton's paper sets out "what Canadians believe to be the six best routes out of poverty" e.g., * Get Help from Your Family * Get a Job and Keep it * Get Training and Education. Then he compares each of those routes (benchmarks) to the Alberta Works (welfare) program to see whether, indeed, welfare rules provide a route out of poverty in Alberta.

Source:
Poverty Costs 2.0

http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/blog/poverty-costs-20-creating-policies-that-save/
Poverty Costs 2.0 is about sharing great ideas to help us invest in lasting solutions to poverty. The ideas will come in the form of policy recommendations to help move forward on the provincial commitment to create a 5 year plan to end child poverty and a 10 year plan to reduce poverty.

As part of the Poverty Costs 2.0 initiative, John Stapleton's text is the first post summarizing a policy recommendation authored by one of the top policy-thinkers in the country. Full, expanded recommendations will be collated in a book to be released early 2013. The final document will contain no less than 10 papers with recommendations from the best policy minds in Canada as well as several additional papers addressing broad systemic issues within the province.

Poverty Costs 2.0 is an initiative of
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/

Vibrant Communities Across Canada
There are Vibrant Communities in 10 other cities in Canada – find out more at
http://vibrantcommunities.ca/

Related link:

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta.

Supporting Albertans To Save
An Asset Building Approach to Poverty Reduction Concept Paper
(PDF - 1.9MB, 14 pages) (dead link)
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/files/documents/supportingalbertanstosave.pdf
June 29, 2012
(...) Asset building is an emerging area of social policy in North America. Generally, asset-based approaches to social policy emphasize investment and future needs rather than a focus on meeting immediate needs, which is the standard approach of income assistance policy. Based on the success of over 500 matched savings programs operating in the United States, over 30 states have developed state-wide matched savings programs and 18 states are currently investing in matched savings. Several U.S. states have legislated matched savings programs, including Minnesota’s Family Assets for Independence Minnesota (FAIM) [ http://minnesotafaim.com/ ], through state statutes. The State of Oregon’s legislated matched savings program has successfully operated for over 5 years and is unique in its use of matched savings as an ‘add-on’ incentive to other social services provided by the state. In Canada, only the province of Manitoba has thus far developed policy support and dedicated stable funding for savings through its Manitoba Saves initiative. Manitoba is also a leader in revising asset limits as a component of Manitoba Saves resulted in raising liquid asset limits to $4,000 per person to a maximum of $16,000 per household.

Source:
Momentum
http://www.momentum.org/
Momentum is a Community Economic Development (CED) charitable organization that works with people living on low incomes to develop productive futures. Momentum offers award-winning programs that assist people in developing financial, personal, social and professional assets.

Related link:

Alberta Centennial Education Savings (ACES) Plan website (Alberta Govt. site)
The ACES Plan will contribute $500 into the Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) of every child born to Alberta residents in 2005 and later.
- incl. program info and links to related resources

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

Are Albertans really paying for Quebec’s social programs?
http://cwf.ca/commentaries/are-albertans-really-paying-for-quebec-s-social-programs
April 20, 2012
By Michael Holden
Student protests in Quebec have triggered a curious response from some observers. Appalled that Quebecers have the audacity to protest tuition fees rising from the lowest in the country to possibly the second-lowest, they opine that the only reason Quebec can afford such fees in the first place is on the back of the Alberta taxpayer. As the narrative goes, Quebec’s low tuition, $7-a-day daycare and other generous social programs are all being paid for by hard-working Albertans who could only dream of affording such luxuries themselves. This story appeals to Albertans convinced that Ottawa and Quebec are stealing our wealth, but this is simply not the case.

Source:
Canada West Foundation
(CWF)
http://cwf.ca/
Author Michael Holden is the Senior Economist at the Canada West Foundation. CWF is the only think tank dedicated to being the objective, nonpartisan voice for issues of vital concern to Western Canadians.

Alberta makes strides against homelessness
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1241519
August 14, 2012
By Gillian Steward
Between 1994 and 2006, Calgary had the fastest growing number of homeless men, women and children in Canada. There were plenty of new condo towers but there wasn’t enough housing for many of the people who laboured to build those glass palaces. Today it’s a different story. Calgary’s 10-year-plan to end homelessness is showing results and has become a model for other Canadian cities. So much so, that Tim Richter, the CEO of the Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF), is moving on to head up the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, a collaboration of several interest groups designed to mobilize communities across the country to develop their own ten-year plans.

[Gillian Steward is a Calgary writer and journalist, and former managing editor of the Calgary Herald.]

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

Related link:

A Plan For Alberta : Ending Homelessness in 10 years (PDF - 1.8MB, 48 pages)
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/documents/PlanForAB_Secretariat_final.pdf
October 2008
Prepared By:
The Alberta Secretariat
For Action On Homelessness
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/Alberta_Secretariat.cfm

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm


Alberta Election 2012 results and coverage - April 23, 2012

Official results:
See Elections Alberta [Chief Electoral Office]
http://www.elections.ab.ca/

---

Edmonton Journal:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/alberta-politics/index.html

Complete coverage

---

Calgary Sun:
http://www.calgarysun.com/battleforalberta
Complete coverage

---

Toronto Star:

Alberta election: PCs steamroll past Wildrose Party
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1166726

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

Globe and Mail:

Redford's vision prevails as Alberta PCs hold their majority (dead link)

* Fear of Wildrose drove some voters to Alberta PCs
http://goo.gl/6TZsZ

* Alberta PCs will need to do some soul-searching, despite election win
http://goo.gl/m9sT2

* Albertans voted for change, not upheaval
http://goo.gl/6ykoW

Source:
Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

--------------------------------------------

Alberta Election 2012 Results and coverage - April 23, 2012
http://www.electionalmanac.com/ea/alberta/
Complete coverage of the 2012 Alberta election, including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more...
Source:
Election Almanac (formerly nodice.ca)

---

For links to Alberta Election 2012 information, go to the
Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

 

---

From
The Homeless Hub Newsletter - February 6, 2012:
http://goo.gl/R5OEm

Homelessness in Calgary Down for the First Time in 20 Years
http://goo.gl/TcXOf
February 6, 2012
News Release
The Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) is pleased to report the 2012 homeless count shows an 11.4 per cent decrease in the number of people experiencing homelessness since 2008.

The report:

The State of Homelessness in Calgary in 2012 (PDF - 460K, 18 pages)
http://calgaryhomeless.com/wp-content/uploads/The-State-of-Homelessnessonlineversion.pdf
February 3, 2012
Key Findings:
1. Results to date show that the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness in Calgary is working.
2. We are on track with 10 Year Plan projections. We are meeting the promise of Housing First for people housed under the 10 Year Plan.
3. Calgary is the epicentre of homelessness in Alberta, driven by migration, and the labour and rental market.
4. Emerging trends suggest family homelessness is increasingly becoming a regional rather than local phenomenon. Prevention and Housing First programs are working, but Calgary is seeing a high number of Aboriginal and immigrant families in family shelters.
5. The size of the at-risk for homelessness pool may be smaller than originally thought.

(Excerpt, p.2):
The 10 Year Plan, initially launched in 2008, was revised and updated in 2011 with a renewed focus on system planning. Its priorities continue to be the reduction of chronic homelessness and emergency shelter use, while demonstrating client benefits from Housing First interventions and decreases in health, correction and shelter services use.
10 Year Plan Milestones
• House 1,500 chronic and episodically homeless people by 2014
• By 2014, ensure that no more than 10% of those served by “Housing First” programs return to homelessness
• By December 2014, all individuals who engage in rough sleeping will have access to housing and support options appropriate to their needs
• Eliminate 85% of 2010 emergency shelter beds by 2018
• Reduce the average length of stay in family emergency shelters to 14 days by Dec. 2014 and to seven days by December 2018
• Reduce the average length of stay in emergency shelters to seven days by January 2018

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness in Calgary
http://m.calgaryhomeless.com/10-year-plan/progress/
- incl. links to annual and quarterly reports charting the progress of the 10-year plan

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
[ http://calgaryhomeless.com/ ]
Our mission :
To end homelessness in Calgary.
Our v
ision : By January 29, 2018, an individual or family will stay in an emergency shelter or sleep outside for no longer than one week before moving into a safe, decent, affordable home with the support needed to sustain it.

Related link:

Alberta announces $3.2b plan to end homelessness (dead link)
March 16, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
The Alberta government has today released a dramatic plan to end homelessness in 10 years by committing $1.2 billion in capital investments and $2 billion in operating funding. The plan – based on the “housing first” approach (which provides immediate housing and then offers supports as required) – will lead to the creation of 11,000 new homes by 2012, according to the provincial government. Full details, including funding and implementation lines, will be released in next month’s provincial budget.

The Alberta Plan:

A Plan For Alberta : Ending Homelessness in 10 years (PDF - 1.8MB, 48 pages)
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/documents/PlanForAB_Secretariat_final.pdf
October 2008
Prepared By:
The Alberta Secretariat
For Action On Homelessness
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/Alberta_Secretariat.cfm

[ Alberta Municipal Affairs
http://municipalaffairs.alberta.ca/ ]

---

Also in the February 6 issue of the
Calgary Homeless FoundationThe Homeless Hub Newsletter:
http://goo.gl/R5OEm
[ Click the link above to access any of the items below. ]

* Homelessness in Calgary Down for the First Time in 20 Years
* Housing Subsidies and Homelessness: A Simple Idea
* Working Rough, Living Poor
* The Housing Market and Canada's Economic Recovery
* Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention
* Inuit Housing and Homelessness
* Youth on the Street and Youth Involved with Child Welfare: Maltreatment, Mental Health and Substance Use

Source:
The Homeless Hub
http://www.homelesshub.ca/
Building on the success of the Canadian Conference on Homelessness in 2005, the Homeless Hub was created to address the need for a single place to find homelessness information from across Canada.

From the
Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations:

Provincial Government Invites Response to Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide
http://goo.gl/Uxi9P
The Government of Alberta is in the early stages of developing a social policy framework. In the broadest sense, this framework is about inclusion and supporting a high quality of life for all Albertans. The Ministry of Human Services has developed a discussion guide that is intended to engage stakeholders in the process of developing the social framework. Included in the discussion guide is a series of questions stakeholders are encouraged to contemplate, and to which the Ministry invites comment. We are pleased that the province is engaging the nonprofit sector and other stakeholders in this important policy matter. This discussion guide, along with some context that was recently provided in a memo to the Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative (ANVSI), are both available to view online.

Comments can be forwarded by February 6, 2012, to Shannon Marchand or Lora Pillipow, whose full contact information can be found on the last page of the discussion guide. We at CCVO are interested in stakeholder response to this discussion guide and encourage you to copy us at policy@calgarycvo.org. Finally, CCVO is considering hosting a forum in Calgary for interested parties to discuss the social policy framework. Please let us know by Wednesday, January 25th if you would be interested in attending.

Developing a Social Policy Framework for Alberta: Discussion Guide (PDF - 124K, 4 pages)(dead link)
January 18, 2012

Context for the Alberta Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide (PDF - 60K, 1 page) (dead link)

Source:
Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations
http://www.calgarycvo.org/
The voluntary sector is on the front lines of every community issue in the city. We represent Calgary's community infrastructure - the volunteers, employees and supporters of Calgary's nonprofit organizations.

Related link:

Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative (ANVSI)
http://culture.alberta.ca/anvsi/
The Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative's (ANVSI) purpose is to improve the quality of life for Albertans' through a viable Non-profit/Voluntary Sector (NPVS) which supports strong and vibrant communities.

2011 Calgary Social Outlook
http://www.calgary.ca/CSPS/CNS/Pages/Publications-guides-and-directories/Social-outlooks/Social-Outlooks.aspx
November 30, 2011
The City of Calgary is pleased to announce the release of the 2011 Calgary and Region Social Outlook. The report is an annual five-year forecast that examines the overall social landscape of Calgary,
a progressive review of key trends shaping Calgary's social environment, with a focus on income, employment, poverty, diversity, the voluntary sector, arts and culture, recreation, safety and sustainability.
- includes links to reports for earlier years, back to 2007

Complete report (PDF - 40.2MB, 200 pages)
http://www.calgary.ca/CSPS/CNS/Documents/social_outlook_2011-2016.pdf
The Social Outlook reports on key trends and issues related to:
* an Inclusive city
--- basic needs (income, employment, poverty, housing and food security)
--- the changing face of Calgary (social and cultural diversity)
--- the voluntary sector
* a Cultural city
* an Active city
* a Safe city
* a city of Strong Neighbourhoods

Source:
Community and Neighbourhood Services

http://www.calgary.ca/CSPS/CNS/Pages/home.aspx

[City of Calgary
http://www.calgary.ca/ ]

Poverty Reduction in Alberta
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Young parents squeezed for time and money, report finds
A University of British Columbia study found that it's much more expensive to raise a family than it was a generation ago.
October 18, 2011
By Andrea Gordon
Canadian parents are raising children with far less money and time than their baby boomer predecessors, despite the doubling of the Canadian economy since 1976, says a report from the University of British Columbia. At the same time, Canadians approaching retirement are wealthier than ever before, setting up an intergenerational tension that threatens young families, according to the study, released Tuesday.
Source:
Toronto Star

The report:

Does Canada work for all generations?
By Paul Kershaw and Lynell Anderson
October 18, 2011

Related resources:

* New Deal for Families blog
* YouTube video "New Deal for Families"

Source:
Human Early Learning Partnership
The Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) is a collaborative, interdisciplinary research network, based at the University of British Columbia. HELP’s unique partnership brings together many scientific viewpoints to address complex early child development (ECD) issues. HELP connects researchers and practitioners from communities and institutions across B.C., Canada, and internationally.
[ University of British Columbia ]

Income Support for Persons With Disabilities [in Ontario, B.C and Alberta] - (PDF - 1.5MB, 21 pages)
September 2011
By
Ronald Kneebone and Oksana Grynishak
This paper examines the criteria disabled persons in Ontario, B.C and Alberta must meet in order to receive income-support. The authors also trace variations of monthly payment levels in relation to political exigencies and inflationary pressures affecting the cost of living. By crunching these numbers, the authors reveal whether disability funding in these three provinces is enough to cover the basic needs of the people who receive support.
Source:
School of Public Policy
[ University of Calgary ]

University of Calgary: Alberta, Ontario barely meeting needs of people with disabilities - BC failing (dead link)
New study compares support for disabled across three provinces
Sept. 21, 2011
Calgary, Alberta
Most people will agree that a fundamental role of government is to provide a safety net for people who are disabled and have no source of income. However, in a groundbreaking comparative study released today by The School of Public Policy, Prof. Ron Kneebone reveals a disparity between the support provided by BC, Alberta and Ontario to disabled residents, and argues that BC is failing to provide for basic needs.
Source:
MarketWatch

Action to End Poverty in Alberta

The Inter-City Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) has been researching the impacts of poverty in Alberta for several years. In 2010, member municipalities of ICFSP agreed to play a leadership role in engaging interested stakeholders to promote the need for a comprehensive poverty-reduction plan for Alberta. In November 2010, "A Dialogue on Poverty" was hosted by the ICFSP and the Family and Community Support Services Association of Alberta (FCSSAA). Over 100 concerned Albertans from across the province participated. Response from the forum unanimously supported the development of a poverty reduction plan.

Poverty reports, publications
and links to poverty organizations

---

Poverty Reduction in Alberta
NOTE: this link takes you to the Alberta section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Since May 2010, ALL links to content concerning poverty reduction strategies and campaigns have been moved to the above page from the individual provincial/territorial pages, including government and NGO links.

Alberta Welfare Reform and
Employment Outcomes of Welfare Recipients
(PDF - 231K, 38 pages)
By Rosita Yi Ki Kwan
Prepared for Progressive Economic Forum Graduate Student Essay Contest
April 30, 2011

[ Analysis of the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics ]

Abstract:
It is well-established in the literature that financial work incentives and employability programs have positive labour supply effect. Though it is found that after a series of welfare reforms based on the work-first approach in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K., former welfare recipients and vulnerable groups, such as single mothers, tended to work in part-time or temporary jobs and witnessed limited wage growth; little is known about other job characteristics, such as union membership and pension plan coverage, of these groups. This study fills this gap by studying the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using two years of panel data from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. I find that both welfare recipients and single mothers who started working after the reform were more likely to be covered by collective agreement and work full-time. However, welfare recipients tended to work regular evening schedules rather than daytime schedules; while single mothers received lower composite wage rates. Hence, there is mixed evidence as to whether the Alberta welfare reform improved employment outcomes for these two groups. More research in this area is certainly needed.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

threeSOURCE - A research & resource hub for Alberta's third sector
One of the major issues confronted by nonprofits, policy advocates and social service providers in Alberta is information sharing. Whether applying for funding, planning programs, or developing policy recommendations, this sector needs the latest information about what's going on locally. We're aiming to bring all this information together in a one stop shop with threeSOURCE. In addition to the website, we’ve also got an RSS feed of everything that gets added to the database - http://feeds.feedburner.com/threesource. Anyone can also subscribe, through the handy form in the left-hand column, to the monthly Research Update newsletter with lists of new acquisitions, important news, and reviews of key publications.

Vital Signs
Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that measures the vitality of our communities, identifies trends, and shares opportunities for action in at least ten areas critical to quality of life. Since Toronto's first Vital Signs publication, the Report has been adopted by 16 communities across Canada and is now conducted nationally by Community Foundations of Canada.

Related link:

Community Foundations of Canada
We are the Canadian movement for community vitality, representing 174 Community Foundations across the country. Together, we help Canadians invest in building strong and resilient places to live, work and play.

Alberta Provincial Election Resources
No set date for the next provincial election
Source:
Election Almanac
- complete coverage of federal, provincial and territorial elections in Canada including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm



Minimum Wage:

Current and Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates for Adult Workers in Canada
- federal govt. site --- the best resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels
Source :
Minimum Wage Database

--------------------------------------------------------

Alberta Employment Minister Lukaszuk
urged to up basic wage by two bits
(dead link)
By Karen Kleiss
September 16, 2010
Albertans earning minimum wage will get a 25-cent-an-hour raise and the province will implement a poverty reduction strategy if the government accepts new recommendations from an all-party committee. The standing committee on the economy voted Wednesday to recommend Employment Minister Thomas Lukaszuk quickly raise the minimum wage to $9.05 and that he take steps to implement a provincewide poverty reduction strategy similar to the 10-year plan to end homelessness. The current minimum wage of $8.80 an hour and has not changed since April 1, 2009. Alberta is one of three provinces that does not have a poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

On the same topic, from
the Calgary Herald:

Alberta MLAs reopen minimum wage debate; is $8.80 too much to pay? (dead link)
Alberta dropping to second-lowest rate in Canada
By Renata D'Aliesio
September 15, 2010
Alberta's minimum wage -- frozen earlier this year -- is set to sink to the second lowest in Canada as a group of provincial politicians weigh possible changes that would affect how much low-paid workers make. An all-party MLA committee meets today to hash over about a half-dozen draft recommendations on the future of the province's base pay after Employment Minister Thomas Lukaszuk requested a review in February
Source:
Calgary Herald

Related links:

Success! WOW!
September 15, 2010
Yesterday was a great day for the entire Vibrant Communities Calgary family. We would like to thank all of the volunteers and community partners that make it possible for us to do the important work of addressing the root causes of poverty in our community. With the help of Dave Taylor, Independent MLA for Calgary Currie we were able to help motivate the Standing Committee on the Economy to unanimously recommend a Poverty Reduction Strategy for Alberta.
Source:
Vibrant Communities Calgary

-------------

Official minimum
wage levels by province:

Current And Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates For Adult Workers in Canada
This is the BEST resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels by province/territory.

Minimum Hourly Wages for Canadian Adult Workers since 1965
NOTE: this information is broken up into five files - one for each decade.
The link takes you to the latest decade; click the date links at the top of the page to open pages for earlier periods.

Source:
Minimum Wage Database
[ Labour Program, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada ]


The Cost of Eating in Alberta in 2008 (PDF - 1.8MB, 28 pages)
February 2009 (PDF file date)
The Alberta Community / Public Health Nutritionists Food Security Subcommittee has done a remarkable job in producing a document that shows you exactly why low -income individuals and families in Alberta cannot meet the requirements of Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide.
Source:
Growing Food Security in Alberta
Our Vision : All children and families in Alberta have healthy food.
Our Mission : Engaging Albertans – groups, organizations, business, governments and individuals - in strategies to ensure secure access to adequate amounts of safe, nutritious, culturally appropriate food for everyone, produced in an environmentally sustainable way and provided in a manner that promotes human dignity.

Alberta Budget 2010, Striking the Right Balance
February 9, 2010

Budget summary by ministry
"The 2010-11 budget includes:
...
* $582 million for income supports and related health benefits, a $47-million reduction from 2009-10. Savings will be realized by redirecting potential expected-to-work income-support clients to employment services, training or work opportunities. As well, benefits to new learners will be reduced. Funding commitments to existing learners will be honoured at current benefit rates. Fewer income-support clients will also result in savings in the health benefit programs.
* $177 million for employment and training programs, a $15-million reduction from 2009-10.
..." (p.4)
Source:
Budget summary by ministry

Disparity Gap Growing Says New Report
Social Workers Propose New Social Policy Framework for Alberta
(dead link)
News Release
March 19, 2010
Edmonton – Growing disparity in Alberta is resulting in low and middle income families losing ground in both quality of life and standard of living, says a new report commissioned by the Alberta College of Social Workers (ACSW). The ACSW’s Social Policy Framework, prepared by the Parkland Institute, catalogues Alberta’s disparity gap and reveals that the province’s social infrastructure needs significant repair. (...)

Complete report:

CASW Social Policy Framework 2010:
Visioning a More Equitable and Just Alberta
(PDF - 3.4MB, 60 pages) (dead link)
March 2010
The report shows:
* Wages for Albertans have not kept pace with inflation, and in some years real wages actually dropped. Disposable income per capita in Alberta has stagnated.
* Middle class Albertans increased their incomes only by working more hours per year than anyone else in Canada.
* Alberta’s flat tax, introduced in 2001, has resulted in over $5 billion in lost revenue annually.

Source:
Alberta College of Social Workers (ACSW)

From Vibrant Communities Calgary:

* Cost of Living Factsheet - August 2009 (PDF - 1.2MB, 4 pages)
* Poverty Fact Sheet - August 2009 (PDF - 653K, 2 pages)
* Living Wage Fact Sheet - August 2009 (PDF - 1.8MB, 4 pages)
Source:
Vibrant Communities Calgary
Vibrant is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.

---

Vibrant Communities - Calgary
(from the Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement)
- incl. * Calgary's Approach * Update * Contact Info * Key Documents

Vibrant Communities
Vibrant Communities is a community-driven effort to reduce poverty in Canada by creating partnerships that make use of our most valuable assets – people, organizations, businesses and governments. It’s a unique approach to poverty reduction that allows communities to learn from — and help — each other. Vibrant Communities links communities across Canada, from British Columbia to Newfoundland, in a collective effort to test the most effective ways to reduce poverty at the grassroots level.
[ Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement:
Tamarack exists to build vibrant and engaged communities in Canada. Our work will result in more collaborative approaches and less poverty. ]



May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Alberta:
Extending the Alberta Advantage (PDF - 393K, 29 pages)
- by Peter Faid, Community Services Consulting Ltd.

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership


From CBC News:

Albertans elect historic 11th straight Tory government (dead link)
Progressive Conservatives gain 11 more seats in worst turnout in provincial history
March 4, 2008
Despite an apparent appetite for change, voters in Alberta stuck with tried-and-true blue, giving the Progressive Conservative party an unprecedented 11th consecutive majority government in Monday night's provincial election. (...) Various polls showed anywhere from 20 to 45 per cent of voters were undecided during a campaign that saw few sparks. Voter turnout dropped even further from a dismal 44.7 per cent in the 2004 campaign to about 41 per cent on Monday night, the worst turnout in Alberta history, according to preliminary numbers.
Source:
Alberta Votes 2008
- incl. results, leader profiles and party platforms, riding and voter information, candidates and issues, and much more...
* Alberta Votes 2008 Headlines <=== links to dozens of Alberta Election 2008 articles and analyses!

Also from CBC:

Albertans to vote March 3 (dead link)
February 4, 2008
After weeks of election speculation in Alberta, it's official: there will be a provincial election March 3. Conservative Leader Ed Stelmach made the announcement less than an hour after the speech from the throne outlined his government's plans, including eliminating health care premiums over four years, increasing the number of health care workers and spending more on crime reduction.

-----------------------------------

Stelmach wins 87% of the seats with 53% of the votes from 41% of the people
March 4, 2008
The Conservatives won their 11th straight election last night, in what could be considered -- on the surface -- an impressive victory. But when you add up the numbers, they don't exactly paint a picture of a content electorate. Out of a possible 2,252,104 votes possible this year, the Stelmach government received just 501,028. However, the combination of low voter turnout and Alberta's first-past-the-post system means that even with such a low number of actual supporters, the Conservatives ended up with a majority government.
Source:
Canadian Union of Public Employees

-----------------------------------

Related Web/News/Blog links:

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"Alberta provincial election 2008 "
- Web search results page
- News search results page
- Blog Search Results page
Source:
Google.ca

Child and Family Poverty Too High in Wealthy Alberta
November 26, 2007
Source:
Public Interest Alberta

Welfare clawback policies stymie labour recruitment, TD report says (dead link)
September 28, 2007
EDMONTON - Alberta's economic growth could be hurt by excessive clawbacks of benefits received by low-income earners, suggests a report released, Thursday, by TD Bank. The Alberta government has suggested recruiting marginalized workers to offset a widespread labour shortage. But welfare recipients face a major disincentive in taking work because of "the extremely high personal marginal income tax rates as social assistance benefits are taxed back," the TD report stated.
Source:
The Edmonton Journal

The Family Benefit Packages in Alberta and BC Do Not Measure Up (PDF file - 60K, 2 pages) (dead link)
News Release
March 7, 2007
Author Paul Kershaw (University of British Columbia) examines overall family benefits packages in Alberta and BC for different types of families and then compares them with those of other industrialized countries. His findings show that Alberta and BC rank low by international standards in terms of their combined investment in family benefits. The study serves as a reminder that promoting gender equity, raising healthy children and supporting parents in the quest to balance work and family requires more than rhetoric, it requires real investment.

Summary (PDF file - 48K, 1 page) - (dead link)
Policy Brief (PDF file - 112 K, 2 pages) - (dead link)
Complete study (PDF file - 625K, 44 pages) - (dead link)

Source:
Institute for Research on Public Policy

Parkland Op-Ed:
Manningcare failed before, it will fail again.
Private health insurance too costly.
by Diana Gibson
November 6, 2006
Preston Manning identifies real problems with Canada's health-care system, but his prescriptions do not hit the mark. Most notably, he, like his father Ernest Manning, favours private health insurance. Ernest Manning already tried private health insurance when he was the premier and it was a dismal failure.

Source:
Parkland Institute
The Parkland Institute is an Alberta research network situated within the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta. It operates within the established and distinctive tradition of Canadian political economy and is non-partisan.

The above column was written in response to the following article
written last week by Preston Manning and Mark Milke:

Will our next premier lead the health-care revolution? (dead link)
Preston Manning and Mark Milke, Freelance
October 30, 2006
If contenders for Alberta's Progressive Conservative leadership wish to lead the necessary health-care revolution in Canada, they and every Albertan will gain much by considering what an excellent health-care system should look like.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

Earlier Parkland op-eds on the subject of health care:

On Health Care, Stephen Harper Doesn't Walk the Talk
by Diana Gibson
December 18, 2005

Parkland Op-Ed:
Fraud in private health insurance should surprise no one
by Diana Gibson
November 9, 2005

More from the Parkland Institute:

The Spoils of the Boom: Incomes, profits and poverty in Alberta
by Diana Gibson
June 13, 2007

Media Release
June 13, 2007
New Report Says Most Albertans Not Seeing the Benefits of the Boom
EDMONTON – Middle class Albertans are no better off as a result of the current boom, and Alberta’s poor are actually worse off than before says a new report from the Parkland Institute at the University of Alberta.

Executive Summary (PDF file - 70K, 2 pages)

Complete report (PDF file - 1.6MB, 32 pages)

City hall could shelter homeless at night: mayor [Calgary] (dead link)
November 1, 2006
Calgary's mayor says city hall could be used as temporary lodging for homeless people left in the cold, snowy streets at night because overwhelmed shelters are full.
Source:
CBC News Calgary

Edmonton print shop to house city's homeless (dead link)
October 31, 2006
A former City of Edmonton print shop will become an emergency shelter this winter as part of the city's plan for dealing with a growing homelessness population. City council approved the $1.4 million plan Tuesday afternoon, saying emergency shelters are expecting a 50 per cent increase in people seeking help this winter.
Source:
CBC News Edmonton

Alberta Food Bank Network Association
- incl. links to : Home - Mission - Projects - People - Members - Newsletter - Bulletin - Resources - Contact

EmployAbilities
"EmployAbilities is a charitable non-profit organization, located in Edmonton, Alberta dedicated to promoting and enhancing employment and learning opportunities for persons with disabilities. We have served the Edmonton community for over 25 years and will continue to offer superior services through Community Partnerships and a committed staff." 
- incl. links to : Agency Profile - Assistive Technology - Community Partnerships - Job Postings - Fundraising - New Initiatives - Partners Call Centre - Resources - Success Stories - Training Programs - WORKink Alberta

Alberta Human Rights Commission
In Alberta, the Alberta Human Rights Act protects Albertans from discrimination in certain areas based on specified grounds. The purpose of the Alberta Human Rights Act is to ensure that all Albertans are offered an equal opportunity to earn a living, find a place to live, and enjoy services customarily available to the public without discrimination.

More of the Same?
The Position of the Four Largest Canadian Provinces in the World of Welfare Regimes

November 5, 2004
by Paul Bernard, Sébastien Saint-Arnaud
"In More of the Same? The Position of the Four Largest Canadian Provinces in the World of Welfare Regimes, Paul Bernard and Sébastien Saint-Arnaud locate the welfare regimes of Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia among those of a group of advanced countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD]. They compare them in terms of a wide set of indicators representing public policy, social situations and level of public participation."

NOTE: This article is based partly on Gøsta Esping-Andersen's 1990 typology of welfare regimes in advanced capitalist societies and more recent related work. It's not a detailed comparison of welfare programs in certain Canadian jurisdictions, but rather an academic analysis of how the welfare systems in four Canadian provinces fit within the international typology. It should be emphasized that the analysis of welfare regimes in the four Canadian jurisdictions focuses on the mid-1990s, which was a tumultuous period in the evolution of the Canadian welfare system. Programs (and governments, except for Emperor Klein...) have changed since then, but ten years later, it's still true that "Alberta somewhat resembles the 'ultra-liberal' United States, while Quebec leans in the direction of Europe, and to some extent, of social-democracy." [Excerpt from the Abstract].

Complete report:

More of the Same? The Position of the Four Largest Canadian Provinces
in the World of Welfare Regimes
(PDF file - 1.5MB, 32 pages)
November 2004
[translation of an article initially published in French in the
Canadian Journal of Sociology, Spring 2004]

Source:
Canadian Policy Research Networks

Canada West Foundation (CWF)
Our mandate is to explore public policy issues of particular interest to western Canadians, to test national policies against regional aspirations and to ensure an effective regional voice in national policy discussions and the national political process.

A Profile of Poverty in Mid-Sized Alberta Cities (dead link)
January 2000 

Canadian Council on Social Development



From the
National Council of Welfare
(NCW):

Over the years, the Council has produced many reports on poverty and welfare, but there are three that stand out in my mind as milestone reports on the history of welfare in Canada, at least since the 1980s.

1. 1987
Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
November 1987
Tangled Safety Net examines the following issues in Canadian social assistance network of programs:
* Complex rules * Needs-testing * Rates of assistance * Enforcement * Appeals * Recommendations
This report is the first comprehensive national analysis of social assistance programs operated by the provincial, territorial and municipal governments. These programs function as the safety net for Canadians and are better known by their everyday name ‘welfare’.

Version française :
Le bien-être social au Canada : Un filet de sécurité troué (PDF - 3Mo., 138 pages)
Novembre 1987
[ NOTA : Si vous trouvez un lien vers ce fichier en français, veuillez communiquer avec moi pour le partager.
Merci! gilseg@rogers.com ]

____________

2. 1992
Welfare Reform
(PDF - 2.8MB, 61 pages)
Summer 1992
This report is an update of the 1987 Tangled Safety Net, but it presents information by jurisdiction rather than by issue - covers all provinces and territories.

Version française:
Réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 3,5Mo., 63 pages)

____________

3. 1997
Another Look at Welfare Reform
(PDF - 6.75MB, 134 pages)
Autumn 1997
- an in-depth analysis of changes in Canadian welfare programs in the 1990s. The report focuses on the provincial and territorial reforms that preceded the repeal of the Canada Assistance Plan and those that followed the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer in April 1996.
[Proactive disclosure : I did the research for, and wrote the provincial-territorial section of, this report while I was on a one-year secondment to the Council. Gilles ]

Version française:
Un autre regard sur la réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 8Mo., 148 pages)

---

Companion document to
Another Look:

Overview of Provincial (and Territorial)
Welfare Reforms in the 1990s

October 1998
Fifteen pages of research notes used in the production of Another Look at Welfare Reform.
HINT: There's a WEALTH of information on provincial-territorial welfare reforms in these pages that didn't make it to the final report!

-------------------------------------------------

Source:
National Council of Welfare
Established in 1969, the Council is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (originally the Minister of Health and Welfare Canada). The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

October 6 (2012)
The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

 

List of issues to be taken up in connection with the consideration of the third periodic report of Canada : United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights - Implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (June 10, 1998) 
Alberta Government Response to the U.N. Committee's List of Issues - November 1998


Alberta Committee of Citizens with Disabilities
 

The Parkland Institute - [ University of Alberta ]
The Parkland Institute is a broad-based, provincial research organization, drawing support and representation from throughout the province and from various segments of Alberta society, including academics, private businesses, unions, professional, community and religious organizations. The Parkland Institute is situated within the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta. 


Pembina Institute
The Pembina Institute is an independent, not-for-profit environmental policy research and education organization. Founded in Drayton Valley, Alberta, the Pembina Institute has a multidisciplinary staff of more than thirty, with offices in Drayton Valley, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver and Ottawa.
The Pembina Institute’s major policy research and education programs are in the areas of sustainable energy, climate change, environmental governance, ecological fiscal reform, sustainability indicators, and the environmental impacts of the energy industry.

Wild Rose Foundation - The Wild Rose Foundation is a lottery funded agency created by the Government of Alberta in November of 1984. The Foundation is governed by a seven-person Board of Directors. The Honourable Stan Woloshyn, Minister of Community Development in Alberta is also the Minister responsible for the Wild Rose Foundation. 
The Foundation's activities: 

1.Provide funding to volunteer, non-profit organizations that provide valuable services to Albertans; 

2.Foster or promote the use of volunteers, or to assist those who volunteer or use the services of volunteers in Alberta; and 

3.Foster or promote charitable, philanthropic, humanitarian, or public spirited acts or to assist those who perform them. 




Welfare reform in Alberta (1997)

Back to Work:
Learning from the Alberta Welfare Experiment

April 9, 1997
By Kenneth J. Boessenkool
Now here's a moldie goldie oldie - I lost track of this report some time ago and just recently stumbled across it again.

I'm flagging this as an important report, not because I think the author "got it right" in his assessment of the relative success of Alberta's welfare reforms starting in 1993, but rather because I consider it a kind of manifesto of social conservatives with respect to welfare and welfare reform in Canada. Author Ken Boessenkool hails "the change [in 1993] in the administrative culture of Alberta Family and Social Services, as a result of which welfare applicants are now routinely turned away unless they have exhausted all other sources of support. In the second stage [of Alberta welfare reforms], the province brought benefit levels in line with wages earned by Albertans with low incomes. Together, these reforms appear to have contributed to a nearly 50 percent decline in the number of Albertans on welfare, Boessenkool says." [bolding added]

On page 6 of his report, the author states, "Alberta did not cut its benefits [in IOctober of 1993] uniformly for all recipients. Rather, it focused its most severe reductions on single, employable individuals. They faced a 19 percent decline in benefits, which brought the amount just below the minimum wage."

Wow.

The welfare income of a single person with no disability in 1993 was "just below minimum wage" AFTER a 19% decrease in that person's maximum benefit level??

No way. Not true.

I did interprovincial welfare rate comparisons for over 25 years as part of my job with the federal government. Never in that period - not once - did a single employable person on welfare receive even close to the prevailing minimum wage, in Alberta or in any other Canadian province. According to the National Council of Welfare's Welfare Incomes report, a single person on welfare in Alberta received about $5,600 for all of 1993. The provincial minimum wage for that year was $5.00 (or about $9,700 for the 52 weeks).

Alberta welfare reforms a model for other provinces, says C.D. Howe Institute study (PDF file - 668K, 38 pages) - April 1997
[NOTE: this PDF file includes a communiqué in English and one in French as well as the 29-page report itself]
By Kenneth J. Boessenkool
"The welfare reform program that Alberta embarked on in 1993 has reduced the province’s welfare caseload, as a percentage of its population, to levels not seen since before the early 1980s’ recession, a success that has important lessons for other provinces, concludes a C.D. Howe Institute Commentary released today. The study, Back to Work: Learning from the Alberta Welfare Experiment, was written by Kenneth J. Boessenkool, a Policy Analyst at the C.D. Howe Institute." [Excerpt from the Communiqué]

Source:
C.D Howe Institute

Related Link:

March 14, 2006:
Tory strategists return to jobs as lobbyists
Watchdog says move by Harper aides violates spirit of proposed ethics law
(dead link)
By Glen McGregor and Tim Naumetz
The Ottawa Citizen
"Two former top aides to Prime Minister Stephen Harper registered to lobby the new Conservative government on key issues such as gas exploration, fuel taxes and airport policy just weeks after they helped Mr. Harper campaign on a promise to stop the revolving door between the lobbying world and government. Former Harper advisers Ken Boessenkool [bolding added] and Yaroslav Baran returned to the lobbying business, separately listing clients that include an association backing ethanol fuel tax breaks and Canada’s busiest airport, after taking a two-month break to work on the Conservative election campaign. An ethics watchdog says the lobby registrations violate the spirit of Mr. Harper’s proposed federal accountability bill, which promises to stop government officials from becoming lobbyists for five years after they leave their jobs. The registrations also may contravene standards already set by the existing federal code of ethics for lobbyists, says Democracy Watch director Duff Conacher."


New Democratic Party of Alberta

Calgary Food Bank
In 1999, the Calgary Food Bank required over $2 million in donated cash and over $8 million in donated food. More than 44,000 hampers were distributed to approximately 121,000 Calgarians who came to us for help. In addition 62,000 people were fed every month through the Food Link program

Calgary Homeless Foundation
"The Foundation provides capital funding for housing projects and has committed itself to providing the vehicle for community consultation on homelessness issues and community collaboration on solutions."

(dis)Abilities - The (dis)Abilities Special Interest Group
Calgary Community-Net 

- links to about two dozen disability-related sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and elsewhere 


Calgary Community Network Association ("Calgary Community-Net")

Watering Down the Milk: Women Coping on Alberta’s Minimum Wage
- A report by Calgary Status of Women Action Committee, February 1999


Homeward Trust Edmonton is a not for profit organization that uses a community-based approach toward the goal of ending homelessness in Edmonton. Our primary role is to coordinate responses to housing needs by working together with local agencies and all orders of government.

Edmonton Social Planning Council
The Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC) is an independent, non-profit, charitable organization. A voluntary Board of Directors representing all community sectors governs the Council. The ESPC builds community through research, advocacy and public education. We identify trends and emerging social issues, then create opportunities to debate those trends and issues.

Inclusive Cities Canada Project

Reports provide wake-up call on future of Canada’s cities
Media Release
March 23, 2005
"‘Social inclusion’ reports were released today in five cities -- Saint John, Toronto, Burlington, Edmonton and Vancouver. They are the work of Inclusive Cities Canada, a unique, participatory research initiative that uses a social inclusion framework to build people-friendly cities, promote good urban governance and develop strategies for supporting urban diversity. The federally-funded initiative set up Civic Panels made of community and municipal leaders to conduct social inclusion ‘audits’. Over 1,000 participants contributed to the findings. The research examined important dimensions of social inclusion, such as how cities respond to diversity, levels of civic engagement, living conditions, opportunities for human development and community services."

Download the report for Edmonton (PDF file - 655K, 45 pages) (dead link)
Related Link:
The Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC) is a non-profit, independent social research and advocacy organization. The ESPC provides leadership to the community and its organizations in addressing social issues and effecting changes to social policy. Our work includes the definition of the scope and nature of social issues (social research), facilitation of community based solutions to social problems (social planning), the promotion of strategies which will reduce the long term costs and problems caused by unresolved social issues (advocacy), information and referral regarding human service and health programs, and the demonstration of new models of service delivery (innovation).

Source:
Inclusive Cities Canada
"Inclusive Cities Canada: A Cross-Canada Civic Initiative is a unique partnership of community leaders and elected municipal politicians working collaboratively to enhance social inclusion across Canada. The goals of Inclusive Cities Canada (ICC) are to strengthen the capacity of cities to create and sustain inclusive communities for the mutual benefit of all people, and to ensure that community voices of diversity are recognized as core Canadian ones."

Federation of Canadian Municipalities
[Inclusive Cities Canada works in collaboration with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities]
The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) is a national organization of 1000 plus cities in Canada. Comprised of locally elected politicians, FCM endeavours to support local governments through conferences, research and information and acts as a lobby for the interests of cities with the Federal Government. Over the past 15 years besides issues of local infrastructure, FCM has advocated for a better quality of life in our local communities. To achieve our goals, FCM liaises and works with numerous other Canadian groups and organizations.

- Go to the Municipalities Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm


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